Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

3 John 1:9

I wrote something to the church; but Diotrephes, who loves to be first among them, does not accept what we say.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Church;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Diotrephes;   John the Apostle;   John, the Epistles of;   Timothy, the First Epistle to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Love;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Diotrephes;   Excommunication;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Diotrephes ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Diotrephes;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I wrote unto the Church - The Church where Caius was; but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the pre-eminence, φιλοπρωτευων, who loves the presidency, or chief place in the Church. He was doubtless an officer in the Church, at least a deacon, probably a bishop; and, being one, he magnified himself in his office; he loved such eminence, and behaved himself haughtily in it.

Receiveth us not - Does not acknowledge the apostolical authority. As some MSS. supply αν after εγραψα, and several judicious critics believe it is implied, the translation will run thus: I would have written to the Church to receive these men kindly, but Diotrephes, who affects the presidency; and into whose hands, if I wrote to the Church, my letter must come, receiveth us not - would not acknowledge my authority to interfere with any of the matters of his Church; and therefore I have written unto thee, whose love to the brethren and general hospitality are well known, that thou wouldst receive those strangers and persecuted followers of our common Lord.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/3-john-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I wrote unto the church - That is on the former occasion when they went forth. At that time, John naturally commended them to the kind attentions of the church, not doubting but that aid would be rendered them in prosecuting their benevolent work among the Gentiles. The Epistle which was written on that occasion is now lost, and its contents cannot now be ascertained. It was, probably, however, a letter of mere commendation, perhaps stating the object which these brethren had in view, and soliciting the aid of the church. The Latin Vulgate renders this: “scripsissem forsan ecclesiae, “I would have written, perhaps, to the church, but Diotrephes,” etc. Macknight also renders this, “I would have written,” supposing the sense to be, that John would have commended them to the whole church rather than to a private member, if he had not been aware of the influence and opposition of Diotrephes. The Syriac version also adopts the same rendering. Several manuscripts also, of later date, introduced a particle, ( αν anby which the same rendering would be demanded in the Greek, though that reading is not sustained by good authority. Against this mode of rendering the passage, the reasons seem to me to be clear.

(1)as already remarked, the reading in the Greek which would require it is not sustained by good authority.

(2)the fair and obvious interpretation of the Greek word used by the apostle, ( ἔγραψα egrapsawithout that particle, is, I “wrote” - implying that it had been already done.

(3)it is more probable that John had written to the church on some former occasion, and that his recommendation had been rejected by the influence of Diotrephes, than that he would be deterred by the apprehension that his recommendation would be rejected.

It seems to me, therefore, that the fair interpretation of this passage is, that these brethren had gone forth on some former occasion, commended by John to the church, and had been rejected by the influence of Diotrephes, and that now he commends them to Gains, by whom they had been formerly entertained, and asks him to renew his hospitality to them.

But Diotrephes, who loveth to have the pre-eminence among them, receiveth us not - Does not admit our authority, or would not comply with any such recommendation. The idea is, that he rejected his interference in the matter, and was not disposed to acknowledge him in any way. Of Diotrephes, nothing more is known than is here specified. Compare the analysis of the Epistle. If he was an officer in the church - a pastor, a ruling elder, a deacon, a vestry-man, a warden, or a private individual - we have no means of ascertaining. The presumption, from the phrase “who loveth to have the pre-eminence,” would rather seem to be that he was an aspiring man, arrogating rights which he did not have, and assuming authority to which he was not entitled by virtue of any office. Still he might have held an office, and might have arrogated authority, as many have done, beyond what properly belonged to it.

The single word rendered “who loveth to have the pre-eminence,” φιλοπρωτεύων philoprōteuōnoccurs nowhere else in the New Testament. It means simply, “who loves to be first” - meaning that he loved to be at the head of all things, to rule, to lord it over others. It is clearly supposed here, that the church would have complied with the request of the writer if it had not been for this man. What were the alleged grounds for the course which he constrained the church to take, we are not informed; the real ground, the apostle says, was his desire to rule. There may have been at the bottom of it some secret dislike of John, or some private grudge; but the alleged ground may have been, that the church was independent, and that it should reject all foreign interference; or that the church was unable to support those men; or that the work in which they were engaged was one of doubtful propriety.

