Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 65:24

It will also come to pass that before they call, I will answer; and while they are still speaking, I will hear.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Jesus, the Christ;   Millennium;   Prayer;   Righteous;   Thompson Chain Reference - Answer Promised;   Deafness-Hearing;   Divine;   God;   Hearing;   Prayer;   Promises, Divine;   The Topic Concordance - Election;   Hearing;   Jerusalem;   Newness;   Sorrow;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prayer;   Prayer, Answers to;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Peace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amos, Theology of;   Create, Creation;   Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the;   New Jerusalem;   Suffering;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah;   Mary, Mother of Mark;   Nehemiah;   Peter;   Regeneration;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Micah, Book of;   Righteousness;   Servant of the Lord;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Progress;  
Encyclopedias:
The Jewish Encyclopedia - Eschatology;   Hope;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for December 3;   Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for August 13;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Before they call, I will answer - I will give them all they crave for, and more than they can desire.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Before they call, I will answer - That is, their desires shall be anticipated, God will see their needs, and he will impart to them the blessings which they need. He will not wait to be applied to for the blessing. How many such blessings do all his people receive at the hand of God! How ready is he to anticipate our needs! How watchful is he of our necessities; and how rich his benevolence in providing for us! Even the most faithful and prayerful of his people receive numerous favors and comforts at his hand for which they have not directly asked him. The prayer for the supply of our daily food, ‹Give us this day our daily bread,‘ God had anticipated, and had prepared the means of answering it, long before, in the abundant harvest. Had he waited until the prayer was offered, it could not have been answered without a miracle. Ever watchful, he anticipates our necessities, and in his providence and grace lays the foundation for granting the favor long before we ask him.

And while they are yet speaking, I will hear - So it was with Daniel (Daniel 9:20-21; compare Psalm 32:5). So it was with the early disciples when they were assembled in an upper room in Jerusalem, and when the Spirit of God descended with great power on the day of Pentecost Acts 2:1-2. So when Paul and Silas, in the prison at Philippi, ‹prayed and sang praises to God,‘ he heard them and came for their rescue Acts 16:25-26. So it has often been - and especially in revivals of religion. When his people have been deeply impressed with a sense of the languishing state of religion; when they have gone unitedly before God and implored a blessing; God has heard their prayers, and even while they were speaking has begun a work of grace. Hundreds of such instances have occurred, alike demonstrating the faithfulness of God to his promises, and suited to encourage his people, and to excite them to prayer. It is one of the precious promises pertaining to the blessings of the reign of the Messiah, that the answer of prayer shall be immediate - and for this his people should look, and this they should expect. God can as easily answer prayer at once as to delay it; and when the proper state of mind exists, he is as ready to answer it now as to defer it to a future time. What encouragement have we to pray! How faithful, how fervent should we be in our supplications! How full of guilt are we if one single blessing is witcheld from our world that might have been imparted if we had prayed as we ought; if one single soul shall be lost who might have been saved if we had not been unfaithful in prayer!

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-65.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Isaiah 65:24

And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer.

The Church in harmony with God’s will

The will of the Church of the new Jerusalem will be Jehovah’s will to such a degree that he already hears and fulfils the slightest movement of prayer in the heart, the prayer but half-uttered. (F. Delitzsch, D. D.)

The Divine willingness to hear prayer.

I. MAN NEEDS TO CALL UPON AND SPEAK TO GOD. What is man’s greatest need? To him who believes in a future world--eternal life. To whom shall he go for this? He must call upon God. This is shown--

1. From the consciousness of an existing want which cannot be supplied.

(a) From within.

(b) From without.

(a) Its inhabitants.

(b) Its wealth.

(c) Its pleasures.

