corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.20.04.08
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

James 5:7

Therefore be patient, brethren, until the coming of the Lord. The farmer waits for the precious produce of the soil, being patient about it, until it gets the early and late rains.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Be patient, therefore - Because God is coming to execute judgment on this wicked people, therefore be patient till he comes. He seems here to refer to the coming of the Lord to execute judgment on the Jewish nation, which shortly afterwards took place.

The husbandman waiteth - The seed of your deliverance is already sown, and by and by the harvest of your salvation will take place. God's counsels will ripen in due time.

The early and latter rain - The rain of seed time; and the rain of ripening before harvest: the first fell in Judea, about the beginning of November, after the seed was sown; and the second towards the end of April, when the ears were filling, and this prepared for a full harvest. Without these two rains, the earth would have been unfruitful. These God had promised: I will give you the rain of your land in his due season, the first rain and the latter rain, that thou mayest gather in thy corn, and thy wine, and thy oil, Deuteronomy 11:14. But for these they were not only to wait patiently, but also to pray, Ask ye of the Lord rain in the time of the latter rain; so shall the Lord make bright clouds, and give them showers of rain, to every one grass in the field; Zechariah 10:1.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on James 5:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/james-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Be patient therefore, brethren - That is, under such wrongs as the apostle had described in the previous verses. Those whom he addressed were doubtless suffering under those oppressions, and his object was to induce them to bear their wrongs without murmuring and without resistance. One of the methods of doing this was by showing them, in an address to their rich oppressors, that those who injured and wronged them would be suitably punished at the day of judgment, or that their cause was in the hands of God; and another method of doing it was by the direct inculcation of the duty of patience. Compare the notes at Matthew 5:38-41, Matthew 5:43-45. The margin here is, “be long patient,” or “suffer with long patience.” The sense of the Greek is, “be long-suffering, or let not your patience be exhausted. Your courage, vigor, and forbearance is not to be short-lived, but is to be enduring. Let it continue as long as there is need of it, even to the coming of the Lord. Then you will be released from sufferings.”

Unto the coming of the Lord - The coming of the Lord Jesus - either to remove you by death, or to destroy the city of Jerusalem and bring to an end the Jewish institutions, or to judge the world and receive his people to himself. The “coming of the Lord” in any way was an event which Christians were taught to expect, and which would be connected with their deliverance from troubles. As the time of his appearing was not revealed, it was not improper to refer to that as an event that might possibly be near; and as the removal of Christians by death is denoted by the phrase “the coming of the Lord” - that is, his coming to each one of us - it was not improper to speak of death in that view. On the general subject of the expectations entertained among the early Christians of the second advent of the Saviour, see the 1 Corinthians 15:51 note; 2 Thessalonians 2:2-3 note.

Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth - The farmer waits patiently for the grain to grow. It requires time to mature the crop, and he does not become impatient. The idea seems to be, that we should wait for things to develop themselves in their proper season, and should not be impatient before that season arrives. In due time we may expect the harvest to be ripened. We cannot hasten it. We cannot control the rain, the sun, the season; and the farmer therefore patiently waits until in the regular course of events he has a harvest. So we cannot control and hasten the events which are in God‘s own keeping; and we should patiently wait for the developments of his will, and the arrangements of his providence, by which we may obtain what we desire.

And hath long patience for it - That is, his patience is not exhausted. It extends through the whole time in which, by the divine arrangements, he may expect a harvest.

Until he receive the early and latter rain - In the climate of Palestine there are two rainy seasons, on which the harvest essentially depends - the autumnal and the spring rains - called here and elsewhere in the Scriptures the early and the latter rains. See Deuteronomy 11:14; Job 29:23; Jeremiah 5:24. The autumnal or early rains of Scripture, usually commence in the latter half of October or the beginning of November; not suddenly, but by degrees, which gives opportunity for the husbandman to sow his fields of wheat and barley. The rains come mostly from the west or south-west, continuing for two or three days at a time, and falling especially during the nights. The wind then chops round to the north or east, and several days of fine weather succeed. During the months of November and December the rains continue to fail heavily; afterwards they return only at longer intervals, and are less heavy; but at no period during the winter do they entirely cease to occur.

Snow often falls in Jerusalem, in January and February, to the depth of a foot or more, but it does not last long. Rain continues to fall more or less through the month of March, but it is rare after that period. At the present time there are not any particular periods of rain, or successions of showers, which might be regarded as distinct rainy seasons. The whole period from October to March now constitutes only one continued rainy season, without any regularly intervening time of prolonged fair weather. Unless, therefore, there has been some change in the climate since the times of the New Testament, the early and the latter rains for which the husbandman waited with longing, seem rather to have implied the first showers of autumn, which revived the parched and thirsty earth, and prepared it for the seed; and the latter showers of spring, which continued to refresh and forward the ripening crops and the vernal products of the fields. In ordinary seasons, from the cessation of the showers in spring until their commencement in October or November, rain never falls, and the sky is usually serene. - Robinson‘s Biblical Researches, vol. ii., pp. 96-100.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/james-5.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Be patient therefore, brethren, until the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient over it, until it receive the early and latter rain.

Until the coming of the Lord ... In Jesus' great prophetic utterances regarding the destruction of Jerusalem, as recorded in Matthew 24; Mark 13, and Luke 21, our Lord blended the prophecies of the destruction of Jerusalem with those of the coming of the end of the world; and, in all probability, not even the apostles and other New Testament writers understood until long afterward that the two events would be separated by a vast distance in time. Only time would reveal that the destruction of Jerusalem, which was indeed the end of the Jewish dispensation, of the Jewish state, and of Judaistic persecution of Christianity, would be only a type of the destruction of the whole world at the Second Advent. They fully understood that Jerusalem was to be destroyed before that "generation" had passed (see in my Commentary on Mark for double meaning of "generation," p. 292). "Coming of the Lord," therefore, in this place has primary reference to the destruction of Jerusalem; but in its wider reference to the Second Advent, the admonition of "patience" applies to all generations of Christians.

