Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 15:14

David said to all his servants who were with him at Jerusalem, "Arise and let us flee, for otherwise none of us will escape from Absalom. Go in haste, or he will overtake us quickly and bring down calamity on us and strike the city with the edge of the sword."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Cowardice;   David;   Thompson Chain Reference - Absalom;   Courage-Fear;   Cowardice;   Haste;   Haste-Delay;   Jerusalem;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Absalom;   David;   Evil;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Family Life and Relations;   Easton Bible Dictionary - David;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Absalom;   Samuel, Books of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ahithophel ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Absalom;   David;   Jerusalem;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ittai;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

David said - Arise - let us flee - This, I believe, was the first time that David turned his back to his enemies. And why did he now flee? Jerusalem, far from not being in a state to sustain a siege, was so strong that even the blind and the lame were supposed to be a sufficient defense for the walls, see 2 Samuel 5:6. And he had still with him his faithful Cherethites and Pelethites; besides six hundred faithful Gittites, who were perfectly willing to follow his fortunes. There does not appear any reason why such a person, in such circumstances, should not act on the defensive; at least till he should be fully satisfied of the real complexion of affairs. But he appears to take all as coming from the hand of God; therefore he humbles himself, weeps, goes barefoot, and covers his head! He does not even hasten his departure, for the habit of mourners is not the habit of those who are flying before the face of their enemies. He sees the storm, and he yields to what he conceives to be the tempest of the Almighty.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And smite the city - David‘s kind nature induced him to spare Jerusalem the horrors of a siege, and the risk of being taken by assault. He had no standing army with which to resist this sudden attack from so unexpected a quarter. Possibly too he remembered Nathan‘s prophecy 2 Samuel 12:10-12.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David said unto all his servants that were with him at Jerusalem,.... His courtiers and ministers of state, the officers of his household, as many of them as were with him in the city; for some of them very probably were in the country, as Ahithophel was, and some might be along with Absalom, whom he had invited to his peace offerings:

arise, and let us flee; it is much that a man of such courage and valour as David should be so intimidated at once as to make a flight as soon as he heard of a conspiracy forming against him:

for we shall not else escape from Absalom; his fears ran so high, that he fancied he would be upon them presently:

make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly; which still more clearly shows the panic he was in:

and bring evil upon us; kill them, or make them prisoners:

and smite the city with the edge of the sword; the inhabitants of it, should they make resistance.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David said unto all his servants that [were] with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not [else] escape from h Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword.

(h) Whose heart he saw that Satan had so possessed that he would leave no mischief unattempted.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

David said … Arise, and let us flee — David, anxious for the preservation of the city which he had beautified, and hopeful of a greater support throughout the country, wisely resolved on leaving Jerusalem.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-15.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David said unto all his servants that were with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not else escape from Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword.

Let us flee — For though the fort of Zion was strong, and he might have defended himself there; yet he had not laid in provisions for a long siege; and, if he had been once besieged there, Absalom would have got speedy possession of his whole kingdom; whereas if he marched abroad, he might raise a considerable army for his defence. Besides, the greatest part of Jerusalem could not be well defended against him.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-15.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 15:14 And David said unto all his servants that [were] with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not [else] escape from Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword.

Ver. 14. Arise, and let us flee.] And so prevent, what in us lieth, the misery of a civil war, and the sacking of the city.

And bring evil upon us.] Impellatque super nos malum, push evil upon us by a sudden surprise. This he spake, not for want of courage, {witness Psalms 3:1-8} or of good company about him, but out of prudence, and willingness to serve God’s providence.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-15.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 15:14. Arise, and let us flee As the danger was instant, David took his measures accordingly. The city was not in a condition to sustain a siege; and if it were, he did not care to expose a favourite city, built by himself, and the residence of the tabernacle of God, to all the evils incident to sieges, and almost inseparable from them. Nor, perhaps, did he care to trust the inhabitants of a place so long exposed to the taint of Absalom's temptations; see Psalms 55. Well acquainted with the young man's impetuosity, and the madness of the people, David judged it much better to give way to the fury of the flood, than attempt to stem it in the fullness of its overflowing.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-15.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Arise, and let us flee; for though the fort of Zion was strong and impregnable, and he might have defended himself there; yet he had not laid in provisions for a long siege; and, if he had been once besieged there, Absalom would have got speedy and quiet possession of his whole kingdom; whereas if he marched abroad, he might raise a considerable army for his defence, and the suppression of the rebels. Besides, the greatest part of Jerusalem could not be well defended against him. And he suspected that a great number of the citizens might take part with Absalom, and possibly deliver him up into Absalom’s hands. Besides, if he had made that the seat of the war, he feared the destruction of that city, which he vehemently desired to preserve, because it was the chief and royal city, and the place in which God had appointed to put his name and worship. Moreover, when David considered that God’s hand was now against him, and that he was now bringing evil upon him out of his own house, as he had threatened, 2 Samuel 12:11, it is no wonder if he was intimidated and disposed to flee.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-15.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

