Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 6:14

And David was dancing before the Lord with all his might, and David was wearing a linen ephod.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ark;   Dancing;   David;   Ephod;   Jerusalem;   Thompson Chain Reference - Dancing;   Ephod;   Linen;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Ark of the Covenant;   Ephod, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant;   Dancing;   Ephod;   Linen;   Uzzah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ark;   Dancing;   Ephod;   Music;   Tabernacle;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jerusalem;   Psalms, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Dance;   Ephod;   Linen;   Tabernacle;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dance;   High Priest;   King;   Levites;   Mahol;   Priest;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant;   Art and Aesthetics;   Ephod;   Music, Instruments, Dancing;   Pilgrimage;   Praise;   Samuel, Books of;   Transportation and Travel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ark;   Chronicles, I;   Dress;   Games;   Jerusalem;   Linen;   Priests and Levites;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ephod;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Dancing;   Nachon;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Dance;   David;   Ephod;   Jerusalem;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ephod;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abiathar;   Ark of the Covenant;   Criticism (the Graf-Wellhausen Hypothesis);   David;   Dress;   Ephod (1);   Games;   Gesture;   Images;   Linen;   Praise;   Psalms, Book of;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Ark of the covenant;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Dancing;   Ephod;   Linen;   Priest;   Samuel, Books of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And David danced before the Lord - Dancing is a religious ceremony among the Hindoos, and they consider it an act of devotion to their idols. It is evident that David considered it in the same light. What connection dancing can have with devotion I cannot tell. This I know, that unpremeditated and involuntary skipping may be the effect of sudden mental elation.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-6.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Danced - The Hebrew word is found only here and in 2 Samuel 6:16. It means “to dance in a circle,” hence, simply to dance. The parallel passage in 1 Chronicles 15:27 gives a widely different sense.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-6.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David danced before the Lord with all his might,.... That is, before the ark of the Lord; not a set dance, or along with others; but he leaped and skipped as "car", a lamb, does, and that for joy that the ark was like to be brought home to his house, without any token of the divine displeasure, as before; the Targum is,"he praised before the Lord with all his might;'exerted himself to the uttermost in singing the praises of God vocally, or by playing on an instrument; to which sense are the Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic versions, which is approved of by CastelF16Lexic. col. 1793. ; who observes, it nowhere appears to have been a custom to dance before the ark; but it might be now done, though not usual, and therefore was observed by Michal with contempt, 2 Samuel 6:16; a later writerF17Hackman. Praecidan. Sacr. p. 156, 157. shows that dancing is the proper sense of the word:

and David was girded with a linen ephod; which others, besides priests, sometimes wore, as Samuel did, and which David might choose to appear in, rather than in his royal robes, as being more agreeable to the service of God, and lighter for him both to walk and dance in on this occasion.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-6.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David danced before the LORD with all [his] might; and David [was] girded with a linen g ephod.

(g) With a garment like the priest's garment.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-6.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

David danced before the Lord — The Hebrews, like other ancient people, had their sacred dances, which were performed on their solemn anniversaries and other great occasions of commemorating some special token of the divine goodness and favor.

with all his might — intimating violent efforts of leaping, and divested of his royal mantle (in a state of undress), conduct apparently unsuitable to the gravity of age or the dignity of a king. But it was unquestionably done as an act of religious homage, his attitudes and dress being symbolic, as they have always been in Oriental countries, of penitence, joy, thankfulness, and devotion. [See on 1 Chronicles 15:27.]

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-6.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David danced before the LORD with all his might; and David was girded with a linen ephod.

Danced — To express his thankfulness to God by his outward carriage, according to the manner of those times.

Linen ephod — The usual habit of the priests and Levites, in their sacred ministrations yet sometimes worn by others, as it was by the young child Samuel; and so David, who laid by his royal robes, and put on this robe to declare, that although he was king of Israel, yet he willingly owned himself to be the Lord's minister and servant.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-6.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 6:14 And David danced before the LORD with all [his] might; and David [was] girded with a linen ephod.

Ver. 14. And David danced before the Lord with all his might.] Lustily indeed, yet not lightly and vainly, as Caligula and Nero sometimes did on an open theatre; nor yet superstitiously, as the Salii, those Roman priests, did in honour of their god Mars, and as the Romanists do at this day in Spain and elsewhere before their breaden god, when he is carried in procession: but by a grave motion of his body, in a holy and sober manner and measure, as was usual with the ancients in some cases, to express thereby their spiritual jollity and ravishments of rejoicing.

