Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 17:1

"My spirit is broken, my days are extinguished, The grave is ready for me.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Life;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hard;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Consume;   Extinct;   Holy Spirit;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

My breath is corrupt - Rather, My spirit is oppressed, חבלה רוחי ruchi chubbalah : My days are extinct, and the sepulchral cells are ready for me - Parkhurst. There is probably a reference here to cemeteries, where were several niches, in Each of which a corpse was deposited. See on Job 17:16; (note). For חבלה chubbalah, corrupted or oppressed, some MSS. have חלה chalah, is made weak; and one has גבלה is worn down, consumed: this is agreeable to the Vulgate, Spiritus meus attenuebatur; "My spirit is exhausted."

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

My breath is corrupt - Margin or “spirit is spent.” The idea is, that his vital powers were nearly extinct; his breath failed; his power was weakened, and he was ready to die. This is connected with the previous chapter, and should not have been separated from it. There was no necessity of making a new chapter here, and we have one of those unfortunate breaks in the middle of a paragraph, and almost of a sentence, which are too common in the Scriptures.

The graves are ready for me - The Hebrew is plural, but why so used I know not. The Vulgate is singular - sepulchrum. The Septuagint renders it, “I pray for a tomb (singular, ταφῆς taphēs ), but I cannot obtain it.” Possibly the meaning is, “I am about to be united “to the graves,” or “to tombs.”” Schultens remarks that the plural form is common in Arabic poetry, as well as in poetry in general.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-17.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 17:1-2

THE CONCLUSION OF JOB'S FIFTH DISCOURSE

DeHoff's excellent summary of this chapter is: "Job's discourse here is broken, and he passes suddenly from one thing to another, as is usual with men in trouble. He pictures himself as a despised man, a man of sorrows, full of misery, abandoned by his friends, and crying to God for mercy."[1] Rowley noted that the triple formation in verse 1 indicates that, "Job was speaking in great emotional strain."[2]

Job 17:1-2

JOB REFERS TO HIS FRIENDS AS MOCKERS

"My Spirit is consumed, My days are extinct,

The grave is ready for me.

Surely there are mockers with me,

And mine eye dwelleth upon their provocation."

We like Van Selms' paraphrase of Job 17:1: "I spoke of years just now, but I am all but dead now. I have no spirit left; I cannot do anything."[3]

"Surely there are mockers with me" (Job 17:2). "Job charged his friends with mockery, the penalty of which (Deuteronomy 19:15-21) prescribed that the false accuser would receive the punishment assigned to the crime wrongly alleged."[4] It was perhaps to this that Job alluded in Job 17:5.

"Their provocation" (Job 17:2). This verse is obscure in meaning, as indicated by various renditions: "Mine eye is weary of their contentiousness," or "Mine eyes are wearied by your stream of peevish complaints."[5]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

My breath is corrupt,.... Through the force of his disease, which made it have an ill smell, so that it was strange and disagreeable to his wife, Job 19:17; passing through his lungs, or other parts, which were affected with some disorder, or as frequently is the case of dying persons, and so Job thought himself to be. The wordF14Pineda. used has the signification of pain, even of the pains of a woman in travail; and so may signify, that Job drew his breath with great pain, as people troubled with an asthma do, or dying persons in the hiccups, or just fetching their last breath; or "my spirit"F15רוחי "spiritus meus", V. L. Pagninus, Montanus, Junius & Tremellius, &c. , as it may be rendered, that is, his vital spirits which were exhausted and spent, there were scarce any left in him; or "my mind"F16"Anima mea", Piscator, Schmidt. , or soul, which was overwhelmed with grief, and so disturbed, that he was not himself, but in a manner distracted with the terrors of God, and the severity of his hand upon him:

my days are extinct; here Job corrects himself; he had spoken of a few years before, but it is as if he should say now, why do I talk of a few years, when I have but a few days to live, and even those are as good as gone? meaning not only his days of prosperity, which were at an entire end, as he thought, but the days of his natural life; the lamp of life was almost burnt out, the oil was spent, the wick was just extinguished, it was like the snuff of a candle going out:

the graves are ready for me; the place of his fathers' sepulchres, the burial place of his ancestors, where many graves were; or he may have respect to various things into which the dead are put, as into so many graves; as besides their being rolled up in linen, as was the way of the eastern countries, there was the coffin, a sort of a grave, and which sometimes was made of stone; and then the place dug in the earth, more properly called the grave, and often over that a sepulchral monument was erected; so that there was grave upon grave. Job does not seem to have any respect to the usage of kings, and great personages, preparing stately monuments for themselves while living, such as the pyramids of Egypt, built by and for their kings, as is supposed; for the words "are ready" are not in the text, only supplied, though they are also by the Targum; they are very short and significant in the original text, "the graves for me", or they are mine; the grave is my property, my house, where I expect shortly to be, and there to abide and dwell until the resurrection, and which was desirable to him; "a grave to me"; that is all that I desire, or can expect; here he wished to be, as he did not doubt he quickly should be; and it is as if he should say, I am ready for that, and so Jarchi paraphrases it; and happy is the man that is ready for the grave, for death, and eternity, for the coming of his Lord, having the grace of God wrought in him, and the righteousness of his living Redeemer on him, which was Job's case; such an one shall go into the nuptial chamber at once, and be received into everlasting habitations.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-17.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 17:1-16. Job‘s answer continued.

breath  …  corrupt — result of elephantiasis. But Umbreit, “my strength (spirit) is spent.”

extinct — Life is compared to an expiring light. “The light of my day is extinguished.”

graves — plural, to heighten the force.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

My breath is corrupt, my days are extinct, the graves are ready for me.

The graves — He speaks of the sepulchres of his fathers, to which he must be gathered. The graves where they are laid, are ready for me also. Whatever is unready, the grave is ready for us: it is a bed soon made. And if the grave be ready for us, it concerns us, to be ready for the grave.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-17.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 17:1 My breath is corrupt, my days are extinct, the graves [are ready] for me.

Ver. 1. My breath is corrupt] Which argueth that my inwards are imposthumated and rotten, so that I cannot in likelihood have long to live; Oh therefore that I might have a day of hearing and clearing before I die! But Job should have remembered that there will be at the last day a resurrection of names as well as of bodies; which he that believeth maketh not haste. Howsoever, it was not amiss for Job, so grievously diseased, and now well in years, to have thought himself to be dying and to discourse about these three particulars, that speak of him as a dying man. In the old the palm tree is full of blooms, the map of age is figured on his forehead, the calendars of death appear in the furrows of his face, the mourners are ready to go about the streets, and he is going to his long home, according to that elegant description, Ecclesiastes 12:1-7 He should therefore say with Varro, Annus octogesimus me admonet, ut farcinas colligam, &c., It is high time for me to pack up, and to be gone out of this life; or rather, as Simeon, Lord, now let thou thy servant depart in peace, &c.

My days are extinct] As a candle, Proverbs 13:9. Or cut off, as a web, so some read it. The original word is found only here.

The graves are ready for me] Heb. The graves for me; q.d. I bid adieu to all things else, and as the grave gapes for me, so do I gape for the grave, Eιθε μοι τουτο γενοιτο. I would it were even so, as Basil said, when Valens, the Arian emperor, threatened him with death. But why doth Job speak of graves in the plural? Surely, to show that he was besieged with many deaths; or else, because the dead are buried (as it were) first in their grave clothes, and then in the coffin, and then in the bier or hearse, and lastly in the sepulchre, which every place did, as it were, proffer to Job, and threaten him with death, in regard to his many pains and pressures, by the scoffs and taunts of his friends. For,

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 17:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-17.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XVII.

Job appeals from men to God: the unmerciful dealing of men with the afflicted may astonish, but not discourage the righteous. Job professes that his hope is not in life, but in death.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 17:1. The graves are ready for me They are preparing a grave for me. See Houbigant.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 17:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-17.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Job continueth his discourse through this Chapter. He speaks of the grave as an asylum: still holding fast his integrity, he looks up to God with an hope, that the sufferings he was exercised with, would not afford an occasion of stumbling to the good, nor confidence to the bad; and points out his relationship with the worm and corruption.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-17.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOB CHAPTER 17

His miserable life; false friends; their punishment, Job 17:1-5. His contempt, and sorrow, Job 17:6,7. The righteous should be established, Job 17:8,9; but he was given over to death, Job 17:11-16.

My breath is corrupt, i.e. it stinks, as it doth in dying persons. Or, my spirit is corrupted, or spent, or lost, i.e. my vital spirits and natural powers are wasted; my soul is ready to leave the body.

My days are extinct; the lamp of my life is wasted, and upon the point of going out, and that in a snuff.

The graves, i.e. the grave; the plural number being put for the singular, as sepulchres, 2 Chronicles 21:20, cities, Jude 12:7, asses, Zechariah 9:9, are put for one of each of these.

Are ready for me; open their mouths as ready to receive me. The sense and scope of this verse is the same with the former.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 17:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-17.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.Now follow short ejaculatory clauses in which “Job chants his own requiem,” (Delitzsch,) reminding the reader of the requiem chanted by Mozart shortly before his death.

My breath is corrupt — Literally, My life (rouahh) is destroyed. Some still read as in the text.

The graves — The Arabians, according to Schultens, frequently use “graves” for the grave. Around the sides of the tomb of the ancient Hebrew there were cells for the reception of sarcophagi containing the bodies of the dead. To such cells Job may refer.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-17.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 17:1. My breath is corrupt — Is offensive to those around me, through my disease. But, as the word חבלה, chubbalah, here rendered corrupt, may signify bound, straitened, or distressed with pain, as a woman in travail, Chappelow thinks the phrase had better be rendered: Spiritus meus constringitur, vel, cum dolore emititur; that is, I have such an oppression, that I can hardly breathe. The reading of the margin, however, is not to be overlooked, My spirit is spent, or lost, that is, my vital spirits and animal powers are wasted; my soul is ready to leave the body: I am a gone man. My days are extinct — The lamp of my life is far spent, and upon the point of going out. The graves are ready for me — That is, the grave; the plural number being put for the singular. Or, he speaks of the sepulchres of his fathers, to which he was to be gathered. Sol. Jarchi’s comment is, “I am ready for the grave.” The text is only קברים לי, kebarim li, sepulchra mihi: The grave for me, or, I have the grave. Any addition seems to spoil that elegancy of expression which consists in a sudden, quick turn of thought; as if Job had said, My breath is gone; my days extinct; I have a grave. Thus the Vulgate, Solum mihi superest sepulchrum, The grave only remains for me. Wherever we go there is but a step between us and the grave. The sepulchres where our fathers are laid are ready for us also. Whatever is unready, the grave is ready. It is a bed soon made. And, if the grave be ready for us, it concerns us to be ready for the grave.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 17:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-17.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Spirit. Hebrew, "breath is corrupt," (Haydock) or spent. I cannot breathe without the greatest difficulty. (Calmet) --- Only. Septuagint, "But I want the grave, and do not obtain it." (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-17.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Job is depressed and feels that his life is coming to an end, his days were about gone and the grave was ready for him.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-17.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

breath = spirit. Hebrew. ruach. App-9.

is = has become.

corrupt = consumed.

extinct. Hebrew. Za"ak. Occurs only here.

the graves. The Septuagint reads as in translation below.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

My breath is corrupt, my days are extinct, the graves are ready for me.

Breath ... corrupt - result of elephantiasis. But (Umbreit) 'my strength (spirit) is spent' [ chubaalaah (Hebrew #2254)] - destroyed.

Extinct. Life is compared to an expiring light. 'The light of my day is extinguished.'

Graves - plur., to heighten the force.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XVII.

(1) My breath is corrupt.—As it is said to be in Elephantiasis. Some understand it, “My spirit is consumed.” (See margin.)

The graves.—i.e., the grave is mine—my portion. The plural is frequently used for the singular in Hebrew, as, e.g., in the case of the word blood, which is commonly plural, though with us it is never so used.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

My breath is corrupt, my days are extinct, the graves are ready for me.
breath is corrupt
or, spirit is spent.
19:17
my days
6:11; 42:16; Isaiah 57:16
the graves
13,14; Psalms 88:3-5; Isaiah 38:10-14
Reciprocal: Job 33:22 - his soul;  Psalm 88:4 - counted;  Psalm 88:15 - afflicted;  Psalm 146:4 - His breath;  Isaiah 38:12 - he will cut

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 17:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-17.html.