Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:18

In this matter may the Lord pardon your servant: when my master goes into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leans on my hand and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon, when I bow myself in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon your servant in this matter."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Elisha;   Idolatry;   Joram;   Miracles;   Naaman;   Rimmon;   Temple;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - False;   Idol;   Idolatrous;   Idolatry;   Temples, Idolatrous;   Worship, False;   Worship, True and False;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Idolatry;   Syria;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rimmon;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Temple;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Gods, false;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Bowing;   Rimmon;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Old Testament;   Rimmon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Evangelism;   Gods, Pagan;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Rimmon;   Syria;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus;   Naaman;   Rimmon (1);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Naaman ;   Pardon;   Rimmon ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Naaman;   Rimmon;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Elisha;   Gehazi;   Naaman;   Rimmon;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Eli'sha;   Na'aman;   Phar'par;   Rim'mon,;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Hand;   Naaman;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Adoration;   Benhadad;   Gesture;   God;   Gods;   Naaman;   Rimmon (2);   Syrians;   Text of the Old Testament;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant - It is useless to enter into the controversy concerning this verse. By no rule of right reasoning, nor by any legitimate mode of interpretation, can it be stated that Naaman is asking pardon for offenses which he may commit, or that he could ask or the prophet grant indulgence to bow himself in the temple of Rimmon, thus performing a decided act of homage, the very essence of that worship which immediately before he solemnly assured the prophet he would never practice. The original may legitimately be read, and ought to be read, in the past, and not in the future tense. "For this thing the Lord pardon thy servant, for that when my master Hath Gone into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he Hath Leaned upon mine hand, that I also Have Bowed myself in the house of Rimmon; for my worshipping in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing." This is the translation of Dr. Lightfoot, the most able Hebraist of his time in Christendom.

To admit the common interpretation is to admit, in effect, the doctrine of indulgences; and that we may do evil that good may come of it; that the end sanctifies the means; and that for political purposes we may do unlawful acts.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Rimmon is known to us as a god only by this passage. The name is connected with a root “to be high.” Hadad-rimmon Zechariah 12:11, the name of a place near Megiddo, points to the identity of Rimmon with Hadad, who is known to have been the Sun, the chief object of worship to the Syrians.

When he leaneth on mine hand - The practice of a monarch‘s “leaning on the hand” of an attendant was not common in the East (compare the marginal reference). It probably implied age or infirmity.

The Lord pardon thy servant in this thing - Naaman was not prepared to offend his master, either by refusing to enter with him into the temple of Rimmon, or by remaining erect when the king bowed down and worshipped the god. His conscience seems to have told him that such conduct was not right; but he trusted that it might be pardoned, and he appealed to the prophet in the hope of obtaining from him an assurance to this effect.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-5.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant,.... Which he next mentions, and on account of which he desires the prayers of Elisha for him, as the Vulgate Latin version; or it may be, this is a prayer of his own, put up at this time to the true Jehovah, in whom he believed:

that when my master: meaning the king of Syria:

goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon: when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon; the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing; the house of Rimmon was a temple of an idol of that name; what idol it was is not easy to say; the Septuagint version calls it Remman, thought by some to be the same with Remphan, Acts 7:43, a name of Saturn, said to be given him from a Greek word, which signifies to "wander"F17A ρεμβεσθαι "vagari", Hesychius. , he being placed among the wandering stars in the supreme heavens; which is not likely, for the word is certainly of a Syriac signification, and comes either from רום, which signifies "high", and so the same with Elioun, the Phoenician deity, called the most highF18Vid. Selden. de Dis Syris Syntagm. 2. c. 10. ; or, as "Rimmon" is used for a pomegranate, this is thought to design the Syrian goddess, to whom this sort of fruit was sacred; or Juno, whose statue, in her temple at MycenasF19Pausan. Corinthiac. sive, l. 2. p. 114. , had a pomegranate in one hand; or rather this Rimmon was Jupiter Cassius, so called from Mount Cassius, which divided Syria from Egypt, who is painted with his hand stretched out, and a pomegranate in itF20Achilles Tatius, l. 3. Vid. Reland. Palestin. Illustrat. tom. 2. p. 934. ; and may be the same with Caphtor, the father of the Caphtorim, Genesis 10:14 who might be deified after his death, their names, Rimmon and Caphtor, being of the same significationF21See Clayton's Origin of Hieroglyphics, p. 113. . But be this deity as it may, it was worshipped by the Syrians; and when the king of Syria went in to worship, he used to lean upon the hand of one of his officers, either being lame, or for state sake, in which office Naaman was; and his request to the prophet, or to the Lord, is, not for pardon for a sin to be committed; nor to be indulged in his continuance of it; not to worship the idol along with his master; nor to dissemble the worship of it, when he really worshipped it not; nor to be excused any evil in the discharge of his post and office; but for the pardon of the sin of idolatry he had been guilty of, of which he was truly sensible, now sincerely acknowledges, and desires forgiveness of; and so Dr. LightfootF23Works, vol. 1. p. 86. , and some othersF24Vid. Quenstedt. Dissert. de. Petit. Naaman. sect. 21, 22. , interpret it; and to this sense the words may be rendered:

