Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 17:15

Where now is my hope? And who regards my hope?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Dead (People);   Despondency;   Thompson Chain Reference - Hope-Despair;   Hopelessness;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Sheol;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Burial;   Sheol;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And where is now my hope? - In the circumstances in which I am found, of what use can hope be? Were I to form the expectation of future good, who could ever see it realized? Is it then any wonder that I should complain and bemoan my wretched lot?

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And where is now my hope? - What hope have I of life? What possibility is there of my escape from death?

Who shall see it? - That is, who will see any hopes that I may now cherish fulfilled. If I cherish any, they will be disappointed, and no one will see them accomplished.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-17.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 17:15

And where is now my hope?

Where now my hope

I. Occasions in life which force upon us this inquiry.

1. In those seasons when the troubles of life press heavily.

2. When our human dependencies have failed.

3. When the terrors of a guilty conscience seize us.

4. The question irresistibly presses upon all as death seems to approach.

II. The disappointment of those who have not provided against these seasons of trial.

1. All earthly hopes are, in their very nature, inadequate to our exigencies.

2. All the hopes which are derived from the world and the creatures are temporal in their duration.

3. If they could endure and go with us into eternity, or the separate state of souls,--yet they would not stand the test of the final day of account.

III. See the necessity of close self-exaltation.

1. This examination should refer to the object of our hope.

2. We should examine whether we have a well-grounded and scriptural prospect of attaining to the object of our hope. It is possible that we may practise self-delusion.

3. Your hope may be good as to its object, its foundation may be the work of Jesus Christ, an anchor sure and steadfast, but have you a valid title to appropriate that hope to yourself?

4. Inquire whether your hope has borne any trials. Application--

2. But, if our hope is found vain and weak, or absolutely false, it is high time to abandon it and seek a better. (The Evangelist.)

Hope held out to anxious inquirers

I. The inquiry. “Where is my hope?”

1. Is your hope in the world? This is the case with multitudes. Then your hope is set on that which is not good.

2. Is your hope in sin? Is that possible? The pleasures of sin are but for a season, the pains of sin are for eternity.

3. Is your hope in your works? This was the case with the ancient Pharisees. They “went about to establish their own righteousness,” but failed in the attempt. All who are “of the works of the law” are under it as a covenant; and as such it requires perfect obedience, or there is no justification by it.

4. Is your hope in your knowledge? “Knowledge puffeth up.” “The Kingdom of God is not in word, but in power.”

5. Is your hope in Christ? Then it is in the right place. The hope of Job was in him--the Redeemer; so was the hope of the primitive Christians.

II. The cases in which inquirers are warranted to hope. We are not warranted to hold out hope in every case. You must be made to feel your guilt, before you will give up your false hope. You must be made to feel your insufficiency before you will apply to Christ for relief.

1. If you repent you are warranted to hope.

2. If you believe, you are warranted to hope.

3. If you obey, you are warranted to hope.

4. If you love Christ, you are warranted to hope.

5. So you are, if you love the house of prayer.

6. And if you love the brethren.

7. And if you seek the Divine glory.

III. The qualities of the hope which the gospel inspires.

1. It is a Divine hope.

2. A lively hope.

3. A joyful hope.

4. A liberal hope.

5. A permanent hope.

In conclusion, let us consider the inquiry in the text in reference to ourselves, and thus endeavour to make a suitable improvement of the subject. Where is now my hope? (Thomas Hitchin.)
.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 17:15". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-17.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And where is now my hope?.... Not the grace of hope, which was in his heart; and though it might sometimes be low in exercise, it could not be lost; it is an anchor, sure and steadfast, and is one of the graces that always abides, and never disappoints and makes ashamed; nor the object of hope, eternal glory and happiness in another world, that is laid up in heaven, and for which he was looking and waiting by faith; but his hope of outward happiness, and of being restored to his former state of prosperity, or a better, which his friends encouraged him to; this had no place in him, nor did he see any reason to cherish it; all ground and foundation of it was removed, as he apprehended; there was nothing on which he could build such an hope as that, see Job 6:11;

as for my hope, who shall see it? that is, which his friends would have him hope for, a line house, a large estate, a numerous family, honour and respect among men, long life, and an abundance of outward peace and happiness; this he was firmly persuaded he should never see, being just going into the grave, nor his friends that suggested these things to him, nor anybody else; though indeed what he himself truly hoped for might be rightly thus described, being things not seen by the eye of the body, nor by carnal sense and reason, but are the invisible glories and realities of another world, for "hope that is seen is not hope", &c. Romans 8:24; but Job does not design these, but the former.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-17.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Who shall see it fulfilled? namely, the “hope” (Job 11:18) which they held out to him of restoration.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And where is now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it?

