Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 22:30

"He will deliver one who is not innocent, And he will be delivered through the cleanness of your hands."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Backsliders;   Righteous;   Wicked (People);  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hand;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eliphaz (2);   Job, Book of;   Pure;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jacob B. Yaḳ;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He shall deliver the island of the innocent - The word אי ai, which we translate island, is most probably the Arabic particle (Arabic) whosoever, whatsoever, any, whosoever he may be, as (Arabic) ai rajuli, whatsoever man he may be. And it is most probable that both words are Arabic, (Arabic) or (Arabic) any innocent, chaste, pure, or holy person; for the word has the same meaning both in Hebrew and Arabic. The text may therefore be translated, He shall deliver every innocent person: He, the innocent person, shall be delivered by the pureness of thy hands; i.e., as thou lovest justice, so thou wilt do justice. Instead of כפיך cappeyca, thy hands, the Vulgate, Syriac, and Arabic have read כפיו cappaiv, his or their hands. Mr. Good thinks that אי ai signifies house, as (Arabic) and (Arabic) in Arabic signify to reside, to have a home, etc.; and therefore translates the passage thus: "The house of the innocent shall be delivered; and delivered by the pureness of thy hands." The reader may adopt which he pleases; but the word island must be given up, as it cannot make any consistent sense.

Thus ends Eliphaz the Temanite, who began with a tissue of the bitterest charges, continued with the most cruel insinuations, and ended with common-place exhortations to repentance, and promises of secular blessings in consequence: and from his whole speech scarcely can one new or important maxim be derived. Blessed be God for Moses and the prophets! for Jesus, the evangelists and the apostles! Their trumpet gives no uncertain sound: but by that of Job's friends who can prepare himself for the battle?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-22.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He shall deliver the island of the innocent - Margin, “the innocent shall deliver the island.” Never was there a more unhappy translation than this; and it is quite clear that our translators had no intelligible idea of the meaning of the passage. What can be meant by “saving the island of the innocent?” The word rendered island (אי 'ı̂y ) commonly means, indeed, an island, or a maritime country; see Isaiah 20:6, note. It is, however, used as a “negative” in 1 Samuel 4:21, in the name “I-chabod” - אי־כבוד 'ı̂y -kâbôd “And she named the child I-chabod (margin, that is, “where is the glory?” or, there is “no glory”), saying, the glory is departed from Israel.” This sense is frequent in the Rabbinic Hebrew, where it is used as connected with an adjective in a privative sense, like the English “un.” It is probably an abbreviated form of (אין 'ayı̂n ) “not, nothing;” and is used here as a “negative” to qualify the following word, “He shall deliver even him that is not innocent.”

So it is rendered by the Chaldee, by Le Clerc, Rosenmuller, Gesenius, Noyes, and others. The Vulgate and the Septuagint render it, “He shall deliver the innocent.” The sense is, that the man who returns to God, and who is regarded by him as his friend, will be able to intercede for the guilty, and to save them from the punishment which they deserved. His prayers and intercessions will be heard in their behalf, and on his account layouts will be shown to them, even when they did not personally deserve them. This sentiment accords with that expressed in Genesis 18:26, “If I find in Sodom fifty righteous within the city, then I will spare all the place for their sakes;” Ezekiel 14:14, “Though these three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job were in it, they should deliver but their own souls;” compare Ezekiel 22:30; Jeremiah 5:1. The sentiment, also, had a beautiful illustration, though one which Eliphaz did not here think of, in his own case and that of his friends, where this very Job, to whom he was giving this counsel, was directed to intercede for them; Job 42:7-8. The sentiment, indeed, is found every where in the Scriptures, that the righteous are permitted to pray for others, and that they are thus the means of bringing down important blessings on them. In answer to those prayers, multitudes are saved from calamity here, and will be brought to eternal life hereafter.