when my master went in to the house of Rimmon to worship there; which was his usual custom; and he leaned on my hand, which was the common form in which he was introduced into it:

and I worshipped in the house of Rimmon, as his master did, for the same word is used here as before:

in as much, or seeing I have worshipped in the house of Rimmon, have been guilty of such gross idolatry:

the Lord, I pray, forgive thy servant in this thing; the language of a true penitent.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

In this thing the LORD i pardon thy servant, [that] when my master goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon: when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon thy servant in this thing.

(i) He feels his conscience is wounded by being present at idols service, and therefore desires God to forgive him, lest others by his example might fall to idolatry: for as for his own part he confesses that he will never serve any but the true God.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

goeth into the house of Rimmon — a Syrian deity; probably the sun, or the planetary system, of which a pomegranate (Hebrew, {(Rimmon}) was the symbol.

leaneth on my hand — that is, meaning the service which Naaman rendered as the attendant of his sovereign. Elisha‘s prophetic commission not extending to any but the conversion of Israel from idolatry, he makes) no remark, either approving or disapproving, on the declared course of Naaman, but simply gives the parting benediction (2 Kings 5:19).

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-5.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

In this thing the LORD pardon thy servant, that when my master goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon: when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon thy servant in this thing.

Rimmon — A Syrian idol, called here by the LXX, Remman, and Acts 7:43, Remphan.

My hand — Or, arm, upon which, the king leaned, either for state, or for support.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-5.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE COMPROMISES OF LIFE

‘When I bow myself in the house of Rimmon.’

2 Kings 5:18

Here we find Naaman making an excuse, it is said, for dissembling his religious convictions, and Elisha accepting the plea. He is convinced that Jehovah is the true God, but is not prepared to make any sacrifice for his faith. What is this but to open a wide door for every species of dissimulation, and to make expediency, not truth, the rule of conduct?

To state the question thus is not to state it fairly.

I. Even if Elisha did accept Naaman’s plea, it would not follow that he was right.—An inspired prophet is not equally inspired at all times.

II. Did Elisha accept Naaman’s plea?—The evidence turns entirely on Elisha’s words, ‘Go in peace.’ These words are the common form of Oriental leave-taking. They may have been little more than a courteous dismissal. Elisha may have felt that the permission craved by Naaman involved a question of conscience which he was not called upon to resolve. Hence he would not sanction Naaman’s want of consistency on the one hand nor condemn it on the other. He declines the office of judge. He leaves conscience to do her work.

III. Who shall say this was not the wisest course to adopt?—The prophet saw Naaman’s weakness, but he also saw Naaman’s difficulty. Put the worst construction on his words, and you will say he evades the question; put the best, and you will say he exercises a wise forbearance.

IV. We may fairly ask how far Naaman is to be excused in urging the plea of the text.—Superstition mingled with his faith. He was a heathen, only just converted, only newly enlightened. We may excuse Naaman, but we cannot pretend as Christians to make his plea ours, or to justify our conduct by his.

V. The Christian missionary preaches a religion whose very essence is the spirit of self-sacrifice, the daily taking up of the Cross and following Christ.—It is plain, therefore, that he could not answer the man who came in the spirit of Naaman, ‘Go in peace.’

VI. Two practical lessons follow from this subject.—(1) The first is not to judge others by ourselves; (2) the second is not to excuse ourselves by others.

—Bishop Perowne.

Illustrations

(1) ‘A man’s worship was not in these days merely a matter of his own faith and religious life; it was a national affair, and as such was to be understood, not as expressing a man’s personal conviction, but his loyalty to the customs and the life of his people. Thus Naaman’s proposal was quite intelligible, and the prophet allowed him to carry it out. It was that as an official he might bow in the house of Rimmon, the national god whom the King of Syria worshipped. This would not be misunderstood, for he also asked for two mules’ burden of earth that he might worship Jehovah.’

