Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:1

"Do not let your heart be troubled; believe in God, believe also in Me.
New American Standard Version
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  1. Adam Clarke Commentary
  2. Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible
  3. Coffman Commentaries on the Bible
  4. John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible
  5. Geneva Study Bible
  6. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible
  7. John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels
  8. People's New Testament
  9. Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament
  10. Vincent's Word Studies
  11. Wesley's Explanatory Notes
  12. The Fourfold Gospel
  13. Calvin's Commentary on the Bible
  14. James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary
  15. John Trapp Complete Commentary
  16. Sermon Bible Commentary
  17. Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible
  18. Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament
  19. Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary
  20. Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary
  21. Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae
  22. Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament
  23. Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament
  24. Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible
  25. Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture
  26. Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament
  27. Whedon's Commentary on the Bible
  28. Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible
  29. Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable
  30. Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament
  31. The Expositor's Greek Testament
  32. Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments
  33. George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary
  34. E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes
  35. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged
  36. The Bible Study New Testament
  37. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers
  38. Treasury of Scripture Knowledge
  39. Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible
  40. Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms
  41. Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Faith;   Jesus, the Christ;   Righteous;   Trouble;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflicted, Promises, Divine;   Afflictions;   Christ;   Comfort;   Comfort-Misery;   Future, the;   God's;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Promises, Divine;   Spiritual;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Fear;   Jesus Christ;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflicted Saints;   Affliction, Consolation under;   Christ Is God;   Faith;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ascension;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Thomas;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Citizenship;   Doubt;   Hardening, Hardness of Heart;   Heart;   Immortality;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Ascension of Christ;   Holy Ghost;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Trinity;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Hope;   John, the Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   English Versions;   Faith;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Joy;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Attributes of Christ;   Authority in Religion;   Character;   Consciousness;   Cowardice;   Divinity of Christ;   Faith ;   Heart;   Heaven;   Heaven ;   Incarnation (2);   Perplexity;   Presence;   Searching;   Trust;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Advent, Second;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Heart;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ascension of Christ;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Affliction;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 28;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 1;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Let not your heart be troubled - After having answered St. Peter's question, he addresses himself again to his disciples, and tells them not to be afflicted at his leaving them, nor to lose courage because of what he said concerning Peter's denying him; that if they reposed their confidence in God, he would protect them; and that, howsoever they might see him treated, they should believe in him more firmly, as his sufferings, death, and resurrection should be to them the most positive proof of his being the Messiah, the Savior of the world.

Ye believe in God, believe also in me - It is best to read both the verbs in the imperative mood: - Place your confidence in God, and in me as the Mediator between God and man, John 14:12-14; and expect the utmost support from God; but expect it all through me. The disciples began to lose all hope of a secular kingdom, and were discouraged in consequence: Christ promises them a spiritual and heavenly inheritance, and thus lifts up their drooping hearts.

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These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Let not your heart be troubled - The disciples had been greatly distressed at what Jesus had said about leaving them. Compare John 16:6, John 16:22. Perhaps they had indicated their distress to him in some manner by their countenance or their expressions, and he proceeds new to administer to them such consolations as their circumstances made proper. The discourse in this chapter was delivered, doubtless, while they were sitting at the table partaking of the Lord‘s Supper (see John 14:31); that in Luke 24:21.

Ye believe in God - This may be read either in the indicative mood or the imperative. Probably it should be read in the imperative - “Believe on God, and believe on me.” If there were no other reason for it, this is sufficient, that there was no more evidence that they did believe in God than that they believed in Jesus. All the ancient versions except the Latin read it thus. The Saviour told them that their consolation was to be found at this time in confidence in God and in him; and he intimated what he had so often told them and the Jews, that there was an indissoluble union between him and the Father. This union he takes occasion to explain to them more fully, John 14:7-12.

Believe in - Put confidence in, rely on for support and consolation.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

The supper with its tragic revelations was over. Judas had departed, and all of the disciples were in a state of shock and grief following the announcement that even Peter would deny the Lord. The greatest tide of evil ever known on earth was already rising around that little company huddled in the upper room. The forces of darkness, with God's permission, were in command; and there was no moon in the blackness of that spiritual night which settled like some evil fog over the Holy City. It was a time of doubts and fears and falling tears. The unaided strength of natural man was no match for the desperate frustrations and shattered hopes of that critical hour; but Jesus was more than a match for that satanic storm moving so ominously upon them. In words of supernatural calm and confidence, the Lord reassured his chosen ones, loving them, encouraging them, and protecting them in every way possible. Before leaving the scene of the supper, he spoke the words of this chapter concerning: (1) the Father's house, (2) the Way, the Truth, and the Life, (3) the Comforter, and (4) the eternal necessity of what he was about to do.

Let not your heart be troubled: believe in God, believe also in me. (John 14:1)

Let not your heart be troubled ... is the theme of this chapter, the same words being repeated in John 14:27.

Believe in God ... in me ... One of the difficulties of translating the Greek New Testament is that certain sentences are capable of more than one rendition, as here. These words mean either: "Ye believe in God" (indicative affirmation of fact), or "Believe (ye) in God" (imperative commandment to be obeyed). The English Revised Version (1885) rendition is preferred because the indicative that the disciples truly believed in God would seem to have been more than Jesus would have credited to them in the circumstance of their doubts and fears. Reynolds noted that:

This (the English Revised Version (1885) rendition) is approved by the great majority of interpreters from the early Fathers to Meyer and Godet ... the different order of the words in the Greek, bringing the two phrases, "in God" and "in me," together, gives potency to the argument of the verse, which is that of the entire Gospel.[1]

Thus, one of the overtones of this passage is that believing in God and believing in Jesus are one and the same thing.

ENDNOTE:

[1] H. R. Reynolds, The Pulpit Commentary (Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1962), II, p. 220.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Let not your heart be troubled,.... In some copies this verse begins thus, and he said to his disciples; and certain it is, that these words are addressed to them in general, Peter being only the person our Lord was discoursing with in the latter part of the preceding chapter; but turning, as it were, from him, he directs his speech to them all. There were many things which must needs lie heavy upon, and greatly depress the minds of the disciples; most of all the loss of Christ's bodily presence, his speedy departure from them, of which he had given them notice in the preceding chapter; also the manner in which he should be removed from them, and the circumstances that should attend the same, as that he should be betrayed by one of them, and denied by another; likewise the poor and uncomfortable situation they were likely to be left in, without any sight or hope of that temporal kingdom being erected, which they had been in expectation of; and also the issue and consequence of all this, that they would be exposed to the hatred and persecutions of men. Now in the multitude of these thoughts within them, Christ comforts them, bids them be of good heart, and exhorts them to all exercise of faith on God, and on himself, as the best way to be rid of heart troubles, and to have peace:

ye believe in God, believe also in me; which words may be read and interpreted different ways: either thus, "ye believe in God, and ye believe in me"; and so are both propositions alike, and express God and Christ to be equally the object of their faith; and since therefore they had so good a foundation for their faith and confidence, they had no reason to be uneasy: or thus, "believe in God, and believe in me"; and so both are exhortations to exercise faith alike on them both, as being the best antidote they could make use of against heart troubles: or thus, "believe in God, and ye believe in me"; and so the former is an exhortation, the latter a proposition: and the sense is, put your trust in God, and you will also trust in me, for I am of the same nature and essence with him; I and my Father are one; so that if you believe in one, you must believe in the other: or thus, and so our translators render them, "ye believe in God, believe also in me"; and so the former is a proposition, or an assertion, and the latter is an exhortation grounded upon it: you have believed in God as faithful and true in all his promises, though yon have not seen him; believe in me also, though I am going from you, and shall be absent for a while; this you may be assured of, that whatever I have said shall be accomplished. The words considered either way are a full proof of the true deity of Christ, since he is represented as equally the object of faith with God the Father, and lay a foundation for solid peace and comfort in a view of afflictions and persecutions in the world.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Let 1 not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.

(1) He believes in God who believes in Christ, and there is no other way to strengthen and encourage our minds during the greatest distresses.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 14:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

John 14:1-31. Discourse at the table, after supper.

We now come to that portion of the evangelical history which we may with propriety call its Holy of Holies. Our Evangelist, like a consecrated priest, alone opens up to us the view into this sanctuary. It is the record of the last moments spent by the Lord in the midst of His disciples before His passion, when words full of heavenly thought flowed from His sacred lips. All that His heart, glowing with love, had still to say to His friends, was compressed into this short season. At first (from John 13:31) the intercourse took the form of conversation; sitting at table, they talked familiarly together. But when (John 14:31) the repast was finished, the language of Christ assumed a loftier strain; the disciples, assembled around their Master, listened to the words of life, and seldom spoke a word (only John 16:17, John 16:29). “At length, in the Redeemer‘s sublime intercessory prayer, His full soul was poured forth in express petitions to His heavenly Father on behalf of those who were His own. It is a peculiarity of these last chapters, that they treat almost exclusively of the most profound relations - as that of the Son to the Father, and of both to the Spirit, that of Christ to the Church, of the Church to the world, and so forth. Moreover, a considerable portion of these sublime communications surpassed the point of view to which the disciples had at that time attained; hence the Redeemer frequently repeats the same sentiments in order to impress them more deeply upon their minds, and, because of what they still did not understand, points them to the Holy Spirit, who would remind them of all His sayings, and lead them into all truth (John 14:26)” [Olshausen].