Whatever was the cause, the case furnishes an illustration of the bad influence of one ambitious and arrogant man in a church. It is often in the power of one such man to bring a whole church under his control, and effectually to embarrass all its movements, and to prevent all the good which it would otherwise accomplish. When it is said, “but Diotrephes receiveth us not,” the reference is doubtless to John, and the meaning is, either that he did not acknowledge him as an apostle, or that he did not recognize his right to interfere in the affairs of the church, or that he did not regard his recommendation of these brethren. The first of these suppositions is hardly probable; but, though he may have admitted that he was an apostle, there were perhaps some reasons operating in this particular case why he prevailed on the church to reject those who had been thus commended to their hospitality.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/3-john-1.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I wrote somewhat unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.

I wrote somewhat unto the church ... Presumably, John had written to the church to which both Gaius and Diotrephes belonged; but as there were usually household churches in every city, they might have belonged to different groups with the church in the larger sense. The letter mentioned here has not come down to us, perhaps being destroyed by Diotrephes. At any rate, John wrote to Gaius, a person totally independent of the evil influence of Diotrephes, and also promised a visit with the evident purpose of counteracting the work of Diotrephes.

But Diotrephes ... Nothing is known of this character except what is stated in these two verses. "The name Diotrephes is very rare, meaning Zeus-reared nurseling of Zeus, and was only to be found in noble and ancient families."[24] This suggests that he might have been wealthy or of high social standing. With it, however, he was proud, arrogant and insensitive.

Receiveth not us ... Some have thought these words mean that he rejected both the missionaries and John who associated himself with the travelling preachers in these words; but it is more likely that John here used "us" in the sense of the apostles; for it was apostolic authority that Diotrephes rejected.

Who loveth to have the preeminence among them ... This prideful and arrogant attitude of Diotrephes was the sin which disturbed the church to which the apostle wrote; but commentators, in some instances, cannot allow that this was the trouble. No! They believe that, `Diotrephes' radical intransigence was due ... to theological partisanship."[25] "Diotrephes could have been an elder who was determined to champion the autonomy of the local church."[26] All such evaluations of the root of the trouble are based upon blindness to the sin of Diotrephes (the true cause of the trouble) which John specifically mentioned. Could it be that "loving to have the preeminence" is not considered sinful in some circles? "Pride was his sin ... and a violent jealousy."[27] "One masterful, power-loving man in a church may work incalculable mischief and injury."[28] "He had slandered (one of the apostles) ... and broken the fellowship of the church."[29] May we take a closer look at:

THE SIN OF DIOTREPHES

It was through pride that Satan fell. It leads the procession of the things God hates (Proverbs 6:16f). Fellowship within the sacred fold of the church itself cannot prevail where the poison ivy of pride is enthroned. The spirit of Diotrephes not only rejected the authority of an apostle, arrogantly turned away the Lord's missionaries from his gates, and slandered the apostle who sat next to Jesus and leaned upon his breast; but it in time placed a Diotrephes in the saddle of authority in every urban community on earth (in the rise of metropolitan bishops), and at last repudiated the word of all the apostles, making a man to be the head on earth of the universal church! Yes indeed, as Paul put it, "the mystery of iniquity" was already at work; and this little gem of a letter gives a close-up of the very tap root of the spirit of Lucifer.

[24] John R. W. Stott, op. cit., p. 225.

[25] Amos N. Wilder, op. cit., p. 311.

[26] John R. W. Stott, op. cit., p. 227.

[27] Robert Law, International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia (Chicago: Howard-Severance Company, 1915), p. 1719.

[28] W. Jones, The Pulpit Commentary, Vol. 22,3John (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1950), p. 11.

