Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 17:17

Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz were staying at En-rogel, and a maidservant would go and tell them, and they would go and tell King David, for they could not be seen entering the city.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abiathar;   Ahimaaz;   Ahithophel;   En-Rogel;   Falsehood;   Friendship;   Jonathan;   Spies;   Zadok;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ahimaaz;   Jonathan;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ahimaaz;   Ahithophel;   Amasa;   Enrogel;   Hushai;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jerusalem;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Ahithophel;   En-Rogel;   Prayer;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Enrogel;   Fountain;   Holman Bible Dictionary - En-Rogel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ahimaaz;   En-Rogel;   Jonathan;   Samuel, Books of;   Wench;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ahimaaz ;   Ahithophel ;   Jonathan ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Abiathar;   Absalom;   Ahimaaz;   En-rogel;   Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Abi'athar;   Ahim'a-Az;   Ahith'ophel;   Fountain;   Jon'athan,;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ahimaaz;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ahimaaz;   En-Rogel;   Hinnom, Valley of;   Jonathan (1);   Samuel, Books of;   Tale;   Wench;   Zadok;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Ahimaaz;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jerusalem;   Jonathan, Jehonathan;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

En-rogel - The fullers' well; the place where they were accustomed to tread the clothes with their feet; hence the name עין ein, a well, and רגל regel, the foot, because of the treading above mentioned.

And a wench went and told them - The word wench occurs nowhere else in the Holy Scriptures: and, indeed, has no business here; as the Hebrew word שפחה shiphchah, should have been translated girl, maid, maid-servant. The word either comes from the Anglo-Saxon, a maid, or the Belgic wunch, desire, a thing wished for: multum enim ut plurimum Puellae a Juvenibus desiderantur, seu appetuntur. So Minsheu. Junius seems more willing to derive it from wince, to frisk, to be skittish, etc., for reasons sufficiently obvious, and which he gives at length. After all, it may as likely come from the Gothic wens or weins, a word frequently used in the gospels of the Codex Argenteus for wife. Coverdale's Bible, 1535, has damsell. Becke's Bible, 1549, has wenche. The same in Cardmarden's Bible, 1566; but it is maid in Barker's Bible, 1615. Wench is more of a Scotticism than maid or damsel; and King James probably restored it, as he is said to have done lad in Genesis 21:12, and elsewhere. In every other place where the word occurs, our translators render it handmaid, bondmaid, maiden, womanservant, maidservant, and servant. Such is the latitude with which they translate the same Hebrew term in almost innumerable instances.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

En-rogel - See the marginal reference.

A wench - Hebrew “the maid servant,” namely, of the high priest, either Zadok or Abiathar, or possibly one employed in some service in the temple courts. (1 Samuel 2:22 note.)

And they went and told king David - As related afterward 2 Samuel 17:21. Here mentioned by anticipation.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-17.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed by Enrogel,.... Who were the sons of the priests; these did not go into the city of Jerusalem with their parents, when they were sent back by David, 2 Samuel 15:27; but stayed by their direction at this place, which was near Jerusalem, and is called in the Targum the fuller's fountain, where they washed their clothes; and, as Kimchi and Jarchi say, by treading them with their feet, whence it had the name of Rogel, of which See Gill on Joshua 15:7,

(for they might not be seen to come into the city); having been charged by their parents to continue there for the sake of carrying intelligence to David, or because suspected by Absalom's party of carrying on such an intrigue:

and a wench went and told them: what Hushai had communicated to the priests, and what was his advice to David; this girl is supposed by Kimchi and Abarbinel to be of the family of Zadok, by whom she was sufficiently instructed to tell her message, and of whom there would be no suspicion:

and they went and told King David; the sons of the priests went and related to him all that had been transmitted to them.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed by Enrogel; for they might not be seen to come into the city: and a wench went and told g them; and they went and told king David.