And David was girded with a linen ephod.] Laying aside his royal habit; he put on a linen garment, not unlike that of the priests, to show his devotion. We read of Charles V, that at his solemn inaguration at Bononia he did put on a linen vesture, to please the Papal society, as if he were consecrated one of their priests. This was much in an emperor, but the less to be wondered at, since afterwards he sent his schoolmaster, Adrian, to Rome, to negotiate for him for the Popedom: thinking thereby to sway much, if he could get both the swords. David had no such aim when upon his silken robe he put this linen ephod, [1 Chronicles 15:27] which, being girt to him, kept his other garments close from flying abroad when he danced. (a)

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-6.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 6:14. David danced before the Lord David's behaviour in this particular was no disparagement to his regal dignity. His dancing, that is, his moving in certain solemn measures, suited to music of the same character and tendency, was an exercise fully justifiable in him. Piety taught David, that all men are upon a level in the solemnities of religion. See Delaney; where the reader will find a dissertation upon dancing, wherein David's dancing before the ark is examined, fully vindicated, and shewn to be very different from that kind of dancing which is too much practised in these days.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-6.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 312

DAVID DANCING BEFORE THE LORD

2 Samuel 6:14. And David danced before the Lord with all his might.

RELIGION is, indeed, a source of joy. In this light it was viewed by the angelic host, when they proclaimed to the shepherds the birth of our Saviour, saying, “Behold, we bring you glad tidings of great joy!” And thus was it found to be by the converts on the day of Pentecost, the Ethiopian Eunuch, the people of Samaria [Note: Acts 8:8; Acts 8:39.], and by all, in every place, who received the word aright [Note: Acts 15:3.]. The Psalms of David place this matter beyond a doubt, they being almost one continued effusion of praise and thanksgiving. In the history before us we have an extraordinary exhibition, strongly confirmatory of this truth. David was bringing up the ark of God to Jerusalem; and so strong were the emotions of joy within him, that, in the presence of not less than thirty thousand of his subjects, he danced before the Lord with all his might.

Let us consider,

I. The expressions of David’s joy—

Certainly, at first sight, it appears strange that a monarch, stripped of his royal robes, and clad in the simple habit of a priest, should be dancing thus extravagantly, as it might appear, at the head of all his subjects. But he was serving and honouring his God: and therefore, under any circumstances, his joy would be great. But it was exceedingly heightened,

1. By his reflections upon the past—

[The ark, with the exception of one short interval, had abode at Baaleh, or Kirjath-jearim, for nearly fifty years, whither it had been carried twenty years after its restoration by the Philistines who had taken it captive. David had greatly desired to bring it up to Jerusalem, where he had prepared a tabernacle for its reception. He ordered it to be put on a new cart, and drawn by oxen, in the manner in which the Philistines had restored it; forgetting that God had given special commands, that none but the Kohathites, who were Levites, should carry it; and that they should never either behold or touch it, but that it should be covered, and they should bear it by means of the staves which were made for that purpose. In its progress, the ark was shaken, at the threshing-floor of Nachon; and Uzzah, one of the conductors of it, put forth his hand to hold it up, lest it should fall: and for this error God struck him dead upon the spot. This judgment was intended as a rebuke, not to Uzzah only, but to all the priests and Levites who were present; and especially to David, who had been so regardless of the divine commands, with which he doubtless was well acquainted, and of which he ought to have been most strictly observant. By this judgment David was disheartened, and he dared not to proceed, lest he himself, also, should fall a sacrifice to the divine displeasure. Accordingly, the ark was turned out of its course, and carried to the house of Obed-edom, the Gittite. But during its continuance there, for the space of three months, such manifest and extraordinary blessings flowed down upon Obed-edom and all his family, that David was assured that God was reconciled towards him: and, inspired with fresh zeal, he proceeded again to bring it up from thence, taking especial care that every thing should be conducted in God’s appointed way. After advancing only six paces, he stopped to offer burnt-offerings and peace-offerings; and then he felt in his soul, that God had accepted this service, and would crown it with good success [Note: 1 Chronicles 15:1-3; 1 Chronicles 15:11-15.].