(2) ‘Have you and I, who are living in the full glory of the sunshine of the Gospel, always the courage to aver our convictions if the avowal will cost us anything? Are we never ashamed of Christ, never ready to climb a step higher by not being righteous overmuch?’

(3) ‘The fact of Naaman’s worshipping Jehovah upon earth actually brought all the way from Samaria to Damascus could not be hid. No one would be left in doubt as to his own religious convictions, or would think that in his heart he was a worshipper of Rimmon. There was no lie, though there was a compromise.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-kings-5.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 5:18 In this thing the LORD pardon thy servant, [that] when my master goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon: when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon thy servant in this thing.

Ver. 18. In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant.] He held it a sin then, and would have a dispensation for it, as it may seem. Young carpenters make many chips; so do young converts many faults, which God imputeth not. Let none by Naaman’s example plead an upright soul in a prostrate body, pretend Nathanael in the skin of a Nicodemus. The words may be taken of the time past, and so some read, The Lord be merciful unto me, for I have gone into the house of Rimmon. So the word is used in Psalms 51:1; Psalms 52:1; Psalms 54:1.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 5:18. In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant, &c.— Rimmon, the great idol of the Phoenicians, is by many thought to have been the sun. There seems to be no doubt that some of the planets at least were worshipped under this name. As Naaman in the preceding verses has declared that he will worship no other god than Jehovah, there seems to be much plausibility in that translation of this verse which has been given by some learned men, and approved by many: In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant, that when my master went into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaned on my hand, and I bowed myself in the house if Rimmon; when I bowed down myself the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing. This is reasonable; but certainly the incongruity would be great, if Naaman, who had just before declared his renunciation of idolatry, should now confess his readiness to relapse into the same crime, and desire God's pardon for it before-hand; whereas, to ask pardon for what he had done amiss, and to desire the prophet's intercession with God in that behalf, argued a mind truly sensible of his former transgression, and very much resolved to avoid it for the future: and accordingly it is supposed, that upon his return home he refused to worship Rimmon any more, and was thereupon dismissed from being general of the king's forces. Houbigant, however, is strongly of opinion, that Naaman pleads for permission to attend his master the king of Syria, merely in a civil capacity, to the temple of Rimmon; which he thinks might well be allowed, while he publicly professed himself a worshipper of the God of Israel, and offered up sacrifices and burnt-offerings only to him. The reader will find much in Calmet and Roque upon the subject, as well as in Houbigant's note on the place. The first interpretation has also the countenance of the learned Dr. Lightfoot.

REFLECTIONS.—He who turned away in a rage, now convinced by experience, returns with humility and gratitude to acknowledge the mercy that he had received.

1. He solemnly confesses his faith in Israel's God, as the only Jehovah, and, renouncing all his idols, resolves henceforth to offer sacrifice to no other God. Note; We then only truly know God, when, not by mere reasoning, but by blessed experience, we find his saving power exercised in our hearts.

2. He presses the prophet to accept a present from him, as the token of his gratitude; but this, though indigent, and able well to employ it for his poor pupils, he solemnly refuses; not as unlawful, but as inexpedient: it would be more for the honour of his God to shew a contempt of this world's wealth. Note; (1.) Nothing so dishonourable in a prophet as the appearance of a mercenary spirit. (2.) Where the heart is fixed on a better portion, it can look on gold as dross.

3. He makes a two-fold request, with which the prophet complies. (1.) He begs two mules' burden of earth, to build an altar to Israel's God, henceforth his own. He looked on the land of Syria as polluted with idols; and now is as attached to the very earth of Israel, as he seemed before to despise it. Note; When the heart is turned to God, how differently do we regard every thing which relates to him! that which was our contempt or aversion, has now our warmest affections. (2.) He begs Elisha's prayers for him, that his past idolatry might be pardoned: not that he might be permitted still, as our translation intimates, to bow in the house of Rimmon, in complaisance to his master. To such a gracious appearance the prophet cannot but give his approbation, and dismisses him in peace, as one accepted of God. Note; (1.) Past transgressions should be ever remembered and lamented. (2.) They are to be encouraged, who give gracious symptoms of real conversion to God.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Rimmon; a Syrian idol, called here by the LXX. Remman, and Acts 7:43 Remphan.

On my hand; or, arm, as that word sometimes signifies, both in Scripture and other authors; or, shoulder; upon which the king leaned, either for state or for support. Compare 2 Kings 7:2.