2. From the fact that light, pardon, guidance, comfort, heaven, can only be had from God.

II. MAN IS ENCOURAGED TO CALL UPON AND SPEAK UNTO GOD. This is shown by four considerations of God’s dealings with man--

1. Opening the way of approach to Himself by His Word.

2. Teaching the way by His servants.

3. Directing in the way by His Spirit.

4. Distinctly promising to bless all who come in the way. But from the text we learn explicitly that man is encouraged to call upon and speak unto God. “Before they call, I will answer.’ God perceives and realizes the desires of the Christian heart. Amid all the complex movements of the universe, He sees the unfolding of the praying heart, and, swifter than the lightning flash, the answer comes. David found it so (Psalms 32:5), so did Daniel (Daniel 10:12), and we have found it so (Matthew 6:8). “And while they are yet speaking I will hear. God is willing to listen to the articulated wish of the Christian hearts. Amid the clash of nations’ strife, the busy hum of struggling humanity, the hoarse cries for sensual pleasure, the blasphemies of the lewd, the groans of the crushed and disappointed, He listens to the speaking of His children, and hears the faintest whispered want. Illustrations: The Israelites at Mizpeh (1 Samuel 7:1-17.); David’s triumph over his enemies (Psalms 6:8-9); Daniel and the seventy weeks Daniel 9:21); Cornelius (Acts 10:3). (J. E. Hargreaves.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Isaiah 65:24". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/isaiah-65.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer,.... The sense is, should they be attacked by any enemy, or fear that they shall be disturbed by them, and so bethink themselves of making application to the Lord for help; while they are preparing for prayer, stirring up one another to it, and appointing a season for it, to meet together on that account; before they are able to put up one petition in a regular way, the Lord will appear for them, and give an answer of peace:

and while they are yet speaking, I will hear; while they are praying to him, he hears and answers, and grants their requests, and more, as he did Daniel. This shows the readiness of the Lord to help and assist his people in any time of trouble, or when they may fear an enemy; and is a great encouragement to attend the throne of grace constantly.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-65.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

calleth,” etc.; and see on Isaiah 65:12, “I called, ye did not answer.” Maurer translates, “They shall hardly (literally, “not yet”) call, when (literally, “and”) I will answer; they shall be still speaking, when I will hear” (Psalm 32:5; Daniel 9:20, Daniel 9:21).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-65.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

All prayer will be heard then. “And it will come to pass: before they call, I will answer; they are still speaking, and I already hear.” The will of the church of the new Jerusalem will be so perfectly the will of Jehovah also, that He will hear the slightest emotion of prayer in the heart, the half-uttered prayer, and will at once fulfill it (cf., Isaiah 30:19).

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The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
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Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/isaiah-65.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.

Before they call — God promised, chap58:9, to answer them, when they called: here he promises to answer the words, as soon as they should be formed in their hearts before they could get them out of their lips.

While — Yea, while they were speaking.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-65.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘O THOU THAT HEAREST PRAYER!’

‘Before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will bear.’

Isaiah 65:24

I. Consider how great degrees of love and anxiety for us are expressed in these few words.—The Almighty Lord of heaven and earth represents Himself as watching with anxiety the hearts and consciences of us His creatures, His sinful creatures!

II. The question, then, which concerns us to put impartially to our consciences is, Whether we do habitually endeavour to pray?—Whether, in the midst of the daily cares and business of life, our minds habitually ascend to our God and Saviour, and with Him continually dwell.

III. If we will not look to God as our Father, what other hope or dependence can we be trusting to?—Our having a good character in the world for morality or religion will avail us nothing.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/isaiah-65.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 65:24 And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.

Ver. 24. And it shall come to pass, that before they call I will answer.] Mirabilis certe promissio, a wonderful promise, verily, saith Scultetus. The prayers of the saints do sooner pierce from their hearts to heaven, than they can find way from their hearts to their mouths. So David found it; [Psalms 32:5] and Daniel; [Daniel 10:12] and that prodigal. [Luke 15:18; Luke 15:20] Our Saviour, who came out of the bosom of the Father, gives two reasons (1.) "The Father himself loveth you," [John 16:27] and love is liberal; (2.) "The Father knoweth before ye ask, that ye have need of all these things." [Matthew 6:32]

And while they are yet speaking, I will hear.] Thus he heard those praying Israelites at the meet at Mizpeh, [1 Samuel 7:6] David, [Psalms 6:8-9] Daniel, [Daniel 9:21] Cornelius, [Acts 10:3] and his company; [Acts 10:44] Luther, when he came leaping out of his study, where he had been praying, with Vicimus! vicimus! in his mouth; the day is ours, we shall carry the cause.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-65.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