Let not your heart be troubled, etc. — What myriads of souls have not these opening words cheered, in deepest gloom, since first they were uttered!

ye believe in God — absolutely.

believe also in me — that is, Have the same trust in Me. What less, and what else, can these words mean? And if so, what a demand to make by one sitting familiarly with them at the supper table! Compare the saying in John 5:17, for which the Jews took up stones to stone Him, as “making himself equal with God” (John 14:18). But it is no transfer of our trust from its proper Object; it is but the concentration of our trust in the Unseen and Impalpable One upon His Own Incarnate Son, by which that trust, instead of the distant, unsteady, and too often cold and scarce real thing it otherwise is, acquires a conscious reality, warmth, and power, which makes all things new. This is Christianity in brief.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-14.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

1. Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.

[Let not your heart be troubled.] They could not but be exceedingly concerned at the departure of their Master drawing on so very near. But there were other things beside his departure that grieved and perplexed their minds.

I. They had run along with their whole nation in that common expectation, that the kingdom should be restored unto Israel through the Messiah, Acts 1:8. They had hoped to have been rescued by him from the Gentile yoke, Luke 24:21. They had expected he would have entertained his followers with all imaginable pomp and magnificence, splendour and triumph, Matthew 20:20. But they found, alas! all things fall out directly contrary; they had got little hitherto by following him but poverty, contempt, reproach, and persecution: and now that their Master was to leave them so suddenly, they could have no prospect or hope of better things. Is this the kingdom of the Messiah?

Against this depression and despondency of mind he endeavours to comfort them, by letting them know that in his Father's house in heaven, not in these earthly regions below, their mansions were prepared for them; and there it was that he would receive and entertain them indeed.

II. Christ had introduced a new rule and face of religion, which his disciples embracing did in a great measure renounce their old Judaism; and therefore they could not but awaken the hatred of the Jews, and a great deal of danger to themselves, which now (they thought) would fall severely upon them when left to themselves, and their Master was snatched from them.

That was dreadful, if true, which we find denounced: "Epicurus" (that is, one that despises the disciples and doctrine of the wise men) "has no part in the world to come, and those that separate themselves from the customs of the synagogue go down into hell, and are there condemned for all eternity."

These are direful things, and might strangely affright the minds of the disciples, who had in so great a measure bid adieu to the customs of the synagogues and the whole Jewish religion: and for him that had led them into all this now to leave them! What could they think in this matter?

To support the disciples against discouragements of this nature:

I. He lays before them his authority, that they ought equally to believe in him as in God himself: where he lays down two of the chief articles of the Christian faith: 1. Of the divinity of the Messiah, which the Jews denied: 2. As to true and saving faith, wherein they were blind and ignorant.

II. He tells them that in his Father's house were many mansions; and that there was place and admission into heaven for all saints that had lived under different economies and administrations of things. Let not your heart be troubled for this great change brought upon the Judaic dispensation, nor let it disquiet you that you are putting yourselves under a new economy of religion so contrary to what you have been hitherto bred up in; for "in my Father's house are many mansions"; and you may expect admission under this new administration of things, as well as any others, either before or under the law.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 14:1". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-14.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

Let not your heart be troubled. Just before him was Gethsemane, the betrayal, the denial, the mock trial, the scourging and the cross; but with these in full view, such are the wonders of his love that he does not think of himself. He does not ask comfort, but he gives it. His heart is full of the sorrow of his disciples over his departure.

Believe also in me. They had believed in him, but they were so confused over the prospect of his death and departure, they stumbled. He bids them to believe in him as they believed in God; to trust him even if they did not comprehend; to walk by faith rather than by sight through the darkness of that hour. To understand these words, the confusion, sorrow and despair of his disciples over his death must not be forgotten.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:1". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Let not your heart be troubled (μη ταρασσεστω υμων η καρδιαmē tarassesthō humōn hē kardia). Not here the physical organ of life (Luke 21:34), but the seat of spiritual life (πνευμα πσυχηpneuma class="normal greek">ταρασσω — psuchē), the centre of feeling and faith (Romans 10:10), “the focus of the religious life” (Vincent) as in Matthew 22:37. See these words repeated in John 14:27. Jesus knew what it was to have a “troubled” heart (John 11:33; John 13:31) where πιστευετε και πιστευετεtarassō is used of him. Plainly the hearts of the disciples were tossed like waves in the wind by the words of Jesus in John 13:38.

Ye believe  …  believe also (πιστευωpisteuete  …  kai pisteuete). So translated as present active indicative plural second person and present active imperative of pisteuō The form is the same. Both may be indicative (ye believe  …  and ye believe), both may be imperative (believe  …  and believe or believe also), the first may be indicative (ye believe) and the second imperative (believe also), the first may be imperative (keep on believing) and the second indicative (and ye do believe, this less likely). Probably both are imperatives (Mark 11:22), “keep on believing in God and in me.”

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Heart ( καρδία )

Never used in the New Testament, as in the Septuagint, of the mere physical organ, though sometimes of the vigor and sense of physical life (Acts 14:17; James 5:5; Luke 21:34). Generally, the center of our complex being - physical, moral, spiritual, and intellectual. See on Mark 12:30. The immediate organ by which man lives his personal life, and where that entire personal life concentrates itself. It is thus used sometimes as parallel to ψυχή , the individual life, and to πνεῦμα theprinciple of life, which manifests itself in the ψυχή . Strictly, καρδία is the immediate organ of ψυχή , occupying a mediating position between it and πνεῦμα . In the heart ( καρδία ) the spirit ( πνεῦμα ), which is the distinctive principle of the life or soul ( ψυχή ), has the seat of its activity.

Emotions of joy or sorrow are thus ascribed both to the heart and to the soul. Compare John 14:27, “Let not your heart ( καρδιά ) be troubled;” and John 12:27, “Now is my soul ( ψυχή ) troubled.” The heart is the focus of the religious life (Matthew 22:37; Luke 6:45; 2 Timothy 2:22). It is the sphere of the operation of grace (Matthew 13:19; Luke 8:15; Luke 24:32; Acts 2:37; Romans 10:9, Romans 10:10). Also of the opposite principle (John 13:2; Acts 5:3). Used also as the seat of the understanding; the faculty of intelligence as applied to divine things (Matthew 13:15; Romans 1:21; Mark 8:17).

Ye believe - believe also ( πιστεύετε καὶ πιστεύετε )

The verbs may be taken either as indicatives or as imperatives. Thus we may render: ye believe in God, ye believe also in me; or, believe in God and ye believe in me; or, believe in God and believe in me; or again, as A.V. The third of these renderings corresponds best with the hortatory character of the discourse.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Let not your heart be troubled - At my departure. Believe - This is the sum of all his discourse, which is urged till they did believe, John 16:30 . And then our Lord prays and departs.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Let not your heart be troubled: believe in God, believe also in me1.
    FAREWELL DISCOURSE TO DISCIPLES. (Jerusalem. Evening before the crucifixion.) John 14:1-16:33

  1. Let not your heart be troubled: believe in God, believe also in me. That one should betray him and one should deny him, that all should be offended, and that the Lord should depart, raised anxieties which Jesus here seeks to quiet. That they should go out as homeless wanderers without the presence of their Lord and be subjected to persecution, was also in their thoughts. But Jesus sustains their spirits by appealing to them to trust in the unseen Father, and his yet present self. As to the two verbs "believe", both may be indicatives or imperatives.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:1". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Да не смущается сердце ваше. Христос не без причины утверждает учеников столькими словами. Ведь им предстояла страшная и тяжелая битва. Не слабым было и искушение, когда некоторое время спустя ученики увидели Его распятым на кресте. От этого зрелища можно было воистину отчаяться. Итак, когда наставал час испытаний, Христос показал средство, способное удержать их от падения. Ведь Он не просто увещевает их к стойкости, но одновременно учит, откуда надо эту стойкость черпать. А именно, из веры, признающей Его Сыном Божиим, имеющим в Себе достаточно сил защитить и спасти Своих людей. Здесь также надо учесть сопутствующие обстоятельства: Христос хотел, чтобы ученики стояли твердо и безбоязненно, хотя бы все и казалось более чем печальным. Итак, сей щит пригоден и для нас, чтобы и нам выдерживать подобные удары. Мы не можем не чувствовать волнения, но должны волноваться так, чтобы при этом не пасть. Говорится же, что верные не волнуются, ибо, опираясь на Слово Божие, они идут твердым шагом, даже если обуреваются великими невзгодами.