[29] Leon Morris, The New Bible Commentary, Revised (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1950), p. 1273.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/3-john-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I wrote unto the church,.... Where Gaius was a member: those who take Gaius to be the same with Paul's host, and whom he baptized at Corinth, think the church at Corinth is here meant; but it seems rather to be meant of some church in Asia nearer Ephesus; nor is it likely that John's first epistle should be here intended, which makes no mention of relieving the brethren, the ministers of the Gospel, that came from Judea: and that this epistle should not be preserved, need not seem strange; for it cannot be thought that everything that was written by him to particular persons, or churches, should be continued. The Alexandrian copy and one of Stephens's read, "I wrote something to the church"; upon this head, concerning receiving and supporting ministers of the Gospel, and so prevents an objection that Gaius might make, why did he not write to the church about it? The Vulgate Latin version reads, "I should", or "would have wrote": and the Syriac version, "I desired", or "wished to have wrote"; suggesting, that though he had not wrote, yet it was much upon his mind, he had a great desire to it:

but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them,

receiveth us not; which hindered him from writing, or was the reason why he wrote now to Gaius since Diotrephes gave no heed to what he had wrote, suppressed his letter, and would not suffer it to be read to the brethren. This Diotrephes, by his name, which signifies one "nourished", or "brought up by Jupiter", was a Gentile; there was one of this name, who was one of the kings of AthensF1Vid. Fabricii Bibliograph. Antiqu. p. 211. ; and what may confirm this is, his slighting and rejecting the brethren that came from Judea: it is very likely he was more than a private member in the church, and that he was an officer, and it may be the pastor; and though there is a preeminence, which of right belongs to such an officer, as to preside over the church, to govern, guide, and direct, according to the laws of Christ, he being set over the church, as a ruler, governor, and guide; yet this may be carried too far, as it was by this man, who coveted more than was his due, and lorded it over God's heritage, ruled the flock with force and cruelty, and usurped a tyrannical power over them; whereas every thing in a church ought to be done, by pastor and people, in love, meekness, and with mutual consent. And it may be also, that he sought to have the preeminence over the rest of the elders of the church, for in those large churches there were oftentimes more elders and pastors than one; see Acts 20:17. This ambitious spirit prevailed and obtained among the false teachers, who set up themselves at the head of parties, and above the apostles of Christ, and paved the way for antichrist, who assumed the title of universal bishop, which has introduced all the errors and impieties of the Romish church. Now this man such an ambitious, lordly, and governing spirit, received not the Apostle John, and those that were with him; meaning not their persons, for as yet he and they were not in person where he was; but his letter, his orders, and instructions; these he paid no regard to, concealed them from the church, and would not admit them to be read: or else the apostle's sense is, that he received not the brethren that came from him, and were recommended by him, and whom he affectionately loved, and who were near and dear to him as himself; and therefore not receiving them is interpreted by him as not receiving himself.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/3-john-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

2 I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.

(2) Ambition and covetousness, two pestilent sins (especially in those who have any church responsibilities) are condemned in Diotrephes.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/3-john-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I wrote — The oldest manuscripts add “something”: a communication, probably, on the subject of receiving the brethren with brotherly love (3 John 1:8, 3 John 1:10). That Epistle was not designed by the Spirit for the universal Church, or else it would have been preserved.

unto the church — of which Gaius is a member.

loveth  …  pre-eminence — through ambition. Evidently occupying a high place in the Church where Gaius was (3 John 1:10).

among themover the members of the Church.

receiveth us not — virtually, namely, by not receiving with love the brethren whom we recommended to be received (3 John 1:8, 3 John 1:10; compare Matthew 10:40).

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I wrote somewhat unto the church (εγραπσα τι τηι εκκλησιαιegrapsa ti tēi ekklēsiāi). A few MSS. add ανan to indicate that he had not written (conclusion of second-class condition), clearly spurious. Not epistolary aorist nor a reference to 2 John as Findlay holds, but an allusion to a brief letter of commendation (Acts 18:27; 2 Corinthians 3:1; Colossians 4:10) sent along with the brethren in 3 John 1:5-7 or to some other itinerant brethren. Westcott wrongly thinks that τιti is never used of anything important in the N.T. (Acts 8:9; Galatians 6:3), and hence that this lost letter was unimportant. It may have been brief and a mere introduction. ΔιοτρεπεςDiotrephes (ΔιοςDios and τρεπωtrephō nourished by Zeus). This ambitious leader and sympathiser with the Gnostics would probably prevent the letter referred to being read to the church, whether it was 2 John condemning the Gnostics or another letter commending Demetrius and John‘s missionaries. Hence he sends Gaius this personal letter warning against Diotrephes.