I have read this verse by itself, purposely to make it, beauty and grace, and blessedness. This scripture promise hath refreshed and encouraged the souls of very many, and thousands have been enabled to set their seal to the truth of it. And what a rich thought is it, that even before we call, or before we go to the throne, the answer is prepared, and come forth. God will be before-hand with his people. And wherefore? because Jesus is thine; and in his blood and righteousness all his redeemed are accepted. Daniel 9:22-23.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/isaiah-65.html. 1828.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Isaiah 65:24

I. Consider how great degrees of love and anxiety for us are expressed in these few words. The Almighty Lord of heaven and earth represents Himself as watching with anxiety the hearts and consciences of us His creatures, His sinful creatures; as listening after any, the least, expression of penitence, so it be sincere; as having joy in any expressions of returning love in the cold and hardened heart. When we reflect on this, when we consider what forbearance and parental anxiety the great God of heaven shows for us, our hearts must indeed be hardened, our natural affections deadened by long intercourse with a cruel, deceitful world, if we feel not at least some desire to be worthy to be called the sons of so kind, so tender, so good a Father.

II. The question, then, which it concerns us to put impartially to our consciences is, Whether we do habitually endeavour to pray? Whether, in the midst of the daily cares and business of life, our minds habitually ascend to our God and Saviour, and with Him continually dwell; whether our desires, hopes, and wishes are in the right direction, namely, towards God and heaven and heavenly things; whether we habitually express these our feelings and affection in such ways as our heavenly Father has directed and sanctioned, namely, by the practice of deliberate, earnest, importunate prayer.

III. If we will not look to God as our Father, what other hope or dependence can we be trusting to? Our having a good character in the world for morality or religion will avail us nothing; our thinking favourably of ourselves will avail us nothing; our occasional regard to good forms, or occasional indulgence of seeming religious feelings, will avail us nothing. If we do not love and adore and devote ourselves to the Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity, we are surely not in the safe way to salvation; and without leading a life of prayer, how can we flatter ourselves that we love our God?

Plain Sermons by Contributors to "Tracts for the Times" vol. x., p. 208.


References: Isaiah 65:24.—Preacher's Monthly, vol.i.,p. 34. Isaiah 66:1, Isaiah 66:2.—E. Roberts, Penny Pulpit, No. 3504; Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xviii., No. 1083. Isaiah 66:5.—S. Cox, Expositor, 1st series, vol. ix., p. 53; J. B. Heard, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ix., p. 225. Isaiah 66:8.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xvii., No. 1009.



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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/isaiah-65.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Isaiah 65:24. And it shall come to pass Behold here an excellent blessing, the truest seal of divine favour and paternal love. We have observed in the analysis, that the closest conjunction of heaven and earth, that is to say, of God and men, is expressed in this verse; wherein the readiness and goodness of God to hear the petitions, and even to prevent the desires, of those who love and serve him, are spoken of in the strongest and most pleasing terms. See ch. Isaiah 30:19 and Psalms 145:18-19.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/isaiah-65.html. 1801-1803.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1022

THE EFFICACY OF PRAYER

Isaiah 65:24. It shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.

THERE is scarcely any thing less justly appreciated than the efficacy of prayer. As a Christian community, we acknowledge the duty of prayer; but we regard it rather as a service to be performed by us, than as a privilege conferred by God. In public worship, we are satisfied with milking the responses that are put into our mouths, without ever endeavouring to obtain and exercise a frame of mind suited to them: decency, rather than fervour, is the object of our pursuit; and when we have gone through the course prescribed by the Church, we think we have performed a service acceptable to God, though in no single petition have we truly poured out our soul before him. In many instances, if God were to take us at our word, and to offer to grant us the petitions we have presented to him, we should pray them back again with tenfold greater earnestness than was felt in their first delivery. If any person would read carefully the various petitions in the Litany, and compare them with the habitual desires of his heart, he would gain an insight into the state of his soul before God, even such an insight as at present he has no conception of [Note: What worldly man, when uttering these words, “From all the deceits of the world, the flesh, and the devil, Good Lord, duliver us,” really means what he says?]. But prayer is, in reality, an instrument of great power: it can, under any circumstances, bring Omnipotence to our aid: yea, so acceptable is it to Almighty God, that even the disposition to offer it shall not be overlooked: but “it shall come to pass,” provided we are truly sincere, “that before we call, he will answer; and whilst we are yet speaking, he will hear.”

