Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 17:2

"Surely mockers are with me, And my eye gazes on their provocation.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Persecution;  
Dictionaries:
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Eye;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Mock;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Are there not mockers with me? - This has been variously translated. The Vulgate: "I have not sinned, and yet my eye dwells upon afflictions." Septuagint: "I conjure you, laboring under afflictions, what evil have I done? Yet strangers have robbed me of my substance." Mr. Good: "But are not revilers before me? Alas, mine eye penetrateth their rebukes." Calmet thinks the Hebrew might be translated thus: "If I have not been united in friendship with the wicked, why are my eyes in bitterness?" Coverdale translates both verses thus: My breth fayleth, my dayes are shortened, I am harde at deathes dore. I have disceaved no man, yet must myne eye continue in hevynesse. Mr. Heath "Were it not so, I have sarcasms enow in store; and I could spend the whole night unmoved at their aggravations." The general meaning is sufficiently plain, and the reader has got translations enough.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And doth not mine eye continue in their provocation? - Margin “lodge.” This is the meaning of the Hebrew word used here - נלן tālan It properly denotes to pass the night or to lodge in a place, as distinguished from a permanent residence. The idea here seems to be, that his eye “rested” on their provocations. It remained fixed on them. It was not a mere glance, a passing notice, but was such a view as resulted from a careful observation. It was not such a view as a traveler would obtain by passing hastily by, but it was such as one would obtain who had encamped for a time, and had an opportunity of looking around him with care, and seeing things as they were. Thus explained, there is much poetic beauty in the passage. The Vulgate, however, renders it, “I have not sinned, and mine eye remains in bitterness.” The Septuagint, “I supplicate in distress - κάμνων kamnōn - yet what have I done? Strangers came, and stole my substance: who is the man?” The simple meaning is, that Job had a calm view of their wickedness, and that he could not be deceived.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-17.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Are there not mockers with me?.... Meaning not irreligious persons, such as make a mock at sin, a jest of religion, a laugh at good men, sneer at the doctrines and ordinances of God, and scoff at things future, as the coming of Christ, the resurrection of the dead, and a future judgment; with whom it is very uncomfortable to be, as well as with any sort of profane men, and such there were no doubt in Job's time; but he seems to design his friends, by whom be thought himself mocked, and who were, as he imagined, scorners of him, Job 12:4; and therefore for this reason entreats his case might be heard, and his cause pleaded:

and doth not mine eye continue in their provocation? or "lodge all night"F17תלן "pernoctat", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Drusius, Schmidt, Michaelis, Schultens. ; his sense is, that they were continually provoking him with their words, their scoffs and jeers, their censures and calumnies, and the weak reasons and arguments they made use of to support their charges and suspicions; these dwelt upon his mind not only in the daytime but in the night, so that he could not get a wink of sleep for them; their words were so teasing and distressing, and they acted such a cruel part to him, and stuck so close to him, and hung upon his thoughts, that he could not get clear of them in the night season; but his mind ran upon them, which kept him waking, that he could not close his eyelids for thinking of them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

[Are there] not a mockers with me? and doth not mine eye continue in b their provocation?

(a) Instead of comfort, being now at death's door, he had but them that mocked at him, and discouraged him.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Umbreit, more emphatically, “had I only not to endure mockery, in the midst of their contentions I (mine eye) would remain quiet.”

eye continueHebrew, “tarry all night”; a figure taken from sleep at night, to express undisturbed rest; opposed to (Job 16:20), when the eye of Job is represented as pouring out tears to God without rest.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Are there not mockers with me? and doth not mine eye continue in their provocation?

Are not — Do not my friends, instead of comforting, mock me? Thus he returns to what he had said, chap16:20, and intimates the justice of his following appeal.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-17.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 17:2 [Are there] not mockers with me? and doth not mine eye continue in their provocation?

Ver. 2. Are there no mockers with me?] Heb. If there be not mockers with me, q.d. despeream, let me be punished, or let me be blamed for wishing to argue it out with God; so some Jewish doctors sense it. Job had before complained about his friends’ jeering and girding at him, Job 16:20. To be mocked in misery is no small aggravation. See what is threatened, Proverbs 1:26. The proverb is, Oculus, fides, et fama non patiuntur iocos, There is no jesting with a man’s eye, faith, and fame. Junius rendereth the text thus, Forasmuch as there are no mockings with me, I mean honestly, and deal plainly, and yet mine eye continueth in their provocations, neither can I be set right in their opinions, so prejudiced they are against me.

