Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 22:29

"When you are cast down, you will speak with confidence, And the humble person He will save.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflicted;   Backsliders;   Humility;   Penitent;   Righteous;   Sympathy;   Wicked (People);   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Humility;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Job;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eliphaz (2);   Eye;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

When men are cast down - There is a great difficulty in this verse; the sense, however, is tolerably evident, and the following is nearly a literal version: When they shall humble themselves, thou shalt say, Be exalted, or, there is exaltation: for the down-cast of eye he will save. The same sentiment as that of our Lord, "He that exalteth himself shall be abased; but he that humbleth himself shall be exalted."

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

When men are cast down - The meaning of this is, probably, when people are usually cast down, or in the times of trial and calamity, which prostrate others, you shall find support. You shall then be enabled to say, “there is lifting up, or there is support.” Or, more probably still, it may mean, “in times when others are cast down and afflicted, thou shalt be able to raise them up, or to aid them. Thou shalt be able to go to them and say, ‹Be of good cheer. Do not be cast down. There is consolation.‘ And thou shalt be able to procure important blessings for them by thy counsels and prayers;” see the notes at Job 22:30.

And he shall save the humble person - That is, either, “Thou shalt save the humble person,” by a change from the second person to the third, which is not uncommon in Hebrew; or, “thou shalt be able from thine own experience to say, “He,” that is, “God,” will save the humble person, or the one that is cast down.” Margin, “him that hath low eyes.” The Hebrew is like the margin. In affliction the eyes are cast upon the ground; and so, also, a casting the eyes to the ground is indicative of dejection, of humility, or of modesty. It refers here to one who experiences trials; and Eliphaz says that Job would be able to save such an one; that is, to support him in his afflictions, and furnish the helps necessary to restore him again to comfort.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-22.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 22:29

When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, There is lifting up; and He shall save the humble person.

The humble soul the peculiar favourite of heaven

I. Some account of lowliness and humility. Lowliness being a relative grace, we must consider it in a threefold view.

1. With respect to ourselves. It implies low and underrating thoughts of ourselves. It has in it even a self-abhorrence; but a singleness of heart in the discharge of duty, without vainglory, or pharisaical ostentation.

2. With respect unto others. This has in it a preferring of others above or before ourselves. A looking upon the gifts and graces of others without a grudge. And an affable, courteous carriage toward all.

3. With reference to God. It implies high and admiring thoughts of the majesty of God. When God discovers Himself, the man sinks into nothing in his own esteem. A holy fear and dread of God always on his spirit, especially in his immediate approaches unto the pretence of God, in the duties of worship. An admiring of every expression of the! Divine bounty, and goodness toward men in general, and toward himself in particular. A giving God the glory of all that we are helped to do in His service. A silent resignation unto the will of God, and an acquiescence in the disposals of His providence, let dispensations be never so cross to the inclinations of flesh and blood. The very soul and essence of Gospel humiliation lies in the soul’s renouncing of itself, going out of itself, and going into and accepting the Lord Jesus Christ as its everlasting all.

II. The humble soul is the peculiar favourite of Heaven. This is evident if we consider--

1. That when the Son of God was here in our nature, He shewed a particular regard unto such.

2. God has such respect unto the humble soul because it is a fruit of His own Spirit inhabiting the soul.

3. This is a disposition that makes the soul like Christ, and the liker that a person be to Christ, God loves Him aye the better.

III. Some marks by which you may try whether you be among the humble and lowly.

1. The lowly soul is one that is many times ashamed to look up to heaven under a sense of his own vileness and unworthiness. He is one that is many times put to wonder that God hath not destroyed him.

2. He is one that is most abased under the receipt of the greatest mercies and sweetest manifestations.

3. He is one that renounces the law as a covenant, and disclaims all pretensions to righteousness from that airth.

4. He is one that has high, raised, and admiring thoughts of Christ, and of His law-abiding righteousness. The humble soul is one that looks on sin as the greatest burden: that values himself of least, when others value him most; that is not puffed up with the falls of others: that is thankful for little, and content and desirous to know God’s will, that he may do it.

IV. Some motives to press and recommend this lowliness and humility of spirit. It assimilates the soul to Christ. It is the distinguishing character of a Christian. Consider how reasonable this lowliness and humility of soul is--whether we look to ourselves in particular or the evils of the land or day wherein we live. (E. Erskine.)

The ministry of fellow helpfulness

Poverty, anxieties, pain, suffering, oppressions, errors, sins, sadnesses, we move among these day by day. Be we high born or lowly, live we in palace or hut, these experiences greet us, and make their appeal to us. What is to be our bearing in relation to all this? How are We to conduct ourselves amid such surroundings? There are two courses open to us--the selfish and the sympathetic. We may shut ourselves up in a spirit of selfish isolation and say, “Other people’s affairs are nothing to me.” We have the power so to choose and act. Of course we take the consequences such conduct involves. That we cannot escape. There is, however, the truer, manlier, Christlier course of brotherly sympathy, kindly feeling, sympathetic helpfulness. Going among men cast down by their surroundings and tendencies, their sins and their sorrows, we may say even to those lowest down, “There is lifting up for you.” Such a bearing as this is in keeping with all the noblest instincts of our nature. A selfish, unsympathetic man is unnatural. He has got a twist. But we love the unselfish, the sympathetic, the helpful. This spirit and bearing religion ever enforces and promotes. It is a vital part of religion. A selfish Christian is a contradiction. The godly man should be an embodied Gospel of hope wherever he goes. The mission of the Lord Jesus lay along this line. He came to men as the great hope bringer. He has made the world transcendently richer by the hope inspirations that pervaded His teaching. Down through the ages, under the same inspiration, Christly men have moved among their follows as hope bringers. (Ralph M. Spoor.)