Be patient, therefore ... "Patience," as used here, does not mean merely patience with respect to persons, but as Gibson noted, "It includes endurance in respect of things (that is, of events)."[24] Harper paraphrased the meaning as "Patiently accept God's delay in the timing of our Lord's return."[25]

The early and latter rain ... "The husbandman" here is a farmer who, after planting his crops, does not expect the harvest at once, but patiently waits until the early and latter rains have sprouted and matured the grain. As Wessel explained:

In Palestine, the early rain in October and November came after the crop was planted, and the latter rain in April and May when they were maturing. Both were crucial for the success of the crop.[26]SIZE>

Some have seen in this illustration an intimation that God in his harvest of the earth will also wait for the early rain (that prosperous era of Christianity before the destruction of Jerusalem), and the latter rain (the evangelization of the world prior to the final advent of Christ). Although interesting, it is precarious to make such an illustration the basis of any specific prophesy. However, as Carson noted, "The words naturally recall our Lord's comparison of the consummation of the age to a harvest (Matthew 13:39)."[27] Joel also has some words in the same line of thought (Joel 2:23).

[24] E. C. S. Gibson, op. cit., p. 68.

[25] A. F. Harper, op. cit., p. 242.

[26] Walter W. Wessel, Wycliffe New Testament Commentary (Chicago: Moody Press, 1971), p. 961.

[27] T. Carson, op. cit., p. 580.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/james-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Be patient therefore, brethren,.... The apostle here addresses himself to the poor who were oppressed by the rich men, and these he calls "brethren" of whom he was not ashamed; when he does not bestow this title upon the rich, though professors of the same religion: these poor brethren he advises to be patient under their sufferings, to bear them with patience,

unto the coming of the Lord; not to destroy Jerusalem, but either at death, or at the last, judgment; when he will take vengeance on their oppressors, and deliver them from all their troubles, and put them into the possession of that kingdom, and glory, to which they are called; wherefore, in the mean while, he would have them be quiet and easy, not to murmur against God, nor seek to take vengeance on men, but leave it to God, to whom it belongs, who will judge his people:

behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth; ripe fruit, which arises from the seed he sows in the earth; and which may be called "precious", because useful both to man and beast; see Deuteronomy 33:14 and between this, and the sowing of the seed, is a considerable time, during which the husbandman waits; and this may be an instruction in the present case:

and hath patience for it until he receive the early and latter rain; the Jews had seldom rains any more than twice a year; the early, or former rain, was shortly after the feast of tabernaclesF21Bartenora in Misn. Taanith, c. 1. sect. 2. , in the month Marchesvan, or October, when the seed was sown in the earth; and if it did not rain, they prayed for it, on the third or seventh day of the monthF23T. Bab. Taanith, fol. 4. 2. & 6. 1. & 10. 1. & Bava Metzia, fol. 28. 1. Maimon. Tephilla, c. 2. sect. 16. ; and the latter rain was in Nisan, or MarchF24Targum, Jarchi, Kimchi, & Miclol Jophi in Joel ii. 23. Vajikra Rabba, sect. 35. fol. 175. 3. , just before harvest; and to this distinction the passage refers.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on James 5:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/james-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

2 Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. 3 Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.

(2) He applies that to the poor, which he spoke against the rich, warning them to wait for the Lord's coming patiently, who will avenge the injuries which the rich men do to them. {(3)} The taking away of an objection: Although his coming seems to linger, yet at the least we must follow the farmer, we who do patiently wait for the times that are fitting for the fruits of the earth. And again, God will not postpone the least bit of the time that he has appointed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on James 5:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/james-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Be patient therefore — as judgment is so near (James 5:1, James 5:3), ye may well afford to be “patient” after the example of the unresisting Just one (James 5:6).

brethren — contrasted with the “rich” oppressors, James 5:1-6.

unto the coming of the Lord — Christ, when the trial of your patience shall cease.

husbandman waiteth for — that is, patiently bears toils and delays through hope of the harvest at last. Its “preciousness” (compare Psalm 126:6, “precious seed”) will more than compensate for all the past. Compare the same image, Galatians 6:3, Galatians 6:9.

hath long patience for it — “over it,” in respect to it.

until he receive — “until it receive” [Alford]. Even if English Version be retained, the receiving of the early and latter rains is not to be understood as the object of his hope, but the harvest for which those rains are the necessary preliminary. The early rain fell at sowing time, about November or December; the latter rain, about March or April, to mature the grain for harvest. The latter rain that shall precede the coming spiritual harvest, will probably be another Pentecost-like effusion of the Holy Ghost.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/james-5.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Be patient therefore (μακροτυμησατε ουνmakrothumēsate oun). A direct corollary (ουνoun therefore) from the coming judgment on the wicked rich (James 5:1-6). First aorist (constative) active imperative of μακροτυμεωmakrothumeō late compound (Plutarch, lxx) from μακροτυμοςmakrothumos (μακροσ τυμοςmakrosυπομονηthumos of long spirit, not losing heart), as in Matthew 18:26. The appeal is to the oppressed brethren. Catch your wind for a long race (long-tempered as opposed to short-tempered). On the exhortation to patience (υπομενωhupomonē) see James 1:3., James 1:12 and repeated in James 5:11. They will need both submission (μακροτυμιαhupomenō James 5:11) and steadfastness (εως της παρουσιαςmakrothumia James 5:10).

Until the coming of the Lord (ο γεωργοςheōs tēs parousias). The second coming of Christ he means, the regular phrase here and in James 5:8 for that idea (Matthew 24:3, Matthew 24:37, Matthew 24:39; 1 Thessalonians 2:19, etc.).

The husbandman (γη εργωho geōrgos). The worker in the ground (εκδεχεταιgēεκδεχομαιergō) as in Matthew 21:33.

Waiteth for (τιμιονekdechetai). Present middle indicative of τιμηekdechomai old verb for eager expectation as in Acts 17:16.

Precious (μακροτυμων επ αυτωιtimion). Old adjective from μακροτυμεωtimē (honor, price), dear to the farmer because of his toil for it. See 1 Peter 1:19.

Being patient over it (εως λαβηιmakrothumōn ep' autōi). Present active participle of εωςmakrothumeō just used in the exhortation, picturing the farmer longing and hoping over his precious crop (cf. Luke 18:7 of God).

Until it receive (λαμβανωheōs labēi). Temporal clause of the future with προμον και οπσιμονheōs and the second aorist active subjunctive of υετονlambanō vividly describing the farmer‘s hopes and patience.

