Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 20:19

Then Hezekiah said to Isaiah, "The word of the Lord which you have spoken is good." For he thought, "Is it not so, if there will be peace and truth in my days?"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Babylon;   Hezekiah;   Isaiah;   Nation;   Resignation;   Temptation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflictions;   Resignation;   Surrendered Life, Characteristics of;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflicted Saints;   Resignation;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Hezekiah;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Babylon;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Babylon, Kingdom of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Manasseh (2);   Holman Bible Dictionary - Assyria, History and Religion of;   Babylon, History and Religion of;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Isaiah, Book of;   Israel;   Text, Versions, and Languages of Ot;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hezekiah;   Manasseh;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Hezekiah;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Judah;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Sennacherib;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Merodach-Baladan;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Good is the word of the Lord - He has spoken right, I have done foolishly. I submit to his judgments.

Is it not good if peace and truth be in my days? - I believe Hezekiah inquires whether there shall be peace and truth in his days. And the question seems to be rather of an interested nature. He does not appear to deplore the calamities that were coming on the land, provided peace and truth might prevail in his days.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-20.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Good is the word … - The language is, according to some, that of a true spirit of resignation and humility; according to others, that of a feeling of relief and satisfaction that the evil was not to come in his day. Such a feeling would be but natural, and though not according to the standard of Christian perfectness, would imply no very great defect of character in one who lived under the old Dispensation.

Peace and truth - Rather, “peace and continuance.” The evils threatened were war and the dissolution of the kingdom.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-20.html. 1870.

Geneva Study Bible

Then said Hezekiah unto Isaiah, Good [is] the word of the LORD which thou hast l spoken. And he said, [Is it] not [good], if m peace and truth be in my days?

(l) He acknowledges Isaiah to be the true prophet of God and therefore humbles himself to his word.

(m) Seeing that God has shown me this favour to grant me quietness during my life: for he was afraid lest the enemies would have had opportunity to rejoice if the Church had decayed in his time, because he had restored religion.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-20.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Good is the word of the Lord which thou hast spoken — indicating a humble and pious resignation to the divine will. The concluding part of his reply was uttered after a pause and was probably an ejaculation to himself, expressing his thankfulness, that, though great afflictions should befall his descendants, the execution of the divine judgment was to be suspended during his own lifetime.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-20.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then said Hezekiah unto Isaiah, Good is the word of the LORD which thou hast spoken. And he said, Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?

Good is, … — I heartily submit to this sentence, as being both just, and merciful. True penitents, when they are under divine rebukes, call them not only just, but good. Not only submit to, but accept of the punishment of their iniquity. So Hezekiah did, and by this it appeared, he was indeed humbled for the pride of his heart.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-20.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

PEACE AND TRUTH GOOD FOR US

‘And he said, Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?’

2 Kings 20:19

If war was, to a great extent, sanctioned and even commanded under the Old Testament, peace is the very base and end of the New. War, viewed from every side, is a terrible thing. War is the great demoraliser—in savaging the human mind, and feeding the worst passions of our nature. It is the very hotbed of cruelty and crime. War turns the most beautiful gardens of our world into wildernesses. War outrages the very Empire of the Prince of Peace, and is rebellion against the great Fatherhood of God over all His creatures. To inflict death to prevent death is the only valid cause, and legitimate cause, for any war that is in the world.

And when ‘peace’ departs, is it too much to say ‘truth’ follows in its wane? The envenomed atmosphere of war is very killing to all that is true. War is itself half made up of falsehoods. I do not wonder that the pious King of Judah united peace and truth and made ‘truth’ and ‘peace’ mutually each the cause of the other, and their union the source of a strange and secret mingling of happiness: ‘Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?’

I. See how ‘peace and truth’ combine to rule in the Kingdom of God.—The great problem was, how in such a world as this, so sinful and so rebellious, ‘peace’ could be compatible with ‘truth.’ For God had said, ‘The soul that sinneth, it shall die.’ ‘There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked.’

How then could any man, seeing all are wicked, not die? or how could any man on the earth be at rest? God must be true and His own Word verified.

In His marvellous wisdom and grace, Christ solved the problem. He—infinite in His Deity, yet perfect Man—became all men’s substitute, so that when He died, all that were His died too. Therefore, in very fact, we have died, and God has kept His Word. And, therefore, ‘peace’ can have a universal reign without the infringement of one iota of the Father’s justice. Forgiveness is justice, and ‘peace’ is ‘truth.’

