Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 65:8

Thus says the Lord , "As the new wine is found in the cluster, And one says, ‘Do not destroy it, for there is benefit in it,' So I will act on behalf of My servants In order not to destroy all of them.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Condescension of God;   God Continued...;   Intercession;   The Topic Concordance - Destruction;   Election;   Servants;  
Dictionaries:
Fausset Bible Dictionary - Esther;   Wine;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Servant of the Lord, the;   Vine;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Micah, Book of;   Righteousness;   Servant of the Lord;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Salt;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cluster;   Music;   Psalms, Book of;   Song;   Wine;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Shirah, Pereḳ;   Well, Song of the;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

A blessing is in it - The Hebrews call all things which serve for food ברכה berachah, "a blessing." On this verse Kimchi remarks: "As the cluster of grapes contains, besides the juice, the bark, and the kernels, so the Israelites have, besides the just, sinners among them. Now as the cluster must not be destroyed because there is a blessing, a nutritive part in it; so Israel shall not be destroyed, because there are righteous persons in it. But as the bark and kernels are thrown away, when the wine is pressed out, so shall the sinners be purged away from among the just, and on their return from exile, shall not be permitted to enter into the land of Israel;" Ezekiel 20:38.

For my servant's sakes "For the sake of my servant" - It is to be observed that one of the Koningsburg MSS. collated by Lilienthal points the word עבדי abdi, singular; that is, "my servant," meaning the Messiah; and so read the Septuagint, which gives a very good sense. In two of my old MSS. it is pointed עבדי abadai, and עבדי abdi, "my servant, "this confirms the above reading.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-65.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Thus saith the Lord - This verse is designed to keep their minds from utter despair, and to assure them that they should not be utterly destroyed. See the analysis of the chapter.

As the new wine - The Hebrew word used here (תירושׁ tı̂yrôsh ), means properly “must” or “new wine” (see the notes at Isaiah 24:7). The Septuagint renders it here, ὁ ῥὼξ ho rōx a grain or berry; meaning probably a good grape. The Chaldee renders it, ‹As Noah was found pure in the generation of the deluge, and I said I would not destroy them, that I might rise up a generation from him, so will I do on account of my servants, that I may not destroy all.‘ Jerome renders it, Granum - ‹A kernel,‘ or berry.

Is found in the cluster - Expositors have differed in the interpretation of this passage. The true image seems to be taken from collecting grapes when a large part of them were in some way damaged or spoiled - either by the quality of the vine, or by a bad season, or by having been gathered too early, or being suffered to remain too long in a heap. In such a case the vine-dresser would be ready to throw them away. But in the mass he would find a few that were ripe and good. While he was throwing away the mass, someone would say that a part was good, and would entreat him not to destroy it. So with the Jews. The mass was corrupt, and was to be cut off. But still a portion should be left. This is in accordance with the doctrine everywhere occurring in Isaiah and elsewhere in the Scriptures, that the whole Jewish nation should not be cut off, but that a remnant should be preserved (see the notes at Isaiah 6:13; compare Isaiah 1:9; Isaiah 7:3; Isaiah 10:21; Isaiah 11:11-16).

For a blessing - That which is regarded as a blessing; that is wine (compare Judges 9:13).

So will I do - The whole nation shall not be cut off, but a remnant shall be kept and saved.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-65.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Isaiah 65:8

Thus saith the Lord, As the new wine is found in the cluster.

God’s regard far the faithful remnant of His people

As one does not destroy a cluster consisting of good and bad berries, because one would also destroy the Divine blessing contained in it, so Jehovah for His servants’ sake will not annihilate Israel. He will not destroy all indiscriminately; the sense is not” the sap along with husk and shell (Knobel, Hahn), but: the berries having good sap along with the preponderant bad berries (J. H. Michaelis, Seinecke). (F. Delitzsch, D.D.) It is an application to new circumstances of Isaiah’s doctrine of the remnant (Isaiah 6:13). (Prof. J. Skinner, D. D.)