The early and latter rain (προμοςprokai opsimon). The word for rain (πρωhueton Acts 14:17) is absent from the best MSS. The adjective προμοςpro(from πρωςprōearly) occurs here only in N.T., though old in the form οπσιμονproand οπσεprōSee Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 5:24, etc. for these terms for the early rain in October or November for the germination of the grain, and the latter rain (opsimon from opse late, here only in N.T.) in April and May for maturing the grain.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/james-5.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Be patient ( μακροθυμήσατε )

From μακρός , long, and θυμός , soul or spirit, but with the sense of strong passion, stronger even than ὀργή , anger, as is maintained by Schmidt (“Synonymik”), who describes θυμός as a tumultuous welling up of the whole spirit; a mighty emotion which seizes and moves the whole inner man. Hence the restraint implied in μακροθυμία is most correctly expressed by long-suffering, which is its usual rendering in the New Testament. It is a patient holding out under trial; a long-protracted restraint of the soul from yielding to passion, especially the passion of anger. In the New Testament the word and its cognates are sometimes rendered by patient or patience, which conceals the distinction from ὑπομονή , uniformly rendered patience, and signifying persistent endurance, whether in action or suffering. As Trench observes, “ ὑπομονή is perseverantia and patientia both in one.” Thus Bishop Ellicott: “The brave patience with which the Christian contends against the various hindrances, persecutions, and temptations that befall him in his conflict with the inward and outward world.” Ὑπομονή. contains an element of manliness. Thus Plato joins it with the adverb ἀνδρικῶς , in a manly way, and contrasts it with ἀνάνδρως , unmanly, cowardly. Μακροθυμία is exercised toward persons; ὑπομονή , toward things. The former is ascribed to God as an attribute (Luke 18:7; 1 Peter 3:20; 2 Peter 3:9, 2 Peter 3:15), the latter never; for the God of patience (Romans 15:5) is the God who imparts patience to his children. “There can be no resistance to God nor burden upon him, the Almighty, from things. Therefore ὑπομονή cannot find place in him” (Trench). Rev. retains A. V., be patient. The thought links itself naturally with that in the preceding verse: the righteous doth not resist.

Therefore

Since things are so. Referring to the condition of things described in the previous passage.

Brethren

In contrast with the rich just addressed.

Waiteth ( ἐκδέχεται )

With expectation. Compare Matthew 13:30; Mark 4:27.

The early and latter rain ( ὑετὸν πρώιμον καὶ ὄψιμον )

Both adjectives only here in New Testament. Ὑετὸν , rain, is rejected by all the best texts. The early rain fell in October, November, and December, and extended into January and February. These rains do not come suddenly, but by degrees, so that the farmer can sow his wheat or barley. The rains are mostly from the west or southwest (Luke 12:54), continuing two or three days at a time, and falling mostly in the night. Then the wind shifts to the north or east, and fine weather ensues (Proverbs 25:23). The latter rains, which are much lighter, fall in March and April. Rain in harvest was regarded as a miracle (1 Samuel 12:16-18). See Introduction, on James' local allusions.


Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/james-5.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.

The husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit — Which will recompense his labour and patience.

Till he receives the former rain — Immediately after sowing.

And the latter — Before the harvest.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on James 5:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/james-5.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Be patient therefore; that is, in enduring the oppression above described.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/james-5.html. 1878.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

7.] Be patient (reff.) therefore (the οὖν ( ἐόν, ‘matters being so’) is a general reference to the prophetic strain of the previous passage: judgment on your oppressors being so near, and your own part, as the Lord’s δίκαιοι, being that of unresistingness), brethren (contrast to οἱ πλούσιοι, last addressed), until ( ἕως as a preposition, see Winer, § 54. 6. “Non tempus tantum sed rem quoque indicat, qua ἡ θλῖψις μακροθύμως toleranda tollatur.” Schneckenb.) the coming of the Lord (i. e. here, beyond all reasonable question, of Christ. ὁ κύριος, it is true, usually in this Epistle is to be taken in the O. T. sense, as denoting the Father: but we have in ch. James 1:1 and James 2:1 examples of St. James using it of our Saviour, and it is therefore better to keep so well known a phrase to its ordinary meaning, than with Theile and De W. (but only wahrscheinlich) to understand it, “Dei, qui Messia adventante invisibili modo præsens est”). Encouragement by the example of the husbandman. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient over it (with reference to it: quasi sitting over it and watching it: this local superposition is the root of all derived meanings of ἐπί with a dative), till it (better than “he,” as Luth. and E. V.) shall have received the early and latter (rain) (see reff., and Winer, Realw. under Witterung. From the latter it appears that the πρώϊμος fell in Oct., Nov., and Dec., extending, with occasional snow, into Jan. (see reff. Deut., Jer.): and after fine spring weather in Feb., the ὄψιμος in March to the end of April (reff. and Jeremiah 3:3 Heb. and E. V.). Œc. gives a curious interpretation of the early and latter rain: πρώϊμος ὑετός, ἡ ἐν νεότητι μετὰ δακρύων μετάνοια· ὄψιμος, ἡ ἐν τῷ γήρᾳ. As to the reading, it is much more probable that ὑετόν has been supplied than that it has been erased):


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on James 5:7". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/james-5.html. 1863-1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7Be patient therefore. From this inference it is evident that what has hitherto been said against the rich, pertains to the consolation of those who seemed for a time to be exposed to their wrongs with impunity. For after having mentioned the causes of those calamities which were hanging over the rich, and having stated this among others, that they proudly and cruelly ruled over the poor, he immediately adds, that we who are unjustly oppressed, have this reason to be patient, because God would become the judge. For this is what he means when he says, unto the coming of the Lord, that is, that the confusion of things which is now seen in the world will not be perpetual, because the Lord at his coming will reduce things to order, and that therefore our minds ought to entertain good hope; for it is not without reason that the restoration of all things is promised to us at that day. And though the day of the Lord is everywhere called in the Scriptures a manifestation of his judgment and grace, when he succors his people and chastises the ungodly, yet I prefer to regard the expression here as referring to our final deliverance.

Behold, the husbandman. Paul briefly refers to the same similitude in 2 Timothy 2:6, when he says that the husbandman ought to labor before he gathers the fruit; but James more fully expresses the idea, for he mentions the daily patience of the husbandman, who, after having committed the seed to the earth, confidently, or at least patiently, waits until the time of harvest comes; nor does he fret because the earth does not immediately yield a ripe fruit. He hence concludes, that we ought not to be immoderately anxious, if we must now labor and sow, until the harvest as it were comes, even the day of the Lord.