‘Peace’ and ‘truth’ thus blend in the mind and government of God.

II. So the great originals become the patterns which all governments and all minds are, as far as in them lies, faithfully to copy.—First in a man’s own soul. ‘Peace’ and ‘truth’ make God’s kingdom there. If ‘peace’ be not built on ‘truth’ it is baseless; it must fall. And ‘truth’ grows out of ‘peace’ as necessary as a flower grows from its root. Just as fear is the certain mother of cunning and deceit, so the mind at rest with God, and the ‘peace’ which flows, are the sure authors of all ‘truth.’

This is the genealogy of ‘peace.’ ‘Peace’ with God begets ‘peace’ with the conscience; ‘peace’ with the conscience begets ‘peace’ with all men.

And, equally, this is the history of ‘truth.’ Be ‘true’ with God and you will be ‘true’ with yourself; be true with yourself and you will be ‘true’ with your fellow-creatures.

III. Then let me earnestly beseech you to be quite sure that you are at ‘peace’ with God.—It is the keystone of life. How may I know it? And if I am not, how can I obtain it?

Accept your ‘peace’ as freely as it is offered—a pure, instant gift of God.

In this war there needs no mediation but that which is already made; no terms, but simple acceptance; no payment, where all is paid. The compact is all drawn out, and waits only for you to put the one seal of faith.

Then, having ‘peace,’ be true. If I had to mention what I think to be the great failure in the religion of most of us, I should say, Want of reality. There are so many things concurring in the present day to make religion unreal.

Whatever you are, be real. Take care that your religion is the same wherever you are; and, wherever you are, a very practical thing—words and acts accurately representing the mind. Love neither simulating what it is not nor dissimulating what it is, compromising and concealing its reality.

Use plain words. Pray real thoughts. Be what you seem, and seem what you are. And let this be the double stamp on everyday life—‘peace’ and ‘truth.’

War is dear at any time, and ‘peace’ is worth any price—short of righteousness—at which it may he attained.

But begin with the true beginning. First, be yourself a man of ‘peace’; a man of ‘truth’ with God and man; and then lay yourself out to extend everywhere what you have proved and found so exceeding good to your own soul.

Rev. Jas. Vaughan

Illustration

‘Many an answered prayer has brought a corresponding leanness of soul to the one who would not leave the decision restfully with God. When King Hezekiah was unwilling to be sick unto death, he pleaded earnestly for recovery; and when a favourable answer was given to his prayer the issue showed that his prolonged life was no added gain to his character or to his career of usefulness. Some who have said that they must recover from sickness are the losers by the answer to their prayers; while others, who would not thus choose for themselves, are the gainers through continuing in sickness. We may indeed shrink from the presumption of deciding unqualifiedly that it is best for ourselves or for our dear ones to be recovered of a sickness that seems unto death; and it is important for us to know that such presumption is inconsistent with true faith.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-kings-20.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 20:19 Then said Hezekiah unto Isaiah, Good [is] the word of the LORD which thou hast spoken. And he said, [Is it] not [good], if peace and truth be in my days?

Ver. 19. Good is the word of the Lord, &c., ] i.e., It is just and equal; and blessed be God that it is no worse. Quintilian saith of Vespasian, that he was patientissimus veri, one that could endure to be freely and faithfully dealt with. Theodosius honoured Ambrose, and our Henry VIII father Latimer, the more for their plain dealing. So did David the prophet Nathan, and Hezekiah the prophet Isaiah, not raging at his so sharp a message, but patiently receiving it; judging himself, and justifying God. Good men are neither waspish nor sullen, when they are either chid or beaten by "the father of their spirits"; but patiently hold their backs to the stripes of a displeased mercy.

And he said, Is it not good? &c.] Is it not a mercy that I may escape that which my posterity shall suffer? He thankfully acknowledgeth a mixture, and that the judgment now denounced was not "an evil, an only evil," as Ezekiel 7:5.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-20.html. 1865-1868.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 380

THE BENEFITS ARISING FROM PEACE AND TRUTH [Note: Thanksgiving for Peace, in 1816.]