Веруйте в Бога (Вы веруете в Бога). Можно перевести и в повелительном наклонении: веруйте в Бога, и в Меня веруйте. Однако первое чтение – веруете – подходит больше и более общепринято. Кроме того, здесь показывается причина стойкости. А именно: мы стоим тогда, когда вера наша основывается на Христе и взирает на Него так, словно Он находится с нами и протягивает нам руку помощи. Но удивительно, почему здесь на первом месте ставится вера в Бога Отца. Скорее ученикам надлежало сказать так: следует верить в Бога постольку, поскольку они уверовали во Христа. Ведь Христос – отпечатленный образ Отца, посему вначале надо воззреть именно на Него. По этой причине Он и снизошел к нам – для того, чтобы наша вера, начав с Него, затем вознеслась к Отцу. Однако Христос имел в виду другое. Никто не говорит, что не надо верить в Бога. Это общепринятая аксиома, с которой соглашаются все. Однако на деле верит едва ли каждый сотый. Это происходит как потому, что величие Божие отстоит от нас слишком далеко, так и потому, что сатана нагоняет всякого рода тучи, скрывающие от нас Бога. Поэтому вера, ища Бога в небесной славе и неприступном свете, очень быстро изнемогает. Плоть охотно порождает тысячу измышлений, уводящих нас от правильного познания Бога. Итак, Христос предлагает Себя как цель, к которой вера наша должна стремиться. И если она будет стремиться к ней, то найдет и то, где ей успокоиться. Ибо Христос – истинный Эммануил, Который тут же ответит нам, как только Его взыщет наша вера. Это одно из главных начал веры: она должна не блуждать где попало, а направляться к одному Христу. И чтобы не колебаться в искушениях, она должна основываться только на Христе. Истинная же проверка веры состоит в том, чтобы никогда не позволять себе отойти от Христа и Его обетований. Папистские богословы, рассуждая об объекте веры, или, скорее, о нем разглагольствуя, считают его простым воспоминанием о Боге. О Христе же ни одного слова. И те, кто мыслит согласно с ними, с необходимостью будут колебаться даже от легкого дуновения ветерка. Гордые люди стыдятся смирения Христова. Поэтому они сразу же переходят к непостижимому величию Божию. Однако вера никогда не достигнет небес, если не подчинит себя Христу, Богу, принявшему смиренный облик. Она никогда не будет стойкой, если не обопрется на Христову немощь.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

HIS ONLY SON OUR LORD

‘Believe in God, believe also in Me.’

John 14:1

Manifestly, everybody must believe in God before he can believe in Jesus Christ in any deep sense; for to say that ‘Jesus is the Son of God’ already implies a belief in God. This was clearly true of the Christian converts from among the Jews, who were already worshippers of Jehovah; and it was true also, though to a less extent, of the Greeks, as St. Paul recognised in his famous speech at Athens; and it remains true of the converts from heathendom to-day.

Our Lord’s work, which the Catechism (following the Apostles) speaks of in one word as Redemption, is summed up in this Creed under three epithets, corresponding to the three epithets of God in the first clause. Jesus is described as (1) the Christ of God; (2) the Only Son of the Father; (3) our Lord—i.e. the Vicegerent of the All-sovereign Ruler. Let us take these three descriptions in order, so as to gain some clearness as to the view of our Lord’s office and Person, which the Christian Church puts before us as the ground of our faith in Him; always remembering that it is in Him that our faith is placed, and not in any propositions about Him.

I. We say, first, that Jesus is the Christ of God.—By Christ is meant ‘the anointed’—i.e. consecrated—servant of God for the work of redemption, Who was promised to the Fathers. And in so saying, we express our belief in the general providence of God throughout history; His good will to men from the creation of the world. We express our belief that the Redemption which Jesus effected, though it came at a definite epoch of the world’s history, was not an unexpected event, a sudden, isolated act of compassion on man’s misery, whether of the Creator Himself, or, as Marcion taught, of some higher and more beneficent deity; but was part of a process fore-ordained in the counsel of God from the beginning. We point back along the history of the Chosen People to a long series of kings and prophets, whose lives and writings are recorded in the Old Testament Scriptures, and show how they were always looking forward to a Divine redemption, always desiring to see the days of the promised Deliverer.

II. To come then to the second term: His only Son.—The history of the phrase ‘Son of God’ as applied to our Lord is of great interest. It began by being a synonym for the Christ, as is plain from its use by the demoniacs: ‘What have we to do with Thee, Jesus, Thou Son of God?’ and the High Priest, ‘Art Thou the Christ, the Son of the Blessed?’ a use which bases itself on Psalms 2, where it is said of the King established on the holy hill of Zion, ‘Thou art My Son.’ But our Lord seems to have avoided its use, just as He avoided the other Messianic title of ‘Son of David,’ because of its associations. It had become worn, like a coin rubbed by passing from hand to hand till it becomes, in fact, a mere counter. Was this unique Son son always, or only after His human birth? There can be no doubt as to the opinion held by the first Christians. No one can forget the argument about God’s love in Romans 8, which describes Him as not sparing His own Son, but ‘sending Him in the likeness of sinful flesh’; or the argument about Christ’s humility in Philippians 2, which describes how He Who was in the form of God emptied Himself and was made in the likeness of men. And, apart from such special testimonies, the mere recognition of Christ as Divine carried with it also the recognition of His eternity. ‘Before Abraham was, I am.’ This, of course, is not to say that there was always manhood in the Godhead, but that there was always sonship, the potentiality of manhood. If the aspect of redemption which we emphasise under the acknowledgment that Jesus is the Christ be the hallowing of our nature by the living in Christ and Christ in us, the aspect emphasised by this second acknowledgment that Jesus is the Son of God is one that directly follows from that—namely, that through this indwelling Presence we too have received the adoption of sons, and look up to God as our Father: ‘As many as received Him, to them He gave the privilege to become children of God.’ We are admitted through Him into the family of God, and enjoy that freedom which is the special attribute of sonship—‘the liberty of the glory of the children of God.’ ‘If the Son shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.’

III. We pass to the concluding phrase of this confession, ‘our Lord,’ which emphasises the truth that the Father is still known to us only through the Son, and that all authority has been committed unto Him. He is our Lord, the Vicegerent of the All-sovereign Ruler.

This acknowledgment is made emphatically by St. Peter in his speech at the first Pentecost, where, after quoting the 110th Psalm, ‘Jehovah said unto my Lord, Sit Thou on My right hand, till I make Thine enemies Thy footstool,’ he continues, ‘Let all the house of Israel know assuredly that God hath made this Jesus Whom ye crucified Lord as well as Christ.’ The sense of St. Peter’s assertion therefore, that ‘Jesus is Lord’ is evident from his quotation from the 110th Psalm; where the Psalmist is speaking of the king. ‘Jehovah said unto my king, Sit Thou on My right hand.’ That, then, is the sense of ‘our Lord’ in this confession of faith. It means ‘our King, at the right hand of God’—i.e., our Divine King.

IV. No one can miss the significance of this acknowledgment in its bearing on our redemption.—I will notice only two points.

(a) If Jesus is our Lord, then His Commandments must be the rule of our lives; there is nothing for it for us who accept His lordship but ‘to bring every thought into captivity to His obedience’ (2 Corinthians 10:5). ‘Why call ye Me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?’ To such an appeal there can be no reply.

(b) If Jesus is Lord—the one Lord through Whom are all things—we must call upon Him for what we need. Notice, as you read the New Testament, how constantly this act of ‘calling upon the Name of the Lord’ is referred to as what especially marks and stamps a Christian. ‘The same Lord is Lord of all, and is rich unto all that call upon Him’ (Romans 10:12); ‘Paul, unto the Church of God at Corinth, with all that call upon the Name of our Lord Jesus Christ, in every place, their Lord and ours.’ Faith, then, in Jesus of Nazareth, as the Christ, and as the only Son of God, comes to expression, and so to reality, as we bow our knees to call upon One Whom our hearts acknowledge to be in very truth our own Lord.

—Canon H. C. Beeching.

Illustration

‘Readers of Old Testament prophecy are often puzzled by the difficulty of determining whether the consecrated being spoken of is an individual or the whole people. The conception seems to have fluctuated, and with reason; for what the prophets had at heart was the realisation of the Divine promise to their whole nation—that the nation should be, in fact as in election, a holy people. They conceived it as a unit: Israel—God’s chosen servant, His beloved Son, His holy representative upon earth for the benefit of the world, the Christ to the nations; and the further idea of an individual Servant and Son consecrated to redeem the collective servant and son emerged only at times and indistinctly. And so it is of the utmost interest and significance that as soon as the confession of Jesus as the Christ had fallen from the lips of St. Peter, our Lord at once announced the founding of the redeemed kingdom, with its distinctive attribute of legislation after the will of God—“Upon this rock I will build My congregation, My Israel; and whatsoever thou shalt bind and loose on earth shall be bound and loosed in heaven.’ And by and by He gave this society a mission to the nations. So that we may express the truth about the Christ in this way: Jesus was the Christ to the Church; and the Church, by virtue of the presence in it of the spirit of Jesus, is the Christ to the world.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 14:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.

