Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Exodus 6:7

Then I will take you for My people, and I will be your God; and you shall know that I am the Lord your God, who brought you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covenant;   God Continued...;   Moses;   Scofield Reference Index - Separation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Election;   Israel;   Israel-The Jews;   Knowledge;   Knowledge-Ignorance;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Jews, the;   Theocracy, the, or Immediate Government by God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Church;   Covenant;   Egypt;   Ethics;   Exodus;   Exodus, book of;   Law;   Leviticus;   Moses;   Numbers, book of;   Quotations;   Yahweh;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Church, the;   God;   God, Names of;   Kinsman-Redeemer;   Praise;   Proverbs, Theology of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Exodus, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Exodus;   Exodus, Book of;   Promise;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Moses;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Israel;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Moses;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Accommodation;   Burden;   Exodus, the Book of;   God, Names of;   Law in the Old Testament;   Leviticus;   Messiah;   Passover;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Hope;   Seder;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I will take you to me for a people, etc. - This was precisely the covenant that he had made with Abraham. See Genesis 17:7, and see Clarke's note on Genesis 17:7.

And ye shall know that I am the Lord your God - By thus fulfilling my promises ye shall know what is implied in my name. See Clarke's note on Exodus 6:3.

But why should God take such a most stupid, refractory, and totally worthless people for his people? 1. Because he had promised to do so to their noble ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Judah, etc., men worthy of all praise, because in general friends of God, devoted to his will and to the good of mankind.

2. "That (as Bishop Warburton properly observes) the extraordinary providence by which they were protected, might become the more visible and illustrious; for had they been endowed with the shining qualities of the more polished nations, the effects of that providence might have been ascribed to their own wisdom."

3. That God might show to all succeeding generations that he delights to instruct the ignorant, help the weak, and save the lost; for if he bore long with Israel, showed them especial mercy, and graciously received them whenever they implored his protection, none need despair. God seems to have chosen the worst people in the universe, to give by them unto mankind the highest and most expressive proofs, that he wills not the death of a sinner, but rather that he may turn from his iniquity and live.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/exodus-6.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And I will take you to me for a people,.... Out of the hands of the Egyptians, and out of their country, to be in a political sense his kingdom and subjects; and in a religious sense a holy people to himself, to fear, serve, worship, and glorify him, by walking according to laws and rules given them by him; and this he did by setting up and establishing a civil and ecclesiastical polity among them:

and I will be to you a God; their King and their God to rule over them, protect and defend them, they being a theocracy; and their covenant God and Father, giving them various spiritual privileges, the adoption, the glory, the covenant, the law, service, and promises:

and ye shall know that I am the Lord your God; by the promises fulfilled, the favours granted, and the deliverances wrought for them:

which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians; see the preceding verse Exodus 6:6.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/exodus-6.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And I will b take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I [am] the LORD your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.

(b) He means, concerning the outward calling, the dignity of which they lost later by their rebellion: but as for election to life everlasting, it is unchangeable.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/exodus-6.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Hosea 2:23.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/exodus-6.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And I will take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I am the LORD your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.

I will take you to me for a people — A peculiar people, and I will be to you a God - And more than this we need not ask, we cannot have, to make us happy.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/exodus-6.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Exodus 6:7 And I will take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I [am] the LORD your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.

Ver. 7. And I will be to you a God.] This is the top of any man’s happiness, to have God for his God. What can such a man want? [Psalms 23:1] As he in Plutarch said of the Egyptians, that though they had no music nor vines among them, yet they had gods. (a)

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/exodus-6.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Exodus 6:7. I will take you "I will now take you under my peculiar protection; separate you to me for a people; and become, in an especial and distinguishing manner, your God."

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/exodus-6.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Will take you to me for a people, i.e. for my people; ye shall no longer be the people and slaves of the king of Egypt, but my people and servants, whom I will bless and preserve.