And it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands - Or, rather, he, i. e., the wicked, for whom you pray, will be delivered by the pureness of thine hands. That is, God will save him in answer to the prayers of a righteous man. Your upright and holy life; your pure hands stretched out in supplication, shall be the means of saving him. No one can tell how many blessings are conferred on wicked people because the righteous pray for them. No one can tell how many a wicked son is spared, and ultimately saved, in answer to the intercessions of a holy parent; nor can the wicked world yet know how much it owes its preservation, and the numberless blessings which it enjoys, to the intercessions of the saints. It is one of the innumerable blessings of being a child of God thus to be permitted to be the means of bringing down blessings on others, and saving sinners from ruin. All the friends of God may thus confer unspeakable benefits to others; and they who have “an interest at the throne of grace” should plead without ceasing for the salvation of guilty and dying people.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-22.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He shall deliver the island of the innocent,.... But where is there such an island, an island of innocent persons? it seems to be better rendered by others, "the innocent shall deliver the island"F19ימלט אי נקי "innocens insulam liberabit", Montanus; so Pagninus, Vatablus. : good men are sometimes, by their counsel and advice, and especially by their prayers, the means of delivering an island or country from ruin and destruction: but the word rendered "island" is a negative particle, as in 1 Samuel 4:21; and signifies "not"; and so in the Targum; which is

"a man that is not innocent shall be delivered:'

in like manner Jarchi interprets it, and so do NoldiusF20Concordant. Ebr. Part. p. 25. No. 135. and othersF21אי נקי "non innocentem", Drusius, Piscator, Michaelis; "non insontem", Schultens; to the same sense Beza, Mercerus, Codurcus, Junius, & Tremellius. ; and the sense is, that Job, for he is the person spoken of, as appears from the following clause, should not only be beneficial by his prayers, to humble and good men, but even to the wicked, such as were not innocent and free from fault and punishment, but guilty, and obnoxious to wrath and ruin; and yet such should escape it, at least for the present, through the prayers and intercession of Job; or God should do this for Job's sake and his prayers:

and it is, or "he is"

delivered by the pureness of thine hands; either by his good works, setting a good example, which, being followed, would be the means of the prevention of present ruin; or by his lifting up pure and holy hands in prayer to God for a sinful people; which God often attends to and hears, and so delivers them from destruction; as the Israelites were delivered through the prayer of Moses, when they had made the golden calf, and worshipped it; see Psalm 106:19; though sometimes God will not admit of an intercessor for such persons, Ezekiel 14:20.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-22.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He shall deliver the x island of the innocent: and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands.

(x) God will deliver a whole country from peril, even for the just man's sake.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-22.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

island — that is, “dwelling.” But the Hebrew expresses the negative (1 Samuel 4:21); translate “Thus He (God) shall deliver him who was not guiltless,” namely, one, who like Job himself on conversion shall be saved, but not because he was, as Job so constantly affirms of himself, guiltless, but because he humbles himself (Job 22:29); an oblique attack on Job, even to the last.

and it — Rather, “he (the one not heretofore guiltless) shall be delivered through the purity (acquired since conversion) of thy hands”; by thy intercession (as Genesis 18:26, etc.). [Maurer]. The irony is strikingly exhibited in Eliphaz unconsciously uttering words which exactly answer to what happened at last: he and the other two were “delivered” by God accepting the intercession of Job for them (Job 42:7, Job 42:8).

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He shall deliver the island of the innocent: and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands.

He, … — God will have so great a respect to thy innocency, that for thy sake he will deliver those that belong to thee, or live with thee, or near thee, thought in themselves they be ripe for destruction.

Their hands — By thy prayers proceeding from a pure heart and conscience. So Eliphaz and his two friends, who in this matter were not innocent, were delivered by the pureness of Job's hands, chap42:8.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-22.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

island

i.e. coast.

Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Job 22:30". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/job-22.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 22:30 He shall deliver the island of the innocent: and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands.

Ver. 30. He shall deliver the island of the innocent] Or, He shall deliver the not innocent; him that is not guiltless; and even such shall be delivered for the purity of thine hands. Thus God gave Zoar to Lot, and all the souls in the ship to Paul, and the guilty Israelites to Moses. See Jeremiah 5:1. Or, The innocent shall deliver the island; or, Liberabitur vita innocentis, the innocent shall be freed from affliction: so Brentius.