Ver. 1. Let not your heart, &c.] Our Saviour sweetly proceeds in his swan-like song. Aelian tells us that he once heard a dying swan sing most heavenly and harmoniously, ευφωνοτατον και ωδικωτατον. (Hist. Var. lib. i.) The poet shows the manner of it, when he saith

-"longa canoros

Dat per colla modos"-

Of the Syrens (on the contrary) it is reported, that how sweetly soever they sang before, yet at death they make a horrid noise and unpleasant roaring. Morris articulo instante, et sanguine male affecto valde horride mugiunt Sirenes. Likewise, good men utter their best usually at last, the wine of the spirit being then strongest and liveliest in them. Whereas wicked men are then usually at worst, and go out with a stench, as the devil is said to do. And as Melancthon said of Eccius’s last wicked work, written of priests’ marriage, Non full cygnea cantio, sed ultimus crepitus: et sicut felis fugiens pedit, sic ille moriens hunc crepitura cecinit. (Melch. Adam. in Vit. Calv.) So of Baldwin the apostate, one saith that vivere simul et maledicere desiit, he died cursing, as that wretch did swearing, who desperately also desired the bystanders to help him with oaths and to swear for him.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 14:1

Consider the connection between believing in God and believing in Jesus Christ.

I. Note first that the difficulty which men find in their way when asked to believe in Christ arises from the supernatural character of His manifestation and working. Take this away and there would be no difficulty for them in believing in Christ, no more difficulty in believing in Him than they have in believing in Socrates or Plato. Admitting that Jesus Christ was no more than a man, that His birth was that of an ordinary mortal, that He lived and died as any other man might, and that being dead and buried, He rests in the grave and was never seen again upon earth; admitting all this, you remove the whole difficulty which the unbeliever says he finds in the way of His believing in Christ, and he will then perhaps join you, in extolling the virtues, in admiring the character and in praising the conduct of Jesus of Nazareth. But such admissions cannot be made. A Christ divested of the supernatural is not the Christ whom the Gospels invite us to believe in, no such being, in fact, ever existed. If these men profess to believe in God, they by that very profession bring themselves under obligation to examine carefully and impartially the historical evidence on which Christianity rests its claim. If God be what they say they believe Him to be, then with Him all things are possible, and nothing can be more probable than that He should reveal Himself to His intelligent creatures, and by many infallible proofs show them that it is indeed He who speaks unto them. They are thus by their own premisses bound to examine the evidences of Christianity, and if these are found to stand the test, they are bound as they believe in God to believe also in Jesus Christ.

II. Advancing a step further, I would now go on to affirm that apart from the revelation of God in and through Jesus Christ, it may be doubted if man can believe in God in any real sense, or as He is. Jesus Christ presents Himself as the Revealer of God to men. It is to Christ then that we are to look for instruction in the knowledge of God, and it is only as we believe in Him, and receive out of that fulness of wisdom and knowledge which is in Him, that we shall so acquaint ourselves with God as really and intelligently to believe in Him. It is only a little way that the light of nature can guide us in the search after God, and a man dependent solely upon that light can hardly be said to believe in God as He is.

III. It is Christ alone who supplies what is wanted for a religion for man. Man needs (1) an incarnation, (2) an atonement. Man, with his conscious weakness and his deep wants, and that sore hunger of the soul which no viands the earth furnishes can fill, and that terrible sense of guilt which oppresses the spirit and fills him with that fear which hath torment, finds in Christ at length that which meets his need and satisfies his convictions, and calms his fears, and gives peace to his conscience, and lifts him up from despair to rejoice in the hope of the glory of God.

W. L. Alexander, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xvii., p. 161.


Something is wanting then, till the believer in God is a believer also in Christ. This is our subject.

I. Now some one might say, Look at the saints of the Old Testament! What grace of reverence, of affiance, of holy aspiration, was lacking in the patriarch Abraham, or in the poet king of the Psalms? And yet Christ was not manifested to them. We venture to dispute the very fact taken for granted. The psalmist, the prophet, the patriarch, yea, the very first father himself, lived and prayed and worshipped in the shadow cast before of Him that should come.

II. Or you might come nearer home, and speak of men who, in this century or the last, have not only led good lives, but have had many pious feelings, and done many beneficent works, without realising what we should call the fulness of the Christian faith. In examples such as these, it is but truth to remember that men thus dispensing with Christ are yet unspeakably indebted to Him. The very idea of God as our Father comes from revelation. It is one ray of that Divine truth which is reflected now in a thousand unconscious or ungrateful intellects.

III. Still, you may say, having made this great revelation, may not Christ Himself disappear? It is an obvious answer, and surely a just one, to such reasonings as these: We cannot take Christ by halves; if Christ said one thing from God, He said all things.

IV. Observe too how the particular truth received, no less than the accompanying doctrine objected to, runs up into matters which we can neither dispute as facts nor yet, apart from God, settle. No man dispenses with or disparages the Cross without being a definite loser in some feature of the Christian character. Where there is a reluctance to rely on Christ alone for forgiveness, you will generally perceive one of two great deficiencies: (1) There is often a feeble sense of the sinfulness of sin; (2) there is often a want of true tenderness towards sinners.

V. Nor is it only in this negative aspect that we perceive the distinctive value of faith in Christ. God, in arranging that we should receive this greatest, this most profound of His gifts, forgiveness and reconciliation, through another, His Divine, His Incarnate Son, has not only made the Gospel of one piece with His dealing with us in this life, but has also given a charm and pathos to the Gospel which it could not otherwise have possessed. "I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all men unto Me."

C. J. Vaughan, Temple Sermons, p. 11.


I. What do we mean, apart from the Christian revelation, when we say we believe in God? We mean that we believe in infinite thought, infinite intelligence, and that all things of which we are conscious, and especially all thought, are derived from this omnipresent thought; nay, are parts of it. We believe in absolute, eternal, infinite, intelligence, exercising itself in the incessant movement of thought, when we believe in God. But if that is all we believe we are only Pantheists. We believe in God not only as infinite thought and life, but as infinite goodness. He is a moral Being; He is absolute Holiness, Truth, Justice, and Beauty; and wherever these things are, in matters of the spirit or the intellect, they are there by Him and through Him. But where thought and life and moral character are, we have also a will, and where there is a will with these things, we have that which we call personality. We believe in God and conceive Him then as personal. Hence there springs up the idea of God as the moral Governor of the world and our personal King, and in God as such we believe.

II. All humanity is lifted by Christ's revelation into union with divinity. Fancy the power of that in life. It does not only exalt it, regenerate it, set it on fire, it makes it completely beautiful. And above all, it fills it with unspeakable love. It binds God and man together like husband and wife, like two beings who, loving one another with perfect sympathy, dwell in one another, and are not two, but one being. That is the faith of the Christian concerning God and man. Christ called God our Father, and made Fatherhood on His side and childhood on ours, the terms that expressed our relation of love to God, and His relation of love to us. God is still to us the infinite thought, and will, and life, and righteousness, by which the material and spiritual universe consists; but in His relation to us as Father, He thinks for us and lives in us, and wills in our behalf, and makes Himself our righteousness. Therefore we not only worship and reverence Him; we also love Him. How? With all our soul and mind and strength, with all the love of children. And now, in being loved by God, and in being able and joyous to love Him, our deepest need is satisfied, our deepest longing quenched. The very root of our heart is watered with the dew of this belief. God is love, and we love Him. It has transfigured all humanity. And that expanded and ennobled belief is the work of Christ. What wonder that He said, "Ye believe in God, believe also in Me."

S. A. Brooke, The Spirit of the Christian Life, p. 305.


References: John 14:1.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xiii., No. 730; W. Roberts, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ix., p. 40. John 14:1-3.—D. Davies, Ibid., vol. xxix., p. 10. John 14:1-4.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxix., No. 1741; Preacher's Monthly, vol. ix., p. 244; H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xii., p. 200; C. Stanford, The Evening of our Lord's Ministry, p. 72. John 14:1-14.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. ii., p. 224; A. B. Bruce, The Training of the Twelve, p. 385.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:1. Let not your heart be troubled: Jesus not only forewarned his disciples of the great trial that was coming upon them, and commanded them to arm themselves against it, (see Luke 22:35-38.) but he spoke a long discourse, wherein he animated them to sustain that trial manfully, and comforted them under the dismal apprehensions which it might raise in them. They were to see Him crucified whom they had acknowledged as the Messiah; wherefore having been always accustomed to consider temporal dominion as the characteristic of their deliverer, and great worldly prosperity as the privilege of his subjects; the death of their Master, and the persecutions befalling themselves, could not fail to give a violent shock to their faith. But, that the force of these blows might be weakened, our Lord foretold his own sufferings, and thereby made it evident, that he voluntarily submitted to them. Withal, to reconcile their minds to the thoughts of his sufferings, he distinctly explained the end of them in this discourse. Let not your heart be troubled, &c. "Be not discomposed with the thoughts of those temptations which are to come upon you. As you believe in God, in a general point of view, as the almighty preserver and governor of the world, who is able to deliver you out of all your distresses; believe also in me; who am not only sent by God, and appointed governor and judge of the world, but am myself God over all, blessed for ever; and therefore can both protect you from evil, and reward you plentifully, for whatever losses you may sustain on my account." The Greek of the last clause may be rendered, Believe in God, and believe also in me; and it appears most natural to render the word πιστευετε, alike in both places; and it is certain that an exhortation to faith upon God in Christ, would be very seasonable, considering how weak and defective their faith was. See John 14:9.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our blessed Saviour in the foregoing chapter, having acquainted his disciples with his approaching death, by the treachery of Judas, their hearts were thereupon overwhelmed with grief and trouble. Accordingly in this chapter, by sundry arguments, he comforts his disciples against the perplexity of their fears and sorrows.