The precious fruit. He calls it precious, because it is the nourishment of life and the means of sustaining it. And James intimates, that since the husbandman suffers his life, so precious to him, to lie long deposited in the bosom of the earth, and calmly suspends his desire to gather the fruit, we ought not to be too hasty and fretful, but resignedly to wait for the day of our redemption. It is not necessary to specify particularly the other parts of the comparison.

The early and the latter rains. By the two words, early and latter, two seasons are pointed out; the first follows soon after sowing; and the other when the corn is ripening. So the prophets spoke, when they intended to set forth the time for rain, (Deuteronomy 28:12; Joel 2:23; Hosea 6:3.) And he has mentioned both times, in order more fully to shew that husbandmen are not disheartened by the slow progress of time, but bear with the delay.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/james-5.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

7 Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.

Ver. 7. Be patient therefore] q.d. You poor oppressed ones, hold out faith and patience. You shall shortly have help. As the mother’s breasts ache to be sucklings so doth God’s heart yearn to be helping.

Unto the coming of the Lord] sc. By particular deliverance; and not only by the general judgment. Let patience have line and rope.

Waiteth for the precious fruit] Being in novum annum semper dives, as the proverb is ever rich against the next year. Spes alit agricolas, Hope holds up the husbandman’s heart.

And hath long patience] He looks not to sow and reap in a day, as the Hyperboreans are said to do, that sow shortly after the sunrising with them, and reap before the sun set; because the whole half year is one continual day with them. (Heresbach de re Rustic.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on James 5:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/james-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

James 5:7. Brethren, It would have been exceedingly strange if the Christians had condemned and killed any of their own number: what is said, therefore, James 5:6 as well as several other things, prove that James 5:1-6 is an apostrophe to the unbelieving Jews; who were wicked themselves, and persecuted the Christians, but were to come to a speedy and exemplary destruction. His beginning this exhortation with Brethren, and recommending patience to them, from the consideration of the approaching destruction of their rich and potent adversaries, seems a plain intimation that the apostle is turning his address to the Christians, to whom, in the preceding verses, he had not been speaking directly; for they were in a suffering state, and were not in general the persecutors of others. See ch. James 2:6-7.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on James 5:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/james-5.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. The duty exhorted to, patience: Be patient, brethren. Patience is a sense of afflictions without murmuring, and of injuries without revenge. It is the duty of Christians to be patient under their sufferings, though they be long and sharp.

Observe, 2. The argument to enforce this duty, The coming of the Lord draweth nigh. This may be understood of Christ's particular coming to judge his murderers at Jerusalem, which was then at hand, or of his general coming to judge the world at the last day. As if our apostle had said, "Have a little patience, and when your Lord cometh he will put a period to all your afflictions; with desire long for his coming, and yet with patience wait for it."

Observe, 3. A pattern of patience, propounded in the husbandman, he waiteth, and waiteth long for the time of harvest; and in order thereunto, for the former and latter rain, to prepare the corn for the day of a joyful harvest. Now, in imitation of the husbandman, the patient Christian thus argues with himself: "If the husbandman waits with patience for the coming of the harvest, shall not I wait with perseverance for the coming of my Lord? The approach of harvest is precious to him, and shall not the appearance of Christ be so to me? Shall he endure so much for a little corn, and not I much more for a heavenly kingdom?

Observe, 4. The direction given in order to the obtaining of this patience and long suffering, stablish your hearts; that is, in a firm expectaion of Christ's coming, believe that he will come certainly, and may come suddenly, and sooner perhaps than you may apprehend.

Learn hence, that it is the duty of Christians, in and under their afflictions, to stablish their hearts in a firm belief of the coming and appearance of Christ, to put a final period to all their sufferings, and to reward their victorious faith and patience: Be ye also patient, stablish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on James 5:7". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/james-5.html. 1700-1703.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

James 5:7. Exhortation to the brethren to patient waiting, on to James 5:11.

μακροθυμήσατε οὖν] μακροθυμεῖν; literally, to be long-suffering to those who do an injury; opposed to ὀξυθυμεῖν; see Meyer on Colossians 1:11. On its distinction from ὑπομένειν, see on 2 Timothy 3:11; here the meaning appears to run into that of ὑπομένειν; comp. the following μακροθυμῶν and James 5:8; but it is here well put, in order to exclude the feeling of disquieting doubt; comp. Hebrews 6:12; Hebrews 6:15.

οὖν] refers to the preceding sentiment (also to that indicated in οὐκ ἀντιτάσσεται ὑμῖν), that the judgment is near (de Wette, Wiesinger(228)).

ἀδελφοί] contrast to the πλούσιοι.

Patience is to endure ἕως τῆς παρουσίας τοῦ κυρίου. On ἔως as a preposition, see Winer, p. 418 [E. T. 590]. As regards the meaning which ἔως here has, Schneckenburger correctly observes: non tempus tantum sed rem quoque indicat, qua θλῖψις ΄ακροθύ΄ως toleranda tollatur. By παρουσία τοῦ κυρίον, according to constant Christian usage, is to be understood the advent of Christ (Wiesinger, Brückner, Lange, Bouman), not the coming of God (Augusti, Theile, de Wette); although James by κύριος chiefly designates God, yet he also uses this name for Christ, chap. James 2:1.

The exhortation is strengthened by the reference to the patient waiting of the husbandman (the same figure in Sirach 6:19). As he waits ( ἐκεδέχεται) for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient with reference to it, until it has received the early and latter rain, so should the Christian patiently wait for the precious fruit of his labour, for which he hopes. The καρπός is designated as τί΄ιος, because it is its preciousness which occasions the ΄ακροθυ΄ία. By ΄ακροθυ΄ῶν ἐπʼ αὐτῷ, ἐκδέχεται is more definitely stated, since that verb does not necessarily include in itself the idea here intended. On ἐπʼ αὐτῷ = in reference to the καρπός, comp. Luke 18:7.

γεωργός is not the subject of λάβῃ (Luther), but καρπός (Stier).