(g) Meaning, the message from their fathers.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

by En-rogel — the fuller‘s well in the neighborhood of Jerusalem, below the junction of the valley of Hinnom with that of Jehoshaphat.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-17.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

“Jonathan and Ahimaaz (the sons of the priests: 2 Samuel 15:27) stood at the Rogel spring (the present well of Job or Nehemiah, at the south-east corner of Jerusalem: see at Job 15:7), and the maid-servant (of one of the high priests) went and told them (Hushai's message), and they went and told it to king David; for they durst not let themselves be seen to come into the city.” They had therefore been staying at the Rogel spring outside the city. After what had taken place publicly, according to 2 Samuel 15:24., Absalom could not be in any doubt as to the views of the high priests. Consequently their sons could not come into the city, with the intention of leaving it again directly, to inform David of the occurrences that had taken place there as he had requested (2 Samuel 15:28). The clause “and they went and told David” anticipates the course of the affair, according to the general plan adopted by Hebrew historians, of communicating the result at the very outset wherever they possibly could.

Copyright Statement
The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
Bibliographical Information
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/2-samuel-17.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed by Enrogel; for they might not be seen to come into the city: and a wench went and told them; and they went and told king David.

Enrogel — Or, the fullers well. A place near Jerusalem, Joshua 15:7; 18:16.

Wench — Pretending to go thither to wash some cloaths, or to draw water.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-17.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 17:17 Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed by Enrogel; for they might not be seen to come into the city: and a wench went and told them; and they went and told king David.

Ver. 17. And a wench went.] She went to Enrogel, that is, the Fuller’s fountain, - where those two were by their parents’ appointment, under pretence of fetching water or washing clothes there, - and carried intelligence. Thus David’s safety depended upon the faithfulness of a wench. God delighteth to help his servants "with a little help," as it is in Daniel 11:34.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-17.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 17:17. En-rogel Or, The fuller's fountain, a place near Jerusalem; so called, as we are told, because the fullers trod their cloth there with their feet; deriving the word rogel from רגל regel, which signifies a foot.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-17.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

En-rogel, or, the fuller’s well; a place near Jerusalem, Joshua 15:7 18:16.

A wench went and told them; pretending to go thither to wash some clothes,

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-17.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Robel, near Jerusalem, on the east. (Menochius) --- Maid, under the pretence of washing linen. (St. Jerome, Trad.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

En-rogel. Now the Virgin"s Fount, on east side of Ophel, or Jebus, from which the Zinnor runs up to the citadel. See note on 2 Samuel 5:8. Compare Joshua 15:7; Joshua 18:16, and App-68, on "Zion".

a wench = a maidservant. Compare Matthew 26:69. Mark 14:66. Luke 22:56. John 18:17.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed by Enrogel; for they might not be seen to come into the city: and a wench went and told them; and they went and told king David. By En-rogel, [ b

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) En-rogel.—A fountain just outside the city, on the boundary between the tribes of Benjamin and Judah (Joshua 15:7; Joshua 18:16). There are two localities which claim to represent it, each of which has its earnest advocates: the “Fountain of the Virgin,” on the western slope of the valley of the Kidron; and “Job’s Well” just below the junction of the valleys of the Kidron and Hinnom. The latter answers much better to the description in Joshua, but either will suit the present passage. The loyalty of the high priests to David must have been well known, and it would have been quite unsafe for their sons to start from the city itself as bearers of tidings to David; even with all their care they were pursued. Their hiding-place, however, was well chosen. as women resorted to the fountains to draw water, so that communications could be had without attracting observation.

A wench.—The maid-servant, the definite article probably indicating some well-known maid of the high priest. The word wench is not found elsewhere in the English Bible.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed by Enrogel; for they might not be seen to come into the city: and a wench went and told them; and they went and told king David.
Jonathan
15:27,36
stayed
Joshua 2:4-24
En-rogel
Joshua 15:7; 18:16; 1 Kings 1:9
Reciprocal: 2 Samuel 18:19 - Ahimaaz;  1 Kings 1:42 - Jonathan;  1 Chronicles 6:8 - Ahimaaz;  Acts 23:16 - he went

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 17:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-17.html.