Destroy it not

“Destroy it not”

View the passage in reference to--

I. GOD’S ANCIENT PEOPLE, THE JEWS.

II. CITIES AND NATIONS GENERALLY.

III. THE STATE OF CHRISTIAN CHURCHES.

IV. PENITENT BACK SLIDERS.

V. YOUNG INQUIRERS.

VI. THOSE WHO ARE CALLED MOST UNPROMISING CHARACTERS. (J. G.Pearsall.)

Little things

Here we have four lessons taught us by a bunch of grapes.

I. THAT GREAT GOOD MAY BE STORED IN LITTLE THINGS. A bunch of grapes is a little thing, and yet there is a blessing in it. With a heart given to Jesus, a child is a sun which cannot but shine, a fountain which cannot but send out streams, a flower which cannot but fill the air with sweetness.

II. GOD ALONE PUTS THE BLESSING INTO LITTLE THINGS. In this He displays--

1. His wisdom.

2. His omnipotence

3. His condescension and compassion.

III. LITTLE THINGS ARE TO BE SPARED FOR THIS BLESSING IN THEM. There are plenty of little things which you are apt to despise because they are little, and yet, destroy them not, says God, for a blessing is in them.

1. Your vows and resolutions.

2. Your principles.

3. Your habits.

4. Your character.

5. Your friendships.

6. Your interest in the heathen.

IV. IF THE BLESSING IS LACKING IN THEM THEY WILL BE UNDONE FOP. EVER. “Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it.” As if it were said, If there were no blessing in it, then it might be destroyed. It is the blessing which delivers. If there is no blessing in us, we are doomed. The unprofitable servant hid his talent in the napkin, but he could not hide himself from his master’s indignation. (J. Bolton.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Isaiah 65:8". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/isaiah-65.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"Thus saith Jehovah, as the new wine is found in the cluster, and one saith, Destroy it not, for a blessing is in it: so will I do for my servants' sake, that I may not destroy them all. And I will bring forth a seed out of Jacob, and out of Judah an inheritor of my mountains; and my chosen shall inherit it, and my servants shall dwell there. And Sharon shall be a fold of flocks, and the valley of Achor a place for herds to lie down in, for my people that have sought me."

The terse message of these verses is: Yes, Israel shall indeed be destroyed, but not all of them. Those who shall inherit God's holy mountain shall be those, and only those, who have "sought" the Lord (Isaiah 65:10).

"Destroy it not ..." (Isaiah 65:8). "The vintagers when they see a cluster with only a few sound grapes in it say, `Destroy it not, for a blessing is in it,' so for the sake of those who are faithful to God,"[13] he will not destroy all of Israel. Kidner noted that in this passage Isaiah united the themes of "The Righteous Remnant," and that of "The Vineyard,"[14] joining many other scholars in stressing the evidences of the unity of the whole prophecy. On this verse, Hailey wrote that, "The Canaanites were cast out of the land because of moral corruption (Deuteronomy 9:3-5); and Israel would retain it only upon the condition of their faithfulness to God (Leviticus 18:24-30; Deuteronomy 4:37-40)."[15]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/isaiah-65.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Thus saith the Lord, as the new wine is found in the cluster,.... Now, lest the truly godly and gracious among these people should be distressed at such denunciations of wrath and destruction, it is suggested that these few, this remnant according to the election of grace, should be saved from the general ruin; as when men are about to cut down a vine, or pluck it up, or prune the unfruitful branches of it, a single cluster of grapes is observed upon it, in which new wine is supposed to be:

and one saith, destroy it not, for a blessing is in it; one that stands by, perhaps the owner of the vine, seeing it, says to his servant, spare the vine, do not cut it down; or do not cut off the branch on which the cluster is, for there is life and sap in it, and it may grow, and bring forth much fruit:

so will I do for my servants' sake, that I may not destroy them all; as formerly he spared Noah at the deluge; of whom the Targum paraphrases the former clause; and Lot at the burning of Sodom; and Joshua and Caleb, when all the rest that came out of Egypt perished in the wilderness; so there would be, and were, a few whom God called by his grace, among the Jews, brought to the knowledge of Christ, and into a Gospel church state in Jerusalem; and these he preserved from the destruction of it, of which they had previous warning, and were directed to Pella, where they were safe: and so, wherever the truth of grace is, such shall not be destroyed; and which is a blessing, and a blessed work in the heart of man, and is a new thing there; and, like new wine, delightful to God and man; and like wine in the cluster, all grace, and all spiritual blessings are with it; and which must be tried by afflictions, to be brought into exercise, as the cluster is pressed; and which is found but in a few, like wine in a single cluster, concerning whom the Father says, destroy them not, being loved and chosen by him; and so says the Son, being redeemed by his blood; and the same says the Spirit, being regenerated and sanctified by his grace; and such being the servants of the Lord, and partakers of his grace, he will not suffer any of them to be destroyed; but encompasses them with his favour; holds them with his right hand; suffers no enemy to do them wrong, and guards them with his power.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-65.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Thus saith the LORD, As the new wine is found in the cluster, and [one] saith, Destroy it not; for a m blessing [is] in it: so will I do for my servants' sake, that I may not destroy them all.

(m) That is, it is profitable: meaning that God will not destroy the faithful branches of his vineyard, when he destroys the rotten stocks, that is, the hypocrites.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-65.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

new wineas if some grapes having good wine-producing juice in them, be found in a cluster which the vinedresser was about to throw away as bad, and one saith, etc.

blessing — that is, good wine-producing juice (compare Judges 9:13; Joel 2:14).

so — God will spare the godly “remnant,” while the ungodly mass of the nation shall be destroyed (Isaiah 1:9; Isaiah 6:13; Isaiah 10:21; Isaiah 11:11, Isaiah 11:12-16).

my servants — the godly remnant. But Horsley, “for the sake of my servant, Messiah.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-65.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Thus saith the LORD, As the new wine is found in the cluster, and one saith, Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it: so will I do for my servants' sakes, that I may not destroy them all.

Thus, … — These word's may be conceived as a gracious answer from God to the prophet, pleading God's covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Israel. To this God replies, that he intended no such severity. His threatening should be made good upon the generality of this people.

Blessing — But yet, as in a vineyard, which is generally unfruitful, there may be some vine that brings forth fruit, and has the hopes of new wine in the cluster, and as to such, the gardener bids his servant destroy it not, for there is in them what speaks God's blessing.

So — So (saith God) will I do for my servants sake, that I may not destroy them all, for the sake of my servants, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-65.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 65:8 Thus saith the LORD, As the new wine is found in the cluster, and [one] saith, Destroy it not; for a blessing [is] in it: so will I do for my servants’ sakes, that I may not destroy them all.

Ver. 8. Thus saith the Lord.] This he saith in effect, I will not destroy the righteous with the wicked, but still reserve a "seed," a remnant; and this he setteth forth by a fine and fit comparison; even as the husbandman, if he find any wine in the cluster, that is, any life or sap in the vine, cutteth it not down utterly.

So will I do for my servants’ sake.] Few though they be, even as one cluster of grapes upon a vine, yet because they are botri mustei, clusters full of new and sweet wine, full of the juice of piety, they shall be preserved.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-65.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Isaiah 65:8

Here we have four lessons taught us by a bunch of grapes.

I. That great good may be stored in little things. A bunch of grapes is a little thing, and yet there is a blessing in it. With a heart given to Jesus, a child is a sun which cannot but shine, a fountain which cannot but send out streams, a flower which cannot but fill the air with sweetness.

II. God alone puts the blessing into little things. In this He displays: (1) His wisdom; (2) His omnipotence; (3) His condescension and compassion.

III. Little things are to be spared for this blessing in them. There are plenty of little things which you are apt to despise because they are little, and yet, destroy them not, says God, for a blessing is in them. (1) Your vows and resolutions; (2) your principles; (3) your habits; (4) your character; (5) your friendships; (6) your interest in the heathen.

IV. If the blessing is lacking in them they will be undone for ever. "Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it." As if it were said, If there were no blessing in it, then it might be destroyed. It is the blessing which delivers. If there is no blessing in us, we are doomed. The unprofitable servant hid his talent in the napkin, but he could not hide himself from his master's indignation.