The question whether we are here to read ἕως with or without ἄν (see critical remarks) cannot be answered from the usage of the N. T.; see Matthew 10:11, and, on the other hand, Luke 12:59. According to Tischendorf, the authorities are decisive for the omission of ἄν. See Al. Buttmann, p. 198 f. [E. T. 230 f.].(229)—( ὑετὸν) πρώϊ΄ον καὶ ὄψι΄ον] the autumnal and spring rains; see Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 5:26; Joel 2:23; Zechariah 10:1 : not “the morning and the evening rain” (Luther); see Winer’s Realwörterb. under “Witterung.(230)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on James 5:7". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/james-5.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

James 5:7. οὖν, therefore) Whatever the wicked may do in the meantime.— παρουσίας, the coming) James 5:8-9; James 5:12.— τοῦ κυρίου, of the Lord) Jesus Christ.— ἐκδέχεται, waiteth for) obtains by waiting, at the harvest. יקצר, shall reap, Septuagint, ἐκδέξεται, Hosea 8:7 .— τίμιον, precious) the reward of labour and patience.— ἕως, until) To be taken with—and hath long patience. He does not cease before (he receives it).— ἂν) See App. Crit.(69)λάβῃ) he receive, from heaven.— πρώϊμον) the early rain, after sowing.— ὄψιμον) the latter rain, when harvest is now near.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on James 5:7". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/james-5.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord; viz. to judgment, and that either particular, to avenge the quarrels of innocent sufferers upon their tyrannical persecutors; or rather, to the general judgment, in which a full retribution is to be made both to the just and unjust, Romans 2:5,6, &c. To which judgment the Scripture calls all to look, especially those that are under oppression and persecution, 2 Thessalonians 1:6,7, &c.

Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth; which cost him hard labour, and by which he receives great benefit, the sustentation of his life.

Until he receive the early and latter rain; the rain soon after the sowing, which caused the corn to spring up; and that before the harvest, which plumped it, and made it fit for reaping, Deuteronomy 11:14 Jeremiah 5:24 Hosea 6:3 Joel 2:23.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on James 5:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/james-5.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

7. The death of the righteous martyr raises once more the thought of μακροθυμία, this time with hopes of the παρουσία. The Book of Enoch again has a parallel: ‘Wait with patient hope; for formerly you have been disgraced with evil and with affliction, but now shall you shine like the luminaries of heaven. You shall be seen and the gates of heaven shall be opened to you. Your cries have cried for judgment and it has appeared to you,’ ch. civ.

οὖν. Therefore, because this grievous persecution is directed against you.

ἕως τῆς παρουσίας τοῦ κυρίου. The recognised expression for the advent or presence of Christ. In the gospels the use of παρουσία is confined to our Lord’s discourse in Matthew 24. In St Paul’s epistles it occurs six times, in 1 and 2 Thess., and in 1 Corinthians 15:23 (in 1 Corinthians 1:8 the true reading is ἡμέρᾳ), it occurs in 2 Pet. three times, namely James 1:16, James 3:4; James 3:12, and 1 John 2:28. There is no LXX. authority for the word.

Another Pauline word for the appearing of Christ is ἐπιφάνεια, 2 Thessalonians 2:8, and five times in the Pastoral Epistles.

The whole expression ἕως τῆς παρ. not only marks the limit—the terminus ad quem—but also suggests a reason for long-suffering.

ὁ γεωργός. The metaphor suggests patience, toil, co-operation (κοινωνία εἰς τὸ εὐαγγέλιον, Philippians 1:5), faith, reward. ὡς ὁ ἀροτριῶν καὶ πρόσελθε αὐτῇ (σοφία) καὶ ἀνάμενε τοὺς καρποὺς αὐτῆς, Sirach 6:19.

τὸν τίμιον καρπὸν τῆς γῆς indicates the naturalness of the development till the end comes. The ripening of events, the parable of the Fig Tree, Matthew 21:19-22, of the Seed growing secretly, the Tares, the grain of Mustard Seed, the Hidden Leaven, Mark 4:26, Matthew 13:24-35, teach the same lesson.

ἕως λάβῃ. For the omission of ἄν in this construction see Mark 14:32, Luke 15:4 ἕως εὔρῃ αὐτό, Luke 22:34 ἕως τρίς με ἀπαρνήσῃ εἰδέναι, 2 Thessalonians 2:7 and Revelation 6:11; Revelation 20:5. When ἕως is followed by οὗ or ὅτου the sequence of the subjunctive is frequent. The construction is used of an event conceived as possible, but uncertain in regard to the time of its occurrence. See Winer, p. 387, Green, p. 166.

(ὑετὸν) πρόϊμον καὶ ὄψιμον. See Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23; Hosea 6:3. In Hebrew the former rain is lit. ‘sprinkling,’ יורֶה, the latter lit. ‘gathered,’ מֵלִקוֹשׁ, from the gathering of the harvest. The former rain begins as a rule at the end of October or beginning of November, lasting often through January and February. By that time the ground is softened and ploughing made possible. The latter rains, on which the growth of the crop depends, fall in March and April. In 1885 the rainfall in Palestine was Jan. 7:79 in.; Feb. 2:90 in.; March 5:47 in.; April 6:52 in.; from May to Nov. less than 1 in.; in Dec. 6–27 in., Pal. Expl. F. Quart. St., April, 1894. The fertility of Palestine is wholly dependent on the rainfall. “Its uncertainty caused it to be a special subject of prayer. At the present day Moslems, Christians and Jews unite in fasts, processions and prayers for the ‘showers that water the earth,’ ” Thomson, The Land and the Book, p. 91. As contrasted with Egypt, which is ‘watered with the foot,’ Palestine is a land that ‘drinketh water of the rain of heaven.’ Hence ‘rain in due season’ is the promised reward of faithfulness in Israel, Deuteronomy 11:10-14 .


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on James 5:7". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/james-5.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5. The Christian sufferer under these wrongs pointed to the judgment day, James 5:7-11.

7. Brethren—Our apostle turns in contrast, from the rich men to the just men; from the persecutors to the persecuted. But what shall we think of commentators who are not quite sure that the rich men and the brethren are not the same!

Be patient—To the Church in all ages the judgment seat of Christ, even though long millenniums distant, is, conceptually, near at hand. See supplementary note to Matthew 25, and note on 2 Peter 3:8.

Coming—The PAROUSIA the second advent, the day when the human race, in resurrection state, stands in the presence of its final Judge.

Observe, again, that, unlike last days, in James 5:3, and day of slaughter, in James 5:5, this Parousia has the Greek article. This indicates that the two former were indefinite events, and the last a definite. That is, the latter indicates the one well known and universally expected event, while the former are a special era for these rich men and their contemporaries.

Husbandman—As the planter fixes his conceptual eye upon the day of harvest, so do ye fix your mind’s eye upon the final reward.

Long patience—An intimation of the unknown length of the period intervening before the judgment day.

