Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Esther 8:15

Then Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal robes of blue and white, with a large crown of gold and a garment of fine linen and purple; and the city of Susa shouted and rejoiced.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Colors;   Crown;   Gold;   Joy;   King;   Linen;   Mordecai;   Shushan (Susa);   Thompson Chain Reference - Clothing;   Crowns;   Dress;   Mordecai;   Purple;   Rich Apparel;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Garments;   Medo-Persian Kingdom;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Purple;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Color, Symbolic Meaning of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Colour;   Linen;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dress;   Linen;   Weaving;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Esther;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Colours;   Crown;   Linen;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Linen (2);   Presence;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Colors;   Purple;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Dress;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Blue;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Gifts;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Color;   Crown;   Esther, Book of;   Linen;   Purple;   Silk;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Aḥ;   Color;   Gems;   Jaffe (Joffe);   Macedonia;   Marriage Ceremonies;   Phylacteries;   Titles of Hebrew Books;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for June 26;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Blue and white - Probably stripe interchanged with stripe; or blue faced and bordered with white fur.

A great crown of gold - A large turban, ornamented with gold, jewels, etc.

Fine linen and purple - See on Genesis 41:42; (note). The בץ buts, here mentioned, is most probably the same with the byssus of the ancients; supposed to be the beautiful tuft or beard, growing out of the side of the pinna longa, a very large species of muscle, found on the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, of which there are a pair of gloves in the British Museum. This byssus I have described elsewhere.

Shushan - was glad - Haman was too proud to be popular; few lamented his fall.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/esther-8.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

See the Esther 1:6 note. The “crown” was not a crown like the king‘s, but a mere golden band or coronet.

A garment - Or, “an inner robe.” The tunic or inner robe of the king was of purple, striped with white.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/esther-8.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE GREAT REJOICING OF THE JEWS EVERYWHERE

"And Mordecai went forth from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a robe of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan shouted and was glad. The Jews had light and gladness, and joy and honor. And in every province, and in every city, whithersoever the king's commandment and his decree came, the Jews had gladness and joy, a feast and a good day. And many from among the peoples of the land became Jews; for the fear of the Jews was fallen upon them."

"Mordecai went forth ... with a great crown of gold" (Esther 8:15). "The Hebrew has two different words for crown, namely, [~kether] which referred to the type of crown worn by the monarch, and [~'atarah], a crown of an inferior kind frequently worn by nobles."[14] Mordecai's crown was the latter. His great authority, symbolized here by his apparel and the crown, was, however, one of the primary reasons for the Jews' rejoicing.

"The Jews ... had a feast and a good day" (Esther 8:16). "This celebration was in anticipation of the feast of Purim, which was first celebrated eight months later (Esther 9:17-19)."[15]

"And many among the peoples of the land became Jews" (Esther 8:17). "Such a providential outworking of events in favor of the Jews convinced many of the power of God, and caused them to become proselytes."[16] Some scholars have interpreted this acceptance of Judaism as merely a political maneuver, not based upon any sincere belief in God; but Keil wrote that, "This might have been true of some of the inhabitants of Shushan, but the majority certainly acted from more honorable motives."[17]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/esther-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king,.... And walked or rode about in the city to show himself to his friends:

in royal apparel of blue and white; such as the Persian kings wore, and were not allowed to any other, as Xenophon writesF7Cyropaedia, l. 8. c. 23. :

and with a great crown of gold; a coronet, such as princes and nobles wear; the latter Targum calls it a great golden chain, and such the eastern kings used to give to their favourites; see Daniel 5:29,

and with a garment of fine linen and purple; this must be an inner garment, since it is distinct from the royal robe before mentioned; though as the word signifies a wrap, or roll, it may design a turban, which was a roll of linen wrapped about the head; and such was the Persian diadem, according to CurtiusF8Hist. l. 3. c. 3. & l. 6. c. 6. Vid. Solerium de Pileo, sect. 9. , which was of a purple colour, mixed with white; and so the Septuagint version is, "and a diadem of fine linen, of a purple colour"; and if so, the crown of gold was not worn on his head, nor is it likely it should be allowed, but was carried before him; see Gill on Esther 6:8,

and the city of Shushan rejoiced, and was glad; not only the Jews in it, but the native inhabitants of it, that had any sense of humanity, expressed their joy at the sight of Mordecai thus arrayed; that so good a man was advanced at court, and so bad a man as Haman was displaced and put to death; see Proverbs 29:2.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/esther-8.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Esther 8:15-17. Mordecai‘s honors, and the Jews‘ joy.