And it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands] i.e. Of thy works, or by thy pure hands lifted up in prayer. Semen sanctum statumen terrae, the saints bear up the state, Isaiah 6:13, they uphold the pillars of the earth by their piety and prayers; and therefore when God is unchangeably resolved to ruin a people he silenceth his saints, as Jeremiah 7:16, or removeth them out of the world, as he did Methuselah the year before the flood. And as one sinner may destroy much good, Ecclesiastes 9:18; so one praying saint may save an island, a whole country; it is delivered by the pureness of thy hands. It may be the work sticks at thee; why then is not thy shoulder at the wheel when the cart is stalled?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 22:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-22.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

READER the view here presented to you of Job's exercises, is the more profitable from being the more plain. In all the charges of the friends of Job before, there were none so palpably false and cruel; and therefore here we feel the more comfort, from the consciousness that Job himself found that consolation under them, which a mind of rectitude cannot but enjoy, under the false accusations of the wicked. Indeed Job was too deeply drenched in affliction, from the sufferings of his body, not to be very sensibly affected also, however false the charges were, with what Eliphaz had said. The man that doth not realize his trials, and feel them as trials, will not truly profit by them. Yet, certainly, Job had a comfortable retreat in his own mind, in the consciousness of their falsehood. Our profit will be the more striking from this chapter, in what we behold under this particular. We are taught the blessedness of that state of mind, when, from being exercised with the temptations, or the accusations of Satan, we can look to JESUS, with thankfulness, when the tempter's malice is ill founded.

But what I would particularly desire from the perusal of this chapter, to have impressed both upon the Reader's mind and my own, is this a that when the malice of men, or the adversary, raiseth storms of trial, or persecution, falsely against us, this is the blessed moment to look after, and narrowly to watch, and eye the hand of JESUS in the permission. My brother! do mark this down as a never-failing maxim, whatever our trial be, it must be by JESUS'S appointment. Be the instrument who, or what it may, yet JESUS is in it. His love, his wisdom, is at the bottom. Mark this down, as a rule never to be controverted. Then follow this up with another. Whatever the trial be, it is for good. Thy GOD, thy JESUS, my soul, cannot do iniquity. Mark this also. And this will bring out a third, as the sweet and blessed result of the two which went before: the end shall be as Job's was; glory to GOD, and salvation to his redeemed. When Eliphaz thus charged Job, when Shimei cursed David, and when, on an infinitely more important exercise than both, or than all the world of GOD'S children put together, JESUS was traduced and blasphemed, what was the result? As it is beautifully expressed in one of the Psalms: 'I will cry unto GOD, most high, even unto GOD, that performeth all things for me.' Yes! Reader! it is very sweet and very precious, when the conscious soul, unjustly oppressed, can take refuge in divine favor, and divine strength, and say, Thou shalt answer for me, O Lord my God!

But chiefly let our eye and heart, upon all those occasions, be altogether fixed upon the person and work of JESUS. In all situations, he is the pattern, and forerunner of his people: and what he said of old, be saith the same to all his exercised family now: fear none of these things, which thou shalt suffer. Through Satan cast some of you in prison, when he would cast, if he could, all: and when, instead of prison he wishes it were hell; yet, it shall be but for ten days, though he would have it to be forever. Fear not therefore; but be faithful unto death and I will give you (saith the faithful and true witness) the crown of glory that fadeth not away.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-22.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He, i.e. God, as Job 22:29, whose prerogative it is to give deliverances.

Shall deliver, to wit, upon thy request, as the following clause showeth: God will hear thy prayers even for others, which is a great honour and comfort; and much more for thyself.

The island of the innocent; not only thyself, when thou shalt become innocent and pure, but for thy sake he will deliver the whole island (or country, that word being oft used not only for such lands or countries as were separated from Canaan by the sea, as is commonly observed, but also for such as were upon the same continent with it, as appears from Genesis 10:5 Psalms 72:10 97:1 Isaiah 41:5) in which thou dwellest. Or, the guilty, or him that is not innocent; for the word here rendered island is sometimes used for not, in Scripture, as 1 Samuel 4:21 Proverbs 31:4. So the sense is, God will have so great a respect to thy innocency and purity, that for thy sake he will deliver those that belong to thee, or live with thee, or near thee, though in themselves they be sinful creatures, and ripe for destruction. See Genesis 18:32.

It is delivered, to wit, the island; or, he, i.e. the guilty person.

By the pureness of thine hands, i.e. by thy prayers proceeding from a pure heart and conscience. When thou shalt lift up pure hands to God in prayer, as it is expressed, 1 Timothy 2:8; whereby as he asserts the prevalency of the righteous man’s prayers with God for mercy, both for himself and others; and by this argument he persuadeth Job to repentance; so withal he allegeth this as an argument or evidence that Job did not stretch out pure hands to God in prayer, as he pretended, because his prayers could not prevail for the preservation of himself or his children, and much less for others at a greater distance.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 22:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-22.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30.The island of , not guiltless. This Hebrew word i (not) our translators altogether mistook. Here it has a negative sense, as in I-chabod, no-glory. The verse should read —

He shall deliver him that is not guiltless,

And he shall be saved by the pureness of thy hands.