Early and latter—The word rain, though truly implied, is not, perhaps, a genuine reading. The early “rainy season” in Palestine is autumnal, extending from first of October to last of December, and even, with slight snow, into January. February brings an interval of fine weather. The latter rain is in spring, embracing March and April.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/james-5.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Be patiently enduring, therefore, brothers, until the coming of the Lord. Behold, the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient over it, until it receive the early and latter rain.’

The idea behind ‘patience’ here is ‘patient endurance’. It does not speak of a quiet waiting, but of a standing up to the trials that face them without wavering and without retaliation. It includes the idea of ‘longsuffering’, facing up to whatever men throw at them and loving them just the same (compare the longsuffering of God - Romans 2:4; 1 Peter 3:20). He makes clear that it will not always be easy. They are thus to praise the Lord through gritted teeth under all circumstances, and are to remember that the Lord is coming. Just as the farmer does year by year when he waits for the early and late rains which will produce his hoped for harvest, sometimes with great apprehension when there appears to be a delay, so are they to wait with patient endurance for what the Lord will do. But one thing they can be sure of. One day the great day of Harvest will come (Matthew 13:41-43), and great will be their rejoicing.

In Palestine the early and late rains were usually regular, and they were vital for food production. The early rain in around September/October would soften and refresh the ground ready to receive the seed. The later rain in March/April, coming before the long hot summer, would feed the roots and make the grain flourish. (See Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23). But sometimes one or other did not come when expected, and so the farmer had to wait for it with patient endurance. This was therefore a reminder that the Lord’s coming, while certain, could not be tied down to a particular time. It might come on cue, or it might be delayed. But certainly there had to be a period during which the heavenly rain (Isaiah 44:1-5; Isaiah 55:10-13 and often) would fall more than once in order to prepare a harvest.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/james-5.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Because of the dangers James just expounded, believers should adopt a patient attitude. The verb makrothymesate (be patient) describes "self-restraint which does not hastily retaliate a wrong." [Note: J. B. Lightfoot, Saint Paul"s Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon , p138.] The Lord"s return is near (cf. Mark 13:32-37; Philippians 4:5; 1 Peter 4:7; 1 John 2:18).

"The word parousias ("coming") was a common term used to describe the visit of a king to a city or province of his kingdom and thus depicts Christ as a royal personage." [Note: Burdick, p201.]

The early rains came shortly after planting in Palestine in late October and early November. The late rains followed as the crop was maturing in late March and early April. This reference may imply a Palestinian origin for the epistle. James knew agriculture in Palestine. The point of James" illustration of the farmer seems to be that as Christians we are primarily sowing and cultivating in this life, not mainly reaping rewards.

"The picture is that of the small farmer in Palestine ... The small farmer plants his carefully saved seed and hopes for a harvest, living on short rations and suffering hunger during the last weeks. The whole livelihood, indeed the life itself, of the family depends on a good harvest: the loss of the farm, semistarvation, or death could result from a bad year. So the farmer waits for an expected future event (ekdechetai); no one but he could know now precious the grain really is ..." [Note: Davids, The Epistle . . ., p183.]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/james-5.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

James 5:7. The connection with the preceding paragraph is obvious and direct. St. James, having pronounced the doom of the rich oppressors, now proceeds to comfort the oppressed.

Be patient: literally, ‘Be longsuffering;’ an exhortation both to forbearance toward their oppressors, and to a trustful waiting on God for deliverance. Their patience must not be short-lived, but enduring.

therefore: an inference from what precedes; seeing that there is a day of vengeance when the unbelieving and ungodly rich will be punished for their injustice, luxury, and oppression, and consequently a day of deliverance to them.

brethren. St. James having, in the spirit of an Old Testament prophet, apostrophized the ungodly rich who were outside the Church, now returns to his readers, the Jewish Christians, his brethren both in the flesh and in the spirit

unto the coming of the Lord: until this period continue to exercise longsuffering. What is wrong will then be redressed; what is evil will then be removed. The night may be dark and lonely; but the longest night comes to a close. By the Lord here is meant Christ, according to the analogy of Scripture, and the general expectation of the coming of Christ by believers (2 Thessalonians 2:1-2). Though St. James applies the title ‘Lord’ chiefly to God, yet he had previously applied it to Christ (James 2:1). Two different meanings have been attached to the phrase ‘coming of the Lord.’ Some understand by it the coming of Christ in spirit to destroy Jerusalem, when the Romans were employed as the instruments of His vengeance upon the unbelieving Jews, and to which reference is made in the previous verses. Others, with greater probability, understand by it His coming in person to judge the world, or what is usually termed the second advent. How far the sacred writers distinguished between the destruction of Jerusalem and the future judgment—the type and the antitype—we have no means of ascertaining. St. James, according to his usual custom, illustrates the necessity of patience by an example taken from natural life, that of the husbandman waiting for the harvest

Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain. The early and latter rain are often mentioned in the Old Testament as essential for the production of the harvest: ‘I will give you the rain in his due season, the first rain and the latter rain, that thou mayest gather in thy corn, and thy wine, and thine oil’ (Deuteronomy 11:14). The early rain was the autumnal showers, which fell from the middle of October to the end of November, and prepared the ground for the seed. The latter rain was the spring showers, which fell in March and April, and were necessary for the ripening of the crops.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/james-5.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

James 5:7. ΄ακροθυμήσατε οὖν: the verb, as well as the adjective, is used both of God and man, e.g., Romans 2:4; 2 Corinthians 6:6; it expresses the attitude of mind which is content to wait; when used of God it refers to His long-suffering towards men (e.g., Sirach 18:11); it is possible that in the present connection this is also implied in view of James 5:9.—Perhaps οὖν was added in order to join it on to the preceding section; it is omitted by the OL MS. s.— ἕως τῆς παρουσίας τοῦ κυρίου: see above, introductory words to this section. παρουσία does not occur in the Septuagint, being (with τοῦ κυρίον) specifically Christian; but with τοῦ θεοῦ, instead of τοῦ κυρίου, it occurs in Test. of the Twelve Patriarchs, Jud. xxii. 2, ἕως παρουσίας τοῦ θεοῦ τῆς δικαιοσύνης (the words are omitted in the Armenian Version).— γεωργός: Cf. Sirach 6:18; Test. of the Twelve Patriarchs, Issach. James 5:3 ff.— καρπόν: used in the sense of “produce of the soil”.— ἕως λάβῃ: the context shows that the subject must be “the earth,” not “the fruit,” for the simple reason that the fruit is not in existence when the “former” rains descend; the great importance of the “former” rains (called both יורה and מורה) was that they moistened the earth (commencing about the month of October) after it had been hardened by the blazing summer sun, and thus enabled it to receive the seed; without the “former” rains to moisten the earth one might as well sow seed on rocks. The subject might possibly be “the husbandman” as he may be said in a certain sense to receive the rain, but the most obvious subject, and that upon which the meaning of the verse most naturally depends, is the earth.— πρόϊμον καὶ ὄψιμον: Cf. Deuteronomy 11:14, and often, יורה ומלקושׁ.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on James 5:7". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/james-5.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