And doth not mine eye continue in their provocation?] Heb. Lodge or tarry all night in their provocations, or bitternesses? Broughton readeth, In these men’s vexing lodgeth mine eye; that is, I lodge not so much in my bed as in the thoughts of my friends’ unkindness. And indeed, saith one, a man may sleep better upon bare boards than upon hard words. Some refer it to the eye of his mind lifted up to God in prayer; but yet no sweetness coming from him either internally or externally. The former is rather to be followed.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 17:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-17.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 17:2. Are there not mockers with me? Were it not so, I have sarcasms enough in store, and I could spend the whole night unmoved at their aggravations. Heath. See chap. Job 24:25. It is very plain to me, says Peters, that as Job in the fourth verse directs his speech to God, so in the two preceding he points at and addresses himself to his mistaken friends: Are there not mockers with me? Lay down now (some earnest or pledge), put me in a surety with thee; who is he that will strike hands with me? i.e. Which of you, who thus mock and insult me, will venture to try your cause before the Supreme Judge? No; they shew a want of understanding in thus rashly censuring me; and were they to bring their cause before thee, O God, thou wouldst not exalt them; i.e. they would be cast in the trial. This sense, we see, is very obvious and easy: the change of the person addressed, and the several breaks in the sentence, only shew the earnestness of the speaker, and are both natural and elegant.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 17:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-17.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Do not my friends, instead of comforting, mock and abuse me, as if I had made use of religion only as a cloak to my wickedness? Heb. If there be not mockers with me, understand, let God do so or so to me. It is a form of an oath, which is defectively expressed, after the manner of the Hebrews. Assuredly I am in the midst of cruel mockers, which is a sore aggravation of my affliction. Thus he returns to what he had said Job 16:20, and intimates the necessity and justice of his following appeal, which otherwise might be thought too bold.

Mine eye; either,

1. The eyes of my body. Do they not continue to provoke me to my face? Or rather,

2. The eye of my mind. Their provoking scoffs and reproaches do not only molest me in the day-time, when they are with me, but lodge with me in the night, and are continually in my thoughts, and break my sleep, and disturb me in dreams. And therefore if I be a little disordered, I may be excused.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 17:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-17.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.Mockers Surely mockers are with me, and on their quarrelling mine eye dwells. Notwithstanding the grave is all that remains for Job, (Job 17:1,) his quasi friends mock him with promissory illusions of long life, and embitter his existence with janglings night and day so that his eye can rest on nothing else.

Continue — Hebrew, Pass the night.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-17.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 17:2. Are there not mockers with me? — Do not my friends, instead of comforting, mock and abuse me, as if I had made use of religion only as a cloak to cover my wickedness? Thus he returns to what he had said chap. Job 16:20), and intimates the necessity and justice of his following appeal, which otherwise might have been thought too bold. And doth not mine eye continue in their provocation? — That is, doth not their provocation continue in mine eye? Do not I still behold them provoking me to my face? Or he may speak of the eye of his mind, and then the meaning is, Their provoking scoffs and reproaches do not only molest me in the day-time, when they are with me, but lodge with me (for the word תלן, talan, here rendered continue, signifies to lodge) in the night, and are continually in my thoughts.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 17:2". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-17.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Not sinned. That is, I am not guilty of such sins as they charge me with. (Challoner) --- Hebrew, "the wicked were not with me" in friendship at any time. Protestants, "Are there not mockers with me?" (Haydock) --- Job was doubly afflicted, with corporal pain and calumny: yet hopeth in God. (Worthington)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-17.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Yet only mockery surrounded him, through his tear-filled eyes he only sees his friends attacking him and viewing him as some terrible sinner.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-17.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

continue in = constantly dwell on.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Are there not mockers with me? and doth not mine eye continue in their provocation? Umbreit, more emphatically, 'had I only not to endure mockery (literally, if only there were not mockings with me), in the midst of their, contentions, I (mine eye) would remain quiet.' 'Eye continue,' or tarry all night [ taalan (Hebrew #3885)], is a figure taken from sleep at night, to express undisturbed rest: opposed to Job 16:20, when the eye of Job is represented as pouring out tears to God without rest. Maurer takes the second clause, 'And (if) mine eye did not continue in their contentious obloquy'-namely, I would not be unwilling to die immediately (taken from Job 17:1). I prefer Umbreit's view, or else the English version.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Mine eye continue in their provocation?—“It sees, and can see nothing else; has nothing else to look upon “: a bitter reproach against his friends.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Are there not mockers with me? and doth not mine eye continue in their provocation?
mockers
12:4; 13:9; 16:20; 21:3; Psalms 35:14-16; Matthew 27:39-44
continue
Heb. lodge.
Psalms 25:13; 91:1; *marg:
provocation
1 Samuel 1:6,7
Reciprocal: Job 11:3 - mockest;  Job 15:12 - thy eyes;  Job 27:12 - altogether;  Luke 8:53 - laughed

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 17:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-17.html.