J. Bolton, Family Treasury, Jan. 1863, p.111.

References: Isaiah 65:8.—Outline Sermons to Children, p. 104. Isaiah 65:11.—F. W. Farrar, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xviii., p. 321. Isaiah 65:19.—Spurgeon, Morning by Morning, p. 236. Isaiah 65:20.—G. Brooks, Outlines of Sermons, p. 341.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/isaiah-65.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

These words must be conceived as a gracious answer from God to the prophet, saying as Abraham, Genesis 18:23,25, or as Moses, Exodus 32:11-13, pleading God’s covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Israel. To this God replieth that he intended no such severity, the unfaithfulness of men should not make his promise of no effect, Romans 3:3. His threatening should be made good upon the generality of this people, whose vine was of Sodom, and of the fields of Gomorrah, Deuteronomy 32:32. But yet, as in a vineyard which is generally unfruitful, there may be some particular vine that brings forth fruit; or, as in a vine which is full of luxuriant branches that bring forth no fruit, there may be here and there a branch that bringeth forth fruit, and hath the hopes of new wine in the cluster; and as to such, the gardener bids his servant

Destroy it not, or them not, for they are fruitful; there is in them what speaketh God’s blessing, or what may be of use, and do us good.

So (saith God)

will I do for my servants’ sake, that I may not destroy them all; either for the sake of my servants, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, with whom I anciently made a covenant; or for my servant David’s sake; or for the sake of such as are my elect at this time amongst them: see Jeremiah 30:11 Amos 9:1.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-65.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.Not all are to be so served. For, as an occasional cluster is ripe, and new wine (ever regarded as a blessing) is in it all the vintage season, so, in this mass of corrupted Israel is a small undefiled group, worthy to be culled out and saved. In a general way, Christ’s time and ministry are here very aptly illustrated; but that the prophet distinctly and exclusively meant this, may be venturesome to assert, unless it be viewed as perspective prophecy.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/isaiah-65.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Yahweh promised not to destroy the whole nation (cluster of grapes), but just the sinners among them (the bad grapes). The whole nation constituted His servants, but most of them were unprofitable servants.

"Reading chs40-55 alone might give one the impression that all that is necessary to be part of the remnant is to believe God"s promises to deliver. Chs56-66 make plain that those who are truly the servants of God are those who believe his promises enough to obey his covenant." [Note: Ibid, p646.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-65.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Whole. The good grain is preserved amid the general corruption. (Haydock) --- A few of the Jews were chosen to believe in Christ.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-65.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Thus saith the LORD. Note the frequent occurrence of this expression in predicting these new things.

As = According as.

new wine. Hebrew. tirosh. App-27. Here is further reference to the new Israel. See notes on Isaiah 65:1.

My servants" sake. Some codices, with one early printed edition, and Septuagint, read "servant"s (singular): i.e. Messiah (see note on Isaiah 37:35): = "for the sake of My servant".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-65.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Thus saith the LORD, As the new wine is found in the cluster, and one saith, Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it: so will I do for my servants' sakes, that I may not destroy them all.

As the new wine is found in the cluster - As if some grapes having good wine-producing juice in them be found in a cluster which the vine-dresser was about to throw away as bad.

And (one) saith, Destroy it not; for a blessing (is) in it. "A blessing" - i:e., good wine-producing juice (cf. Judges 9:13; Joel 2:14).

So will I do for my servants' sakes, that I may not destroy them all. God will spare the godly 'remnant,' while the ungodly mass of the nation shall be destroyed (Isaiah 1:9; Isaiah 6:13; Isaiah 10:21; Isaiah 11:11-16).

My servants - the godly remnant. But Horsley, 'for the sake of my servant, Messiah.' So the Septuagint and Arabic translate singular.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-65.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) As the new wine . . .—Literally, the must, or unfermented juice of the grape. The transition from the denunciations of the preceding verse is abrupt, and suggests the thought of an interval of time and absence of direct continuity. Possibly, however, a link may be found in the “first” of the amended translation, which prepares the way for something that is to follow. God chastens, but does not destroy.