Mordecai went out  …  in royal apparel — He was invested with the khelaat of official honor. A dress of blue and white was held in great estimation among the Persians; so that Mordecai, whom the king delighted to honor, was in fact arrayed in the royal dress and insignia. The variety and the kind of insignia worn by a favorite at once makes known to the people the particular dignity to which he has been raised.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/esther-8.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.

Great crown — Which the chief of the Persian princes were permitted to wear but with sufficient distinction from the king's crown.

The city — Not only Jews, but the greatest number of the citizens, who by the law of nature abhorred bloody counsels, and had a complacency in acts of mercy.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/esther-8.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Esther 8:15 And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.

Ver. 15. And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king] Whither he went is not set down. It is probable he either went to Haman’s house, the oversight whereof was committed to him by Esther, or that he went to some other parts of the city, upon the public employment, whereof now he had his hands full; and, therefore, all his faculties were in motion, and every motion seemed a well guided action, as one saith well of Queen Elizabeth, when she first came to the crown.

In royal apparel] Suitable to his new condition. This he might lawfully do, no doubt, as did Joseph, Daniel, Solomon. Generally those that are in king’s houses are clothed in softs, and go gorgeously. There is indeed a blame worthy excess herein, Zephaniah 1:8, Isaiah 3:18. Alcisthenes’s costly cloak, prized at one hundred and twenty talents; Demetrius, king of Macedonia’s, robe of state, which none of his successors would wear, propter invidiosam impendii magnificentiam on account of their hatred of its expensive magnificance. (Athenaeus); Herod’s cloth of silver, which, by refraction of the sunbeams upon it, gave such a splendour, that the foolish people for that, and for his speech, cried him up for a god. Good Mordecai thought never a whit the better of himself for his gay clothing; neither did his heart rise with his clothes, as the boat doth with the water that carrieth it. He affecteth not this change, but rather accepteth it; he endureth it rather than desireth it. Sheep’s russet {A coarse homespun woollen cloth of a reddish-brown, grey or neutral colour, formerly used for the dress of peasants and country-folk} would please him every whit as well as cloth of tissue, but that the king will have it so; and being now the second man in the kingdom, he must go accordingly, lest he should be slighted, as Agesilaus, king of Sparta, was by the Persians for his overly plain habit. Vestis virum facit, a man is esteemed as he is arrayed: cultusque concessus atque magnificus, comely and costly attire addeth authority, as Quintilian long since observed.

And with a great crown of gold] We read not that Haman had any such. It may be the king had bestowed it upon Mordecai as a special favour, for having saved his life, Esther 2:19-21. Sure it is that he gave it to him for a better cause than Alexander the Great did his crown of one hundred and eighty pounds, provided by him at a great supper, and promised to him that should drink most. Mordecai had his temporal crown upon far better terms, and yet looked for a more weighty one in heaven, 2 Corinthians 4:17, even such a weight of glory, as that if the body were not by the power of God upheld, it were impossible it should bear it.

And with a garment of fine linen] Or of silk, which was anciently sold for its weight in gold, as Pliny testifieth. This rich glutton is taxed for the too frequent use of it, Luke 16:19. It was his every day’s wear, as the Greek word importeth ( ενεδιδυσκετο. Verb, frequentativum).

And purple] This was also much worn by great ones of old. Dives was daily clothed with it, and was so far from cloking his pride, that he proclaimed it in his cloak. This purple colour was made, saith Lavater here, of the juice or blood of a certain shell-fish. Now, they say, there is no right purple. Perhaps, when the four monarchies ceased, purple ceased with them.

And the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad] At one time they were in perplexity, Esther 3:5, now in jollity. "Then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them." The joyful Jews there by way of antiphony answer, "The Lord hath indeed done great things for us; whereof we are glad," Psalms 126:2-3. Tremellius, after Eben Ezra, rendereth it, And the city of Shushan shone ( lucebat); the lily was now most lovely and lightsome. The word signifieth properly hinnivit, neighed as a horse; which he doeth not but when he is well pleased. The whole city was well apaid, but the poor Jews were overjoyed; so that their mouth was filled with laughter and their tongue with singing; this is the import of the metaphor here used.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/esther-8.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Esther 8:15. And with a great crown of gold The word royal is not added here, as in the 8th verse of the sixth chapter; nor is the horse mentioned, as there, because no extraordinary honours are here spoken of, but only that honour and that habit which immediately belonged to the keeper of the royal signet. Houbigant.