Observe, 1. How Christ addresses himself to his disciples in a very endearing and affectionate manner; Let not your hearts be troubled.

Whence learn, 1. That the best and holiest of God's children and servants, whilst here in an imperfect state, are subject to desponding, and disquieting and distrustful fears.

2. That no work is more delightful to our Saviour, than to comfort the troubled and perplexed spirits of his servants.

Observe, 2. The remedy which Christ prescribes for the calming their present fears, and for arming them against future troubles, and present fears, and for arming them against future troubles, and that is, Faith in the Father and in himself: Ye believe in God, believe also in me.

Observe next, The arguments of consolation which Christ propounds for the support of his disciples, under the sorrow which they had conceived for his approaching departure.

1. He tells them, That heaven, whither he was now going, was his Father's house, a place of happiness, not designed for himself also, but for many more to enjoy perpetual rest and abode in, as in everlasting mansions: In my Father's house are many mansions.

Heaven is God's house, in which he will freely convese with his domestics, his children and servants, and they shall enjoy full glory there, as in a quiet and capacious habitation.

A second ground of comfort is, that he assures them, he will come again and receive them to himself, that they may live together with him in the heavenly mansions. This promise Christ makes good to his saints, partly at the day of their death, and perfectly at the day of judgment, when he shall make one errand for all, and take up all is children to himself, and make them completely happy, both in soul and body, with himself.

Learn hence, That though Christ has removed his bodily presence from his friends on earth, yet his love to them is not ceased, nor will he rest satisfied till he and they meet again, eternally to solace themselves in each other's company: I will come again and receive you to myself, that where I am, there ye may be also.

A third argument for consolation is, that, notwithstanding Christ was to leave them, yet they knew whither he went: namely, to heaven, and which was the way thither; Whither I go ye know, and the way ye know.

It contributes much to the comfort of believers, as to know God and heaven, so to know the way that leads thither, that so they may be armed against all the difficulties of that way.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 14:1". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-14.html. 1700-1703.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

The Lord is here comforting his Disciples, to prepare their Minds against the Time of his Departure. He describes the Person, Work, and Grace, of the Holy Ghost

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/john-14.html. 1828.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

1.] A pause has intervened; “Peter is humbled and silent” (Lücke); the rest are ταρασσόμενοι τῇ καρδίᾳ on account of the sad things of which they had been hearing;—Judas’s treachery,—Peter’s denial,—the Lord’s departure from them.

πιστεύετε both times is imperative. So Cyr(182), Nonn., Thl., Euth., Aug(183), Hil(184),—Lampe, Lücke, De Wette, Stier, Tholuck (edn. 6), and A.V.R. Many (Erasmus, Beza, Grot., Olsh., also E. V.) take the first as indic., the second as imper., ‘Ye believe in God: believe also in me.’ But this is inconsistent with the whole tenour of the discourse, which presupposes a want of belief in God in its full and true sense, as begetting trust in Him. Luther takes both as indicative. The command is intimately connected with ch. John 13:31-32faith in the glorification of Christ in the Father, and of the Father in Him.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:1". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1682

FAITH IN CHRIST AN ANTIDOTE TO ALL TROUBLE

John 14:1. Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.

AS God is eminently distinguished by that character, “The Comforter of all them that are cast down,” so did Jesus evince his title to it during the whole time of his sojourning on earth: there was no distress which he did not remove from those who made their application to him; and not unfrequently did he anticipate the wants, which the unbelief or ignorance of his followers made them unable to express. He had now been revealing to his Disciples the things which were speedily to be accomplished: and, perceiving that they were greatly dejected by the prospect before them, he encouraged them in the words which we have read; “Let not your hearts be troubled:” and then he prescribed an antidote, sufficient to dispel all their fears: “Ye believe in God; believe also in me.”

In discoursing on these words, we shall shew,

I. The troubles which he taught them to expect—

There were three in particular which seemed most to affect them;

1. Their bereavement of his presence—

[This, if it had been only to a remote quarter of the globe, or after the manner of Elijah’s departure, would have greatly depressed their minds; because of the love he had manifested towards them, and their entire dependence on him for instruction and support — — — but to have him withdrawn from them by cruel sufferings and an ignominious death, was distressing beyond measure; so that the very thought of it filled them with the deepest concern — — —]

2. The disappointment of their worldly hopes—

[They had supposed he was about to establish an earthly kingdom, and that they should be exalted to situations of great dignity. But when they heard, that, instead of reigning over other nations, he was to be rejected by his own; and that, instead of elevating them to posts of honour, he himself was to die upon a cross; they knew not how to reconcile these things with his former professions, or how to bear the shame which such a disappointment would unavoidably occasion — — —]

3. The persecutions they were to meet with from an ungodly world—

[Hitherto they had been screened from persecution, their Lord and Master having borne the brunt of it in his own person: but now they understood that they were to drink of his cup, and to endure all manner of sufferings, and death itself, after his example. This excited painful apprehensions in their minds, and caused them the most serious disquietude — — —]

What means he used to dissipate their fears, will be found in,

II. The remedy he proposed—

The verbs in our text may be taken either imperatively or indicatively; and many think it would be better to construe both of them alike: but the spirit of the passage seems best preserved in our translation; which acknowledges, that they do believe in God the Father, and exhorts them to place the same confidence in him as in the Father. They now thought they should lose him entirely and for ever. To rectify this error, he enjoins them, notwithstanding his removal from them, to believe in him,

1. As present with them in their trials—

[Though he would not be present to the eye of sense, he would be really nigh to them on all occasions. Wherever they should be, there would be no bar to his admission to their souls: he would come and visit them, and dwell in them, and manifest himself to them, as he would not unto the world. This would be a far greater blessing to them than his bodily presence; so that they had no reason to regret his apparent withdrawment from them.]

2. As interested in their welfare—

[They had never found him indifferent about any thing that related to them: nor would he forget them after he should have been taken from them into heaven: on the contrary, he was going thither to prepare mansions for them; and he would still enter into all their concerns, sympathizing with them in their afflictions, and regarding every thing that should be done to them as done immediately to himself. If any should give them a cup of cold water only, he would acknowledge it as an obligation conferred on him; and, if any should presume to touch them in a way of injury, he would resent it as if they had “touched the apple of his eye.”]

3. As sufficient for their support—

[They had seen what wonders he had wrought during his continuance among them: and they must not imagine, that, because he offered up his soul a sacrifice for sin, he was therefore deprived of his power to perform them: for though he would, in appearance, be crucified through weakness, he did really possess all power in heaven and in earth. They might still look to him for the relief of every want, and support in every trial; and they should assuredly find his grace sufficient for them.]

4. As coming again to recompense all that they might endure for his sake—

[He had told them, that he would come again, and that too in all the glory of his Father, with myriads of attendant angels, to judge the world. They need not therefore be anxious about any present trials, since he pledged himself to remember all that they should do or suffer for him, and richly to compensate their fidelity to him.

These were subjects on which he had often conversed familiarly with them: and if only they would give him credit for the accomplishment of his promises, they might discard their fears, and be of good comfort.]

It will be not unprofitable to consider more distinctly,

III. The sufficiency of this remedy to dispel all anxiety from their minds—

Faith in Christ is a perfect antidote against troubles of every kind. Faith has respect to him in all his glorious offices and characters:

1. As the Saviour of the soul—

[What has that man to do with fear and trouble, who sees all his iniquities purged away by the blood of Jesus, and his soul accepted before God? — — — If he forget these things, he may be cast down by earthly trials: but if he keep this steadily in view, the sufferings of time will be of no account in his eyes: he will feel that he has ground for nothing but unbounded and incessant joy — — —]

2. As the Governor of the universe—

[Who that sees how perfectly every thing is under the controul of Jesus, will give way to fear or grief? Not a sparrow falls, nor a hair of our head can be touched, without him: and, if he suffer any injury to be inflicted on us, he can overrule it so as to convert it into the greatest benefit. What then have we to do, but to let him work his own will, and to expect that all things shall work together for good? — — —]

3. As the Head of his people—

[He is to all his people the head of vital influence; and will he forget to communicate what is necessary for the welfare of his members? We are weak; and our enemies are mighty: but is that any ground for fear, whilst we remember whose members we are? Can we not do all things through Christ strengthening us? — — —]

4. As the Judge of quick and dead—

[The distribution of rewards and punishments is committed unto him; and he has told us what sentence he will pronounce on all his faithful people. And will not that word, “Come ye blessed,” or that, “Well done, good and faithful servant,” richly repay all that we can do or suffer for him in this world? Can we survey the thrones of glory he has prepared for us, and be afraid of the trials that await us here? — — —]

Behold then,

1. The happiness of believers—

[They may, they must, have their trials; and whilst they possess the feelings of men, they will find some trials grievous to be borne: but they neither have, nor can have, any cause for anxious fear: whilst God is for them, none can be against them. Let them therefore “be careful for nothing,” but “cast all their care on Him who careth for them.”]