DAVID’S FLIGHT FROM JERUSALEM, 2 Samuel 15:13-30.

14.Arise, and let us flee — His deep consciousness of that guilt which brought all this evil upon him unmanned him in the hour of danger, and that mighty warrior, whose sword had subdued all the nations around him, now for the first time turns his back to the foe. But, as Nathan had forewarned him, the evil was in his own house, (2 Samuel 12:11,) and he felt there was no safety for him at his home.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-15.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 15:14. David said, Arise, and let us flee — As soon as he had received information of what had passed, he saw the danger was instant, and took his measures accordingly. He knew Absalom would lose no time to accomplish his design, and that the nature of it required him to strike home at once. David therefore orders his servants, soldiery, and friends, to depart from Jerusalem immediately. For, though the fort of Zion was strong, and he might have defended himself there for some time, yet he had not laid in provisions for a long siege; and, if he had been once besieged there, Absalom would have got speedy possession of his whole kingdom, whereas, if he marched abroad, he might raise a considerable army for his defence. Besides, the greatest part of Jerusalem could not be well defended against an enemy. And if it could, “he did not care to expose a favourite city, built by himself, and the residence of the tabernacle of God, to all the evils incident to sieges, and almost inseparable from them. Nor, perhaps, did he incline to trust the inhabitants of a place so long exposed to the taint of Absalom’s temptations.” This, some think, appears from the 55th Psalm, which, they suppose, was meditated and poured out in prayer to God upon the discovery of Absalom’s conspiracy. And from thence it is evident that he had discerned the seeds and workings of a conspiracy in the city, and that Ahithophel was at the bottom of it: and not only so, but that David foresaw his sudden and sad end. — Delaney. For we shall not else escape from Absalom — He was well acquainted with the young man’s impetuosity, and the madness of the people, and therefore judged that the only method to be pursued, in order to safety, was to give way to the fury of the flood, and not attempt to stem it in the fulness of its overflowing.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-15.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Ruin, of a house falling. Hebrew, "evil." David gives way to the fury of the rebels, hoping that they will enter into themselves, without bloodshed. He departs on foot, like a penitent, acknowledging the justice of God. Fear does not prompt him to leave Jerusalem, which was a place of such strength, (chap. v. 6.) nor are his attendants abandoned on a sudden by that courage, which made some of them a match for a whole army. David disposes of all things with great coolness and prudence. (Calmet) --- He wishes to appease God. (Menochius)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

evil. Hebrew. App-44.

city. Put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Subject), for its inhabitants. App-6.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David said unto all his servants that were with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not else escape from Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword.

David said ... Arise and let us flee. David, anxious for the preservation of the city which he had beautified, and confiding in a greater support throughout the country, wisely resolved on leaving Jerusalem.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) Let us flee.—The sequel abundantly proved the wisdom of David’s course. Ahithophel also (2 Samuel 17:1-2) and Hushai (2 Samuel 17:7-13) recognised that delay would be fatal to Absalom’s cause. His rebellion was thoroughly unreasonable, and must lose ground with time given for reflection. By this course also much of the horror of civil war was averted, and Jerusalem saved from “the edge of the sword.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David said unto all his servants that were with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not else escape from Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword.
Arise
19:9; Psalms 3:1; *title
bring
Heb. thrust.
Ezekiel 46:18; Matthew 11:12; *marg:; Luke 10:15
and smite
23:16,17; Psalms 51:18; 55:3-11; 137:5,6
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 23:26 - David made haste;  2 Samuel 17:16 - but speedily;  Psalm 55:5 - Fearfulness;  Psalm 55:7 - GeneralPsalm 64:4 - suddenly

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 15:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-15.html.