Hope — The happiness you would have me expect.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-17.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 17:15 And where [is] now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it?

Ver. 15. And where is now my hope? &c.] Heb. And where is my hope? sc. of restoration to my pristine prosperity, which you have so often promised me, who am now ready set upon the confines of death? Job was past the Cape of Good Hope in his own apprehension; but God turned again his captivity, Job 42:10 Qui nihil sperare potest desperet nihil. Who is able to hope for nothing, despairs for nothing. Job did well to propound death to himself, and prepare for it by such a before mentioned familiarity; but yet he should have better thought of the infinite power and goodness of God, who raiseth the dead, and delighteth to help such as are forsaken of their hopes. "Who delivered us from so great a death, and doth deliver: in whom we trust that he will yet deliver," 2 Corinthians 1:10. The Hebrew word that signifieth hope signifieth also a line, because by hope the heart should be stretched out as a line to the thing it hopeth for; and because it signifieth also a congregation, therefore some render this verse thus, And where now is my congregation? And as for my congregation, who shall see it? q.d. I have no other family or familiars but what are to be found in the grave, Jeremiah 3:17, Genesis 3:19.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 17:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-17.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 17:15. And where is now my hope? The repetition of the word hope is extremely elegant in this place. The two verses may be thus connoted; Where now, pray, can be my hope? my hope indeed! whoever have a mind to see it, (Job 17:16.) they must descend to the confines of the grave, seeing we shall go down to the dust together. Houbigant renders the last verse, It [my hope] shall descend together with me into the grave: it shall rest with me in the dust.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, Job wished for a fair trial of his case; but it must be soon, or death would prevent him.

1. He speaks of himself, as of one at the point of death, his breath corrupt through his disease, and drawn with difficulty; his days extinct, the last of them just at their end, and the graves of his fathers open, as ready for his reception. Note; (1.) Though the breath of natural life will quickly expire; yet if God has breathed spiritual life into us, we can never die. (2.) The days of time are drawing to their period; what folly then to seek our portion here, instead of securing a part in that eternity, where time will be lost as a drop in the ocean. (3.) If the grave is ready for us, highly it imports us to be ready for the grave; then come death, and welcome!

2. He complains of his friends, as mockers, who insulted him with abuse, and deceived his expectations, provoking him continually, so that neither day nor night his eyes could close. Note; (1.) It is cruel to mock at any man's calamities. (2.) An exasperated spirit drives sleep from the eyelids.

3. He longs that God would hear the cause. Lay down now some pledge of appearing, put me in a surety with thee, let me have assurance that the cause shall be heard, or, appoint my surety with thee, my Divine Redeemer, who will undertake to plead my cause for me, and then I am sure of success. Who is he that will strike hands with me, and lay any thing to my charge? I shall then have an advocate to answer for me. Note; They who have Christ for their surety, may appear with boldness at the bar of God.

4. He imputes the charges of his friends to a judgment of infatuation upon them from God; and thence concludes their unfitness to be exalted as umpires in the dispute. Note; (1.) Wisdom is God's gift; and when the wise abuse their talent, he can infatuate and confound them. (2.) They shall not be exalted, but be cast down into the pit of misery, who employ the wisdom that God hath given them against the cause and people of God.

5. He denounces a curse upon flatterers, such as he considered his friends to be, who pretended to speak for God, and to give him great expectations of prosperity: The eyes of his children shall fail, his family be desolate, and find no kindness in their distresses. Note; Flattery is abominable, and every wise and good man abhors it.

6. He laments that he was now despised, though once the darling of his friends and the people. His poverty became a proverb, and his wickedness was universally esteemed to be the cause of it. Note; (1.) We must place little confidence in men's regard: love and loathing, honour and infamy, are often successive. (2.) Every one is the great man's admirer; but let him be reduced, and how despicable does he in poverty appear! It is well if we have one friend who is not so changeable.