Destroy it not . . .—The thought is that as even one fruitful cluster of grapes will lead the vine-dresser to spare an otherwise fruitless vine in the hope of a fuller blessing in the future, so Jehovah will spare a sinful nation for the twenty or the ten righteous (Genesis 18:23-33). The words “destroy it not” are those which stand at the head of Psalms 57-59, as indicating the tune to which they were to be sung; and it is a natural inference that it may have been a popular vintage song, and therefore doubly apt for the prophet’s purpose. May we compare our own song of “Wood-man, spare that tree?” applied, as it has been, to the trees of ancient institutions.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-65.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Thus saith the LORD, As the new wine is found in the cluster, and one saith, Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it: so will I do for my servants' sakes, that I may not destroy them all.
6:13; Jeremiah 30:11; Joel 2:14; Amos 9:8,9; Matthew 24:22; Mark 13:20; Romans 9:27-29; Romans 11:5,6,24-26
Reciprocal: Genesis 18:26 - GeneralGenesis 18:32 - I will not;  Genesis 19:22 - for;  Genesis 30:27 - the Lord;  2 Kings 11:2 - they hid him;  2 Chronicles 22:11 - she slew him not;  Isaiah 10:21 - return;  Isaiah 19:24 - shall;  Isaiah 35:2 - the glory;  Jeremiah 23:8 - GeneralEzekiel 14:22 - therein;  Micah 5:5 - when the;  John 11:15 - for;  2 Corinthians 8:9 - for;  Ephesians 1:4 - as;  Revelation 7:3 - Hurt not

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-65.html.

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary

DESTROY IT NOT

Isa . Thus saith the Lord, Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it, &c.

"Behold, therefore, the goodness and severity of God." Let it not, however, be supposed that God delights to destroy men's lives, or is capricious in the bestowment of rewards and punishments. The goodness and severity of God are not contradictions in the Divine nature, but the two halves of His perfect character (Exo ). The burden of our text is MERCY. HOW many applications may we make of the words, "Destroy it not!" Let us view the passage in reference to—

I. GOD'S ANCIENT PEOPLE THE JEWS. The Jews at different parts of their history have resembled clusters of grapes, bruised, trodden down, and unfit for use. Yet God says to His Church, "Destroy it not; for a blessing is in it." Do you speak of the aversion and obstinacy of Israel? Let me ask, Wherein is the heart of a Jew worse than the heart of a Gentile? Is he self-righteous, and were not you, &c.?

II. CITIES AND NATIONS GENERALLY. Let our eye gaze on this great metropolis. But shall we yield to despondence? Never, whilst there are so many righteous men and intercessors. England has a blessing, yea, is not only blessed, but is a blessing, a blessing to the nations of the earth. And may we not believe that there are many nations God will not destroy because a blessing is in them?

III. THE STATE OF CHRISTIAN CHURCHES. A review of the history of the Church will lead many persons to say it is the history of declension and revival. But alas! has there been no period which may be called the dark ages? Yet, even in these times of apostacy, God has had a people, and among them men and women of eminent piety, who had not defiled their garments. The text should deter us from yielding to despondency and inactivity.

IV. T. PENITENT BACKSLIDERS. The tree decays and falls, but still there may be life in the root, and new shoots may be sent up. So was it with David and Peter, who not only sighed and wept, but brought forth fruits meet for repentance, and whose latter end testified to the grace of God that was in them. I urge backsliders not to despair.

V. YOUNG INQUIRERS. The fruits of righteousness at first may be immature. Many young professors are discouraged by harsh reproof, and questioning as to sincerity; because one or two grapes in the cluster are imperfect some would throw away the whole cluster. Let me give you a word of warning as well as encouragement. Though Christ will not destroy the bruised reed, nor the tender grapes, yet many destroyers are around you. Your dangers may not be open persecution, nor some of the supposed formidable temptations, but a number of small, trivial, almost imperceptible snares,—little sins, falsely so-called. These are the little foxes that spoil the vines, for our vines have tender grapes. Be not afraid, none so gentle and loving as the great Vine-dresser, when even He comes with His pruning-knife.