To enter into the full import of this promise, we should consider,

I. To whom it is made—

To the Millennial period, in the first instance, it most undoubtedly refers—

[The whole preceding context clearly shews this. In the beginning of the chapter, God denounces the heaviest judgments against his “rebellious people.” But, having determined not utterly to destroy them, he says, “As the new wine is found in the cluster, and one saith, Destroy it not, for a blessing is in it; so will I do for my servants’ sakes, that I may not destroy them all [Note: ver. 8–10.]” — — — Then, having contrasted in very strong terms the felicity of the faithful with the misery of those who shall have provoked him to anger, he proceeds to declare, that the whole nation, yea, and the whole world also, shall be restored to his favour, and enjoy a degree of prosperity unknown to his people, even in the most distinguished periods of their history. So great shall be the change on earth, that it shall be as if “new heavens and a new earth were created:” and all former seasons, whether of prosperity or adversity, shall be forgotten, as being altogether lost in the contemplation of their present bliss [Note: ver. 17.]. Holiness and happiness will then reign throughout all the Church, without intermission and without alloy [Note: ver. 18, 19. with 2 Peter 3:13.]. His Jewish people shall no more be subjected to the judgments that have been inflicted on them, Instead of being cut off in the midst of their days, their lives shall be so prolonged, that a person of a hundred years of age shall be accounted but an infant; and if cut off at that age, he shall be regarded as having prematurely perished under the displeasure of an angry God. Both they and their offspring shall be so blessed of the Lord, as to bear in every respect the marks of his special favour; and, above all, their communion with him shall be most sweet and intimate, and their communications from him most rich and abundant [Note: ver. 20–25. with Revelation 21:1-4.].]

But it also belongs to the Church of God in all ages—

[The prophets speak of this privilege as belonging to the saints in their days. David, in his Psalms, is full of this subject: “The Lord is nigh unto all them that call upon him, to all that call upon him in truth: He will fulfil the desire of them that fear him; he will also hear their cry, and will save them [Note: Psalms 145:18-19.],” The Prophet Isaiah says, “Thou shalt call, and the Lord shall answer; thou shalt cry, and He shall say, Here I am [Note: Isaiah 58:9.].” To the same effect, the Prophet Jeremiah also speaks: “Ye shall call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you. And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart [Note: Jeremiah 29:12-13.].”

Of the instances of such gracious communications there would be no end, if I were to attempt to enumerate all that are recorded in the Scriptures. Let one suffice, even that of Daniel, when he set himself, by prayer and supplication, to obtain of God an insight into the prophecies of Jeremiah relative to the termination of the seventy years’ captivity in Babylon. He gives us the account of himself: “While I was speaking and praying, and confessing my sin, and the sin of my people Israel, and presenting my supplication before the Lord my God for the holy mountain of my God; yea, while I was speaking in prayer, even the man Gabriel, whom I had seen in the vision at the beginning, being caused to fly swiftly, touched me about the time of the evening oblation. And he informed me, and talked with me, and said, O Daniel, I am now come forth to give thee skill and understanding. At the beginning of thy supplications the commandment came forth: and I am come to shew thee; for thou art greatly beloved; therefore understand the matter, and consider the vision [Note: Daniel 9:20-23.].” And again, in the following chapter, the angel says to him, “Fear not, Daniel; for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understand, and to chasten thyself before thy God, thy words were heard; and I am come for thy words [Note: Daniel 10:12.].”

And speaks not the New Testament the same language also? Were these privileges so richly enjoyed under the Jewish dispensation; and are they denied to us? No: we may “ask what we will;” and be sure of being heard [Note: John 15:7.]. Both God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ will esteem themselves “glorified” in granting our petitions, and doing for us whatsoever we ask [Note: John 14:13-14.]. We have only to “believe that the petitions shall be granted,” and not one of them shall be offered in vain [Note: Mark 11:24.]. Of this, I say, we may possess the fullest confidence [Note: 1 John 5:14-15.]: and if, “our joy be not full,” the fault is altogether our own [Note: John 16:24.]; since God, by repeated asseverations, has assured us that we shall not ask in vain [Note: Matthew 7:7-8.]. Even at the moment that we are praying, will he often manifest the acceptance of our prayers [Note: Acts 4:31.], and “do for us exceeding abundantly above all that we either ask or think [Note: Ephesians 3:20.].” What wilt thou that I should do for thee? is, in fact, our Lord’s address to us all; and he only waits to see the desire of his blessings formed in our hearts, as the signal for pouring out upon us all the riches of his grace.]