Who loveth to have the preeminence among them (ο πιλοπρωτευων αυτωνho philoprōteuōn autōn). Present active articular participle of a late verb, so far found only here and in ecclesiastical writers (the example cited by Blass being an error, Deissmann, Light etc., p. 76), from πιλοπρωτοςphiloprōtos fond of being first (Plutarch), and made like πιλοπονεωphiloponeō (papyri), to be fond of toil. This ambition of Diotrephes does not prove that he was a bishop over elders, as was true in the second century (as Ignatius shows). He may have been an elder (bishop) or deacon, but clearly desired to rule the whole church. Some forty years ago I wrote an article on Diotrephes for a denominational paper. The editor told me that twenty-five deacons stopped the paper to show their resentment against being personally attacked in the paper.

Receiveth us not (ουκ επιδεχεται ημαςouk epidechetai hēmās). Present active indicative of this old compound, in N.T. only here and 3 John 1:10. Diotrephes refused to accept John‘s authority or those who sided with him, John‘s missionaries or delegates (cf. Matthew 10:40).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/3-john-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I wrote unto the Church

The best texts insert τι somewhatwhich indicates that the apostle did not regard the communication as specially important.

Diotrephes ( Διοτρεφὴς )

The name is from Δίος ofZeus (Jove), and τρέφω tonourish, and means Jove-nursed.

Who loveth to have the pre-eminence ( ὁ φιλοπρωτεύων )

From the adjective φιλόπρωτος fondof being first. The word occurs here only.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/3-john-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.

I wrote to the church — Probably that to which they came.

But Diotrephes — Perhaps the pastor of it.

Who loveth to have the preeminence among them — To govern all things according to his own will.

Receiveth us not — Neither them nor me. So did the mystery of iniquity already work!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/3-john-1.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Unto the church; to the church where Gaius resided.--Receiveth us not; did not regard the instructions which John had given; perhaps intercepted and suppressed the letter.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/3-john-1.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.

Ver. 9. I wrote unto the church] sc. Of Corinth, where Paul baptized Gaius, and where Diotrephes seems to have been a great sect-master, and chief of those deceitful workers that there so much disparaged Paul.

Diotrephes, who loveth, &c.] Ambition is like the crocodile, which groweth as long as it liveth. What stirs made proud Paulus Samosatenus in the primitive Church! What continual quarrelings were there between the bishops of Constantinople and of Rome for the primacy, and between the archbishops of Canterbury and of York for precedence! What a deal suffered learned Zanchy at Argentina from his ambitious colleagues; and various of our English divines and others, from the lordly prelates! Pareus was wont to say that the chief cause of all the Church’s troubles was the Churchmen’s affectation of dominion. This trouble town if we could cast out of the Church, said he, great hopes there were that we should all εις το θειον κηρυγμα ομοφρονως και ορθοδοξως συνδραμειν, concur and consent in one and the same truth. (Isidor. Pelus. iv. eph 54.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/3-john-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