VI. THOSE WHO ARE CALLED MOST UNPROMISING CHARACTERS. Have we never heard of a man of sterling piety, talent, liberality, and influence in the Church of God, who was once the most unruly and ill-disposed boy in the Sabbath-school, but who, owing to a kind and persevering teacher, received convictions and instructions that never were forgotten? Talk not of unpromising characters as hopeless. Did not John Newton seem unpromising when a captain on board a slave ship, &c. Some of the so-called unpromising characters are more hopeful than many who are "not far from the kingdom of God." How infinitely valuable must be the soul of man! If you would not destroy a vine or cluster of grapes, how much less the soul. Will you, by indifference or unbelief, destroy your soul? The soul though fallen has a blessing in it. What encouragement is offered us. God is kinder than man, &c.—J. G. Pearsall: The Christian World, Dec. 2, 1864.

Isa . I. Apostate Israel and their curse. II. The true Israel and their blessing.

Isa . Apostacy. I. Forsakes God. II. Forgets His ordinances. III. Bestows its devotion and energies upon false objects. IV. Meets with its merited doom (vol. i. p. 67).

Isa . I. The gracious call of God. II. The impenitence of many. III. The inevitable result. (See p. 366.)—Dr. Lyth.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/phc/isaiah-65.html. Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1892.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.Thus saith Jehovah. Here the Prophet softens the preceding statement; for otherwise it would have been very hard to say that the iniquities of the fathers would be brought to remembrance in such a manner, that the Lord would destroy the fathers and the children along with them; and these things might strike believers with such horror as to lead them to think that their salvation was past all hope. We must therefore be carefully on our guard, and observe the reason why the Lord is angry with us; for he wishes to terrify us, so as to lead us to himself, and not so as to throw us into despair. For this reason he holds out hope to believers, that they may not lose courage; and, by exhibiting consolation, he encourages them to repentance. He confirms it by a comparison.

As if one found a grape in a cluster. As if a person who has determined to root out a vine that is inconvenient or injurious to him, and finds a fruit-bearing branch, shall spare it; so the Lord will refrain from tearing up those in which he shall find no strength or flavor. Formerly he complained that the people were useless, and even that they yielded bitter fruits. (Isaiah 5:2.) Isaiah retains the same comparison, but applies it in a different manner. “Though the people may be said to be an unfruitful and degenerate vine, yet there are still left some fruit-bearing branches which the Lord will not suffer to perish.

But this may be understood in two ways; either that the Lord will preserve his people for the sake of the elect, or that, when the reprobate are destroyed, he will rescue believers from destruction. There is a wide difference between these two interpretations. As to the first, we know that the wicked are sometimes spared on account of good men, whom God does not wish to destroy or to involve in the same judgment, as various examples of Scripture sufficiently shew. The Lord would have spared Sodom, if he had found but ten good men in it. (Genesis 18:32.) All who sailed along with Paul, to the number of “two hundred and seventy-six,” (Acts 27:37,) were “given to him” and rescued from shipwreck, that the power which He manifested in his servant might be more illustriously displayed. (Acts 27:24.) The Lord blessed the house of Potiphar, and made it to prosper in all things, for the sake of Joseph who was in his family. (Genesis 39:5.) There are other examples of the same kind, which every one will easily collect for himself.

But I approve more highly of the other interpretation, that the Lord will punish the sins of his people in such a manner as to have regard nevertheless to his own, and not to involve all universally in the same destruction. Nor does he mean only that believers shall be saved, but that a people shall be left amongst whom men shall call on his name. And the comparison ought to be carefully observed; for he shews that the remnant will be small, as compared with the multitude which was at that time, as has been already explained. (Isaiah 1:9.)

Now, as to believers being often punished along with the reprobate, let us not think that it is wrong; for the Lord will often find in each of us enough of blame to afflict and punish us. Besides, he wishes to instruct and arouse us by his chastisements; and seeing that we have been joined to a certain people, and, as it were, ingrafted into their body, we undoubtedly ought not to think it strange if we, who may be said to be diseased members, shall share in the same strokes and pains. Yet the Lord moderates the punishment, so as not to tear up by the roots the elect plants.

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 65:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-65.html. 1840-57.