Now, to enter into David’s feelings aright, we must mark the contrast between this present effort and that which had so lately failed: and we must remember, that, not content with expressing his gratitude to God by secret aspirations, he strove, by his open and visible acknowledgments, to inspire all his people with the same ardent gratitude with which his own breast was filled. This will account for what might otherwise appear extravagant in this outward demonstration of his joy.]

2. By his anticipations of the future—

[The ark was the symbol of the divine presence: and by having it at Jerusalem, he hoped that he should have more easy access to Jehovah at all seasons, and bring down, both on himself and all his people, a rich abundance of spiritual blessings. Of this, David himself informs us in the 132d Psalm, which he wrote on that express occasion. He tells us, that he had sworn he would not come up into the tabernacle of his own house, nor go up into his bed, till he should have found out a place for the Lord, an habitation for the mighty God of Jacob. He then adds, “Lo, we heard of it at Ephratah, (Kiriath-jearim,) and found it in the fields of the wood: and we will go into his tabernacle, and worship at his footstool.” Then, declaring what his prayers to God should be, he anticipates the future advent of the Messiah, and states the answers he should receive to his prayers, repeating the very words of his petitions as the precise terms of God’s promises: “The Lord hath chosen Zion; he hath desired it for his habitation. This is my rest for ever: here will I dwell; for I have desired it. I will abundantly bless her provision; I will satisfy her poor with bread: I will also clothe her priests with salvation; and her saints shall shout aloud for joy. There will I make the horn of David to bud: I have ordained a lamp for mine anointed. His enemies will I clothe with shame: but upon himself shall his crown flourish [Note: Psalms 132:1-7; Psalms 132:13-18.].” After such prospects as these, can we wonder at any expressions of his joy, however ardent, or however extraordinary? Methinks, his zeal in this instance was temperance, and his excess sobriety.]

And now let me shew,

II. What occasion we also have for joy at this time—

This whole matter was typical of our blessed Lord’s ascension into heaven. In the 68th Psalm, written by David on this occasion, he says, “The chariots of God are twenty thousand, even thousands of angels: the Lord is among them, as in Sinai, in the holy place. Thou hast ascended up on high, thou hast led captivity captive: thou hast received gifts for men, yea, for the rebellious also, that the Lord God might dwell among them [Note: Psalms 68:17-18.].” And St. Paul quotes these very words as declarative of our Lord’s ascension to heaven, and the out-pouring of the Spirit upon his Church as the very bestowment of those gifts which he had obtained for her [Note: Ephesians 4:8-12.].

Here, then, we have already marked for us the nobler grounds of joy which we possess at this time,

1. In the dignity of the person so exalted—

[The ark was dignified as a shadow, and an emblem, of the Lord Jesus: but we commemorate the exaltation of the Lord Jesus himself. And I wish you particularly to notice how this also was announced by the holy Psalmist: “Lift up your heads, O ye gates; and be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle. Lift up your heads, O ye gates, even lift them up, ye everlasting doors; and the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord of hosts, he is the King of glory [Note: Psalms 24:7-10.].”]

2. In the richness of the benefits imparted by him—

[In the passage before mentioned we see, in a general view, the gifts which our ascended Saviour bestows upon his rebellious subjects. But who can recount them all, or even estimate so much as one of them aright? See the first-fruits of those benefits on the day of Pentecost; and behold them spread over the face of the whole earth, and poured out in the richest possible abundance at this day. See the Saviour “seated at the right hand of God, far above all principalities and powers, and might and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come. See how God hath put all things under his feet, and given him to be head over all things to the Church, which is his body, the fulness of him who filleth all in all [Note: Ephesians 1:20-23.].” See him “exalted thus, and having a name given him above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father [Note: Philippians 2:9-11.].” All these his victories must be contemplated, and all the felicity of his redeemed people both in time and eternity, before we can estimate, in any measure, what ground we have for joy in the resurrection and ascension of our blessed Lord. My dear Brethren, only view these things by faith as David did, and even your lowest notes will resemble those of “that sweet singer of Israel:” “God is gone up with a shout, the Lord with the sound of the trumpet. Sing praises to God, sing praises: sing praises unto our King, sing praises: for God is the King of all the earth: sing ye praises with understanding [Note: Psalms 47:5-7.].”]