Seeing, then, that the promise is made to God’s people in every age, let us consider,

II. What it speaks to us—

It plainly declares,

1. How wonderful is the condescension of Almighty God—

[When God promised to dwell in the temple which Solomon had built, the pious monarch exclaimed, “Will God in very deed dwell with man on the earth?” And well may we utter a similar exclamation, in reference to the subject before us: “Will God indeed hear and answer the prayers of such insignificant and sinful worms as we?” To this I answer, that he surely will: nor shall the meanest or most unworthy suppliant in the universe be spurned from his footstool. “Though he is high above all creatures, yet will he have respect unto the lowly.” Yes, “though he is the High and Holy One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy, yet will he dwell with him that is poor and of a contrite spirit, to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite:” nor shall all the angels in heaven so occupy his attention, but that “he will look through all their shining ranks to the poor and contrite man, who trembles at his word.” Nor is it the prayer only of the contrite that he will listen to; he will not despise their desire; their very sighs shall enter into his ears, and their tears be treasured up in his vials. What amazing condescension is this! Were it but an earthly monarch that so humbled himself, the whole world would sound with his praises: but He, of whom these things are spoken, is King of kings, and Lord of lords. What praises, then, should we render unto him? Never will his grace be fully appreciated, till we shall see the infinite distance which there is between him and us, and the unworthiness of those to whom this mercy is vouchsafed.]

2. How inconceivable is the folly of prayerless men—

[Thousands, who imagine that they pray, do nothing but deceive their own souls. For what is their prayer, but a solemn mockery of their God? Let those who never pray, but according to some form which they either read out of a book or repent from memory, inquire what has been the frame of their minds in prayer; and they will find that they have, for the most part, “drawn nigh to God with their lips, whilst their hearts have been far from him.” I mean not to say that persons may not pray with, as truly and fervently as without, a form: for they who have ever entered into the spirit of the Liturgy, know the contrary. But no real saint ever lived without pouring out before God, from time to time, many “cries and breathings” which proceeded from the state of his own mind, and which no written form could have furnished. And if this be not our habit, we are as truly prayerless, as if we had never used even an outward form. Let me then ask of such persons, Have you no sins to confess to God? no mercies to implore? no blessings to be thankful for? or have you any other source from whence you can derive the blessings you stand in need of? Ah! think how soon the season for prayer will be for ever past; and how vain even the most importunate supplications will soon be, though you should pray only for a drop of water to cool your tongue. Be in earnest, I pray you, and no longer deceive your own souls. Our Lord tells you, that the mere formalist worships him in vain.” And if you will only candidly examine the state and habit of your souls when at a throne of grace, you shall attain a deep insight into your real character, and shall know, with great precision, the doom that awaits you in the eternal world. What will be your feelings in that world, when you reflect, that when all heaven was offered you, you would not so much as ask for it! How will the poor ignorant heathen condemn you, when their labours in the pursuit of happiness shall be recounted, and your reluctance even to offer a prayer shall be adduced against you! See the papist, with all his penances and mortifications; will not he also condemn you? See but a beggar, in the pursuit of relief for his body; how urgent! how importunate! how averse to take a denial. Shall not he also rise up in judgment against you? Verily, the bitterest reflection in hell itself will be, that, when the Lord Jesus Christ had purchased heaven for you by his blood, and offered it to you freely in answer to your prayers, you deemed the task too heavy, and the terms too hard. May God in his mercy save you from such bitter reflections as these! And may it never be said of you, in relation to the heavenly glory, “They had it not, because they asked it not.”]