3 John 1:9. But Diotrephes, Diotrephes has been taken for a Gentile Christian, who would not receive the Jewish Christians; and it must be acknowledged that it was a common name among the Gentiles: but it is also well known, that Alexander, Philip, Stephen, AEneas, and many other Gentile names, were common among the Jews, and therefore the name of Diotrephes will prove nothing. Besides, the Gentile Christians rarely or ever refused communion with the Jewish Christians; but the Judaizing Christians very frequently refused to join with the Gentile converts; and several of the Judaizers resisted men endued with apostolic authority. Diotrephes therefore seems to have been a zealous, bigoted, Judaizing Christian, the minister of some Christian church near Ephesus; who was out of all patience with such as preached the gospel to the Gentiles, and would neither use them kindly himself, when they passed that way, nor suffer any of his church, if he could help it, to treat them with kindness, and encourage them in that attempt.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/3-john-1.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. The pious care which St. John took for the relief and succour of such faithful Christians as now travelled amongst them, both to avoid persecutation, and to preach the gospel; he wrote to the church on their behalf, desiring their reception, and advising their relief; I wrote to the church, that is, I wrote for them, and sent my testimonial to the church on their behalf; every one has a pen to plead for himself, happy he that has both tongue and pen to intercede for others.

Observe, 2. The opposition which St. John met with in so good a work; Diotrephes, a proud man, regarded not his letters, acknowledged not his authority, yea, slighted the apostle, prating against him with malicious words: the holiest men may meet with opposition in the holiest and best of actions, wherein the glory of God and the public good are most concerned. I wrote to the church, but Diotrephes received us not.

Observe, 3. The holy apostle's resentment of this indignity, and wise resolution thereupon: When I come, I will remember his deeds: that is, I will sharply rebuke him, and use that severity towards him which his crime deserves, according to the authority which God has given me.

Learn hence, That though private offences against Christ's ministers must be forgiven and forgotten by them, yet when an offence is prejudicial to the church, it must be opposed, and openly censured.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/3-john-1.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

3 John 1:9. ἔγραψα, I wrote) concerning these things. That epistle is not extant.— τ ἐκκλησί, to the church) of that place from which they went forth: 3 John 1:7. Here is the anticipation of an objection: lest Caius should say, Why do they come to us?— φιλοπρωτεύων α τ ν, who wishes to be the first of them) If even then, during the life of the apostle, Diotrephes exalted himself, what was not the case afterwards?— ἡμ ς, us) who commend them, and those who are commended by us.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/3-john-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 9,10. I wrote unto the church; this was probably some church of which Gaius was.

Diotrephes, one who had received or usurped some office or authority in it, to so ill a purpose, as when he had no inclination to be hospitable himself to fellow Christians, prevented others from being so; and upon pretence of the little differences of these Jewish from the Gentile Christians, excluded them their communion.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/3-john-1.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Я писал церкви Вероятно, Иоанн уже писал церкви о гостеприимстве, но письмо это утеряно. Возможно, Диотреф никогда не читал письма Иоанна церкви, так как отвергал авторитет Иоанна (ср. ст. 9, 10).

любящий первенствоватьДиотреф Во второй части своего послания Иоанн осуждал нарушение принципов гостеприимства в отношении верных служителей Слова. Слово «первенствовать» означает «стремиться быть первым» и подразумевает эгоистичного, эгоцентричного и своекорыстного человека. Значение слова свидетельствует также о демагогии, с которой человек превозносит себя. Он не желает никому служить, но хочет, чтобы все служили только ему. Поступки Диотрефа прямо противоречат служению и учению Иисуса и поучениям новозаветных авторов о служении и руководстве в церкви (ср. Мф. 20:20-28; Флп. 2:5-11; 1Тим. 3:3; 1Пет. 5:3).

не принимает нас Диотреф представляет собой пример человека, у которого нет доброты и гостеприимства по отношению к слугам Божиим. Он отрицает даже апостольскую власть Иоанна над поместной церковью, а, следовательно, отрицает откровение Божие, которое приходит через власть Апостола. Гордость Диотрефа побуждает его прилагать усилия, чтобы занять место Иоанна, через которого Христос управлял Церковью. Характер Диотрефа противоположен мягкому и любящему характеру Гаия, который с готовностью оказывал гостеприимство.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/3-john-1.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

I wrote unto the church; requesting them to assist the brethren in their benevolent efforts.

Diotrephes; who opposed the apostle, and influenced the church not to comply with his request.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/3-john-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Gaius" good example stands out more clearly beside Diotrephes" bad example. Diotrephes is a rare name and means "nourished by Zeus." [Note: Hiebert, 144:574:203.] John brought Diotrephes into the picture to clarify the responsibility of Gaius and all other readers of this epistle and to give instructions concerning this erring brother.