When I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon; not in honour to the idol, which I do here, and shall there, openly renounce; but only in compliance with the king’s infirmity and conveniency, who cannot well bow if I stand upright. The Lord pardon thy servant in this thing: because there seemed to be an appearance of evil in this action, though done with an honest mind, he desires the prophet’s prayers that God would not charge it upon him as idolatry nor be displeased with him for that practice.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.Pardon thy servant — Here is truly an example of one asking pardon, or at least apologizing, for an offence he is yet to commit. But the peculiar nature of the offence is to be taken into consideration, and it must not be assumed that Elisha sanctioned his purposes. See on 2 Kings 5:19.

My master — The king of Syria.

Goeth into the house of Rimmon — The temple erected in honour of this Syrian deity, and in which the idol was pompously worshipped. This is the only scriptural mention of this Syrian deity, but traces of the name appear in Tabrimon (1 Kings 15:18) and Hadadrimmon Zechariah 12:11. As to the origin and signification of the name no settled opinion can well be formed. As Rimmon (רמון ) signifies a pomegranate, some have thought this deity was the emblem or personification of some fertilizing principle in nature, and hence presenting a relic of the ancient tree-worship of the East. Others take Rimmon to be “the abbreviated form of Hadadrimmon, Hadad being the sun-god of the Syrians. Combining this with the pomegranate, which was his symbol, Hadadrimmon would then be the sun-god of the later summer, who ripens the pomegranate and other later fruits, and, after infusing into them his productive power, dies, and is mourned with the ‘mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon.’” Zechariah 12:11. But Selden, Gesenius, and others, derive the word from the root רום, or רמם, to be high, and understand it as the name of the supreme Syrian god, the “most high.”

He leaneth on my hand — That is, Naaman attended the king when he went to worship, and assisted him when necessary in the performance of peculiar ceremonies.

I bow myself — As it had been one duty of Naaman, as the king’s adjutant, to accompany his master into the temple of Rimmon, he had, of course, been accustomed to show all proper respect and reverence for the place and the worship. When his master bowed, he bowed; and now when he returns to his master he expects to be required to perform the same service still. He wishes to be a loyal subject and servant of his king, but he cannot truly worship Rimmon. He hopes, therefore, to be excusable, if, as a loyal subject, he submits to go through the mere forms of service which his king requires, but does not allow his heart to engage in the idol-worship.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 5:18. When my master goeth into the house of Rimmon — Or rather, went, or hath gone, namely, formerly; for the Hebrew text of the whole verse may be properly rendered in the past time, thus: In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant, that when my master went into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaned on my hand, and I bowed myself in the house of Rimmon; when I bowed myself in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing. Rimmon, it must be observed, was a Syrian idol, called here by the Seventy Remman, and Acts 7:43, Remphan. And as Naaman, in the preceding verses, had declared that he would worship no other God but Jehovah, this translation seems evidently the true one, and is approved by many learned men, as Mr. Locke, Dr. Lightfoot, Lord Clarendon, and others. Certainly, as Dr. Dodd observes, “‘the incongruity would be great, if Naaman, who had just before declared his renunciation of idolatry, should now confess his readiness to relapse into the same crime, and desire God’s pardon for it beforehand; whereas to ask pardon for what he had done amiss, and to desire the prophet’s intercession with God in that behalf, argued a mind truly sensible of his former transgression, and very much resolved to avoid it for the future; and accordingly it is supposed that upon his return home he refused to worship Rimmon any more, and was thereupon dismissed from being general of the king’s forces.”

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Remmon, denotes "a pomegranate," or something "elevated," and is probably an epithet of the sun, the chief idol of the Syrians, which was also styled Adad, "one," as both are united, Zacharias xii. 11. --- Rempham is probably the same divinity, Acts vii. 43. Septuagint here read, Remman. Hesychius explains Ramas, "the highest god." Selden thinks the Elion of the Phœnicians is understood; Grotius, that Saturn, the highest of the planets, is meant. Serarius declares for Venus, to whom pomegranates were sacred; and P. Martyr for Juno, who held one of these apples in her hand. (Pausan. in Corinth) --- Remmon occurs no where else. --- Hand. This was an honour of the chief favourite, chap. vii. 2. (Calmet) --- Thing. He does not ask leave to commit sin, which would be absurd; though Protestants are not ashamed to accuse the Catholic Church, as if her "indulgences" were pardons for sins to come; though they be in reality no pardon for sin at all, but only a remission of temporal punishment, after the sin has been remitted by penance. Why do they not manfully attack what we really profess to believe? --- When he. Hebrew, "when I bow," &c. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-5.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Simmon. The Assyrian storm-god Ramman.

worship = bow down himself. leaneth. Compare 2 Kings 7:2, 2 Kings 7:17.

the LORD pardon = Jehovah pardon. Some codices add "I pray thee", but marked "to be cancelled".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In this thing the LORD pardon thy servant, that when my master goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon: when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon thy servant in this thing.