Delight in the Lord

These words describe the sacred pleasures of piety.

I. The sublimity of its nature. The saints delight--

1. In the saving knowledge of God.

2. In the present enjoyment of God.

3. In the future anticipation of God.

II. The Divinity of its origin. “In the Almighty.”

1. The Almighty is suited to our capacities.

2. The Almighty is adequate to our necessities.

3. The Almighty is durable as our existence.

III. The tendency of its influence. “Thou shalt lift up thy face unto God.” The effects which accompany spiritual joy, distinguish it from mere enthusiastic delusion, and demonstrate both the genuineness and efficacy of experimental religion in them that believe.

1. They exercise confidence in God.

2. They enjoy communion with God.

3. They maintain obedience to God. (Sketches of Four Hundred Sermons.)
.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 22:29". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-22.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

When men are cast down,.... Wicked men are brought down from a state of prosperity to a state of adversity, are in low circumstances, great straits and difficulties:

then thou shall say, there is lifting up; that is, for himself and his; when others are in adversity, he should be in prosperity; when others are cast down into a very low estate and distressed condition, he should be exalted to a very high estate, and be in affluent circumstances, see Psalm 147:6; or else the sense is, when thou and thine, and what belong to thee, are humbled and brought low, then thou mayest promise thyself a restoration and change for the better; and boldly say, they will be lifted up, and raised up again, since God's usual method is to exalt the humble, and to abase the proud, Luke 14:11; or rather, this may respect the benefit and advantage that humble persons wound gain by Job, and his prayers for them, and may be rendered and interpreted thus: "when they have humbled"F17כי השפילו "quum humiliaverint", Montanus, Cocceius, Michaelis. themselves, and bowed themselves low at thy feet, and especially before God, "then thou shall say", pray unto God for them, that "there may be a lifting up", raising them up out of their low estate, and thou shall be heard:

and he shall save the humble person; that is, "low of eyes"F18שח עינים "demissum oculis", Montanus, Beza, Junius & Tremellius, Piscator; "humilem oculis", Vatablus. , humble in his eyes; who is so pressed with troubles and distress, that he hangs down his head, looks upon the ground, and will not lift up his eyes, but is of a dejected countenance; or that is low in his own eyes, has humble thoughts of himself, esteems others better than himself, and lies low before God under a sense of his sinfulness and unworthiness, and casts himself entirely upon the grace and mercy of God; such an one he saves, in a spiritual sense, out of his troubles and afflictions; he does not forget the cry of such humble ones, but remembers them, and grants their desires: and he saves the lowly and humble with a spiritual and eternal salvation; gives more grace unto them, and outfits them for glory, and at last gives glory itself; raises them on high to sit among princes, and to inherit the throne of glory; the meek shall inherit the earth, the new heavens and earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness, James 4:6.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-22.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

u When [men] are cast down, then thou shalt say, [There is] lifting up; and he shall save the humble person.

(u) God will deliver his when the wicked are destroyed round about them, as in the flood and in Sodom.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-22.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Rather, When (thy ways; from Job 22:28) are cast down (for a time), thou shalt (soon again have joyful cause to) say, There is lifting up (prosperity returns back to me) [Maurer].

he — God.

humbleHebrew, “him that is of low eyes.” Eliphaz implies that Job is not so now in his affliction; therefore it continues: with this he contrasts the blessed effect of being humble under it (James 4:6; 1 Peter 5:5 probably quote this passage). Therefore it is better, I think, to take the first clause as referred to by “God resisteth the proud.” When (men) are cast down, thou shalt say (behold the effects of) pride. Eliphaz hereby justifies himself for attributing Job‘s calamities to his pride. “Giveth grace to the humble,” answers to the second clause.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, There is lifting up; and he shall save the humble person.

Cast down — All round about thee, in a time of general calamity.

There is — God will deliver thee.

He — God.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-22.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 22:29 When [men] are cast down, then thou shalt say, [There is] lifting up; and he shall save the humble person.