The letter to the church of which both Gaius and Diotrephes were a part is not extant, as far as we know, unless it Isaiah 1or2John. "Them" refers to the believers in that church. John exposed Diotrephes" motivation as pride. Diotrephes had put John down to exalt himself. John did not say or imply that Diotrephes held false doctrine. He only blamed his improper ambition (cf. Matthew 20:27). [Note: Westcott, p240.] John never raised the subject of heresy in3John directly.

". . . a person like Diotrephes is guilty of usurping a position in the church that belongs to the Lord Jesus Christ alone! [cf. Colossians 1:18]" [Note: Zane C. Hodges, The Epistles . . ., p285.]

"The temptation to use a role in the Christian assembly as a means of self-gratification remains a real one that all servants of God need to resist." [Note: Idem, " 3 John," p913. Cf. Wiersbe, 2:544.]

"Some forty years ago I wrote an article on Diotrephes for a denominaltional paper. The editor told me that twenty-five deacons stopped the paper to show their resentment against being personally attacked in the paper." [Note: Robertson, 6:263.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/3-john-1.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

3 John 1:9. I wrote somewhat to the church: not meaning either important or unimportant, but touching the maintenance of the evangelists; this communication, probably intercepted by Diotrephes, is lost or superseded by the present Epistle.

But Diotrephes, who loveth to have the pre-eminence among them, the members of the church, receiveth us not: we know nothing about this man but what is contained in this graphic sketch of him. The evangelists had reported to St. John that neither his authority nor his letter was honoured by Diotrephes; that he rejected both, and spoke against the apostle publicly in a church which was almost entirely under his influence, being opposed by Demetrius and his selecter company, and Gaius keeping aloof probably through sickness.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/3-john-1.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

-10

Diotrephes....doth not receive us, nor those we recommend, but prattles and talks against me. We know no more of this man, nor of Demetrius, of whom St. John gives so favourable a character. (Witham) --- It seemeth, saith Ven. Bede, that he was an arch heretic, or proud sect master --- Greek: upomneso. I will rebuke them, and make them know to be wicked. (Ven. Bede)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/3-john-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

wrote = wrote something, as the texts.

Diotrephes. Nothing is known of him.

who loveth, &c. Greek. philoproteuo, love to be first.

among = of.

receiveth. Greek. epidechomai. Only here and 3 John 1:10.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/3-john-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not. I wrote. 'Aleph (') A B add [ ti (Greek #5100)], 'something:' a communication, probably as to receiving the brethren with brotherly love (3 John 1:8; 3 John 1:10). That letter was not designed by the Spirit for the universal Church, else it would have been preserved.

Unto the church - to which Caius belongs. Loveth ... pre-eminence - through ambition. Evidently occupying a high place in that church: a Judaizer, and so opposed to the missionaries who preached the doctrines of grace to the Gentiles (3 John 1:10). Among them - over the members.

Receiveth us not - virtually, by not receiving with love the brethren whom we recommended (cf. Matthew 10:40).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/3-john-1.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not.
who loveth
Matthew 20:20-28; 23:4-8; Mark 9:34; 10:35-45; Luke 22:24-27; Romans 12:10; Philippians 2:3-5; Titus 1:7-16
receiveth
8; Matthew 10:40-42; Mark 9:37; Luke 9:48
Reciprocal: Numbers 16:10 - and seek;  Ezra 4:3 - Ye have nothing;  Proverbs 6:19 - that soweth;  Proverbs 13:10 - Only;  Matthew 18:17 - tell;  Matthew 20:26 - it;  Matthew 23:6 - GeneralMatthew 24:49 - to smite;  Mark 12:38 - which;  Luke 9:46 - GeneralLuke 9:49 - we saw;  Luke 11:43 - for;  Luke 12:45 - to beat;  Luke 14:7 - they;  Luke 20:46 - which;  Luke 22:26 - GeneralJohn 9:34 - And they;  Acts 8:19 - GeneralRomans 12:3 - not to;  Romans 12:16 - Mind;  1 Peter 5:3 - as