3. How truly blessed are they who live nigh unto their God in prayer—

[They understand the subject, and can bear witness to the truth of God in relation to it. Often have they gone to a throne of grace oppressed with their sins, which, like an insupportable burthen, sink them to the earth: but God has sustained them, and given them “rest unto their souls.” They went contemplating nothing but continued and perhaps augmented sorrows; and, “ere they were aware, their souls are made like the chariots of Ammi-nadib [Note: Song of Solomon 6:12.]:” “even before they called, he answered; and while they were yet speaking, he heard.” Know ye, then, your privilege: Carry to the Lord your every want, your every fear; and “cast all your care on him, who careth for you.” “Commit your way to him, and” not only shall your trials be alleviated, but “your very thoughts,” the most variable things under the whole heaven, “shall be established.” “This is the heritage of the servants of the Lord;” and they who possess it, enjoy a heaven upon earth. Go on, then, improving daily your liberty of access to God; and spread before him all your wants, and “make known with confidence your requests unto him:” so shall “the peace of God now rule your hearts,” and “God himself be your portion, and your eternal great reward.”]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/isaiah-65.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

God promised, Isaiah 58:9, to answer them when they called; here he promiseth to be so ready to answer, as to answer the words as soon as they should be formed in their hearts, before they should get them out of their lips, Psalms 32:5 Daniel 10:12; yea, while they were speaking, Daniel 9:20,23 Ac 10:44. Nor doth God say only they shall have the things they would have, (for so wicked men may sometimes have from the bountiful hand of Divine Providence,) but they shall have them as an answer or return unto their prayers.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-65.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24.Before they call, I will answer — With unclouded consciousness of union with God, they shall realize certain possession of blessings, without need or occasion of calling for them. Such is the character of the faith of Christian adoption — a state covering the whole scope of ever-advancing religious life.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/isaiah-65.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Perfect communication with God will be another blessing of this peaceable kingdom. Christians already enjoy good communication with Him ( Matthew 6:8; 1 John 5:14-15), but in the future it will be even better.

"What greater privilege than to have a God whose love is so great that He answers before one calls to Him!" [Note: Young, 3:517.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-65.html. 2012.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Isaiah 65:24. Before they call I will answer — “Behold here,” says Vitringa, “a desirable blessing, the truest seal of divine favour and paternal love. The closest conjunction of heaven and earth, that is, of God and men, is expressed in this verse; seeing that God declares he will abundantly and immediately satisfy the desires of his people, which desires are here supposed to be just and conformable to his will; and that he will be of such goodness as of his own accord to prevent their requests, and even answer their prayers before they utter them.”

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/isaiah-65.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

before they call, &c. A reference to Isaiah 30:19. The blessing of Messiah (Psalms 21:3) now extended to the new Israel.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-65.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.

Before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear. Contrast Isaiah 64:7, "none ... calleth," etc.; and note, Isaiah 65:12, 'I called, ye did not answer.' Maurer translates, 'They shall hardly (literally, not yet) call when (literally, and) I will answer; they shall be still speaking when I will hear' (Psalms 32:5; Daniel 9:20-21 ).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-65.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) Before they call . . .—In man’s experience of men, often, as things are now, in his relations with God, there is an interval between prayer and the answer. In the new Jerusalem the two would be simultaneous, or the answer would anticipate the prayer.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-65.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear.
58:9; Psalms 32:5; 50:15; 91:15; Daniel 9:20-23; 10:12; Mark 11:24; Luke 15:18-20; Acts 4:31; 10:30-32; 12:5-16; 1 John 5:14,15
Reciprocal: Genesis 24:15 - before;  Genesis 24:45 - before;  Genesis 25:21 - entreated;  Exodus 33:17 - I will do;  1 Kings 3:12 - I have done;  2 Kings 19:20 - I have heard;  1 Chronicles 21:26 - and called;  2 Chronicles 7:1 - when Solomon;  2 Chronicles 20:14 - Then upon;  2 Chronicles 34:27 - I have even;  Nehemiah 2:6 - So it pleased;  Psalm 3:4 - I cried;  Psalm 10:17 - cause;  Psalm 34:17 - cry;  Psalm 59:10 - prevent;  Psalm 65:2 - thou;  Psalm 102:2 - in the day;  Psalm 108:6 - and answer me;  Psalm 138:3 - In the day;  Isaiah 30:19 - he will;  Isaiah 37:21 - Whereas;  Jeremiah 29:12 - GeneralJeremiah 33:3 - Call;  Hosea 2:21 - saith;  Zechariah 13:9 - they shall call;  Matthew 6:6 - pray;  Luke 17:14 - as;  Luke 23:43 - To day;  John 1:48 - when;  John 16:23 - Whatsoever;  Acts 2:2 - suddenly;  Acts 8:29 - GeneralActs 12:12 - where

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-65.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

SPEEDY BLESSING

Isa . Before they call I will answer.