2. The misery of unbelievers—

[Where has God said to them, “Let not your hearts be troubled?” No such word can be found in all the sacred volume. They have need of continual fear and terror: for, what refuge have they, whilst they are not united unto Christ by faith? Whither can they go under the trials of this life? and what consolation can they have in the prospects of eternity? Better were it, if they die in such a state, that they had never been born. Hear then what Jesus says to you: Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth; for I am God; and besides me there is none else. His address, in the text, is a proof of his Godhead, and consequently of his sufficiency to save all that come unto God by him.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on John 14:1". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/john-14.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:1.(138) From Peter Jesus now turns, with consolatory address in reference to His near departure, to the disciples generally; hence D. and a few Verss. prefix καὶ εἶπεν τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ (so also Luther, following Erasmus). But the cause of the address itself is fully explained in John’s narrative by the situation, and by no means requires the reference, arbitrarily assumed by Hengstenberg, to Luke 22:35-38. The whole of the following farewell discourses, down to John 17:26, must have grown out of the profoundest recollections of the apostle, which, in a highly intellectual manner, are vividly recalled, and further expanded. It coheres with the entire peculiarity of the Johannean narrative of the last Supper, that the Synoptics offer no parallels to these farewell discourses. Hence it is not satisfactory, and is not in keeping with the necessary personal recollection of John, to regard him as taking his start from certain primary words of earlier gospels, which he, like an artist of powerful genius, has transfigured by a great, but, at the same time, most appropriate and enchanting transformation (Ewald).

μὴ ταρασσ.] by anxiety and apprehension. Comp. John 12:27. It points to what He had spoken in the preceding chapters of His departure, not, as Chrysostom, Theodore of Mopsuestia, Theophylact, Euth. Zigabenus, and many thought, to Peter’s denial, after the prediction of which the rest of the disciples also might have become anxious about their constancy. This is erroneous, because the following discourse bears no relation to it.

πιστεύετε, κ. τ. λ.] By these words Jesus exhorts them not to faith generally (which they certainly had), but to that confident assurance by which the μὴ ταράσσεσθαι was conditioned: trust in God, and trust in me. To take, in both cases, πιστεύετε as imperatives (Cyril., Gothic, Nonnus, Theophylact, Euth. Zigabenus, Bengel, and several others, including most moderns, from Lücke to Hengstenberg and Godet) appears most in conformity with the preceding imperative and the direct character of the address.(139) Others: the first πιστ. is indicative, and the second imperative: ye believe on God, believe therefore on me (Vulgate, Erasmus, Luther in his Exposition, Castalio, Beza, Calvin, Aretius, Maldonatus, Grotius, and several others). Luther, who takes the first sentence as a hypothetical statement, which in itself is admissible (Bernhardy, p. 385; Pflugk, ad Eur. Med. 386, comp. on John 1:51), has in his translation taken πιστεύετε, in both cases, as indicatives. According to any rendering, however, the inseparable coherence of the two movements (God in Christ manifest and near) is to be noted. Comp. Romans 5:2.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 14:1". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:1. ΄ή) In some copies there is prefixed this clause, καὶ εἶπε τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ· and this the distinguished D. Hauber supports, especially in den harmonischen Anmerkungen, p. 206. Erasmus was the first to edit the passage so; and Luther, following either Erasmus, or the Vulgate, which contains a similar interpolation, translates it so. The whole voice of antiquity refutes this addition, as I had shown in my Apparatus, p. 595 [Ed. ii. 263]. The principle of an adequate reason, which D. Hauber uses as if favouring its insertion, I will use on the other side, so as to say with Erasmus himself, Lucas Brugensis, and Mill, that one or two transcribers, at the commencement of a Pericopa, or portion appointed for Church reading, prefixed this formula, as they most frequently have done.(343)μὴ ταρασσέσθω, let not—be troubled) on account of My departure: ch. John 13:33, “Yet a little while I am with you: ye shall seek Me,” etc.; John 16:6, “Because I have said these things unto you, sorrow hath filled your heart.” He takes away from the disciples their trouble of heart before that He alludes to the causes of that trouble. The Lord knew what these were in the case of the disciples, ch. John 13:33, and unfolds them in detail more openly in the following parts of His discourse. This [comforting of the disciples] is repeated, and with additional emphasis, at John 14:27. [And it is not merely in ch. 13., but further also in ch. 14., a reply is given to the question proposed by Peter, ch. John 13:36, “Lord, whither goest Thou?”—V. g.]— πιστεύετεπιστεύετε, believe ye—believe ye) The Imperative, just as in the parallel expression, μὴ ταράσσεσθω, let not—be troubled. The sum and substance of this sermon is this, Believe ye: and this exhortation, Believe, at John 14:11, and subsequently, is urged until [His exhortation becoming effectual] it is made into the Indicative, ch. John 16:31; John 16:30, “Do ye now believe? By this we believe that Thou camest forth from God:” and when this was effected, the Saviour prays and departs. [Hence is evident the very close connection which there is of the chapters 14., 15., 16., between one another.—Harm., p. 506.] It might be thus punctuated, πιστεύετε· εἰς τὸν θεὸν καὶ εἰς ἐμὲ πιστεύετε· whereby the verb would first be placed by itself, equivalent to a summary of what follows, as in ch. John 16:31; then next the same would be repeated with an explanation; with which comp. ch. John 13:34, note [That ye love, first put simply, then repeated with Epitasis, or explanatory augmentation]. But the received punctuation seems to me preferable, and moreover to be understood so as that the accent in pronunciation should in the former clause fall chiefly on the words believe ye; in the second clause, on in Me: so that the ancient faith in God, may be as it were seasoned [dyed] with a new colour, by their believing in Jesus Christ.— εἰς ἐμέ, in Me) who am come from God; ch. John 16:27, “The Father Himself loveth you, because ye—have believed that I came out from God.”

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:1". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOHN CHAPTER 14

John 14:1-4 Christ comforteth his disciples with the promise of

a heavenly mansion.

John 14:5-7 He professes himself the way, the truth, and the life,

John 14:8-11 and that he is one with the Father.

John 14:12-14 He promises them power to do greater works than his own,

and the grant of all that they should ask in his name.

John 14:15-26 He requireth their obedience as a proof of their love,

and giveth them a promise of the Comforter, the Holy Ghost.

John 14:27-31 He leaveth his peace with them.

Chapter Introduction

The three ensuing chapters contain either one or more consolatory discourses of our Saviour to his disciples, (as appeareth from John 14:1), made, as is probable, to them in the guest chamber (at least that part of them which we have in this chapter); for we read of no motion of our Saviour’s till we come to the last verse of this chapter. That which troubled them was, what he had told them in the close of the former chapter, that he was going from them. By our Saviour’s discourse in this and the two following chapters, it should seem that there were three things that troubled them.

1. The sense of their loss as to his bodily presence.

2. The fear, that with the loss of that they should also lose those spiritual influences which they had received from him, and upon which their souls had lived.

3. The prospect of those storms of troubles and persecutions, which were likely to follow his departure from them; for if we wisely consider what our Saviour saith in these three following chapters, it all tends to comfort them as to troubles that might arise in their spirits, upon one or other of these accounts: the general proposition is laid down in John 14:1.

Let not your heart be troubled, through grief, or fear, which are the two passions which ordinarily most disturb our minds. Our Saviour himself was troubled, but not sinfully; his trouble neither arose from unbelief, nor yet was in an undue measure; it was (as one well expresses it) like the mere agitation of clear water, where was no mud at the bottom: but our trouble is like the stirring of water that hath a great deal of mud at the bottom, which upon the roiling, riseth up, and maketh it the whole body of the water in the vessel impure, roiled and muddy. It is this sinful trouble, caused from these two passions, and rising up to an immoderate degree, and mixed with a great deal of unbelief and distrust in God, against which our Saviour here cautions his disciples; and the remedy he prescribes against those afflicting passions, is a believing in God, and a believing on him. The two latter passages in the verse are so penned in the Greek, that they may be read four ways; for the verb

believe, twice repeated, may be read either indicatively or imperatively, or the one may be read indicatively and the other imperatively; so as they may be translated, You believe in God, you believe also in me. And so they teach us, that there is no such remedy for inward troubles, as a believing in God, and a believing in Jesus Christ; and those that do so, have no just reason for any excessive heart troubles. Or else they may be read, Believe in God, believe in me: or else as we read them,

Ye believe in God, believe also in me: or, Believe in God, ye believe in me. But the disciples’ faith in Christ as Mediator, and God man, being yet weak, and their weakness being what our Saviour hath ordinarily blamed, not magnified, or commended, the best interpreters judge the sense which our translators give to be the best sense; and judge that our Saviour doth inculcate to them his Divine nature, and again offer himself to them as the proper object of their faith. You (saith he) own it for your duty to trust in God, as your Creator, and he that provideth for you: believe also in me, as God equal with my Father; and in me, as the Messiah, your Mediator and Redeemer: so as you have one to take care or all your concerns, both those of your bodies, and those of your souls also, so as you have nothing to be immoderately and excessively, or distrustfully, troubled for; therefore let not your hearts be troubled; only, without care or distrust, commit yourselves to me.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Это ученикам следовало бы оказать поддержку Иисусу в часы перед принятием Им креста, но вместо этого Он должен был поддерживать их духовно и душевно. В этом проявляется сущность Его служения любовью (ср. Мф. 20:26-28).

