Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 33:9

The land mourns and pines away, Lebanon is shamed and withers; Sharon is like a desert plain, And Bashan and Carmel lose their foliage.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Bashan;   Carmel;   Sharon;   War;   Scofield Reference Index - Kingdom;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bashan;   Carmel, Mount;   Mountains;   Sharon;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Carmel;   Sharon;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Carmel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Sharon, Saron;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Sharon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Leaf, Leaves;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Carmel;   Plain;   Sharon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Sharon ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Carmel ;   Sharon ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Sharon;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Sha'ron;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sharon;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ashamed;   Bashan;   Carmel;   Champaign;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Bashan;   Carmel, Mount;   Exodus, Book of;   Palestine;   Sharon;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Bashan and Carmel shake off their fruits "Bashan and Carmel are stripped of their beauty" - Φανερα εσται, made manifest. Sept. They read ונערה veneerah .

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-33.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The earth mourneth - The land through which he has passed. For the sense of this phrase, see the note at Isaiah 24:4.

Lebanon is ashamed and hewn down - For the situation of Lebanon, see the note at Isaiah 10:34. Lebanon was distinguished for its ornaments of beautiful cedars. Here iris represented as being stript of these ornaments, and as covered with shame on that account. There is not any direct historical evidence that Sennacherib had advanced to Lebanon, though there are some intimations that this had occurred (see the note at Isaiah 14:8), and it was certainly a part of his boast that he had done it (see Isaiah 37:24). There is no improbability in supposing that he had sent a part of his army to plunder the country in the vicinity of Lebanon (see Isaiah 20:1).

Sharon is like a wilderness - Sharon was the name of a district south of mount Carmel along the coast of the Mediterranean, extending to Cesarea and Joppa. The name was almost proverbial to express any place of extraordinary beauty and fertility (see 1 Chronicles 5:16; 1 Chronicles 27:29; Isaiah 35:2; Isaiah 65:10). There was also another Sharon on the east side of the Jordan, and in the vicinity of Bashan, which was also a fertile region 1 Chronicles 5:16. To this, it is more probable that the prophet here refers, though it is not certain. The object seems to be to mention the most fertile places in the land as being now desolate.

Bashan - For an account of the situation of Bashan, subsequently called Batanea, see the note at Isaiah 2:13.

And Carmel - (see the note at Isaiah 29:17).

Shake off their fruits - The words ‹their fruits,‘ are not in the Hebrew. The Septuagint reads this: ‹Galilee and Carmel are made bare‘ ( φανερὰ ἔσται, κ.τ.λ. phanera estai etc The Hebrew word נער no‛ēr probably means to shake; to shake out or off; and refers here to the fact probably that Bashan and Carmel are represented as having shaken off their leaves, and were now lying desolate as in winter.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-33.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The earth mourneth and languisheth,.... All Christendom, being now under the power, dominion, and tyranny of antichrist, and the church's faithful witnesses slain, and a stop put to all Gospel ministrations; and therefore the church must be in a very languishing condition, and great reason for mourning:

Lebanon is ashamed, and hewn down; being stripped of its stately cedars; as now the church of Christ, comparable to that goodly mountain Lebanon, will be deprived of its able ministers, which were like tall and spreading Cedars, for their gifts, grace, strength, and usefulness:

Sharon is like a wilderness; such parts, as Great Britain, which have been most fruitful (as Sharon was a very fruitful place) for the Gospel, and Gospel ordinances, in the purity of them, and for professors of religion, being fruitful in grace, and in good works, shall now be like a desert; there being no ministry, no ordinances, nor any, that dare to make an open profession of the true religion:

and Bashan and Carmel shake off their fruits; before they are ripe, or come to anything; places noted for being fruitful, and pastures for flocks; and denote, as before, such spots in Christendom where the Gospel has most flourished, but now should be like barren heaths, and desert places.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-33.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

The earth mourneth [and] languisheth: Lebanon is ashamed [and] hewn down: o Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan and Carmel shake off [their fruits].

(o) Which was a plentiful country, meaning, that Sennacherib would destroy all.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-33.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(Isaiah 24:4).

Lebanon — personified; the allusion may be to the Assyrian cutting down its choice trees (Isaiah 14:8; Isaiah 37:24).

Sharon — south of Carmel, along the Mediterranean, proverbial for fertility (Isaiah 35:2).

Bashan — afterwards called Batanea (Isaiah 2:13).

fruits — rather, understand “leaves”; they lie as desolate as in winter.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-33.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The earth mourneth and languisheth: Lebanon is ashamed and hewn down: Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan and Carmel shake off their fruits.