Divine generosity outruns human petitions. The promise here so graciously given is illustrated practically by many instances recorded in Scripture. And many devout Christians can attest a similar readiness.

I. The condition of speedy blessing. From the language of the text it is plain that the promise is limited to those who—

1. Are conscious of need; and

2. Recognise that such need can be supplied only from a Divine source.

II. The character, &c. The language used is very simple and very human. We are assured that when the petition and its spirit are acceptable, God will—

1. Hear. This is something more than a statement of the Divine Omniscience. He will hear as a king hears the suit of a favourite or the petition of a suppliant, i.e., with an attentive and favourable disposition.

2. Answer. This means not by words merely, but by acts. The assurance is given that God's providence will supply a want, or His grace remit a sin, or His Spirit impart needed strength or guidance.

III. The explanation, &c. If a human benefactor were in question, there would be something paradoxical in this promise. But this disappears when it is remembered who He is who makes this wonderful promise.

1. The perfect acquaintance which the Divine Benefactor has with the wants of the suppliant.

2. The spontaneous and abounding benevolence of the Divine heart hastens to anticipate the wants, to outrun the requests of those who have petitions to present and blessings to implore.—The Homiletical Library, vol. ii. pp. 157, 158.

I. Man needs to call upon and speak to God. II. Man is encouraged to call upon and speak unto God.—Lay Preacher.

Isa .

1. The characters described. II. Their happiness. A blessing upon their toil. Upon their children.

Isa . I. Some types of human nature. II. Their harmonious combination. Altered feelings, tastes, habits—all harmonised. III. The power by which this change is to be effected. IV. The happy issue. Peace, love, righteouness. V. The signal contrast. In the serpent and his seed.—J. Lyth, D.D.

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/isaiah-65.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

24.Before they cry, I will listen. A remarkable promise; for nothing is more desirable than to have God reconciled to us, and to have it in our power to draw near to him with freedom and boldness; for, although we are surrounded by innumerable distresses and calamities, yet we cannot be miserable so long as we are at liberty to betake ourselves to the Lord. Here therefore the Lord promises that we shall not pray in vain. Yet this was also promised to the fathers under the Law. It is certain that, since the beginning of the world, God listened to the fathers, to all that called upon him; for this is the most valuable fruit of faith. But he confirms this more and more. Because the Jews would be exiles for a long time, the Lord solemnly declares that he will not permit them any longer to languish in banishment, and will no longer delay his assistance, but will “listen to them even before they cry.”

This relates chiefly to the kingdom of Christ, through whom we are heard and have access to God the Father, as Paul admirably explains. (Ephesians 2:18.) The fathers indeed enjoyed the same access, and there was no other way in which they could be heard but through Christ; but the door was still narrow and might be said to be shut, whereas now it has been most widely and perfectly thrown open. Under the law the people were wont to stand at a distance in the porch; but now nothing hinders us from entering into the sanctuary itself, because

“the veil of the temple hath been rent.” (Matthew 27:51.)

Thus we have admission into heaven through Christ,

“that we may approach with freedom and boldness to the throne of grace, to obtain mercy and find needful assistance.”
(
Hebrews 4:16.)

A question will be put. “Are there no believers in the world, and is there no kingdom of Christ, in the present day? For it does not appear that God is so ready to render assistance, and there is no visible fruit of our prayers.” I reply. Though it becomes fully evident that we have been heard when the event actually proves it, yet God does not in the meantime overlook us; for he does not permit us to faint, but supports us by the power of his Spirit, that we may wait for him patiently. Nor does he delay, as men do, because he has need of time, but because he wishes to exercise and try our patience. In a word, there are two ways in which God listens to us; first, when he renders assistance openly; and secondly, when he aids us by the power of his Spirit, that we may not sink under the weight of afflictions. And if this doctrine were deeply fixed in the hearts of men, they would fly to God more readily and boldly, and would not dispute so eagerly about calling on saints. For how comes it that men contrive for themselves such a variety of intercessors, to whom they betake themselves rather than to Christ, but because they do not receive that doctrine, and because they reject such large and bountiful promises?

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-65.html. 1840-57.