смущается Вера в Него может остановить волнение сердца. См. пояснения к 12:27.

(14:1-31) Вся эта глава сосредоточивается на обещании, что Христос есть Тот, Кто служением Духа Святого дарует утешение верующему не только Своим будущим возвращением, но также и в настоящее время (ст. 26). Местом действия по-прежнему остается верхняя комната (горница), где ученики вместе с Иисусом собрались до Его ареста. Иуда уже к тому времени ушел (13:30), и Иисус обратил Свое прощальное слово к оставшимся одиннадцати. Общество учеников должно было вскоре разрушиться: они будут смущены, сбиты с толку и подавлены тревогой вследствие событий, которые скоро произойдут. Предвидя это опустошение, Иисус говорил, чтобы утешить их сердца.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 14:1". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Be troubled; a season of great trial was just before them. But in passing through it, they must not lose their confidence in God or in him. Trust in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ his Son, is the great safeguard against troubles, and the all-sufficient support under them.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Impending departure of Jesus, John 14:1-14.

1.Let not your heart be troubled—The Saviour himself, in view of his own impending passion, had been “troubled in spirit,” John 13:31; John 12:27, but now he employs his own moments of divine calmness to sustain the hearts of his followers above a similar trouble. The whole is most intelligible by keeping his agony, and cross, and departure in view, as the point by which they would most be troubled. The source of their consolation is God himself, the heaven to which Jesus goes, the Father to whom he introduces them.

Ye believe in God—This may be either indicative or imperative in the Greek. It may be translated ye believe in God, or believe ye in God. Commentators greatly differ, but the essential result of either meaning will be the same. Their trust in God is the essential antecedent of their trust in Christ.

In God—God the Father Almighty as the basis and foundation of all things; whom we cannot but conceive as existing as the fundamental reality. He who is firmly based on Him has a sure foundation of trust.

In me—Who am the revealer and the manifestation of God essential, as has been verified by the attributes of God exercised and displayed through me. But as God essential is universal and invisible in himself, so he becomes concentrated in me, and brought to a point in contact upon each individual soul. The same reliance, therefore, which you can repose in God, as a God of universal reality and truth, you can, in spite of all the sufferings you shall see me endure, repose in me, the only begotten Son of God. Jesus thereupon proceeds, assuming their faith in God and himself, to direct their attention from the approaching scenes of earthly woe, to the heaven he indicates beyond them.

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Do not let your hearts be troubled. Have confidence (believe) in God, have confidence also in me.”

Conscious of their troubled thoughts and hearts He set out to encourage them. And He did it by pointing out what He would be doing for them in the future. Let them not be afraid. They must not waver in their confidence. They not only have to hold to their belief in God, they have to hold to their belief in Him. This indeed is to be their rock and their confidence, that, whatever happens, they continue to recognise in Him the One Who has come from the Father, the One Who reveals the Father, the One Who brings men to the Father, the Expected One. That is where their confidence must now lie.

Whether the verb is indicative (‘you believe’) or imperative (‘Have confidence!’) matters little. Either translation of the word is strictly correct, but the meaning is the same. It is an encouragement not only to maintain their confidence in God, but also to have the same confidence in Jesus. It is a claim to equality with God.

The word ‘heart’ is in the singular, ‘the heart of you all.’ It may mean ‘each of your hearts’ or ‘all your hearts’ seen as one in a collective noun.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-14.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus was troubled because of what lay before Him, and the Eleven were troubled (Gr. tarassestho) because they did not understand what lay before them. Jesus had just told them that He was going to leave them ( John 13:33), but they had forsaken all to follow Him. Jesus had said that Peter would deny Him implying that some great trial was imminent ( John 13:38).

God"s revelations about the future should have a comforting and strengthening effect on His people (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:18). This verse introduces a short section of revelation that has given much comfort to God"s people as they think about the future ( John 14:1-4). It is a favorite passage at funerals.

Jesus explained how to calm their troubled hearts. The verb "believe" or "trust" (Gr. pisteuo), which occurs twice, can be either in the indicative or the imperative mood in each case. The spelling of the words in both moods is identical in the Greek text. Probably in both clauses Jesus meant to give an imperative command: "Believe in God; believe also in me." This makes the most sense in the context, as most of the modern English translations have concluded. He meant, "Stop being troubled." Jesus was telling the disciples (plural "your") to trust in God and to trust in Him just as they trusted in God. This was a strong claim to deity and a great comfort. They could rely on what He was about to tell them as coming from God.

The NASB translates the singular "heart" (Gr. kardia) that Jesus used collectively whereas the NIV interpreted it to mean each of their hearts individually. The heart is metaphorically the center of personality.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:1. Let not your heart be troubled: believe in God, believe also in me. No separation ought to be made between this chapter and the last section of chap, 13, for the place, the circumstances, and the object of the discourse here entered on are the same as there. The dominating thought of all is that of chap. John 13:31,—that the time is come when a full revelation is to be made of the ‘glory’ of the Son of man in the Father, and of the Father in Him; when it shall be seen that the ‘going away’ of Jesus to the Father not only contains in it what swallows up all the humiliation of His earthly lot, but is the great proof and illustration of that union of Himself with the Father in love, the manifestation of which ‘glorifies’ both the Father and the Son. To such a manifestation, then, it is evident that the ‘going away’ of Jesus was necessary: He must in His earthly form be separated from His disciples, that His glory may be revealed not only to those who had the spiritual eye, but to the world (chaps. John 16:10, John 17:21). While however separation must thus take place, it is, on the other hand, the object of our Lord to show that it was really no separation,—that He does not ‘go away’ in the carnal sense understood by Peter in chap. John 13:36, but will ever be with His disciples in an abiding union and communion of spirit (comp. the interesting parallel in chap. John 20:17).

The ‘trouble’ spoken of in the words now before us is not that of mere sorrow; it is rather that which Jesus had Himself experienced (see chap. John 12:27) when the prospect of His sufferings rose immediately before Him. It is ‘trouble’ from the opposition of the world while they carry on their work of love; but ‘trouble’ which at the same time passes into the heart, and leads to the conflict of all those feelings of anxiety, perplexity, fear, and sorrow, which make the heart like a ‘troubled sea’ that the Divine voice ‘Peace, be still!’ alone can calm. The work of the disciples, committed to them as it had been to their Master (chap. John 17:18), will bring with it this ‘trouble;’ yet they have enough to keep them calm with His own calmness (John 14:27), enough to lead them to say with Him, ‘But for this cause came I unto this hour’ (chap. John 12:27).—The foundation of all peace comes first, and the word ‘believe’ must be taken in the same way in both clauses of the statement. To understand it differently in the two would give, either to faith in God or to faith in Jesus, an independent existence inconsistent with the general teaching of this Gospel. We must, therefore, either translate, ‘Ye believe in God, ye believe also in me,’ or, ‘Believe in God, believe also in me;’ the hortatory form of ‘Let not your heart be troubled’ and of the whole discourse makes the latter probable. Yet, as the disciples already believed, the exhortation must have reference not to the formation, but to the deepening and constant exercise of that faith, the object of which is really one—God in Jesus. Thus also we may understand why faith in God is mentioned first, and not second, as in chap. John 12:44. It is the highest act of faith that is referred to,—faith, no doubt, in God through Jesus, but faith in Him as the ultimate Guide of all that happens. It is the evolution of the Divine plan that they have to do with; therefore let them believe in ‘God.’ In addition to this, we may call to mind that God Himself was the Fountain of that Messianic hope of which, by the departure of Jesus, the disciples would think themselves deprived. At the same time, it is to be observed that the order of the words in the two clauses is different, ‘God’ following, but’ me’ preceding, its verb. The effect is to bring ‘in God’ and ‘in me’ into the closest possible connection.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:1. But as they sat astounded and perplexed, He continues, . Let not your heart be tossed and agitated like water driven by winds; cf. Liddell and S. and Thayer. He not only commands them to dismiss their agitation, but gives them reason: . “Trust God, yea, trust me.” Trust Him who overrules all events, He will bring you through this crisis for which you feel yourselves incompetent; or if in your present circumstances that faith is too difficult, trust me whom you see and know and whose word you cannot doubt. It is legitimate to construe the first as an indicative, and the second as imperative: but this gives scarcely so appropriate a sense.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:1". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

John 14:1. Let not your hearts be troubled — At the thoughts of my departure from you, and leaving you in a world where you are likely to meet with many temptations, trials, and troubles, and to become a helpless prey to the rage and power of your enemies. Ye believe in God — The Almighty Preserver and Governor of the universe, who is able to support you under, and deliver you out of, all your distresses; believe also in me — Who am sent by God, not only to teach, but to redeem and save you; and who can both protect you from evil, and reward you abundantly for whatever losses and sufferings you sustain on my account. But the original words, πιστευετε εις τον θεον και εις εμε πιστευετε, it seems, ought rather to be rendered, Believe in God, believe also in me; that is, Confide in the being, perfections, and superintending providence of God: or, Rely on the great acknowledged principles of natural religion, that the glorious Maker and Governor of the world is most wise, mighty, holy, just, and good, and the sovereign disposer of all events; and comfort yourselves likewise with the peculiar doctrines of that holy religion which I have taught you. Or, as Dr. Doddridge interprets the clause, “Believe in God, the Almighty Guardian of his faithful servants, who has made such glorious promises to prosper and succeed the cause in which you are engaged; and believe also in me, as the promised Messiah, who, whether present or absent in body, shall always be mindful of your concerns, as well as ever able to help you.” It appears most natural, as he justly observes, to render the same word, πιστευετε, alike in both places; and it is certain an exhortation to faith in God and in Christ would be very seasonable, considering how weak and defective their faith was. Thus Dr. Campbell: “The two clauses are so similarly expressed and linked together by the copulative [ και, and, or also] that it is, I suspect, unprecedented, to make the verb in one an indicative, and the same verb repeated in the other an imperative. The simple and natural way is, to render similarly what is similarly expressed: nor ought this rule ever to be departed from, unless something absurd or incongruous should follow from the observance of it, which is so far from being the case here, that by rendering both in the imperative, the sense is not only good, but apposite.”