But it will be profitable to inquire,

III. How far the expressions of our joy should correspond with his—

In point of ardour, we should not fall short of him, but should, if possible, exceed him. Yet in the mode of expressing our joy, I think he is not a proper pattern for us—

1. There is a great difference between his dispensation and ours—

[The Jewish dispensation abounded with “carnal ordinances:” and every service of the saints was marked with outward and visible signs. Every penitent that would obtain mercy of the Lord must carry his appointed offering, and conform in every thing to some peculiar law. The same must be done by those who would return thanks to God for mercies received. But we, under the Christian dispensation, are to enter into our chamber, and shut our door, that we may not be seen of men, but be seen by Him only whom we serve, the heart-searching God [Note: Matthew 6:6.]. The Jews needed the priests to mediate between God and them: but we may approach God, every one of us for ourselves, through that One Mediator, the Lord Jesus Christ; yea, and may enter into the holy of holies itself, through the blood of his sacrifice which he once offered for us on the cross [Note: Hebrews 10:19-22.]. This, then, marks a broad line of distinction between David’s services and ours, and renders such “bodily exercise” as his unsuitable to us.]

2. Our frame of mind should be more spiritual and more refined—

[I will not say that the body is not to participate in the emotions of our minds: for in this our fallen state such a sympathy must of necessity be called forth by any intense feeling, whether of joy or sorrow. But there is a delicacy and refinement in the Christian’s feelings: and the less they savour of what is animal, the better. A Christian’s joy is “the joy of the Holy Ghost:” and when it rises to the highest pitch, so as to be utterly “unspeakable,” it is then a “glorified joy,” such as the glorified saints and angels experience in heaven [Note: 1 Peter 1:8. The Greek.]. Behold all of them before the throne of God: they are all prostrate on their faces, whilst yet they sing praises to God and to the Lamb. Their joy is a meek and holy joy: and sure I am that such is the joy that becomes us in this lower world, compassed as we are with so many infirmities. And I would the rather recommend that, because it will be less likely to cast a stumbling-block before us, and less likely to deceive your own souls. I am far from justifying Michal for casting such severe reflections on David. But her spirit shews what feelings will be generated in the bosoms of the ungodly, by any thing which seems to border on excess. By an inattention to the feelings of others, we may do considerable injury both to ourselves and them also. Our Lord, therefore, cautions us “not to cast our pearls before swine, lest they turn again and rend us.” On such occasions, I think, we should rather put a veil over our faces, as Moses did, than blind them by a splendour which they cannot bear. Yet we are not so to regard the ungodly, as to be deterred from serving God in any, and in every, way that he requires. But if we bear in mind the infirmities of others, we may the better hope to allure them to the service of their God, and to bring them to a participation of all the blessings which we ourselves enjoy.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/2-samuel-6.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

David danced before the Lord, to express his inward joy and thankfulness to God by his outward carriage, according to the manner of these times. See Exodus 15:20 Jude 11:34 21:21 1 Samuel 18:6 Psalms 149:3.

A linen ephod; the usual habit of the priests and Levites in their sacred ministrations, yet sometimes worn by others, as it was by the young child Samuel, 1 Samuel 2:18, before he was come to those years in which the Levites were allowed to minister; and so hereby David, who laid by his royal robes, and put on this robe, to signify and declare, that although he was king of Israel, yet he willingly owned himself to be the Lord’s minister and servant.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-6.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

14.Danced before the Lord — From the most ancient times, both among the Jews and other nations, dancing formed a part of the ceremonies of religious processions and festivals, but the performers were usually a band of females. Exodus 15:20; Judges 11:34; Judges 21:21; 1 Samuel 18:6. When persons of different sexes engaged, they seem always to have kept in separate companies, and never to have danced promiscuously.