===============================

[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Temporaneum et Serotinum. In most Greek manuscripts Greek: ueton proimon kai opsimon, pluviam priorem et posteriorem.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on James 5:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/james-5.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Our Attitude Towards Such Abuse:

"Be patient, therefore, brethren, until the coming of the Lord. Behold, the farmer waits for the precious produce of the soil, being patient about it, until it gets the early and late rains."

"Be patient, therefore, brethren"-Indicating that a good number of Christians were suffering at the hands of wealthy individuals who were abusing their position and power. This letter has already mentioned the need to be patient (, 1:12). Without such endurance we won"t make it (Hebrews 6:12; Hebrews 12:1). See also 1 Corinthians 13:4; Galatians 5:22 and 2 Peter 1:6. It is clear that patience is a quality without which we cannot please God.

Points To Note:

1. We too live in a time when Christians need to be exhorted to be patient. Too many of us have adopted the thinking of the world which says, "I deserve this and I deserve it now!" We live in a society, while claiming to be tolerant is in fact very intolerant. Look at the lawsuits that clog our court system and the acts of personal violence and revenge. 2. "if God, a holy God, can be patient with us in the face of the enormity of our sin, how much more can we be patient in the face of whatever opposition may come our way" (Draper p. 150). 3. "It means to hold one"s spirit in check…The believer is not to allow mistreatment and oppression to drive him to hatred, bitterness, or despair. Such feelings might be directed against the persons causing the pressure, or against God, who was allowing it to happen" (Kent p. 176). And it can be a very fine line between being angry at our oppressors---and being angry at God. 4. It is clear that these brethren were not given the right to rise up and attack the rich, they didn"t have the right to take the judgment of the wicked into their own hands. Compromise with the world and physically attacking the world are both wrong (Hebrews 10:32-39; 1 Peter 4:12-19; Romans 12:9-21). There are probably a host of reasons why God doesn"t want Christians to organize themselves and retaliate against their oppressors. But one reason has probably already been given us in James 1:20. Retaliation on our part can so easily degenerate into sin. It is so easy to cross the line from innocent victim to guilty oppressor ourselves (see 1 Corinthians 6:1-8).

"until the coming of the Lord"-While God does from time to time come in physical judgment upon groups of people, such as nations and cities (Jerusalem-A.D. 70, is one example, Matthew 24:27). And such comings can take the pressure off of Christians by sweeping away or breaking the power of their enemies. This coming appears to be the Second Coming. Which means that the Second Coming, while being a day of deliverance for the righteous, will be a day of condemnation for the wicked (2 Thessalonians 1:7-9; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; 1 Thessalonians 5:1-3).

"Behold, the farmer waits for the precious produce of the soil, being patient about it, until it gets the early and late rains".

The early rain fell in October, November, and December, and extended in January and February. "The first showers of autumn which revived the parched and thirsty soil and prepared it for the seed; and the later showers of spring which continued to refresh and forward both the ripening crops and the vernal products of the field" (Pulpit Comm. p. 69). The latter rains are much lighter and they fall in March and April.

This illustration would especially be relevant to this audience, for some of them were laborers in the field. They understood the patience of the farmer. The farmer does not expect to harvest on the same day he has planted. He may suffer several disappointments or set backs before he receives a harvest. "Just as the farmer can know that the Lord is going to send the rain for the crops, so we can know the Lord is going to send his Son once again. Just as the farmer trusts the final outcome to the Lord who sends the rain, we can trust God for the final outcome of our lives" (Draper p. 150).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/james-5.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

unto, until Same Greek. word, heos.

coming. Greek. parousia. First occurance: Matthew 24:3.

hath long patience = being patient.

early. Greek. proimos. Only here.

latter. Greek. opsimos. Only here. Compare Joel 2:23.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on James 5:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/james-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.

Be patient therefore - As judgment is so near (James 5:1; James 5:3), ye can afford to be "long-suffering" [ makrothumeesate (Greek #3114)], after the example of the unresisting just one (James 5:6).

Brethren - contrasted with the "rich" oppressors, James 5:1-6.

Unto the coming of the Lord - when the trial of long-suffering waiting shall cease.

Husbandman waiteth for - i:e., amidst toils and delays, through hope of the harvest. Its 'preciouness' (cf. Psalms 126:6, "precious seed") will amply compensate for all the past. Compare Galatians 6:8-9.

Hath long patience (suffering) for it - `over it,' in respect to it.

Until he receive - `until it receive' (Alford). The receiving of the early and latter rains is not the object of his hope, but the harvest, to which those rains are the preliminary. The early rain fell at sowing time, about November or December; the latter rain, about March or April, to mature the grain for harvest. The latter rain that shall precede the spiritual harvest will probably be another Pentecost-like effusion of the Holy Spirit (Heb. ,28-32 ).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/james-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) Be patient.—The third, and last, part of the Letter commences here with these exhortations towards endurance.

Therefore—i.e., because of this your deep and abiding misery, be sure God’s help is nigh:—

“The darkest hour is on the verge of day.”

“Out of your stony griefs” build, like Jacob of old, a house of God (Genesis 28:19), whereunto you may run and find refuge. If there be wrath laid up in store for the oppressor, great is the coming peace of the oppressed.

The husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it . . . Be ye also patient.—It becomes you, the just, to bear with the unjust till God work the end of your trial, and prove them at the same time. Again and again, through several verses (James 5:7-11), St. James repeats his advice, emphasising it with various reasons: the nearness of deliverance; the Judge standing at the gate; the example of the prophets—persecuted by men, and therefore blessed of God; the hope of those who endure—Job for example: the very faithfulness and tender mercy of the Lord, bringing all things to a perfect end. Few ideas are more startling (is a reflection of Dr. Evans) than those produced by the strange combinations in Scripture. Matters are joined there which we mostly put asunder here, speaking of them, at least, as apart. And thus we read in the Revelation (James 1:9) of the kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ. But all Christians are citizens of a patient kingdom; the King thereof is more patient, as He hath greater need of patience than His subjects, and He is patient, because He is strong. Impatience is a sign of weakness. God can afford to wait, for His time is eternity. And we can be strong in His strength, and wait also in patience. In so far as St. James’s hearers were earthly minded, they could not learn this lesson; so often with ourselves we would have our wrong righted instantly, and to the full. Only one view of life can alter this, viz., the lifting of our gaze from earth to heaven, remembering that “the time is short” (1 Corinthians 7:29).

The early and latter rain.—It is, perhaps, just as well to recollect there were only two seasons of rainfall in the Holy Land, and, if long delayed, famine was a certain result. With the change of the Israelites from pastoral life to agricultural, the malignity of these dearths was lessened; but they were and are still severe. The Bible mentions many such—e.g., in the days of Abraham (Genesis 12:10), Isaac (Genesis 26:1), Jacob (Genesis 42:2), Ruth (James 1:1), Samuel (2 Samuel 21:1), Ahab (1 Kings 18:2). The “early rain” fell during the autumn sowing—in October, November, and December; “the latter” in March and April. By many versions the word “rain” is omitted, but, of course, was always intended.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/james-5.html. 1905.

The Bible Study New Testament

Be patient, then. "You who are being persecuted as He was, learn from His example and be patient." Until the Lord comes. I think James is pointing to the destruction of Jerusalem, not the Second Coming. See Matthew 24:29-31 and notes. For us who live today, these words of James point to the Second Coming! See how the farmer. Time is essential! It requires time for a crop to grow and mature so it can be harvested, Some who harshly treated their fellow-man and opposed the Good News would change. Enough time must pass, so that God's purpose could be completed. Compare Revelation 6:9-11 and notes.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on James 5:7". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/james-5.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.
Be patient
or, Be long patient, or, Suffer with long patience.
Luke 8:15; Romans 2:7; 8:24,25; 15:4; 2 Corinthians 6:4,5; Galatians 5:5; 6:9; Colossians 1:11; 1 Thessalonians 1:3; Hebrews 6:15; 12:1-3
unto
8,9; Matthew 24:27,44; Luke 18:8; 21:27; 1 Corinthians 1:7; 1 Thessalonians 2:19; 3:13; 2 Peter 3:4
until
Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 5:24; Hosea 6:3; Joel 2:23; Zechariah 10:1

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on James 5:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/james-5.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

James now addresses the poor brethren who had been unjustly treated, and on the basis of facts and truths just revealed, exhorts them to be patient unto the coming of the Lord when all wrongs will be adjusted. As an example of patience he refers to the husband-man or farmer as he proceeds in his business. Early and latter rain actually means the fall and spring rains. I shall quote from Smith"s Bible Dictionary as follows: "In the Bible ‘early rain' signifies the rain of the autumn, and ‘latter rain' the rain of spring. For six months in the year, from May to October, no rain fa-lls, the whole land becomes dry, parched and brown. The autumnal rains are eagerly looked for, to prepare the earth for the reception of the seed."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on James 5:7". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/james-5.html. 1952.

Mr. D"s Notes on James

James 5:7-12

Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.

"Be patient" and do it right now! Patient is not in the vocabulary of most people these days. They not only want it ALL they want it ALL RIGHT NOW.

Remember, this is in the context of the rich being terrible to the worker, and James tells them to be patient. Be patient when in trouble and when you are being treated terribly.

Just how patient should we be? Should we stand by when others are being treated miserably? Should we hold our peace when we are facing terrible times?

There are Christians around the world today that are going to court to gain their rights. Not, like us in America over prayer and Bible reading in the schools, but for their lives, for their future and for their right to worship.

1 Peter 2:21-23 mentions: "21 For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: 22 Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth: 23 Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed [himself] to him that judgeth righteously:"

He suffered, and He is our example. If we want to answer our questions let us look at how our EXAMPLE for this life suffered.

Matthew 27:27-31 "21 For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: 22 Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth: 23 Who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed [himself] to him that judgeth righteously:"

Mark 15:19-20 "19 And they smote him on the head with a reed, and did spit upon him, and bowing [their] knees worshipped him. 20 And when they had mocked him, they took off the purple from him, and put his own clothes on him, and led him out to crucify him."

Of course there is the reality that He was here to die, and that to fulfill prophecy He was to give Himself up to the cross, but how does this relate to us? How far should we go in our humbleness and patience when trouble comes upon us?

We also have the example of Paul that called upon his Roman citizenship as a means of gaining a hearing, but we also see in him a willingness to give a defense, a witness and leave it to the authorities. Thus we might want to take careful use of our rights and do what we can within the system we live in; however we ought also to attempt to retain the possibility of witnessing through and after our hard times, to those that seek to give us trouble.

The reality of this life is that God will take care of all injustice to His people either now or later. You know that old story from our days as children - "My dad is bigger en yer dad!" Well, I have to tell you, my Father is bigger en all other dads combined, and He is going to care for any wrong that needs caring for when it comes to His son.

"Be patient" has the idea we have of patience, but also has the idea of length of patience. That is why we use the term long suffering. It isn"t just patient today, but also to continue to be patient as long as it takes. In fact the word is translated "hath long patience" later in the verse.

Some might ask, well just how long suffering do we have to be? Well, James says, till the coming of the Lord. That would relate to, be patient until the end if it takes that long. This is the rapture that James is speaking of, that physical appearing of the Lord - that may well be a long time, indeed, it may be all your life and then a bunch of years, we don"t know.

It is of note that the disciples asked the Lord how many times they should forgive someone. His answer was "Until seventy times seven." Matthew 18:22 b. Relate this to the numbers Daniel uses in his prophecy of the end time and you must wonder if we aren"t to forgive till the end as well.

"The coming" is the Greek word "parousia" and relates to the visible return of Christ for His brethren.

The thought is to be patient until the end if need be. Till all is done and God settles all accounts, would work for the text.


Copyright Statement
Copyright 2008. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the author, except as provided by U.S.A. copyright laws. Do feel free to make copies for friends that might be interested as long as you do not make profit from the copies. This is God's work and I don't want anyone to profit from it in a material way.

Bibliography
Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on James 5:7". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/james-5.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, April 8th, 2020
Wednesday in Easter Week
There are 4 days til Easter!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology