Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ecclesiastes 11:10

So, remove grief and anger from your heart and put away pain from your body, because childhood and the prime of life are fleeting.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Children;   Vanity;   Worldliness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Emptiness;   Emptiness-Fulness;   Vanity;   The Topic Concordance - Children;   Vanity;  
Dictionaries:
Holman Bible Dictionary - Body;   Ecclesiastes, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ecclesiastes;   Psychology;  
Encyclopedias:
The Jewish Encyclopedia - Anger;   Ecclesiastes, Book of;   Hair;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for August 12;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Therefore remove sorrow - כעס caas, anger; every kind of violent passion, all filthiness of the flesh and spirit. "Childhood and youth are vanity;" they pass away and come to nothing. Eternity alone is permanent; live for eternity.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE THIRD REMEDY

This third remedy of the perplexities of life is piety, that is, the faithful worship and service of God.[17] The scriptural text that develops this extends through Ecclesiastes 12:7

"Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh; for youth and the dawn of life are vanity."

Note this parallel:

Remove sorrow from thy heart;

Put away evil from thy flesh.

According to the genius of Hebrew parallelism, these two lines are saying exactly the same thing, namely, that the only way to remove sorrow from one's heart and to engage in all that happy rejoicing that has been mentioned, is for the youth to "put away evil from his flesh." Failing to do that, he shall wallow in remorse and misery all the days of his life and finally descend into the grave itself in wretched despair. Any person who has lived a normal lifetime has seen it happen a hundred times! There is no way to restrict what is written here as being applicable to the physical body alone; it is a strict morality that is commanded.

"Youth and the dawn of life are vanity" (Ecclesiastes 11:10b). This cannot mean that they are vanity in the sense of Solomon's earlier uses of that term in Ecclesiastes. They are not vanity because they are undesirable or worthless, or anything like that, they are vanity in the sense that they are fleeting; they soon pass away. As Wordsworth stated it:[18]

Trailing clouds of glory do we come

From God who is our home.

Heaven lies about us in our infancy

At length the man sees it die away

And fade into the light of common day.

F. C. Cook's observation on Ecclesiastes 11:10 was, "Let the timely recollection of God's judgment and the fleeting character of youth so influence your conduct that you will refrain from all actions which entail future remorse and suffering."[19]

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/ecclesiastes-11.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart,.... Worldly sorrow, as opposed to lawful mirth and cheerfulness, and especially to spiritual joy: or "anger"F26כעס "iram", Pagninus, Montanus, Mercerus; "indignationem", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Gejerus; "God's anger", Broughton. , as the word may be rendered, and often is; either at the providence of God, or at the correction of friends; all perturbations of the mind; all fierceness of spirit, and fiery passions, to which youthful age is subject: or all those things, as Jarchi observes, that provoke God to anger; sinful lusts and pleasures, the end and issue of which also is sorrow to men; and which agrees with our version;

and put away evil from thy flesh; or body; such as intemperance and uncleanness, to which young men are addicted: the advice is much the same, in both clauses, with that of the apostle's, "flee youthful lusts", 2 Timothy 2:22. Jarchi interprets this of the evil concupiscence;

for childhood and youth are vanity; which quickly pass away; come into manhood, and soon slide into old age, and are gone presently, and all things within that compass: all actions done in that age are for the most part vain and foolish; and all the delights, joys, and pleasures thereof, vanishing and transitory. The last wordF1השחרות "ortus" Junius & Tremellius; "aurora", Cocceius, Gejerus, so Aben Ezra and Ben Melech; "dies nigredinis pili"; so the Targum, and Abendana. , used to express the juvenile age, either is akin to a word which signifies the "morning"; youth being the morning and dawn of man's age, and increases as that; and as soon as it is peep of day with him, or he enters into life, he possesses vanity: or as having the signification of "blackness"; because, as Jarchi observes, the head of a young man is black: and so the Targum,

"childhood, and the days of blackness of hair, are vanity;'

whereas the hair of an aged man is gray.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Therefore remove i sorrow from thy heart, and k put away evil from thy flesh: for childhood and youth [are] vanity.

(i) That is, anger and envy.

(k) Meaning, carnal lusts to which youth is given.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

sorrow — that is, the lusts that end in “sorrow,” opposed to “rejoice,” and “heart cheer thee” (Ecclesiastes 11:9), Margin, “anger,” that is, all “ways of thine heart”; “remove,” etc., is thus opposed to “walk in,” etc. (Ecclesiastes 11:9).

flesh — the bodily organ by which the sensual thoughts of the “heart” are embodied in acts.

childhood — rather, “boyhood”; the same Hebrew word as the first, “youth” in Ecclesiastes 11:9. A motive for self-restraint; the time is coming when the vigor of youth on which thou reliest, will seem vain, except in so far as it has been given to God (Ecclesiastes 12:1).

youth — literally, the dawn of thy days.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

“And remove sorrow from thy heart, and banish evil from thy flesh: for youth and age, not yet grown to grey hairs, are vain.” Jerome translates: aufer iram a corde tuo , and remarks in his Comm .: in ira omnes perturbationes animi comprehendit ; but כּעס (R. כס, contundere , confringere ) does not signify anger, but includes both anger and sorrow, and thus corresponds to the specific ideas, “sadness, moroseness, fretfulness.” The clause following, Jerome translates: et amove malitiam a carne tua , with the remark: in carnis malitia universas significat corporis voluptates ; but רעה is not taken in an ethical, but in a physical sense: כעס is that which brings sorrow to the heart; and רעה, that which brings evil to the flesh ( בשׂר, opp. לב, Ecclesiastes 2:3; Proverbs 14:30). More correctly than the Vulgate, Luther renders: “banish sorrow from thy heart, and put evil from thy body.” He ought to free himself from that which is injurious to the inner and the outer man, and hurtfully affects it; for youth, destined for and disposed to joy, is hevel, i.e., transitory, and only too soon passes away. Almost all modern interpreters (excepting the Jewish), in view of Psalms 110:3, gives to שׁחרוּת the meaning of “the dawn of the morning;” but the connection with ילדוּת would then be tautological; the Mishn.-Midrash usus loq., in conformity with which the Targ. translates, “days of black hair,” proves that the word does not go back to שׁחר, morning dawn, morning-red, but immediately to שׁחור, black, and as the contrast of שׂיבה (non-bibl. שׂיבוּת, סיב, סב ), canities, denotes the time of black hair, and thus, in the compass of its conception, goes beyond ילדות, since it comprehends both the period of youth and of manhood, and thus the whole period during which the strength of life remains unbroken.

(Note: The Mishna, Nedarim iii. 8, jurist. determines that שׁחורי הראשׁ denotes men, with the exclusion of women (whose hair is covered) and children. It is disputed ( vid ., Baer's Abodath Jisrael, p. 279) whether תּשׁחרת, Aboth iii. 16, Derech erez c. II., Midrash under Lamentations 2:11, is = שׁחרוּת, but without right; ben - tishhorěth is used for a grown-up son in full manly strength.)

Copyright Statement
The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
Bibliographical Information
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh: for childhood and youth are vanity.

Sorrow — Sensual and disorderly lusts, which he elegantly calls sorrow, to intimate, that although such practices at present gratify mens senses, yet they will shortly bring them to intolerable sorrows.

Evil — All evil desires, tho' now they seem good to thee.

Vanity — Most vain. The time of youth is vanishing and transitory, and old age and death will speedily come, against which every wise man will take care to lay in solid provisions and comforts.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ecclesiastes 11:10 Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh: for childhood and youth [are] vanity.

Ver. 10. Therefore remove sorrow from thine heart.] One would have thought that he should have said rather, considering the premises, remove joy from thy heart, "Let thy laughter be turned to mourning, and thy joy into heaviness," [James 4:9] turn all the streams into that channel that may drive that mill that may grind the heart. But by sorrow here, or indignation, as Tremellius renders it, the Preacher means sin, the cause of sorrow; and so he interprets himself in the next words, "Put away evil from thy flesh," - i.e., mortify thy lusts.

For childhood and youth are vanity.] The Septuagint and Vulgate render it, Youth and pleasure are vain things. They both will soon be at an end.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

MY soul! pause over the perusal of this very interesting Chapter. And while thou art studious to obey the wise man's precept, and to cast thy bread upon the waters, let thine eye, like the prophet's upon the watch tower, be upon the lookout for the Lord's direction, and the Lord's blessing upon thy labors. But, my soul, what are the portions which thou canst give to seven, or to eight! Alas! what hast thou which thou didst not receive? Surely it is all the Lord's, and of his own must thou give him. Oh! how blessed to be the Lord's almoner, when the Lord condescends thus to employ his creatures.

And, my soul! while like the husbandman in the morning, thou sowest thy seed, and in the evening withholdest not thine hand; look to it, that the seed sown is pure and uncorrupt, and that he that ministereth seed to the sower, may both minister bread for thine own food, and multiply the seed sown, and increase the fruits of righteousness. Blessed Jesus! thou art the Almighty Sower, that hath both produced, and sown the good seed in every age of thy Church. Oh! do thou thyself dwell in the hearts of thy people. Let no tares spring up to choak the good seed. But do thou water it with the dew of heaven from above, and let the sunshine with all its loveliness and fruitfulness upon it, that it may bring forth a glorious harvest, some an hundred fold, some sixtyfold, some thirty-fold.

My aged fathers! do not forget what the wise man here saith: If a man live many years, and rejoice in them all, yet let him remember the days of darkness, for they shall be many. Oh! for grace, when walking upon the confines of the eternal shore, to have done with this world, and all its dying concerns. Oh! for grace to see, like the Patriarch, the evil days of our pilgrimage, and like him to be waiting for dismission, from all the objects around, that the hoary saint may gather up his feet into the bed, and from long acquaintance with a covenant God in Christ, as he had, the dying triumph may be, I have waited for thy salvation, O Lord! And you no less, young men! see that your rejoicing is in Jesus. Oh! for grace to give the strength of your days to Christ, that in the weakness of years, Jesus may be the support; and when both heart and strength shall fail, Jesus may be the strength of your heart and your portion forever. Amen.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1828.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ecclesiastes 11:10. Therefore remove sorrow And remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away pain from thy flesh; because this youth, nay, this dawn of light, is but a vapour; Desvoeux: who puts a semicolon only at the end of this verse, and connects very properly the first verse of the next chapter with it thus:—and remember thy Creator, &c.]

REFLECTIONS.—1st, The great blessing of abundance, and the proper employment of it, is to use it in relieving the necessities of the indigent.

1. Solomon exhorts to liberality. Cast thy bread upon the waters, upon the multitude of poor objects; and, like ships of merchandize, the return made shall amply repay the venture: for thou shalt find it after many days; the blessing of God shall often restore it with increase in this world, at least in a better we shall reap the fruits of our benevolence. Give a portion to seven, not complaining of the number who seek relief, but also to eight; even to as many as through their indigence call for a supply, and our ability enables us to assist; for thou knowest not what evil shall be upon the earth, and therefore, instead of making that a reason for withholding the needful assistance, we should be careful to make a good use of what we have while we have it; and what our hand findeth to do, do it with our might.

2. He urges the duty by several considerations taken from the objects around us, and answers the objections which the niggard heart might make.

(1.) If the clouds be full of rain, they do not reserve their contents, but empty themselves upon the earth; so should the rich water with their bounty all around them.

(2.) If a tree fall toward the south or towards the north, either the seed which grows into a tree, or the stock when it is filled, in the place where the tree falleth, there it shall be, in the former instance freely producing fruit for those who come to gather it; or, according to the latter, when by death we are cut down as a tree, we can do good no longer; and therefore should now, while we have opportunity, improve the moment: nor should the unworthiness of the object discourage us; if we give in real charity, we shall not lose our reward.

(3.) We must not be deterred by the fears of want which may happen to ourselves; or by any probable future difficulties be discouraged from present duty. If every blast of wind or flying cloud discouraged the husbandman, he would neither sow his ground, nor reap his harvest.

(4.) Though we may not see how God will repay us for what is expended in his service, yet shall it infallibly be done. We know not whence the wind cometh, or whither it goeth, how the soul is united to the body, or the bones grow in the womb of her that is with child; and a thousand things in the ways of Providence are equally mysterious to us. But though we know not the manner of his operation, we feel and see the effects: and so shall we receive a return from him of what is in charity lent to him.

(5.) We shall finally reap, if we faint not. Our duty is, to labour with indefatigable diligence, and trust God for the success; we know not which of our works of faith and labours of love shall most prosper, whether those of the morning of youth, or the evening of age, and may hope that both shall be alike good, watered with the dew of the divine benediction, and producing a plentiful harvest, either in time or in eternity.

2nd, After the many directions given how so live, he proceeds in the conclusion to teach us how to die.

1. He addresses the aged. Those who have lived many years, and years of almost uninterrupted prosperity too, rejoicing in them all; to such the light of life is sweet, and a pleasant thing it is to behold the sun, to be numbered among the living, and enjoy the blessings that God bestows. But the more comforts we have found here, and the longer we have possessed them, the more need we fear, lest inordinate love of life should draw us away from our better hope above; and therefore let such remember the days of darkness, for they are many, days of sickness, pain, and infirmity; or days of death, when the body is inclosed in the silent grave, and no more to be found among the living. This should be ever placed in our view, that we may never be secure, or careless, but dying daily, and ready to meet the summons which calls our bodies to their bed of dust, and our souls to the world of spirits.

2. He addresses the youth. Rejoice, O young man, in thy youth; which may be considered, as before, as his serious advice, to take the most comfortable enjoyment of the blessings of life, in such a way, as to be ever ready to answer at the judgment-seat of Christ: or the words may be regarded as a pointed irony, expressive of the vanity and misery of indulging youthful lusts, for which so solemn a reckoning must be quickly made. Rejoice, if such wretched gratifications can afford a drop of satisfaction, and let thy heart cheer thee in the days of thy youth, pass all the jocund hours in mirth and gaiety, and walk in the ways of thy heart, keeping it back from no joy, but giving a boundless scope to the indulgence of every appetite; and in the sight of thine eyes, let them wander unrestrained on every pleasing object: but know thou, however lightly it is thought of, however sadly forgotten, know thou, what God will shortly make thee know, whether thou wilt or no, that for all these things God will bring thee into judgment; terrible expectation to those who spend their lives in vanity, and in a moment go down to the grave! Be admonished, therefore, before that fatal hour arrives; remove sorrow from thy heart, all those causes of it which will be bitterly felt in the days of more advanced age, if the pangs of repentance seize thee; or when in death, if found impenitent, the more terrible pains of hell come about thee; and put away evil from thy flesh, the sins of intemperance and uncleanness, to which the flesh is addicted: for childhood and youth are vanity; the pleasures of both poor and transient; the days swiftly hurrying by, old age advancing, and death at the door. The sooner we begin seriously to weigh these things, and the more awfully to be impressed thereby, the more diligently shall we set ourselves to prepare for our great change, and be happily ready for our appearance before the judge of quick and dead, whenever he shall summon us away.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Sorrow, i.e. sensual and disorderly lusts, which he elegantly and emphatically calls sorrow, with respect to the foregoing words, to intimate, that although such practices do at present gratify and delight men’s senses and vain minds, yet they will shortly and certainly bring a man to intolerable and eternal sorrows, which it is thy wisdom to prevent. Sorrow; or, as it is rendered in the margin, and by divers others, anger; a passion to which men are most prone in the heat of youth; whereby he may understand either anger against him for this sharp admonition; or rather against God, who hath laid such severe restraints upon them, and threatens such punishments to them for following their own natural inclinations. So the sense is, Do not quarrel with thy Judge, but submit and make thy peace with him by declaring war against all thy sins.

Evil; all evil concupiscences or lusts, which though now they seem good to thee, will another day appear to be very evil and bitter things.

From thy flesh; from thy bodily members; which he mentions not exclusively, as if he would allow them their spiritual evils; but emphatically, because young men, to whom be is here speaking, are most given to fleshly or bodily lusts.

Childhood and youth are vanity, i.e. most vain, either,

1. In their temper and dispositions. Young men are frothy, and foolish, and inconsiderate, whereby they run into manifold dangers, and therefore they shall do well to hearken to the counsels of those who by their greater wisdom and experience are more capable judges of these matters. Or,

2. In their condition. The time of youth is vanishing and transitory, and old age and death will speedily come, against which every man in his wits will take care to lay in solid provisions and comforts.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Remove sorrow, etc. — In this verse the precept so often given is exactly reversed. The way has been, to reckon the present as every thing, and grasp all it has to give, because the future is vain and uncertain. Now Koheleth fixes his vision on the calm and crystal ages beyond the judgment, and urges the enjoyment of the present because it is “vanity,” and the future is every thing.

Youth — Hebrew, the time of black hair, meaning the early prime — the juventus or military age — until forty-five years. Even this best and choicest part of human life is vanity compared with the hereafter.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Ecclesiastes 11:10. Therefore remove sorrow — Sensual and disorderly lusts, which he elegantly calls sorrow, to intimate, that although such practices at present gratify men’s senses, yet they will shortly bring them to intolerable sorrows. And put away evil from thy flesh — All evil desires, though now they seem good to thee. For childhood and youth are vanity — Most vain. The time of youth is vanishing and transitory, and old age and death will speedily come, against which every wise man will take care to lay in solid provisions and comforts.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Anger. All turbulent passions, and evil or carnal pleasures. (St. Jerome)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"So, remove vexation from your heart and put away pain from your body, because childhood and the prime of life are fleeting."

"So, remove vexation from your heart"-"Rid thy heart, then, of resentment" (Knox). "Vexation"-includes sadness, moroseness, fretfulness, grief, anger, wrath, spite and sorrow.

