Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 3:10

to transfer the kingdom from the house of Saul and to establish the throne of David over Israel and over Judah, from Dan even to Beersheba."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abner;   Conspiracy;   Ish-Bosheth;   Treason;   Thompson Chain Reference - Throne;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Rizpah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Abishag;   Abner;   Beersheba;   Oath;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Israel;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Directions (Geographical);   Translate;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abner;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ishbosheth ;   Translation;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - David;   Dwelling;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ish-Bo'sheth;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Throne;   Translation;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Abner;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Dan;  

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Samuel 3:10

To translate the kingdom from the house of Saul.

The translation of life

The kingdom was to pass from the house of Saul to the house of David, and David was to be king “over Israel and over Judah, from Dan even to Beersheba.” The thought is that kingdoms of an earthly kind change hands, and therefore they are to be regarded as belonging to things temporary and mutable, and not to things eternal and unchangeable. What hast thou that thou hast not received? By long use men come to entertain the idea of sole proprietorship, and thus the sense of monopoly increases. Our children are not ours, they are God’s; our lives are not our own, they belong to the Creator; we have no, thing, except in the sense of stewardship and in the sense of involving responsibility for the use we make of it. It is well that men can only reign for a certain time; it, would be well if royalty could change its point of origin, so that human vanity might be checked and human ambition might be baffled in many a course. We are not to think of earthly kingdoms alone as meaning political sovereignities; we are to think of personal influence, institutional functions, and all arrangements made to meet the necessity of the present day; all these things must be changed in order to be purified; the direction may be altered in order that attention may be wakened; those who imagine themselves secure for ever must be shaken out of their security, that they may learn that there is no permanence but in God. The Lord reigneth. All men reign under Him, and are subject to His will. They only are happy who use the world as not abusing it, and who hold it with so light a hand that at any moment they can lay it down again. (J. Parker, D. D.)

God in history

Someone has pithily said: “There are three kinds of histories. There is that which makes the king the centre of the story. The tale is mainly one of wars and their causes. It speaks glowingly of the king’s victories, and explains away his defeats. It has been dubbed, ‘The Drum and Trumpet History.’ Then there is that which traces the growth of the people--their morals, customs, politics, and religion. This is the ‘Bread and Success’ history. But, last of all, there is the history like that of the chosen nation, where the guide and ruler is God. This is true history, for it reckons in the mightiest fact and force of all. It is the ‘Sane and Sublime History,’ and no other is worth the name.”

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Samuel 3:10". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-samuel-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

To translate the kingdom from the house of Saul,.... Which was what the Lord had sworn to do, 1 Samuel 15:28; and which Abner now threatens to do, insolently taking that to himself which belonged to the Lord, and as if he could not do it without him:

and to set up the throne of David over Israel and over Judah; over the one as well as over the other; for it was set over Judah already:

from Dan even unto Beersheba; which were the utmost borders of the land of Israel, from north to south, and so includes the whole.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-3.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 3:10 To translate the kingdom from the house of Saul, and to set up the throne of David over Israel and over Judah, from Dan even to Beersheba.

Ver. 10. To translate the kingdom] This was Abner’s arrogance to boast such great things of himself, as if he had carried a king in his pocket, as that great Earl of Warwick in Edward IV’s time was said to have done.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-3.html. 1865-1868.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 3:10. To translate the kingdom from the house of Saul — A wonderful change, which the study of revenge had wrought in him, that he who so lately had gone about the country confirming the Israelites in their opposition to David, now resolved to bring them all over to him! But here we see the hand of God. Providence made use of this unjust resentment of Abner to bring about its own designs with regard to David.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-3.html. 1857.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) To translate the kingdom.—This sudden expression of Abner’s resolve seems to imply that he had before had the matter under consideration, and shows that there was some ground for the reproach of Ish-bosheth. The following verse brings out clearly the utter weakness of Ish-bosheth.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

To translate the kingdom from the house of Saul, and to set up the throne of David over Israel and over Judah, from Dan even to Beersheba.
from Dan
17:11; 24:2; Judges 20:1; 1 Kings 4:25
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 3:20 - Dan;  2 Samuel 3:21 - will gather;  1 Chronicles 10:14 - turned;  1 Chronicles 21:2 - Beersheba

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-3.html.

The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

"Handfuls of Purpose"

For All Gleaners

"To translate the kingdom."2 Samuel 3:10.

That is to say, to hand over the kingdom from one man to another. The kingdom was to pass from the house of Saul to the house of David, and David was to be king "over Israel and over Judah, from Dan even to Beersheba." The thought is that kingdoms of an earthly kind change hands, and therefore they are to be regarded as belonging to things temporary and mutable, and not to things eternal and unchangeable. What hast thou that thou hast not received? The kingdom did not belong to Saul, except in a secondary sense, for God still retained the kingdom in his own hands; he setteth up, and he bringeth down; he creates the prince, and he sets the beggar in his lowly place. By long use men come to entertain the idea of sole proprietorship, and thus the sense of monopoly increases. Our children are not ours, they are God"s; our lives are not our own, they belong to the Creator; we have nothing, except in the sense of stewardship and in the sense of involving responsibility for the use we make of it. Blessed is he who can say, amid the transition of kingdom and influence of every name and kind, "He must increase, but I must decrease." It is well that men can only reign for a certain time; it would be well if royalty could change its point of origin, so that human vanity might be checked and human ambition might be baffled in many a course. We are not to think of earthly kingdoms alone as meaning political sovereignties; we are to think of personal influence, institutional functions, and all arrangements made to meet the necessity of the present day: all these things must be changed in order to be purified; the direction may be altered in order that attention may be wakened; those who imagine themselves secure for ever must be shaken out of their security, that they may learn that there is no permanence but in God. The Lord reigneth. All men reign under him, and are subject to his will. They only are happy who use the world as not abusing it, and who hold it with so light a hand that at any moment they can lay it down again.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Parker, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:10". The People's Bible by Joseph Parker. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jpb/2-samuel-3.html. 1885-95.