2 Kings 20:19. Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?

BY many it is thought that a knowledge of futurity would contribute to their happiness: but we are persuaded that it would prove only a source of misery: the good that would be foreseen would lose more than half its zest, whilst the evil that was anticipated would embitter the remainder of their days. It was as a punishment, and not as a favour, that an insight into futurity was given to King Hezekiah. He had displeased the Lord by his conduct towards the ambassadors of the king of Babylon: and God sent him word what calamities should befall both his family and nation through the instrumentality of that monarch. This judgment however was tempered with mercy; the execution of it being deferred to a generation yet unborn. Hence the judgment was submitted to with pious resignation: “Good is the word of the Lord which thou hast spoken. Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?”

It is not our intention to enter any further into the Jewish history than just to fix the precise import of our text. The text is applicable to all persons in every age, and particularly so to this present season. We shall therefore take occasion from it to shew,

I. What blessings God is now conferring upon us—

What we are to understand by “peace and truth” will be best seen by a reference to the preceding context—

[God had declared that the king of Babylon should invade Judea, and take all the wealth of Hezekiah for a prey, and carry captive his children, and entirely destroy the whole Jewish polity. But, inasmuch as these judgments should be deferred, Hezekiah, instead of beholding the subjugation and captivity of his children, should have “peace;” and, instead of seeing the abolition of the temple worship, should have “truth” continued to him.]

Now these are the very blessings for which we are peculiarly called to render thanks this day—

[Peace is now happily once more restored: and such a peace as places our country in a state of greater security than it has ever enjoyed since it became a nation — — —

“Truth,” also, with an undisturbed enjoyment of all religious ordinances, is now secured to us. We are no longer in danger of having the temples of our God converted into barracks for a licentious soldiery, or magazines for the implements of war. No longer have we any reason to fear lest a victorious enemy should deprive us of our religious liberty, or a yoke of superstition be imposed upon us as the only worship tolerated in the land. Blessed be God! we enjoy the Gospel in all its purity; and every man throughout the whole land is permitted to serve his God in the way that seems to him to be most agreeable to the Divine commands — — —]

Such blessings being now insured to us, let us consider,

II. In what light they should be viewed—

The continuance of them to Hezekiah was deemed by him a mercy, a great and undeniable mercy: “Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?” To us then is the possession of them,

1. A rich mercy—

[How rich a mercy “peace” is, we, who have never had our country the seat of war, are but ill qualified to judge. It is our happiness indeed that we cannot judge of it; since it can only be known by an experience of those calamities which war brings in its train.

Nor can we adequately conceive how much we are indebted to God for the possession of “truth.” To estimate this aright, we should behold all the degrading superstitions of heathen nations, and see what self-tormenting methods they practice for the obtaining of peace with their senseless deities of wood and stone. We should see also how the far greater part of those who call themselves Christians are blinded by ceremonies of man’s invention, and debarred the use of those sacred oracles which are “able to make them wise unto salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.” Some sense, we trust, many of us have of the value of a Saviour, through whom the vilest of sinners find access to God, and obtain all the blessings of grace and glory. But we must go up to heaven and behold the felicity of the Saints made perfect; and go down to hell to behold the miseries of the damned, before we can fully appreciate that Gospel, by which we are quickened from death in trespasses and sins, and are “translated from the kingdom of Satan into the kingdom of God’s dear Son.”]

2. An undeserved mercy—

[Hezekiah felt that he might justly have been deprived of these blessings, and been made to experience in his own person all the calamities which were denounced against him in his posterity. And what was Hezekiah’s fault? It was this: that when the ambassadors came to congratulate him on his recovery from a dangerous illness, he neglected to commend to them the God of Israel, by whom their souls, and the souls of their countrymen, might be saved; and sought rather to aggrandize himself by an ostentatious display of his own wealth and power. Now we are far from wishing to extenuate his guilt: it was doubtless exceeding great: and the pride of his heart merited from God the severest chastisement [Note: 2 Chronicles 32:25-26.]. But what was his guilt compared with ours? We scarcely hear on any occasion the glory of our successes ascribed to God; nor do we find one in a thousand who relies truly and simply on God for a continuance of them: self-glorying, and confidence in an arm of flesh, are the leading features of our whole people; so that we might justly have been left to experience defeats answerable to all our victories. And how is the “truth” improved amongst us? As, on the one hand, there is not a nation under heaven where it shines with purer lustre, so neither, on the other hand, is there a nation under heaven where it is treated with greater contempt. And as to those who profess to value it, how little are its fair and beauteous lineaments visible in their hearts and lives! Well indeed might our mis-improvement of the light have long since provoked God to “take away his candlestick from us:” and it is a most unmerited mercy that “the glorious Gospel of the blessed God” is yet continued to us.]

