Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

3 John 1:10

For this reason, if I come, I will call attention to his deeds which he does, unjustly accusing us with wicked words; and not satisfied with this, he himself does not receive the brethren, either, and he forbids those who desire to do so and puts them out of the church.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ambition;   Church;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Church;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Diotrephes;   John the Apostle;   John, the Epistles of;   Timothy, the First Epistle to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Love;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Diotrephes;   Excommunication;   King James Dictionary - Remember;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

If I come, I will remember - I will show him the authority which, as an apostle of Jesus Christ, I possess.

Prating against us - Diotrephes might have been a converted Jew, who was unwilling that the Gentiles should be received into the Church; or a Judaizing Christian, who wished to incorporate the law with the Gospel, and calumniated the apostles who taught otherwise. This haughty and unfeeling man would give no countenance to the converted Gentiles; so far from it, that he would not receive any of them himself, forbade others to do it, and excommunicated those who had been received into the Church by the apostles. This appears to be the meaning of neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the Church. He had the complete dog in the manger principle: he would neither do, nor let do; and when good was done that he did not approve, he endeavored to undo it.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/3-john-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Wherefore, if I come - He was evidently expecting soon to make a visit to Gaius, and to the church, 3 John 1:14.

I will remember his deeds which he doeth - That is, he would punish his arrogance and presumption; would take measures that he should be dealt with in a proper manner. There is no evidence whatever that this is said in a vindictive or revengeful spirit, or that the writer spoke of it merely as a personal matter. From anything that can be shown to the contrary, if it had been a private and personal affair merely, the matter might have been dropped, and never referred to again. But what had been done was public. It pertained to the authority of the apostle, the duty of the church, and the character of the brethren who had been commended to them. If the letter was written, as is supposed by the aged John, and his authority had been utterly rejected by the influence of this one man, then it was proper that that authority should be asserted. If it was the duty of the church to have received these men, who had been thus recommended to them, and it had been prevented from doing what it would otherwise have done, by the influence of one man, then it was proper that the influence of that man should be restrained, and that the church should see that he was not to control it. If the feelings and the character of these brethren had been injured by being rudely thrust out of the church, and held up as unworthy of public confidence, then it was proper that their character should be vindicated, and that the author of the wrong should be dealt with in a suitable manner. No one can show that this was not all that the apostle proposed to do, or that any feelings of private vindictiveness entered into his purpose to remember what Diotrephes had done; and the existence of any such feelings should not be charged on the apostle without proof. There is no more reason to suppose this in his case than there was in the case of Paul, in administering discipline in the church of Corinth, 1 Corinthians 5:3-5, or than there is in any instance of administering discipline now.

Prating against us - The word “prate,” ( φλυαρέω phluareōoccurring nowhere else in the New Testament, means to “overflow with talk,” (Greek φλύω phluōLatin: “fluo,” flow;) to talk much without weight, or to little purpose; to be loquacious; to trifle; or, to use an expression common among us, and which accords well with the Greek, to run on in talk, without connection or sense. The word does not properly imply that there was malignity or ill-feeling in what was said, but that the talk was of an idle, foolish, and unpprofitable character. As John here, however, specifies that there was a bad spirit in the manner in which Diotrephes expressed himself, the real thing which is implied in the use of the word here is, that there were much talk of that kind; that he was addicted to this habit of “running on” against the apostle; and that he was thus constantly undermining his influence, and injuring his character.

With malicious words - Greek, “evil words;” words that were fitted to do injury.

And not content therewith - Not satisfied with venting his private feelings in talk. Some persons seem to be satisfied with merely talking against others, and take no other measures to injure them; but Diotrephes was not. He himself rejected the brethren, and persuaded the church to do the same thing. Bad as evil talking is, and troublesome as a man may be who is always “prating” about matters that do not go according to his mind, yet it would be comparatively well if things always ended with that, and if the loquacious and the dissatisfied never took measures openly to wrong others.

Neither doth he himself receive the brethren - Does not himself treat them as Christian brethren, or with the hospitality which is due to them. He had not done it on the former visit, and John evidently supposed that the same thing would occur again.

And forbiddeth them that would - From this it is clear that there were those in the church who were disposed to receive them in a proper manner; and from anything that appears, the church, as such, would have been inclined to do it, if it had not been for the influence of this one man.

And casteth them out of the church - Compare Luke 6:22. It has been made a question whether the reference here is to the members of the church who were disposed to receive these brethren, or to the brethren themselves. Lucke, Macknight, and some others, suppose that it refers to those in the church who were willing to receive them, and whom Diotrephes had excommunicated on that account. Heumann, Carpzoviius, Rosenmuller, Bloomfield, and others, suppose that it refers to these strangers, and that the meaning is, that Diotrephes would not receive them into the society of Christians, and thus compelled them to go to another place. That this latter is the correct interpretation seems to me to be evident, for it was of the treatment which they had received that the apostle was speaking.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/3-john-1.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Therefore, if I come, I will bring to remembrance his works which he doeth, prating against us with wicked words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and them that would he forbiddeth and casteth them out of the church.

If I come ... In 3 John 1:1:13, the apostle made this much more definite: "I hope shortly to see thee, and we shall speak face to face."

I will bring to remembrance ... Wilder supposed that, "at the same time (John) will refute his empty charges";[30] but it is a mistake to understand it in this way. What John evidently intended to do was to bring the words and conduct of Diotrephes "to remembrance, not of himself, but of the whole church, exposing his wicked conduct that it might receive the censure to which it was entitled. Nothing that Diotrephes had said concerning the blessed apostle required any refutation.

His works which he doeth ... wicked words ... It is interesting that "words" here are equated with "works." Words are indeed works, wicked words being works of Satan, and righteous words being a "work of faith." Since it is supposed that Gaius was a member of the same church as Diotrephes, or at least a resident of the same area, some have wondered why it was necessary for John to elaborate the works of Diotrephes, thinking that perhaps Gaius would have known about them already. Orr explained as follows:

The objection would be valid only if this were purely a private letter; but there are no purely private letters in the New Testament. This letter is a formal indictment of Diotrephes, as well as a testimonial for Gaius and Demetrius.[31]

Them that would he forbiddeth and casteth out ... These words clearly indicate an action called in later times "excommunication"; but the manner of Diotrephes' doing this is not suggested. It is not known if he was "an elder" who had induced the group to take such action, or if he here merely "arrogated to himself an authority which later became legal for local bishops."[32]

Roberts also noted in this context that:

The Greek makes it plain that it was the members of the church who wanted to practice this virtue (of receiving the missionaries into their homes and supporting them) who were put out of the church (by Diotrephes)[33]

This clearly indicates Diotrephes' action as being a vicious secondary boycott of every Christian who would not receive and honor his dictum that the missionaries should be turned away. He not only disfellowshiped and rejected the missionaries, he went far beyond this and disfellowshiped (even to the extent of denying them membership in the body of Christ) everyone who would not follow his lead in this matter. As noted above, it is not clear just how Diotrephes was able to do this. Dummelow explained it thus:

He could have been "the head of the church" to which Gaius belonged; but it may be that he had sufficient social influence to exclude the brethren from the Christian society of the place.[34]

However, Diotrephes might have accomplished his evil design, he had utterly no right to any such authority; and the granting of it at a later period of church history to "bishops" was likewise sinful, anti-Christian, and diabolical. Not even an entire eldership could have been justified in the brutal enforcement of a secondary boycott of their fellow-Christians because their judgment had not been honored in such a case. It is a hopeless blindness indeed that fails to discern the heinous nature of the sin of Diotrephes.

[30] Amos N. Wilder, op. cit., p. 311.

[31] R. W. Orr, op. cit., p. 624.

[32] Amos N. Wilder, op. cit., p. 312.

[33] J. W. Roberts, op. cit., p. 178.