Mourneth — Being desolate and neglected.

Hewn — By the Assyrians.

Bashan — Two places eminent for fertility, are spoiled of their fruits.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-33.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 33:9 The earth mourneth [and] languisheth: Lebanon is ashamed [and] hewn down: Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan and Carmel shake off [their fruits].

Ver. 9. The earth mourneth and languisheth.] (a) Or the land luget et languet. Thus they go on in their doleful relation: Miserrima sunt omnia, atque miseranda. What sad work hath Antichrist made of late years in the Christian world? what desolations in all parts?

Lebanon is ashamed and hewn down, Sharon is like a wilderness.] East, west, north, and south of the land are laid waste by the enemy and the avenger, that "boar out of the wood," that "bear out of the forest." [Psalms 80:13]

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-33.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The earth mourneth, being desolate and neglected.

Lebanon is ashamed and hewn down by the Assyrians. Or, as the word signifies, and is here rendered by others, withereth or languisheth, because its trees are not now used by the Jews for their buildings, as they have been; and because they are spoiled and destroyed by the Assyrians.

Sharon; a pleasant and fruitful place, as appears from 1 Chronicles 27:29 Song of Solomon 2:1 Isaiah 35:2.

Bashan and Carmel; two places eminent for fertility, and especially for good pastures, Deuteronomy 32:14 1 Samuel 25:2, which are here synecdochically put for all such places.

Shake off their fruits; are spoiled of their fruits. Or, as it is rendered by some others, yell or roar, as this word is rendered Jeremiah 51:38.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-33.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

All parts of Israel suffer because of the invading Assyrians. Lebanon was a forested region in the north, Sharon a beautiful plain to the west, and Bashan and Carmel were fertile areas to the east and north respectively. Assyria had decimated all the best (most fruitful) parts of the land.

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Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-33.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Confounded. Its trees were cut down, chap. xxxvii. 24.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-33.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hewn down = withered.

shake off. Hebrew. na"ar. A rare word. Occurs twice in the "former" portion (here, and Isaiah 33:15), and once in the "latter" portion (Isaiah 52:2). App-79.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-33.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) The earth mourneth . . .—Lebanon, with its cedars, the Sharon (as we say, the Campagna), Bashan, with its oaks (Isaiah 2:13), Carmel, with its copse-wood, are the types of beauty and fertility, now languishing and decaying. Possibly the embassy referred to was sent in the autumn, so that the prophet saw in the natural features of that season the symbols of failure and decay.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-33.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The earth mourneth and languisheth: Lebanon is ashamed and hewn down: Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan and Carmel shake off their fruits.
earth
1:7,8; 24:1,4-6,19,20; Jeremiah 4:20-26
Lebanon
14:8; 37:24; Zechariah 11:1-3
hewn down
or, withered away. Sharon.
35:2; 65:10; Song of Solomon 2:1
Bashan
Deuteronomy 3:4; Jeremiah 50:19; Micah 7:14; Nahum 1:4
Reciprocal: Numbers 21:33 - Bashan;  Joshua 12:18 - Lasharon;  Joshua 19:26 - Carmel;  Job 15:33 - shake off;  Isaiah 17:13 - but;  Jeremiah 4:28 - the earth;  Jeremiah 14:2 - the gates;  Hosea 2:3 - as;  Amos 1:2 - the habitations;  2 Timothy 4:3 - they will;  Revelation 6:13 - of a

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-33.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.The earth hath mourned and languished. Here he describes more fully how wretched and desperate the Jews would perceive their condition to be, that their confidence might nevertheless come forth out of a deep gulf. The places are also specified by him, Lebanon, Bashan, and Carmel, which are widely distant from each other, and which form almost the farthest boundaries of the holy land, in order to shew that no part of it; will remain safe or uninjured. He describes this calamity in such a manner as to assign to each place what peculiarly belongs to it. To “Lebanon” he assigns confusion, because it is elsewhere mentioned as beautiful and glorious, in consequence of having been covered with lofty and valuable trees. He declares that “Sharon,” which was a level and fertile district, will be “like a wilderness,” and that “Bashan and Carmel,” which abounded in “fruits,” will be “shaken.” Thus he alludes to the natural character of each place, and describes the misery and distress in such a manner as to magnify and illustrate the kindness of God, by whom they would be delivered, even though they appeared to be utterly ruined; for here we may see the hand of God openly displayed, if it be not thought preferable to view the Prophet as relating a past transaction in order to excite them to thankfulness.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 33:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-33.html. 1840-57.