And I will be to you a God, to judge and deliver you.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/exodus-6.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

God, Elohim, who will pass sentence in your favour, as a just judge. (Menochius)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/exodus-6.html. 1859.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) I will take you to me for a people.—Comp. Exodus 19:5-6; Deuteronomy 7:6. The selection of Israel as a “peculiar people” did not involve the abandonment of all other nations, as we see by the instances of Balaam, Ruth, Job, Nebuchadnezzar, Darius the Mede, Cyrus, and others. God always continued to “govern all the nations upon the earth” (Psalms 67:4); and “in every nation those that feared him and worked righteousness” were accepted with him (Acts 10:35). The centurion of the Gospels (Matthew 8:5-13, Luke 7:2-10) and Cornelius in the Acts (Acts 10:1-33) carry the same principle into Gospel times.

I will be to you a God.—See Genesis 17:8.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/exodus-6.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And I will take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I am the LORD your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.
will take
19:5,6; Genesis 17:7,8; Deuteronomy 4:20; 7:6; 14:2; 26:18; 2 Samuel 7:23,24; Jeremiah 31:33; Hosea 1:10; 1 Peter 2:10
I will be
29:45,46; Deuteronomy 29:13; Zechariah 13:9; Matthew 22:32; Romans 8:31; Hebrews 11:16; Revelation 21:3,7
from under
5:4,5; Psalms 81:6
Reciprocal: Exodus 6:26 - Bring;  Exodus 7:17 - thou shalt;  Exodus 16:6 - the Lord;  Exodus 16:12 - ye shall know;  Leviticus 11:45 - that bringeth;  Leviticus 18:2 - GeneralLeviticus 22:33 - GeneralLeviticus 26:12 - will be;  Numbers 10:29 - for the Lord;  1 Kings 20:28 - ye shall know;  2 Chronicles 20:7 - our God;  Psalm 79:10 - let him;  Psalm 114:2 - GeneralIsaiah 63:8 - Surely;  Ezekiel 20:5 - In the;  Acts 7:5 - yet

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/exodus-6.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7.And I will take you to me. The end of their liberation is here described in the continued tenor of His grace. For it would have been little that the people should once be redeemed from Egypt, unless, when redeemed, they had lived under the defense and guardianship of God. As, therefore, He had long since separated the holy seed of Abraham from the other nations by circumcision, He now again sets it apart, (sanctificat,) and promises that he will be their God. In these words, then, their peculiar election, as well as its perpetuity, is asserted; since to be accounted the people of God means the same as to be by especial privilege received into his favor, and to be called by adoption to the hope of eternal salvation. But the future tense shews that the benefit was not to be merely temporal, when God with a stretched-out arm shall bring the people out of Egypt, but that this should only be the beginning of eternal protection. Moreover, we should observe the anagoge or similitude between us and the Israelites, because God has once delivered us by the hand of his only-begotten Son from the tyranny of Satan, to this end, that he may always pursue us with his paternal love. Afterwards he subjoins the possession of the land of Canaan as an earnest or pledge, which was given to the Israelites, in order that God might always dwell among them, protect them with his aid, and defend them with his power. I have said that this was the earnest of their adoption, because the faith of the fathers was not to be tied to earthly blessings, but to tend to an higher object. Meanwhile, by this outward sign God shewed them that they were his peculiar people, for whose habitation he chose the land in which he would be worshipped. By saying He “would lift up his hand,” (75) He means in confirmation, because the promise was ratified by the addition of an oath. It is indeed certain that there is enough and more than enough steadfastness in the simple word of God; but He made this concession to man’s weakness, and interposed His sacred name as a pledge, that they might with fuller confidence be persuaded that nothing was promised them in vain. To lift up the hand, means to swear; a similitude taken from men, who, by this gesture, testify that they speak in the sight of God, as if they would call Him down as a witness from heaven. This is not applicable to God, who swears by Himself, because there is none greater to whom He may lift His hand, (Hebrews 6:13;) but, metaphorically, the custom of men is transferred to Him. As to the insertion, that “they should know that He was the Lord,” after they had been brought forth, it contains an indirect rebuke; since that knowledge is too late which comes after the event. But at the same time, He promises that He would cause them openly to experience how true He is in all His sayings, that the Israelites may more constantly expect their redemption. Repeating at the close that He is Jehovah, He magnifies (as He had just before done) His invincible power, which easily surmounts all impediments; whilst this expression also contains a testimony to His truth, as if He had said that He alone can be safely trusted to, because He is both faithful in His promises and possessed of infinite power.

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Exodus 6:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/exodus-6.html. 1840-57.