[34] J. R. Dummelow, op. cit., p. 1263.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/3-john-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Wherefore, if I come,.... Where both Gaius and Diotrephes lived, as he trusted he should shortly, 3 John 1:14;

I will remember his deeds which he doth; meaning, not only that he would tell him of them to his face, but make mention of them, and expose them to the whole church, and reprove him for them: and which are as follow,

prating against us with malicious words; it is a common thing for ministers of the Gospel to be prated against, not only by the men of the world, but by professors of religion, and by such who call themselves preachers also; nor need it be wondered at, since John, an apostle of Christ, the beloved disciple, who was so harmless and inoffensive in his conversation, so kind and loving in his disposition and temper, so meek and humble in his deportment, and now in such an advanced age, was prated against by a Diotrephes: and what is said against Christ's ministers is no other than prating; silly, idle, trifling, and empty stuff, as the word used signifies; for want of greater things, they take up any little matter, and improve it against them; and this is often done with a malicious intent, to hurt their characters, spoil their usefulness, and render their ministry unprofitable.

And not content herewith; with prating against the Apostle John, and the ministers with him, in this wicked way:

neither doth he himself receive the brethren; the meaning is not, that he did not receive them into the church, for they were there, since afterwards mention is made of his casting them out from thence; but he did not receive them into his house, and entertain them as he ought to have done; for a minister of the Gospel, and a pastor of a church, ought to be hospitable, and given to hospitality, and entertain strangers, especially those who are brethren in Christ, and fellow ministers of the word: and the rather these were to be received, since they travelled about to spread the Gospel among the Gentiles, and took nothing of them. And this was not all, he not only did not receive them himself, and reject them, but was not willing that others should receive them:

and forbiddeth them that would; on such who had a heart, as well as ability, to receive and entertain these poor brethren, he laid his injunctions, and gave them strict orders, in his lordly and tyrannical way, not to show any respect unto them;

and casteth them out of the church; that is, he excommunicated them, either those that entertained them, or rather the brethren themselves; which was an abuse of the ordinance of excommunication, as that ordinance is abused, when any single person, a pastor, or any other, as here, assumes the power of doing it himself, and does it without the church; whereas it is a punishment or censure, to be inflicted by many, or to be done by the joint suffrage of the church; and when it is done in a wrong cause, for some small trifling matter, or none at all, and not in a case of heresy or immorality, obstinately persisted in; and when it is done from wrong principles, and with wrong ends, as to gratify the pride and passion of some; and not for the good of the person cast out, or to prevent others from falling into the same snare, or for the honour of religion, and the glory of God. The phrase seems to be taken from the Jews, who expressed their excommunication, or putting out of the synagogue, by a casting out; see John 9:34.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/3-john-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

if I come — (3 John 1:14).

I will remember — literally, “I will bring to mind” before all by stigmatizing and punishing.

prating — with mere silly tattle.

neither doth he  …  receive the brethren — with hospitality. “The brethren” are the missionaries on their journey.

forbiddeth them that would — receive them.

casteth them — those that would receive the brethren, by excommunication from the Church, which his influence, as a leading man (3 John 1:9) in it, enabled him to do. Neander thinks that the missionaries were JEWS by birth, whence it is said in their praise they took nothing from THE GENTILES: in contrast to other Jewish missionaries who abused ministers‘ right of maintenance elsewhere, as Paul tells us, 2 Corinthians 11:22; Philippians 3:2, Philippians 3:5, Philippians 3:19. Now in the Gentile churches there existed an ultra-Pauline party of anti-Jewish tendency, the forerunners of Marcion: Diotrephes possibly stood at the head of this party, which fact, as well as this domineering spirit, may account for his hostility to the missionaries, and to the apostle John, who had, by the power of love, tried to harmonize the various elements in the Asiatic churches. At a later period, Marcion, we know, attached himself to Paul alone, and paid no deference to the authority of John.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

If I come (εαν ελτωean elthō). Condition of third class with εανean and second aorist active subjunctive of ερχομαιerchomai He hopes to come (3 John 1:14), as he had said in 2 John 1:12 (one argument for identifying 2 John with the letter in 3 John 1:9).

I will bring to remembrance (υπομνησωhupomnēsō). Future active indicative of υπομιμνησκωhupomimnēskō old compound (John 14:26; 2 Peter 1:12). The aged apostle is not afraid of Diotrephes and here defies him.

Which he doeth (α ποιειha poiei). Present active indicative, “which he keeps on doing.”

Prating against us (πλυαρων ημαςphluarōn hēmās). Present active participle of old verb (from πλυαροςphluaros babbling 1 Timothy 5:13), to accuse idly and so falsely, here only in N.T. with accusative ημαςhēmās (us).