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/3-john-1.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

I wrote unto the church means the church of which Gaius was a member. This is indicated by some following statements in the book. John insists that he will come to the place to which he wrote the letter referred to, and at the same time trusts to see Gaius face to face. The fact that John wrote unto the church but that Diotrephes ignored the letter, indicates that the epistle was sent to this man as an elder of the congregatio n. That would be usual to send an official document to the officers, or at least in their care, as we read that Paul addressed his epistle to the church at Philippi to "the bishops and deacons" ( Philippians 1:1). Thae epistle had something to do with John"s proposed visit to the church, since he declares or implies that he is going to make the journey notwithstanding the opposition of Diotrephes. This may raise a question in the mind of the reader whether it is right to visit a congregation against the authority of an elder. It is proper for an apostle to do Song of Solomon, for they were in the church before the elders. (See 1 Corinthians 12:28 where "governments" stands for the eldership.) Loveth to have the preeminence. This thirst for power among the elders is what resulted in the great falling away and development of the Church of Rome. Paul said in 2 Thessalonians 2:7 that the mystery of this iniquity was already at work when he was writing, and he evidently was referring to such characters as Diotrephes. (See General remarks at 2 Thessalonians 2:1-17.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/3-john-1.html. 1952.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.I wrote—Perhaps in a letter sent by these missionaries on their first tour.

The church—Of the city where Gaius resided. The letter doubtless commended the missionaries to the entire Church, but met with rejection from Diotrephes. We suppose that in a full sense the word church included the entire body of Christians in the city. Yet it consisted of separate congregations, each perhaps under its own elder or pastor, and each would be called a church. The period of great church buildings had not commenced. One congregation would worship in a private house, (Romans 16:5,) another in a hired hall, (Acts 19:9,) a third in a synagogue, (James 2:2.) But Diotrephes, an elder over one of these congregations, rejected the apostle’s letter and authority.

Loveth to have the pre-eminence—Literally, making himself first. He would be master and supreme in his own congregation. He would obey none of these mandates from Ephesus, even though from an apostle. He was an independent, a high congregationalist. Bede says, that he was “a heresiarch of that time, proud and insolent, preferring, by maintaining novelties, to usurp the primacy of knowledge to himself than to listen humbly to the ancient doctrines of John.” Alford denies the possibility of his heresy, and maintains that he was simply “an ambitious man, who wished that not the apostle, but himself, should rule the Church.” But certainly he would not reject the apostle but upon some doctrinal ground. And that he was tinctured with the antinomianism arising from finding all sin in matter, will appear from 3 John 1:11.

Receiveth us not—By us is meant primarily the apostle himself, through his letters and messengers; yet inclusively, the whole party of apostolic Christians and Christianity.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/3-john-1.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

3 John 1:9. , a brief letter of commendation, (2 Corinthians 3:1), introducing and authorising a company of itinerant brethren, probably those referred to in 3 John 1:5. , “love to be first, to be chief” ( ). The noun is and the adj. (Polyb., Plut). (2 John 1:9) and denote two tempers which disturbed the Christian life of Asia Minor—intellectual arrogance and personal aggrandisement. refers to . , “doth not receive me in the person of my delegates” (cf.Matthew 10:40), i.e., “disowneth my authority”.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/3-john-1.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

9. I wrote. As an apostle, John supervised the work of the church. He would write many such short letters to keep in touch with many local churches and individuals. But Diotrephes. We know nothing ‘else about him. He is probably a church elder, and may be a Nicolaitan (See notes on Revelation 2:14-15). Who loves to be their leader. Diotrephes is a church boss. It may be that the glory of power is what motivates him, but we can only guess, since we have no details. There must have been many such as this man in the early church (See 1 Peter 5:3and note). Will not. He refused to listen to what John said. Some think this means he was a Paulite (1 Corinthians 1:12)who rejected the authority of the other apostles.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 3 John 1:9". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/3-john-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.