7. Bitter sorrow dimmed his eye, and continual tears wore him to a skeleton; so deeply does the body usually partake in the anguish of the soul. Let us fear inordinate grief, lest it make us self-murderers!

8. He declares what effect his sufferings and his friends' behaviour would have upon the righteous. They would be astonished at his sorrows and their cruelty, and rise up with indignation to reprove the hypocrisy of such as pretended to sanctity, yet were so rash in their censure of the innocent. Far from being discouraged by such a dark dispensation, or the fear of the like usage, they would hold on their way in purity, simplicity, and integrity; and, instead of fainting, grow stronger and stronger. Perhaps he expresses his own confidence of doing so, notwithstanding their revilings, conscious of his righteousness, and the cleanness of his ways before God. Note; (1.) A good man may see things that he cannot account for in God's dealings; but he staggers not through unbelief. (2.) They who are faithful to God are zealous for him, and dare to vindicate his oppressed cause and people. (3.) The bitterest abuse that God's people sustain is usually from formal and hypocritical professors. (4.) Difficulties and opposition quicken and strengthen them who walk in the ways of God.

2nd, From sad experience he is now convinced how little expectation he could entertain from his friends.

1. He professes his despair of being eased by their counsels, in which no traces of wisdom appeared; and, unless they returned to a better mind, and came with more unprejudiced tempers to hear his defence, he could hope for little good from their conference. Note; Many are wise in their own eyes, who, in conference, are found to add nothing to the knowledge of those whom they pretend to instruct.

2. He concludes it folly to flatter himself with the hope of good days. They are passed, no more to return; all his gracious purposes of the employment of his affluence for the good of mankind are frustrated; and the thoughts of his heart are ready to perish with his body in the grave: they are so bitter, that they change night into day, giving him no rest; and the light is short, because of darkness; the days of prosperity seemed but like a flash of passing light, succeeded by thick darkness; or the day obscured with his sorrows drew to an end, and scarcely afforded a beam of welcome light. Note; (1.) Death will put an end to all our purposes; therefore what now thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might. (2.) The night is tiresome to the sleepless eye, and the day dark to the sorrowful; let us bless God if we sleep in peace, and awake cheerful to meet the morning sun.

3. His approaching end made it vain to expect a change; he looked for no house but the grave, no bed of lasting repose but the dust, no more dear relatives but worms and corruption; his hope was gone of earthly blessings, which neither he nor they would live to see restored. One prospect only was before him, They shall go down to the bars of the pit, and rest together there. Note; (1.) We are too apt to faint in adversity, and, when perplexed, to be in despair. Job little thought what good things yet awaited him. (2.) It is useful to keep death in our view, and to make the grave familiar to us. To a gracious soul, death has lost its terror. Since Jesus slept in the grave, it is but our house of passage, as travellers from time to eternity, from life to immortality. (3.) To be proud, little becomes those who are so nearly related to worms and corruption. (4.) They who could obtain no rest before, in death will find it; there, at least, fierce disputes and animosities will have an end.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 17:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-17.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Where is now my hope? and what then is become of that hope which you advised me to entertain?

My hope, i.e. the fulfilling of my hope, or the happiness which you would have me expect; hope being put for the thing hoped for, as Proverbs 13:12 1 Corinthians 9:10.

Who shall see it? no man shall see it: it shall never be.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 17:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-17.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Who. Hebrew, "who shall see my hope?" I wish all might witness it. (Haydock) --- But I expect no redress on this side of the grave. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-17.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

He felt that his hope would die with him. "He had no hope of future prosperity, which his friends predicted" (Strauss p. 169). Job had already stated that he had no hope of recovering (6:11; 7:6; 14:19).

Notice how our emotions can be completely wrong! Job was sure he was going to die soon, but he would live on for another 140 years (). He would see prosperity again. How short-sighted we can be when depressed! Contrast Job"s depressing view of death with what the New Testament teaches (Philippians 1:21-23; 1 Peter 1:4; Revelation 14:13; 1 Thess. 4:13).

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-17.html. 1999-2014.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And where is now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it?

And where. Where, then is my hope? The apodosis to Job 17:13-14. Who shall see at-fulfilled? namely, the "hope" (Job 11:18) which they held out to him of restoration.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-17.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And where is now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it?
my hope
4:6; 6:11; 13:15; 19:10
Reciprocal: Job 7:6 - without hope;  Lamentations 3:18 - General

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 17:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-17.html.