With wicked words (λογοις πονηροιςlogois ponērois). Instrumental case. Not simply foolish chatter, but malevolent words.

Not content (μη αρκουμενοςmē arkoumenos). Present passive participle of αρκεωarkeō with usual negative μηmē For this verb in this sense see 1 Timothy 6:8; Hebrews 13:5, only there επιepi is absent. John knows that the conduct of Diotrephes will not stand the light. See Paul‘s threats of exposure (1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 10:11; 2 Corinthians 13:1-3). And John is the apostle of love all the same.

He himself (αυτοςautos). That was bad enough.

Them that would (τους βουλομενουςtous boulomenous). “Those willing or wishing or receive the brethren” from John.

He forbiddeth (κωλυειkōluei). “He hinders.” Present active indicative of κωλυωkōluō and means either actual success in one case (punctiliar use of the present indicative) or repetition in several instances (linear action) or conative action attempted, but not successful as in Matthew 3:14 (this same verb) and John 10:32.

Casteth them out of the church (εκ της εκκλησιας εκβαλλειek tēs ekklēsias ekballei). Here again εκβαλλειekballei can be understood in various ways, like κωλυειkōluei This verb occurs in John 2:15 for casting out of the temple the profaners of it and for casting the blind man out of the synagogue (John 9:34.). If this ancient “church-boss” did not succeed in expelling John‘s adherents from the church, he certainly tried to do it.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/3-john-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Prating ( φλυαρῶν )

From φλύω tobubble up or boil over. Hence of talk which is both fluent and empty. Compare the kindred adjective φλύαροι tattlers 1 Timothy 5:13.

Them that would

Those who were disposed to receive the strangers.

Casteth them out

By excommunication, which, through his influence, he had power to bring about.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/3-john-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Wherefore, if I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, prating against us with malicious words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the church.

He prateth against us — Both them and me, thereby endeavouring to excuse himself.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/3-john-1.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Casteth them out of the church, excludes them from the friendly aid and hospitality of the church.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/3-john-1.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 Wherefore, if I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, prating against us with malicious words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the church.

Ver. 10. Prating against us] One would wonder what he could prate against St John, and yet he did, and that maliciously. True it is, he did but trifle and play the fool (as the Greek word φλυαρων signifies) in that he prated; but he showed his malice nevertheless. So do the Jesuits, as in many other their practices, so in this, that in their writings against us they confirm that with glorious words and arguments which we stick not at; to make the world believe that we deny all that which they so busily and so bravely prove, and so to make us odious; whereas they leave the main matter in controversy utterly unproven, thinking to carry it away with outfacing and great words. The word signifieth pompose sed nugaciter loqui, to talk big bubbles of words, saith Aretius; who also telleth us that it is a metaphor taken from over-seething pots, that send forth a foam; or (as others will have it) from overcharged stomachs, that must needs belch.

Forbiddeth them that would] Such as Gaius was; that himself only might have the prick and the praise. This is the property of envy, as we see in Saul, in the Pharisees, in Tiberius Caesar, who, tiger-like, laid hold with his teeth on all the excellent spirits of his times. Nero etiam omnium erat aemulus, &c. He forbad Lucan the poet to make verses, only because he could do it very excellently.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/3-john-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

3 John 1:10. If I come, When I come. See 1 John 3:2. 2 Corinthians 13:2. Diotrephes's turning out of the church such as displeased him, renders it highly probable that he was bishop or pastor of that church. See the former note.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/3-john-1.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

3 John 1:10. ἐὰν ἔλθω, if I shall come) 3 John 1:14.— ὑπομνήσω, I will remind him) A Metonymia of the antecedent for the consequent: that is, I will notice (punish), I will set a mark of censure upon, so that he may feel.— λόγοις πονηρο ς, with malicious words) by which he endeavours to excuse himself.— το ς βουλομένους, those that wish) that is, to receive us and them.— ἐκβάλλει, he casts out) a great amount of insolence.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/3-john-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "3 John 1:9"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/3-john-1.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

если я приду, то напомню о делах Апостольская власть Иоанна подразумевала, что Диотреф обязан ответить за свое поведение. Апостол не мог не заметить стремления Диотрефа занять место Христа в церкви. Ст. 10 указывает, что Диотреф был виновен в следующем: 1) «поносит нас». Слово, переведенное как «поносит», происходит от слова, означающего «бьет ключом» и имеет смысл бесполезной пустой болтовни, бессмысленных речей. Обвинения против Иоанна были совершенно необоснованными; 2) «злыми словами». Обвинения Диотрефа были не только лживыми, но и злобными; 3) «не принимает братьев». Диотреф не только клеветал на Иоанна, но и умышленно пренебрегал другими верующими; 4) «изгоняет из церкви». В оригинале подразумевается, что Диотреф имел обыкновение отлучать тех, кто противостоял его власти.

не принимает братьев Диотреф домогался первенствовать среди братьев. Если бы он признал власть Иоанна (ст. 9) и оказывал гостеприимство странствующим учителям, его цель оказалась бы под угрозой.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/3-john-1.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The brethren; whom the apostle had recommended to their hospitality and aid. Those who love power and seek to have preeminence in the church, are very apt to be haters of good men and of what they do for Christ-to be opposed to the right of private judgment, and to persecute those who exercise it. But all such deeds are evil, let who will perform them, and they will be remembered and treated as evil in the day when God shall render to every one according to his works.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/3-john-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The apostle promised and warned that whenever he might visit that congregation he would point out Diotrephes" sinful behavior, assuming it continued. Specifically, Diotrephes was charging John falsely to elevate himself. Worse than that he was not giving hospitality to visiting brethren, as Gaius was, perhaps because he saw them as a threat to himself. Third, he intimidated others in the church and forced them to stop welcoming these men.

"Diotrephes was condemned not because he violated sound teaching regarding the person and nature of Jesus Christ but because his "life" was a contradiction to the truth of the gospel." [Note: Glenn W. Barker, " 3 John," in Hebrews -, Revelation, vol12of The Expositor"s Bible Commentary, p375.]

"The verb ekballei, in the present tense again (literally, "he throws out"), need not imply formal excommunication from the Church, as this became known later. Cf. Matthew 18:17; Luke 6:22; John 9:34-35; 1 Corinthians 5:2. On the other hand, it seems as if Diotrephes had already arrogated to himself the task of "expulsion," and was actually driving people out of the congregation (as he had refused to welcome the brothers) rather than merely desiring to do so ..." [Note: Smalley, p358.]

Obviously Gaius did not bow to his wishes, showing that he had strength of character and probably influence in the church. With this epistle John threw his support behind Gaius and against Diotrephes.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/3-john-1.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

3 John 1:10. We mark here the same tone of faithful sternness which pervades the two other Epistles: in these, however, as against those who assailed the truth, in this against one who invades the order of the church. It is more than probable that Diotrephes was of the Judaizing faction which strove to thwart the publication of the Gospel to the Gentiles; and this would account for the apostle’s severity. I will bring to remembrance before the church, his works which he doeth: not merely his prating against us with malicious words, as reported by the evangelists, but his actions, of more importance to the apostle than any words spoken against himself merely. He casteth them out who would receive the brethren: by using his influence to have them cut off from the Christian society, whether by formal excommunication or otherwise.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/3-john-1.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/3-john-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Wherefore = On account of (App-104. 3 John 1:2) this.

if. App-118.

remember. See John 14:26.

prating. Greek. phluareo. Only here. Compare 1 Timothy 5:13.

malicious. App-128.

words. App-121.

not. App-105.

therewith = upon (App-104.) these (things).

neither. Greek. oute.

forbiddeth = hindereth, as Luke 11:52.

them that would. Literally the willing (ones). App-102.

casteth. Greek. ekballo. Compare John 9:34.

out of. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/3-john-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Wherefore, if I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, prating against us with malicious words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the church.

If I come - (3 John 1:14.) I will remember, [ hupomneesoo (Greek #5279)] - 'I will bring to mind' before all, by stigmatizing and punishing.

Prating - with silly tattle. Neither doth he himself receive the brethren - with hospitality: the missionaries. Forbiddeth them that would - receive them.

Casteth them - those that would receive the brethren, by excommunication from the Church, which his influence (3 John 1:9) in it enabled him to do. Neander thinks that the missionaries were JEWS whence it is said in their praise they took Nothing from THE GENTILES: in contrast to other Jewish missionaries who abused ministers' rights of maintenance elsewhere (2 Corinthians 11:22; Philippians 3:2; Philippians 3:5; Philippians 3:19). In the Gentile churches there existed an ultra-Pauline party of anti-Jewish tendency, forerunners of Marcion. Diotrephes stood at the head of this party, which, as well as his domineering spirit, may account for his hostility to the missionaries, and to the apostle John, who had, by love, tried to harmonize the various elements in the Asiatic churches. At a later period Marcion, we know, attached himself to Paul alone, and paid no deference to John's authority.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Wherefore, if I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, prating against us with malicious words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the church.
I will
1 Corinthians 5:1-5; 2 Corinthians 10:1-11; 13:2
prating
Proverbs 10:8,10
and casteth
Isaiah 66:5; Luke 6:22; John 9:22,34,35
Reciprocal: Ezra 4:3 - Ye have nothing;  Proverbs 6:19 - that soweth;  Proverbs 13:10 - Only;  Matthew 18:17 - tell;  Matthew 20:26 - it;  Matthew 24:49 - to smite;  Luke 9:49 - we saw;  Luke 12:45 - to beat;  Luke 22:26 - General2 Corinthians 10:6 - in;  Philippians 2:29 - Receive;  2 Thessalonians 3:6 - that ye;  James 3:6 - a world;  1 Peter 5:3 - as;  3 John 1:8 - to receive

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/3-john-1.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

John expects to come and when he dopes he will consider the deeds of Diotrephes, namely, his opposition to the apostle. Prating means to use false accusations against John in an effort to defend himself. Malicious words are the kind uttered with the intent of doing harm. Not content therewith is said because he not only opposed John, but opposed the brethren whom he sent to the church as messengers. He also forbade others who would have accepted the messengers, and if they showed friendship for the apostolic messengers, they were excluded from the church.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/3-john-1.html. 1952.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Remember his deeds—Compare the terrible apostolic threats of St. Paul, in 1 Corinthians 4:19-21.

Prating—The Greek word implies a certain full flow, or fluency, of contemptuous languages.

Malicious—Not only hostile, but intrinsically evil words.

Casteth’ out of the church— He had such a mastery over his own congregation that he was able to excommunicate the apostolic believers, in spite of such men as Demetrius and Gaius in the same or other congregations of the church.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/3-john-1.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

3 John 1:10. : the aged Apostle with his failing strength can only “hope” (cf.3 John 1:14) to undertake the journey. , not “remind him of his works” (contrast the “work” of Gaius in 3 John 1:5), but “bring his works to remembrance,” by reciting them at a meeting of the Church. St. John does not threaten excommunication or any sort of discipline, but simply that he will state the facts and let them speak for themselves. A terrible reckoning, like that of the Day of Judgment (cf.Revelation 20:12)—to hear a recital of all one’s passionate speeches and inconsiderate actions. Contrast St. Paul’s threats (1 Corinthians 4:21; 2 Corinthians 10:11; 2 Corinthians 13:1-3). St. John deserved to be called “the Apostle of Love”. (nugari, verschwatsen), of foolish chattering. Suid.: · . The chatter of Diotrephes was not only foolish but malevolent ( ). ., see note on 1 John 2:4. , cf.John 4:11. , , pres. implying not that he actually did it but that he tried to do it. , here not of literal ejection (cf.John 2:15 = Matthew 21:12 = Mark 11:15) but of excommunication from the fellowship of the congregation.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/3-john-1.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

10. When I come. John intends to come personally and use his authority as an apostle to deal with Diotrephes (see Acts 13:10-12and note). Everything he has done. Diotrephes: (1) would not pay attention to John’s letter; (2) said terrible things about John (compare Judges 1:15)and told lies to cause trouble; (3) refused to receive the brothers and would give them no hospitality; (4) tries to drive out of the fellowship all who even admit they want to receive the brothers from John. [The present continuous implies that Diotrephes was trying to drive out those who wanted to receive the brothers. See Expositor’s Greek Testament. ]

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:10". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/3-john-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.