3. A mercy that may well reconcile us to all events connected with it—

[We are not to suppose that Hezekiah was indifferent about the welfare of his posterity: it was nothing but his sense of the greatness of the mercy vouchsafed to him, that led him to acquiesce so meekly in the sentence as it was denounced against him. The prospect of the calamities that would come on his posterity was doubtless a source of bitter anguish to his mind: but it was a great matter that he had obtained a respite, and that the judgment was not inflicted instantly upon him. This favour therefore he acknowledged as a mercy, which might well compose and tranquillize his mind.

Now it is certain that the blessings which we enjoy are far from coming without alloy. They will, it is to be feared, prove in the issue a source of misery to many. The peace, which leads to the disbanding of so many thousand troops, will leave multitudes in a state unfavourable to their best interests. Many will find it difficult to return to the employment of honest industry; yea perhaps may find it difficult even to get employment: and many who in the scenes of war have been accustomed to blood and pillage may bring home with them a disposition to exercise amongst their brethren the same evil habits which they deemed allowable amongst their enemies: and thus our domestic security may be invaded, and the perpetrators of these crimes be subjected to an untimely death by the hands of the public executioner. This is an evil felt at the termination of every war: yet must it by no means indispose us to acknowledge the blessings of peace.

The very truth of God also, even the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ, brings on many, through their rejection of it, an heavier condemnation. Good would it have been for many, if they had never heard the Gospel; yea good, if Jesus Christ had never come into the world to save our ruined race. It was declared at the very time that he did come, that “he was set for the fall, as well as for the rising again, of many in Israel [Note: Luke 2:34.]” and that, though he should be “a sanctuary to some, he should prove to others a stumbling stone and a rock offence [Note: Isaiah 8:14.].Thus does the Gospel itself, that greatest gift of God to mankind, “become to some a savour of life unto life, but to others a savour of death unto death [Note: 2 Corinthians 2:16.].” Still however we must not suffer these things to diminish our value for the Gospel. If some abuse their food to intemperance, we must not therefore be unthankful for our food: nor if men abuse the Gospel, must we impute it to any defect in the Gospel, but to the depravity of their own hearts, which turns the blessing into a curse. We say then, that whatever evils may, by accident, be connected with the blessings we have received, even though those evils should fall upon our own children, it becomes us to adore and magnify our God that those blessings are not withheld from us, but that we are privileged to possess them in our days.]

4. A mercy which should be gratefully and diligently improved—

[A state of peace, and a quiet enjoyment of Gospel ordinances, is extremely favourable for the attainment of vital godliness. So it proved to the Christian Church in its infant state [Note: Acts 9:31.]; and so it will be to us. Do we ask, In what way we should improve the present occasion? We answer, In the way that David and Solomon improved their circumstances, when God had favoured them with the blessings which are now conferred on us. David bethought him, What can I do for God? I will build him an house that shall be worthy of his divine Majesty [Note: 2 Samuel 7:1-2.]. Solomon also adopted precisely the same resolution under the same circumstances [Note: 1 Kings 5:4-5.]. The same holy zeal should now inflame our hearts. We are not indeed called to build for the Lord an house of wood and stone, but a house of “living stones,” that shall be “an habitation of God through the Spirit” to all eternity. O see what myriads of stones there are lying in the quarry of corrupt nature, that through your instrumentality may be formed and fashioned to build the temple of the Lord. Look at the blind obdurate sons of Abraham, and see what may be done to bring them to the knowledge of that Saviour whom they have crucified. Look at the Gentile world, all lying in darkness and the shadow of death; and see what may be done for the enlightening of their minds, and for the saving of their souls alive. To employ our time, and property, and talents according as God shall give us opportunity, in such works, will be the best return that we can make to God for the light and peace that we enjoy: and, if we exert ourselves diligently in these labours of love, verily we shall have reason to all eternity to say, “Was it not good, that peace and truth were in our days?”]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/2-kings-20.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Good is the word of the Lord: I heartily submit to this sentence, as being both just, because deserved and procured by mine and my people’s sins; and merciful, because the punishment is less than I have deserved.

Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days? which speaks not as if he were careless and unconcerned for his posterity, (which neither the common inclinations and affections of nature in all men, nor that singular piety and charity which was eminent and manifest in Hezekiah, can suffer us to believe,) or for the church and people of God, for whose welfare he was so solicitous and industrious in the whole course of his life; but because it was a singular favour that this judgment did not immediately follow his sin, the cause of it, but was suspended for a longer time.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-20.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19.Good is the word of the Lord — A pious expression of submission to the Divine judgment. Compare the similar language of Eli. 1 Samuel 3:18, and of Shimei, 1 Kings 2:38. “He calls that good,” says Le Clerc, “in which it is right to acquiesce, as having proceeded from Him who does nothing but what is not only most just, but tempered with the greatest goodness, even when he inflicts punishment.”

If peace and truth be in my days — He can regard it as nothing but pure goodness and special deference to himself that the judgment is not to come in his own time.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-20.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 20:19. Good is the word of the Lord — I heartily submit to this sentence, as being most just and merciful. All true penitents, when they are under divine rebukes, call them not only just, but good: not only submit to, but accept of the punishment of their iniquity. So Hezekiah did, and by this it appeared he was indeed humbled for the pride of his heart. Undoubtedly it was most grievous to him to hear of the calamities that should befall his children; but, notwithstanding, with a truly penitent and pious mind, he pronounced the sentence good, as coming from that Being who not only does nothing but what is right, but nothing but what is tempered with mercy and goodness, even when he punishes; and therefore a resigned submission to his will is highly reasonable and proper, and our absolute duty.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-20.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Let. Hebrew, "and he added, let," &c. (Calmet) --- Protestants, "he said, is it not good, if peace and truth (or a solid and desirable peace) be in my days?" He is not indifferent about his family, as the Jews would insinuate (Eusebiuis and St. Jerome, in Isaias xxxix. 7, 8.) from the prophet's adding, Be comforted....my people; (Isaias xl. 1.; Haydock) but he submits with resignation to God's decrees, (St. Ambrose) and begs that God would be pleased to suffer him to die in peace, as the sentence did not seem to affect his person. (Haydock) --- Josephus insinuates that he was exceedingly grieved at the distress which hung over his posterity, (Antiquities x. 3.) and we are assured the Ezechias and the people entered into sentiments of humility and penance, which for a time averted the wrath of God, 2 Paralipomenon xxxii. 26.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-20.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Good. Hezekiah"s submission was like Eli"s. Compare 1 Samuel 3:18.

Is it not good, if: or, Is it not that, &c. Figure of speech Erotesis. Septuagint reads "Let there be good".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then said Hezekiah unto Isaiah, Good is the word of the LORD which thou hast spoken. And he said, Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?

Good is the word of the Lord - indicating a humble and pious resignation to the divine will. The concluding part of his reply was uttered after a pause, and was probably an ejaculation to himself, expressing his thankfulness that, though great afflictions should befall his descendants, the execution of the divine judgment was to be suspended during his own lifetime.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-20.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) Good is the word of the Lord . . .—Pious acquiescence in the will of God. (Comp. Eli’s: “It is the Lord: let him do what seemeth him good.” Comp, also a similar expression in 1 Kings 2:38.)

Is it not good, if peace . . .—This rendering appears to be right. Severe as is the prophetic word of judgment, it contains an element of mercy, in that Hezekiah himself is spared. The words are introduced by and he said, to indicate that they were spoken after a pause.

Peace and truth.—Rather, peace and permanence (or, security, stability; Jeremiah 33:6). Ewald, Thenius, and Bähr render: “Yea, only may there be peace, &c, in my days.” (Comp. the prayer of the church: “Give peace in our time, O Lord.”)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then said Hezekiah unto Isaiah, Good is the word of the LORD which thou hast spoken. And he said, Is it not good, if peace and truth be in my days?
Good
Leviticus 10:3; 1 Samuel 3:18; Job 1:21; Psalms 39:9; Lamentations 3:22,39
It is not good, etc
or, Shall there not be peace and truth, etc. peace and truth.
Esther 9:30; Jeremiah 33:6; Zechariah 8:19; Luke 2:10,14
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 2:38 - The saying;  1 Kings 11:12 - in thy days;  2 Chronicles 32:26 - Hezekiah;  2 Chronicles 34:28 - neither;  Acts 21:14 - The will

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 20:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-20.html.