REFLECTIONS.—Just execution having been performed on the person of the wicked Haman, we have here,

1. The disposal of his estate, which, as forfeited, the king bestows on the queen. The ten thousand talents which were offered as the price of blood, become the property of those whose lives were marked out for a prey.

2. Mordecai is highly advanced. Though the queen had before concealed her kindred, she thinks it a proper season now to own her relation and obligations to Mordecai, whose good services had already so highly recommended him to the king; but this more especially engaged the royal favour to him. He is immediately introduced; and, as a token of the warmest regard, the king presents him with the ring from his finger, and thus he becomes, in the king's favour and in dignity, the worthy successor of the wicked Haman. To his trust also the queen commits the management of the forfeited estate: thus completely were the tables changed; the wickedness of the wicked was upon him, and the wealth of the sinner laid up for the just. Note; (1.) This world is a changing scene, kings' favours are precarious, and riches make themselves wings and fly away. Let it admonish us to secure his favour whose regards are unchangeable to the good, and those riches which are abiding, even eternal in the heavens. (2.) God's providence often in this world displays the justice of his government.

3. Esther again appears before the king; though uncalled, yet confident of his regards, the golden sceptre bids her be comforted, and she humbly presents her petition. With tears she pleads the danger of her kindred and people, and the insupportable grief of seeing them massacred; with deep submission represents the case to the king, and hopes that the bloody edict may be reversed, which Haman, by misrepresentations, had obtained. Note; (1.) Though we have justice on our side, yet as inferiors it becomes us to use entreaty. (2.) Some men's mischief survives them: they murder even after death, by the pernicious writings and sentiments that they have propagated. (3.) Our advancement must never make us forget our poor relations, or be unconcerned for their distresses.

4. The king kindly receives her request, and instantly prepares to counteract the mischief of the former decree. Note; When we have done wrong, we cannot too soon endeavour to prevent, to the utmost of our power, the mischievous consequences that might ensue.

5. When the Lord pleases to work, how soon can he give beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, and the garments of praise for the spirit of heaviness! We have,

(1.) Mordecai in royal apparel, robed in purple and fine linen, with a coronet of gold upon his head: a great distinction this; but poor, compared with the brighter robes with which the King of glory shall array his redeemed when he shall put on their heads a crown of glory that fadeth not away.

(2.) On his advancement a general joy was diffused around: the city promised themselves prosperity under his wise and just administration: the Jews with gladness heard the unexpected tidings of deliverance; and whilst with exultation they rejoiced, the people around them, now perceiving the court-favour towards them, paid them all honour and respect. Note; [1.] A happy change of administration, from bad men and bad measures, is a truly national joy. [2.] The anguish and sorrow that a christian sometimes feels, only serves to heighten his joy when the Lord turns and refreshes him, and brings him from the depths of the earth again.

(3.) A great accession of converts was made to the Jewish church on this occasion. The evident finger of God seen in their deliverance, their present happy and prosperous estate, and the fear of the power with which they were invested, wrought upon multitudes, who, to avoid their resentment, or to obtain court-favour, or perhaps from better motives of divine conviction, became proselytes. Note; When the church is in prosperity professors are numerous, but the faithful are proved in adversity.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/esther-8.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(15) ¶ And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.

No doubt Mordecai was humble under all this splendor, and rejoiced more in the people's salvation, than in his own purple. Think, Reader! of thy Jesus, who passed through the streets of Jerusalem, agreeably to the Prophet's account of him ages before, meek and lowly: Zechariah 9:9. with Matthew 21:5-9. Behold him in his purple before Pilate, when he stood as thy Surety! John 19:5. Look at him with an eye of faith, as John saw him, in a vesture dipped in blood. Revelation 19:13.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/esther-8.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

With a great crown of gold; which the chief of the Persian princes were permitted to wear, but with sufficient distinction from the king’s crown.