Ver. 29. When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, There is lifting up] And that by the force of thy faith, the nature whereof is to gather one contrary out of another (as life out of death, assurance of deliverance out of deepest distresses, Deuteronomy 32:36), and to believe God upon his bare word, and that against sense in things invisible, and against reason in things incredible. Because they are humbled, thou shalt say, Exaltation: and saving of him that boweth his eyes down; whereof some make this to be the sense: Job, attaining to such a blessed change, shall be able out of his own experience to comfort others in misery, who likewise humble themselves. Junius rendereth it and the following verse thus: When men shall have cast down any one, and thou shalt think of his lifting up; then will God save the low of eyes, or him that is low in his own eyes: he will deliver that guilty person, and he shall be delivered by the purity of thy hands; that is, saith he, So great shall his love be to thee, and his blessing upon thee, that for thy sake he shall show mercy to others, though they be none of the best, according to the promise made to Abraham, Genesis 12:3; Genesis 18:24. And hence Job’s intercession is joined with that of Noah and Daniel, Ezekiel 14:14.

And he shall save the humble person] Heb. Him that is low of eyes, as was Job at this time; and the publican, Luke 18:13. "A high look and a proud heart" go together, Psalms 101:5. And as God resisteth such, James 4:4, 1 Peter 5:5, so he giveth grace to the humble; and not grace only, but glory too, as here; safety here, and salvation hereafter.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 22:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-22.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

When men are cast down, Heb. When they (i.e. they who do this work. It is an indefinite and impersonal speech, which is very common in the Hebrew language) shall cast down or overthrow; either,

1. Proud and wicked men, as may be guessed by the opposition of the humble and innocent, who should be saved, whilst these were destroyed. So the sense is, When there shall come a general calamity, which shall sweep away all the wicked round about them. Or,

2. Thee, or thine; which pronoun is oft understood. So the sense is, When through God’s permission thou shalt be brought into some trouble, which God sees fit for thee.

Thou shalt say within thyself, with good assurance and confidence.

There is lifting up; or, There shall be lifting up, either,

1. For them; if they repent and humble themselves, they shall be preserved or restored. And this thou wilt assure them of from thy own experience. Or,

2. For thee and thine; God will deliver thee, when others are crushed and destroyed. And; or, for; this particle being oft put causally, as hath been formerly noted. So the following words contain a reason why he might confidently say, that there would be such a lifting up for a person so humbled.

He, i.e. God, unto whom only salvation belongeth, Psalms 3:8.

Shall save; either,

1. Eternally; or,

2. Temporally, to wit, from the evils here mentioned.

The humble person, Heb. him that hath low or cast-down eyes; which phrase may here note, either,

1. Humility and lowliness of mind and disposition, as pride is oft expressed by high or lofty looks, as Psalms 18:27 101:5 131:1 Proverbs 6:17. And so this is a tacit admonition and reproof for Job, whom for his confident justification of himself, and his contemptuous expressions and censures concerning them, they judged to Job guilty of intolerable pride of heart. Or,

2. Lowness of estate or condition, as James 1:10. So it notes him whose eyes and countenance are dejected by reason of his great troubles and miseries; as, on the contrary, prosperity makes persons lift up their eyes and faces.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 22:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-22.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

29.Lifting up — Words of cheer; “upwards,” “forwards,” or, as Gesenius has it: “Thou commandest lifting up.” Omit there is. The words of the man of God are words of consolation and of power. The sorrowful are lifted up, and God. saves “the humble person” — literally, the meek of eye.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-22.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Glory, as the gospel declares, Matthew xxiii. 12. The Hebrew is more perplexed. "When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, there is lifting up;" (Protestants; Haydock) or "when thy eyes shall be cast down, they shall say to thee, Arise." (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-22.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the humble. Hebrew the man of downcast eyes. Compare Luke 18:13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, There is lifting up; and he shall save the humble person.

Rather, When thy ways (from Job 22:28) are cast down (for a time), thou shalt (soon again have joyful cause to) say, There is lifting up (prosperity returns back to me). (Maurer.)

He - God. Humble - Hebrew, 'him that is of low eyes,' Eliphaz implies that Job is not so now in his affliction; therefore it continues: with this he contrasts the blessed effect of being humble under it (James 4:6, and 1 Peter 5:5, probably quote this passage). Therefore it is better, I think, to take the first clause as referred to in James and Peter by "God resisteth the proud." When (men) are cast down, thou shalt say (behold the effects of) pride. Eliphaz hereby justifies himself for attributing Job's calamities to his pride. "Giveth grace to the humble" answers to the second clause.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) There is lifting up.—This may be its meaning, but some understand it in a bad sense: “When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, It was pride that caused their fall.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-22.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When men are cast down, then thou shalt say, There is lifting up; and he shall save the humble person.
men
5:19-27; Psalms 9:2,3; 91:14-16; 92:9-11
he shall
Proverbs 29:23; Isaiah 57:15; Luke 14:11; 18:9-14; James 4:6; 1 Peter 5:5
the humble person
Heb. him that hath low eyes.
Psalms 138:6; Isaiah 66:2; Ezekiel 21:26,27; Luke 1:52
Reciprocal: Jeremiah 40:5 - gave him;  Jeremiah 52:31 - lifted up;  Matthew 23:12 - GeneralLuke 18:14 - every;  Acts 27:22 - I exhort;  2 Corinthians 4:9 - cast;  James 4:10 - he

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 22:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-22.html.