Our own purity of life under God becomes a powerful agency for the conversion of others. (Psalms 51:13.) So little do we know of our spiritual needs, that we are quite as ready to exhort others as to care for ourselves. At the very moment that these words of noble counsel fell from his lips, Eliphaz needed the prayers of some upright man, which Job himself (Job 42:8) finally offered. The reader cannot but be touched with a feeling of regret as this high-minded son of Teman passes from the scene, commissioned as he was from God to deliver an exhortation that for beauty of sentiment, purity of thought, and depth of spiritual knowledge, is without compare in the Old Testament Scriptures. He stands forth the lofty peer of Balaam, free (the reader may trust) from his failing; — the only one of “THE THREE,” at all worthy to grapple with Job in the solution of the dark problem of evil. In argument, however, he lacked self-control, and allowed himself to follow his friends in vituperation and to surpass them in calumny. Eliphaz spoke of God “the thing that was not right,” by perverting the facts of human life, and by setting forth an imperfect retribution, as worthy of the righteousness of God.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-22.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 22:30. He — Whose prerogative it is to give deliverances; shall deliver Namely, upon thy request, as the following clause shows; the island of the innocent — Not only thyself, when thou shalt become innocent, or righteous, but, for thy sake, he will deliver the whole island, or country, in which thou dwellest: God will have so great a respect to thy innocence, that for thy sake he will deliver those that belong to thee, or live with thee, or near thee, though, in themselves, they be ripe for destruction. By the pureness of thy hands — By thy prayers, proceeding from a pure heart and conscience. So Eliphaz and his two friends, who, in this matter, were not innocent, were delivered by the pureness of Job’s hands, Job 42:8.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 22:30". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-22.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Innocent. Hebrew, "He shall deliver even the man who is not innocent, and that for the sake of the purity of thy hands." (Chaldean; Junius, &c.) --- God will even spare the guilty, to manifest the regard which he has for the intercession of the saints. These interpreters have taken ai in the same sense as ain, which is the case, 1 Kings iv. 21. (Calmet) --- Others explain, "He shall deliver the island of the innocent, and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands." (Protestants) This also would shew the merit and protection of the saints, as a whole island may owe its safety to one of God's servants. In effect, the would stands by the prayers of the saints. (Haydock) --- All that has been said from ver. 21 tends to shew that God favours his friends; and, consequently, that he would never have punish Job, if he had not been guilty. (Calmet)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-22.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"And he will be delivered through the cleanness of your hands": The idea is that the righteous man has influence with God, and through his prayers others will be delivered (see Genesis 18:21-33). Yet God reminds us that such "influence" only goes so far (Ezekiel 14:12-18; Jeremiah 31:29-30). Later in the letter Job will intercede for his friends (42:7-10).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-22.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the island of. Island put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Subject), App-6, for coasts, or borders; but the words are omitted by the Septuagint

it. The Aramaean, Septuagint, Syriac, and Vulgate read "thou".

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-22.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He shall deliver the island of the innocent: and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands.

Island - i:e., dwelling. But the Hebrew [cut down from 'eeyn (Hebrew #369)] expresses the negative (1 Samuel 4:21); translate 'Thus He (God) shall deliver him who was not guiltless'-namely, one who, like Job himself on conversion shall be saved, but not because he was, as Job so constantly affirms of himself, guiltless, but because he humbles himself (Job 22:29): an oblique attack upon Job even to the last.

And it - rather, 'he (the one not heretofore guiltless) shall be delivered through the purity (acquired since conversion) of thy hands:' by thy intercession, (as Genesis 18:26, etc.) (Maurer.) God will deliver even others from death at thy intercession. The irony is strikingly exhibited in Eliphaz unconsciously uttering words which exactly answer to what happened at last: he and the other two were "delivered" by God accepting the intercession of Job for them (Job 42:7-8). Umbreit makes Eliphaz in the latter clause turn from Job to God: 'He (Job) shall be delivered by the pureness of thine hands,' O God, not by his own pureness, such as he once thought he had.