Girded with a linen ephod — See on 1 Samuel 2:18. The ephod was worn by David on this occasion, probably, for the purpose of showing special respect and reverence for the ark of God.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-6.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Ephod which ordinarily was the habit of priests. But no law restrained others from using it, (Calmet) particularly on sacred occasions; as we often see laics in a surplice, when they have to sing Church music, &c. (Menochius) --- David had also on a cloak of byssus; (Paralipomenon) and still Michol speaks as if he had been uncovered; because in this solemn ceremony, he was inspired to divest himself of his royal robes, and to act with a degree of enthusiasm; (Haydock) which would not have been otherwise becoming in a king. David is considered by some of the fathers as a figure of the priests of the new law; as he ate the loaves of proposition, was dressed like priests, &c. Sacerdos scitus erat David. (1 Iræn. iv.; St. Ambrose v. in Luc. vi.) (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-6.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

danced. This explains the subscription of Psa 87, Mahalath Leannoth = dancing with shoutings. Compare 1 Chronicles 15:25-29. See App-65.

The Psalm 87 subscription reads: "A Song or Psalm for the sons of Korah, to the chief

Musician upon Mahalath Leannoth." See notes on Psalms 87:7.

a linen ephod. Compare Aaron (Exodus 28:6) and Samuel (1 Samuel 2:18).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-6.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David danced before the LORD with all his might; and David was girded with a linen ephod.

David danced before the Lord. The Hebrews, like other ancient people, had their sacred dances, which were performed on their solemn anniversaries and other great occasions of commemorating some special token of the divine goodness and favour, (Exodus 15:20; Judges 11:34; Judges 21:21; 1 Samuel 18:6; Psalms 149:3; Psalms 105:1-45, etc.,) with all his might-intimating a wild movement of the feet with violent efforts of leaping, and, divested of his royal mantle, in a state of undress-conduct apparently unsuitable to the gravity of age or the dignity of a king-the linen ephod being not exclusively the official habit of priest and Levites, but worn frequently by others (cf. 1 Samuel 2:18) who were in any capacity engaged in the service of God. But the laying aside of his kingly attire, and the assumption of this light tunic, was unquestionably done as an act of religions homage, his attitudes and dress being symbolic, as they have always been in Oriental countries, of penitence, joy, thankfulness, and devotion. It was customary for bands of women to meet warriors on their return home (1 Samuel 18:7-8) with music and dancing, one leading the rest, as Miriam also did before the Lord, as "a man of war" (Exodus 15:20). On this accasion David acted himself as the leader, in lieu of Michal, who ought to have lad the female choir (see the notes at 2 Samuel 6:16; 2 Samuel 6:20).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-6.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) David danced.—The religious dances on occasions of great national blessing were usually performed by women only (Exodus 15:20-21; Judges 11:34; 1 Samuel 18:6). The king, by now taking part in them himself, marked his strong sense of the importance of the occasion, and his readiness to do his utmost in God’s honour.

Girded with a linen ephod.—This is usually spoken of as if David were arrayed in a distinctively priestly dress; but it is remarkable that the ephod was not prescribed as a part of the priestly dress—the ephod of the high-priest (Exodus 25:7, &c.) being quite a different thing—and was worn by others, as Samuel (1 Samuel 2:18). The wearing of the ephod, however, is spoken of in 1 Samuel 22:18 as characteristic of the priests, and in Judges 8:27; Judges 17:5; Judges 18:14-20, it is connected with idolatrous worship. It is also to be noted that the high priest’s ephod (Exodus 28:6; Exodus 28:8, &c.) was made of shesh, while the garments of the ordinary priests, as well as the ephods of Samuel and David, were of bad. The explanation seems to be that the ephod of bad was simply a garment worn by any one engaged in a religious service, and it is used in 1 Samuel 22:18 to describe the priests, because such service constituted their ordinary life. It was not, therefore, a peculiarly priestly dress, though naturally more worn by them than by any one else.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-6.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David danced before the LORD with all his might; and David was girded with a linen ephod.
danced
Exodus 15:20; Judges 11:34; 21:21; Psalms 30:11; 149:3; 150:4; Luke 15:25
with all this
Deuteronomy 6:5; Ecclesiastes 9:10; Colossians 3:23
girded
1 Samuel 2:18,28; 22:18; 1 Chronicles 15:27
Reciprocal: Exodus 28:4 - ephod;  Exodus 32:19 - the dancing;  1 Samuel 19:24 - stripped;  2 Samuel 6:20 - uncovered;  2 Samuel 6:21 - before;  2 Chronicles 20:27 - forefront;  Ezekiel 46:10 - GeneralHosea 3:4 - ephod

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 6:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-6.html.