Goeth into the house of Rimmon - a Syrian deity, probably the sun, or the planetary system, of which a pomegranate (Hebrew Rimmon) was the symbol.

Leaneth on my hand - i:e., meaning the service which Naaman rendered as the attendant of his sovereign. It is quite clear that Naaman, as a convert to the faith of the true God, meant to perform no act of religion in the temple of Rimmon, and hoped that his official attendance there upon his royal master would be pardoned, as not done by his consenting will. In regard to the privilege of toleration to worship the true God, there is no reason to believe that it would not be enjoyed by Naaman, as by Joseph, Daniel latterly, Nehemiah, and others. In regard to Naaman's remark about 'bowing in the house of Rimmon,' Elisha's prophetic commission not extending to any but the conversion of Israel from idolatry, he makes no remark, either approving or disapproving, on the declared course of Naaman, but simply gives (2 Kings 5:19) the parting benediction. But another view has been given of Naaman's and Elisha's words, by rendering them in the past tense, which is perfectly admissible. 'In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant, that when my master went into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaned on my hand, and I worshipped in the house of Rimmon; in that I have worshipped in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) In this thing.—Touching this thing (but in at the end of the verse). The LXX. and Syriac read, “and touching this thing,” an improvement in the connection.

To worship.—To bow down (the same verb occurs thrice in the verse).

The house of Rimmon.—The Assyrian Rammânu (from ramâmu, “to thunder”). One of his epithets in the cuneiform is Râmimu, “the thunderer;” and another is Barqu (=Bâriqu), “he who lightens.” Rimmon was the god of the atmosphere, called in Accadian, AN. IM (“god of the air or wind”), figured on bas-reliefs and cylinders as armed with the thunderbolt. His name is prominent in the story of the Flood (e.g., it is said Rammânu irmum, “Rimmon thundered”); and one of his standing titles is Râhiçu (“he who deluges”). The Assyrians identified Rammân with the Aramean and Edomite Hadad. (Comp. the name Hadad-rimmon, Zechariah 12:11; and Tabrimon, 1 Kings 15:18.) A list of no fewer than forty-one titles of Rimmon has been found among the cuneiform tablets.

Leaneth on my hand.—A metaphor denoting the attendance on the king by his favourite grandee or principal adjutant. (Comp. 2 Kings 7:2; 2 Kings 7:17.)

When I bow down myself.—An Aramaic form is used. The clause is omitted in some Hebrew MSS.

The Lord pardon thy servant.—Naaman had solemnly promised to serve no god but Jehovah for the future. He now prays that an unavoidable exception—which will, indeed, be such only in appearance—may be excused by Jehovah. His request is not, of course, to be judged by a Christian standard. By the reply, “Go in peace,” the prophet, as spokesman of Jehovah, acceded to Naaman’s prayer. “Naaman durst not profess conversion to the foreign cultus before the king, his master; so he asks leave to go on assisting at the national rites” (Reuss).

The Lord pardon.—In the current Hebrew text it is the Lord pardon, I pray. The LXX. appears to have had the same reading; but very many MSS. and all the other versions omit the precative particle. It is, however, probably genuine.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In this thing the LORD pardon thy servant, that when my master goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon: when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon thy servant in this thing.
and he leaneth
This verse should probably, as many learned men have supposed, be read in the past, and not in the future tense: "In this thing the Lord pardon thy servant, that when my master went into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaned on my hand, and I worshipped in the house of Rimmon; in that I have worshipped in the house of Rimmon, the Lord pardon thy servant in this thing." Rimmon is supposed by Selden to the same with Elion, a god of the Phoenicians, borrowed undoubtedly from the Elyon of the Hebrews, one of the names of God.
7:2,17
and I bow
17:35; Exodus 20:5; 1 Kings 19:18
the Lord pardon
2 Chronicles 30:18,19; Jeremiah 50:20
Reciprocal: 1 Chronicles 6:77 - Rimmon

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-5.html.