Remarks:

(1) Man's piety is no gain to God: the 'profit' is all to one's self (Job 35:7). We cannot add to God's perfect felicity, nor put Him under an obligation to us. When we have done all that is commanded to us, the truth is, "we are unprofitable servants: we have done that which was our duty to do" (Luke 17:10). God receives no benefit from man for which He owes us a debt. When He desires us to be holy, it is our happiness that He desires. The cause of men's misery or blessedness is to be looked for in themselves, and is not due to any selfish aim on God's part: for whether we be saved or lost, God shall overrule all things to His own glory (Proverbs 16:4).

(2) God, being Himself the All-merciful and All-just One, takes particular cognizance of sins against the law of justice and the law of love. The poor, the naked, the weary, the hungry, the widow, and the fatherless are His especial clients: He will plead their cause and execute judgment for them, not only on the oppressor, but also on the unmerciful, who have had no sympathy for, and rendered no relief to their brethren in their distress. The Judge shall say, "Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these (my brethren), ye did it not to me" (Matthew 25:45). Even in this world retribution in kind often overtakes the unmerciful and selfish. But the full retribution shall be in the world to come.

(3) The worldly and unbelieving are willing to admit the being of a God, provided that He be not supposed to take particular cognizance of all the concerns of this lower world: "Thick clouds" (Job 22:14), say they in their heart, if not in express words, "are a veil to Him, that He seeth not:" it is true "He walketh in the circuit of heaven," but as to what goes on here on earth, nature has her fixed laws, and "all things continue as they were from the beginning of creation" (2 Peter 3:3-4). In direct confutation of all such Epicurean notions stands the fact of God's visitation of man's sin with the overwhelming flood, in the days of Noah (Job 22:15-16; 2 Peter 3:5). The way of wickedness is an "old way," but it is no better and no safer for that. The same God who punished so awfully men's ungodliness and unbelief then, can and will do the same again by fire (2 Peter 3:7).

(4) The practical lesson to be learned by each is, "Acquaint now thyself with God, and be at peace: thereby good shall come unto thee" (Job 22:21). So long as one is unconverted, one is alienated from, and a stranger to God. Whatever else he may know, he knows not Him whom to know is "eternal life" (John 17:3). To be at peace with God, we must come to Him through Christ, who is "our peace;" and then, "being justified by faith, we have peace with God, through our Lord Jesus Christ" (Romans 5:1).

(5) The blessed fruits of this peace with God are, His law becomes henceforth dear to us, so that we no longer put from us Him and His words} (Job 22:17), but "lay them up in our heart" (Job 22:22): the love of money gives place to the love of God; gold is henceforth valued by us as but "dust" (Job 22:24-25), when compared with the Almighty. God is the believer's treasures and his "delight" (Job 22:26): no longer does he hang the head in slavish fear, but "lifts up his face unto God" in child-like confidence (Job 22:26): his prayers, too, are heard, being presented through the all-prevailing merits of our great High Priest (Job 22:27): his purposes, being in the main directed to the glory of God, are realized (Job 22:28).

(6) Twenty-ninth verse furnishes us with one great key of God's dealings with us: God is continually abasing the proud and lifting up the humble. He will save none but those who confess themselves "not innocent." He will have none to be esteemed absolutely pure but Himself (Job 22:30; Luke 18:10-14).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-22.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(30) He shall deliver the island of the innocent is undoubtedly an error for He shall deliver him that is not innocent: that is, either God shall deliver, or the humble person, if that is the subject of the former clause; the humble-minded man would have saved them. “He would have delivered him that is not innocent; yea, even so shall he be delivered by the cleanness of thy hands,” as the ten righteous would have saved Sodom. It is remarkable that this, which is the last word of Eliphaz, has in it the significance of a prophecy, for it is exactly thus that the history of Job closes; and Eliphaz himself exemplified his own promise in being indebted to Job for the act of intercession by which he was pardoned, together with his friends; Job 42:8-9.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-22.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He shall deliver the island of the innocent: and it is delivered by the pureness of thine hands.
He shall deliver the island of the innocent
or, The innocent shall deliver the island.
42:8; Genesis 18:26-32; Isaiah 58:12; Jeremiah 5:1; Acts 27:24
pureness
Isaiah 1:15; Malachi 1:9; Matthew 17:19,20; Acts 19:15,16; 1 Timothy 2:8; James 5:15,16 Reciprocal: 2 Kings 2:12 - My father;  Proverbs 11:11 - the blessing;  Isaiah 20:6 - isle;  Acts 27:22 - I exhort

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 22:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-22.html.