Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 39:4

"Their offspring become strong, they grow up in the open field; They leave and do not return to them.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Hart, the;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Animals;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Knowledge;   Liking;   Nature;   World;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Like;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

In good liking - After the fawns have sucked for some time, the dam leads them to the pastures, where they feed on different kinds of herbage; but not on corn, for they are not born before harvest-time in Arabia and Palestine, and the stag does not feed on corn, but on grass, moss, and the shoots of the fir, beech, and other trees: therefore the word בר bar, here translated corn, should be translated the open field or country. See Parkhurst. Their nurslings bound away - Mr. Good. In a short time they become independent of the mother, leave her, and return no more. The spirit of the questions in these verses appears to be the following: - Understandest thou the cause of breeding of the mountain goats, etc.? Art thou acquainted with the course and progress of the parturition, and the manner in which the bones grow, and acquire solidity in the womb? See Mr. Good's observations. Houbigant's version appears very correct: (Knowest thou) "how their young ones grow up, increase in the fields, and once departing, return to them no more?"

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-39.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Their young ones are in good liking - Hebrew “they are fat;” and hence, it means that they are strong and robust.

They grow up with corn - Herder, Gesenius, Noyes, Umbreit, and Rosenmuller render this, “in the wilderness,” or “field.” The proper and usual meaning of the word used here (בר bâr ) is corn (grain); but in Chaldee it has the sense of open fields, or country. The same idea is found in the Arabic, and this sense seems to be required by the connection. The idea is not that they are nurtured with grain, which would require the care of man, but that they are nurtured under the direct eye of God far away from human dwellings, and even when they go away from their dam and return no more to the place of their birth. This is one of the instances, therefore, in which the connection seems to require us to adopt a signification that does not elsewhere occur in the Hebrew, but which is found in the cognate languages.

They go forth, and return not unto them - God guards and preserves them, even when they wander away from their dam, and are left helpless. Many of the young of animals require long attention from man, many are kept for a considerable period by the side of the mother, but the idea here seems to be, that the young of the wild goat and of the fawn are thrown early on the providence of God, and are protected by him alone. The particular care of Providence over these animals seems to be specified because there are no others that are exposed to so many dangers in their early life. “Every creature then is a formidable enemy. The eagle, the falcon, the osprey, the wolf, the dog, and all the rapacious animals of the cat kind, are in continual employment to find out their retreat. But what is more unnatural still, the stag himself is a professed enemy, and she, the hind, is obliged to use all her arts to conceal her young from him, as from the most dangerous of her pursuers.” “Goldsmith‘s Nat. His.”

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-39.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Their young ones are in good liking,.... Plump, fat, and sleek, as fawns are:

they grow up with corn; by which they grow, or without in the field, as the word also signifies; and their growth and increase is very quick, as Aristotle observesF12Ib. (Aristot. Hist. Animal.) l. 6. c. 29. ;

they go forth, and return not unto them: they go forth into the fields, and shift and provide for themselves, and trouble their dams no more; and return not to them, nor are they known by them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-39.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

are in good liking — in good condition, grow up strong.

with corn — rather, “in the field,” without man‘s care.

return not — being able to provide for themselves.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-39.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Their young ones are in good liking, they grow up with corn; they go forth, and return not unto them.

Young ones — Notwithstanding their great weakness caused by their hard entrance into the world.

Grow up — As with corn, that is, as if they were fed with corn.

Go forth — Finding sufficient provisions abroad by the care of God's providence.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-39.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 39:4 Their young ones are in good liking, they grow up with corn; they go forth, and return not unto them.

Ver. 4. Their young ones are in good liking] Or, they recover; revalescent {begin to grow well}, as Isaiah 58:14, notwithstanding the hardness of their birth, by reason of their dam’s exceeding dry temperature, Psalms 42:1. As the hind brayeth after the water brooks, as being naturally hot and dry, when in pain especially; and this the young are sensible of in their coming into the world, which yet they soon recover and grow sleek and fat, η ελαφος (Sept.). Let God be trusted for the welfare of our children, though weak and wearish when newly born, and hard put to it in the birth.

They grow up with corn] Or, in the field; after that they have been nourished a while with their dam’s milk, they forage for themselves; being calved about autumn, as Aristotle noteth, that is, in seed time; others say, about harvest, when grain is in the field, and God’s great barn door open, as the proverb is. This is here brought as an argument for the Divine providence.

They go forth, and return not unto them] That is, to their dams; as finding food enough abroad. Thus other creatures, as soon as they are born almost, can shift for themselves; only poor shiftless man is long ere he can do anything, or comes to any proof, to be able to provide for himself.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 39:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-39.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Are in good liking; or, grow strong, or fat; notwithstanding their great weakness caused by their hard entrance into the world.

With corn; which they find and feed upon in the fields. Or, as with corn, i.e. as if they were fed with corn; the particle as being oft deficient, and to be supplied. Or, in the field, as this word in the Chaldee or Syriac dialect signifies.

Return not unto them; finding sufficient provisions abroad by the care and conduct of God’s providence.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 39:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-39.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4.Are in good liking Become strong.

With corn — Rather, in the wilderness.

Unto them — To their parents. A suggestive trait of the brute creation, that the offspring, when grown, is forever alienated from the parent as parent. The tender links that bind the child of a human being to its parent as long as life shall last, are unknown in the creation beneath us. The affection of the one race is eloquent and prophetic of immortality; the want of it in the other seems to indicate that this present life answers all the ends, and subserves all the purposes, of brute being.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-39.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 39:4. Their young ones are in good liking — Notwithstanding their great weakness caused by their hard entrance into the world. They grow up with corn — As with corn; that is, as if they were fed with corn. They go forth and return not — Finding sufficient provisions abroad by the care of God’s providence.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 39:4". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-39.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Feed. Being weaned very soon. (Pliny, [Natural History?] viii. 32.)

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-39.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

with corn = in the open field. Hebrew. bar. A Homonym with three meanings: (1) pure, clear, clean (Job 11:4. Song of Solomon 6:9, Song of Solomon 6:10. Psalms 19:8; Psalms 24:4; Psalms 73:1, &c); hence corn winnowed and cleansed (Genesis 41:35, Genesis 41:49. Psalms 65:13. Proverbs 11:26. Joel 2:24, &c); (2) the ground, or open field (Job 39:4), because bare and clean. Compare Proverbs 14:4; (3) ton: see note on Psalms 2:12.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-39.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Their young ones are in good liking, they grow up with corn; they go forth, and return not unto them.

Are in good liking - in good condition, grow up strong.

With corn - rather, in the field [ baar (Hebrew #1250)], without man's care.

Return not - being able to provide for themselves.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-39.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XXXIX.

(4) They grow up with corn.—Or more probably, perhaps, in the open field, as the word means according to some.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 39:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-39.html. 1905.