The city of Shushan; not only Jews, but the greatest number of the citizens, who, by the law of nature written upon their hearts, had an abhorrency from bloody counsels and designs, and a complacency in acts of benignity and mercy; or for other reasons, of which See Poole "Esther 3:15".

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Esther 8:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/esther-8.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.Mordecai went out from’ the king — This verse relates back to Esther 8:1-2. Mordecai had been summoned into the royal presence, and there promoted to the high office made vacant by the fall of Haman.

Having been invested with the insignia of office, and clothed with authority as chief minister, he went forth to attend to the duties of his new position.

Royal apparel of blue and white — State garments, such as became the grand vizier; royal robes of royal colours. Compare note on Esther 1:6.

A great crown of gold — The word here rendered crown is עשׂרה, atarah, a coronet. Only a very exalted prince or courtier could go thus adorned. When Mordecai was honoured for his loyal service to the king, the horse on which he rode was decked with a royal crown. Note on Esther 6:7. Now Mordecai himself is made to wear a coronet.

A garment of fine linen — Or, a mantle of byssus.

Shushan rejoiced — As it had been previously “perplexed” and saddened. See Esther 3:15, note. It was now felt by the great majority of the people that a most wicked and pernicious edict was virtually frustrated.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/esther-8.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Esther 8:15. With a great crown of gold — Which the chief of the Persian princes were permitted to wear, but with sufficient distinction from the king’s crown. For it must be observed, that the word royal is not added here, as in chap. Esther 6:8, nor is the horse mentioned, as there, because no extraordinary honours are here spoken of, but only that honour, and that habit, which immediately belonged to the keeper of the royal signet. — Houb. The city of Shushan rejoiced — Not only Jews, but the greatest number of the citizens, who by the law of nature abhorred bloody counsels, and had a complacency in acts of mercy.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/esther-8.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Cloak. The kings wore one of purple, over their purple and white tunic. (Cyrop. viii.) --- Greek have "diadem." (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/esther-8.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.

Mordecai went out ... in royal apparel. He was invested with the khelaat of official honour. A dress of blue and white was held in great estimation among the Persians: so that Mordecai, whom the king delighted to honour, was in fact arrayed in the royal dress and insignia. The variety and the kind of insignia worn by a favourite at once makes known to the people the particular dignity to which he has been raised.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/esther-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Blue and white.—See Note on Esther 1:6.

Crown.—This is a different word from that previously used of a “royal crown” (Esther 6:8).

Garment.—The inner robe or tunic. That of the king was of purple striped with white.

Linen.—White linen.

The city of Shushan rejoiced.—The tide of royal favour had changed, and the people of Shushan were evidently not very different from the mass of the populace of the present day, who shout with the winning side. Nothing succeeds like success, and the mobile vulgus of Susa cheered Mordecai as doubtless they would have hooted had they seen him led to execution. The crowds who welcomed our Lord into Jerusalem on His triumphal entry soon let their enthusiasm die away—“ Hosanna!” now; tomorrow, “Crucify!”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/esther-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.
royal apparel
5:1; 6:8,11; Genesis 41:42; Matthew 6:29; 11:8; Luke 16:19
blue
or, violet.
1:6
and with a great crown
Mordecai was now made the chief minister, or vizier, instead of Haman; and was accordingly invested with the "royal apparel," in conformity to the custom of the East. So we are informed, in the History of the Revolt of Ali Bey, that on the election of a new sheikh bellet, or chief of the country, in Egypt, the pasha who approves of him invests him with a robe of valuable fur. Perhaps the crown was one of the insignia of the office of vizier. Concerning the blue, fine linen, and purple, see the Notes on Ex 25:4; 39:27.
the city
Haman was too proud to be popular: few lamented his fall.
3:15; Proverbs 29:2
Reciprocal: Judges 8:26 - purple;  2 Kings 25:29 - changed;  Esther 10:2 - advanced him;  Psalm 67:2 - That;  Psalm 107:41 - setteth;  Proverbs 11:10 - it goeth;  Proverbs 28:12 - righteous;  Proverbs 31:22 - clothing;  Ecclesiastes 9:8 - thy garments;  Isaiah 22:21 - clothe;  Isaiah 61:3 - beauty;  Daniel 8:2 - Shushan;  Luke 7:25 - are in;  Revelation 3:4 - walk;  Revelation 4:4 - crowns

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Esther 8:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/esther-8.html.