"pain from your body"-attitudes and practices which could hurt your body. "That which would rob youth of good times, pleasant days, happy memories, and general physical and mental/spiritual happiness is to be avoided" (Kidwell p. 272). Too many people have been convinced that joy or happiness can only be found in that which is forbidden by God. But the real truth is that happiness and joy are the result of doing the right thing. "Joy was created to dance with goodness, not alone" (Kidner p. 100). There are a good number of people who can"t enjoy a good portion of their life, because of all the bad choices they made while young.

"because childhood and the prime of life are fleeting"-"The freshness of youth with its unimpaired vigor of the body, which makes joy taste all the sweeter, is but of a short duration---Bad attitudes and the misuse of the body can make any enjoyment difficult or impossible" (Leupold p. 272). The prime of life, includes more than just the teens or twenties. Literally, it is the days of dark hair.

Take care of yourself physically, mentally and spiritually while you are young. If you neglect the wisdom of these verses, not only will you be a miserable young person, but also a miserable old person.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

evil = sadness.

youth = dawn of life. Hebrew. shaharuth. Occurs only here

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh: for childhood and youth are vanity.

Sorrow - i:e., the lusts that end in "sorrow," opposed to "rejoice," and "heart cheer thee" (Ecclesiastes 11:9); i:e., "Remove" all "the ways of thine heart:" "remove," etc., is thus opposed to "walk in," etc. (Ecclesiastes 11:9). The Hebrew for "sorrow" or 'anger' [ ka`ac (Hebrew #3708)] expresses any mental excitement, whether from anger (a tendency of the young especially), jealousy, ambition, etc. Remove these, and all the self-indulgences that cause them, and retain the serene tranquillity of a godly mind.

Flesh - the bodily organ by which the sensual thoughts of the "heart" are embodied in acts. 'The sight of the eyes' (Ecclesiastes 11:9) ministers to the lust of the "flesh."

Childhood - rather, boyhood; the same Hebrew word as the first "youth" in Ecclesiastes 11:9.

Are vanity. A motive for self-restraint; the time is coming when the vigour of youth, on which thou reliest, will seem vain, except in so far as it has been given to God (Ecclesiastes 12:1).

Youth - Hebrew, Shakaruth; literally, the dawn of thy days.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) Sorrow.—See Note on Ecclesiastes 7:3.

Youth.—The word occurs not elsewhere in the Old Testament; but nearly the same word is used of black hair in Leviticus 13:37; Song of Solomon 5:11.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/ecclesiastes-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Therefore remove sorrow from thy heart, and put away evil from thy flesh: for childhood and youth are vanity.
remove
12:1; Job 13:26; Psalms 25:7; 2 Peter 3:11-14
sorrow
or, anger.
Psalms 90:7-11
and put
Job 20:11; 2 Corinthians 7:1; 2 Timothy 2:22
for
1:2,14; Psalms 39:5; Proverbs 22:15 Reciprocal: Judges 20:13 - put away;  2 Kings 2:23 - little children;  Job 3:10 - hid;  Psalm 34:11 - Come;  Psalm 119:9 - shall;  Proverbs 1:4 - to the;  Ecclesiastes 2:24 - nothing;  Ecclesiastes 8:6 - therefore;  Luke 15:13 - wasted;  Luke 16:2 - give;  1 Corinthians 7:31 - use;  1 Corinthians 13:11 - I spake

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ecclesiastes-11.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ecclesiastes 11:10. The last verse exhorted to a divine cheerfulness: this verse dissuades from that which stands in its way. כעס signifies "discontent," that is, with God and his leadings. That poor age was rich in this particular (compare Ecclesiastes 7:9). We meet with it also in the contemporary Malachi: see Ecclesiastes 3:14, "ye say it is vain to serve God, and what profit is it that we keep his ordinances and walk in filth before the Lord of hosts?" And put away evil from thy body. Discontent has the effect, at the same time, of rendering the body wretched (Psalms 6:8). Schmidt remarks, "atflictiones et aerumnas, quae ex tristitia animi in corpus redundant carnemque consumunt." To this we must add the mortifications resorted to in order to extort redemption from God; compare the passage from Malachi just quoted and Isaiah 58:3, "wherefore do we fast, and thou seest not, wherefore do we afflict our soul and thou knowest not?" The exhortation, not wilfully to rob themselves by dark melancholy of that which God graciously presents to them, is grounded on the consideration that youth, the time when men are most capable of enjoyment, is vain and quickly passes שחרות, "the time of dawn," "youth," occurs only here, and is a word that was probably formed by the author himself. This is rendered probable by the preceding term ילדות, which serves as an explanation.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 11:10". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/ecclesiastes-11.html.