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on John 14:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/john-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

having answered the questions of St. Peter, Jesus again addresses himself to his disciples, and bids them not to be afflicted or troubled, at what he says to them. Many Greek and Latins begin this chapter thus: Jesus said to his disciples, let not your hearts be troubled. (St. John Chrysostom) --- Euthymius; Leont.; Theophylactus; Theodor.; &c. agree, that our Saviour wished to encourage his apostles, who were so much troubled, because he had said, that Peter should deny him. They thought within themselves, if Peter, who is the strongest, and most resolute amongst us, shall so far forget himself, as to deny his master, what will become of us? Jesus seeing their anxiety, tells them not to be troubled; but to believe in him, and in his words, for he had said, that he would not lose any, whom his Father had given him; (John chap. vi, ver. 39.) and that whosoever should believe in him, should have life everlasting. (chap. iii, ver. 15.) --- Let not you heart be troubled. Christ here begins those incomparable discourses to his apostles, which are set down in the four next chapters. His sufferings and death now approaching, he forewarns them not to be troubled. You believe in God, and put your trust in him; believe also, and trust in me, no less than in him. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

not. Greek. me. App-105.

troubled. Compare John 11:33 (Himself); John 12:27 (My soul); John 18:21 (spirit). Here it is the heart. In all cases the whole being is meant. See also Luke 24:38.

ye believe. There is no reason for translating the two verbs differently. Both are imperative. "Believe in God, and believe in Me".

believe. App-150.

in. Greek. eis. God. App-98.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.

'We now come,' says Olshausen admirably, 'to that portion of the Evangelical History which we may with propriety call its Holy of Holies. Our Evangelist, like a consecrated priest, alone opens up to us the view into this sanctuary. It is the record of the last moments spent by the Lord in the midst of His disciples before His passion, when words full of heavenly thought flowed from His sacred lips. All that His heart, glowing with love, had still to say to His friends, was compressed into this short season. At first the contact took the form of conversation; sitting at table, they talked familiarly together. But when the repast was finished, the language of Christ assumed a loftier strain; the disciples, assembled around their Master, listened to the words of life, and seldom spoke a word. At length in the Redeemer's sublime intercessory prayer, His full soul was poured forth in express petitions to His heavenly Father on behalf of those who were His own. It is a peculiarity of these last chapters, that they treat almost exclusively of the most profound relations-as that of the Son to the Father, and of both to the Spirit; that of Christ to the Church, of the Church to the world, and so forth. Moreover, a considerable portion of these sublime communications surpassed the point of view to which the disciples had at the time attained: hence, the Redeemer frequently repeats the same sentiments in order to impress them more deeply upon their minds, and, because of what they still did not understand, points them to the Holy Spirit, who would remind them of all His sayings, and lead them into all truth.'

Let not your heart be troubled. What myriads of souls have not these opening words cheered, in deepest gloom, since first they were uttered!

Ye believe in God, believe also in me, [ pisteuete (Greek #4100) eis (Greek #1519) ton (Greek #3588) Theon (Greek #2316), kai (Greek #2532) eis (Greek #1519) eme (Greek #1691) pisteuete (Greek #4100)]. This may with equal correctness be rendered four different ways.

(1) As two imperatives-`Believe in God, and believe in Me.' (So Chrysostom, and several both Greek and Latin Fathers; Lampe, Bengel, DeWette, Lucke, Tholuck, Meyer, Stier, Alford.) But this, though the interpretation of so many, we must regard, with Webster and Wilkinson, as somewhat frigid.

(2) As two indicatives-`Ye believe in God, and ye believe in Me.' So Luther, who gives it this turn-`If ye, believe in God, then do ye also believe in Me.' But this is pointless.

(3) The first imperative and the second indicative; but to make sense of this, we must give the second clause a future turn-`Believe in God, and then ye will believe in Me.' To this Olshausen half reclines. But how unnatural this is, it is hardly necessary to say.

(4) The first indicative and the second imperative, as in our version-`Ye believe in God, believe also in Me.' (So the Vulgate, Maldonat, Erasmus, Calvin, Beza-who, however, gives the first clause an interrogatory turn, 'Believe ye in God? Believe also in Me' - (Cranmer's and the Geneva English versions, Olshausen prevailingly, Webster and Wilkinson.) This alone appears to us to bring out the natural and worthy sense-`Ye believe in God, as do all His true people, and the confidence ye repose in Him is the soul of all your religious exercises, actings and hopes: Well, repose the same trust in Me.'

What a demand this to make, by one who was sitting familiarly with them at the same supper table! But it neither alienates our trust from its proper Object, nor divides it with a creature: it is but the concentration of our trust in the Unseen and Impalpable One upon His Own Incarnate Son, by which that trust, instead of the distant, unsteady and too often cold and scarce real thing it otherwise is, acquires a conscious reality, warmth, and power, which makes all things new. This is Christianity in brief.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

1. Do not be worried and upset. He knows what will happen to him this night, and that he will die on the Cross the next day, But Jesus does not ask for help, he gives it! And believe also in me. They were confused by the thought of his death. He asks them to believe in him as they believe in God.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:1". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XIV.

(1) Let not your heart be troubled.—The division of chapters is unfortunate, as it breaks the close connection between these words and those which have gone immediately before. The prophecy of St. Peter’s denial had followed upon the indication of Judas as the traitor, and upon the announcement of the Lord’s departure. These thoughts may well have brought troubled hearts. The Lord had Himself been troubled as the darkness drew on (John 12:27; John 13:21), and He calms the anxious thoughts that He reads in the souls of the disciples.

Ye believe in God, believe also in me.—It is more natural to take both these clauses as imperative—Believe in God, believe also in Me. Our English version reads the first and last clauses of the verse as imperative, and the second as an indicative, but there is no good reason for doing so; and a sense more in harmony with the context is got by reading them all as imperatives. As a matter of fact, the present trouble of the hearts of the disciples arose from a want of a true belief in God; and the command is to exercise a true belief, and to realise the presence of the Father, as manifested in the person of the Son. There was a sense in which every Jew believed in God. That belief lay at the very foundation of the theocracy; but like all the axioms of creeds, it was accepted as a matter of course, and too often had no real power on the life. What our Lord here teaches the disciples is the reality of the Fatherhood of God as a living power, ever present with them and in them; and He teaches them that the love of God is revealed in the person of the Word made flesh. This faith is the simplest article of the Christian’s creed. We teach children to say, we ourselves constantly say, “I believe in God the Father.” Did we but fully grasp the meaning of what we say, the troubles of our hearts would be hushed to silence; and our religion would be a real power over the whole life, and would be also, in a fulness in which it never has been, a real power over the life of the world.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.
not
27,28; 11:33; *marg:; 12:27; 16:3,6,22,23; Job 21:4-6; 23:15,16; Psalms 42:5,6,8-11; 43:5; Psalms 77:2,3,10; Isaiah 43:1,2; Jeremiah 8:18; Lamentations 3:17-23; 2 Corinthians 2:7; 4:8-10; 2 Corinthians 12:9,10; 1 Thessalonians 3:3,4; 2 Thessalonians 2:2; Hebrews 12:12,13
ye
5:23; 6:40; 11:25-27; 12:44; 13:19; Isaiah 12:2,3; 26:3; Acts 3:15,16; Ephesians 1:12,13,15; 3:14-17; 1 Peter 1:21; 1 John 2:23,24; 5:10-12
Reciprocal: 2 Chronicles 14:11 - rest on thee;  2 Chronicles 20:20 - Believe in the Lord;  Psalm 112:7 - trusting;  Psalm 131:2 - myself;  Proverbs 3:25 - Be;  Proverbs 15:13 - by;  Zechariah 13:7 - the man;  Matthew 14:27 - it;  Matthew 24:6 - see;  Mark 11:22 - Have;  Mark 13:7 - when;  John 16:33 - but;  John 18:1 - spoken;  Romans 15:13 - fill;  Hebrews 6:1 - faith;  1 Peter 3:14 - and be;  1 John 3:23 - his commandment

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

John 14:1

"You believe in God, believe also in me."John 14:1

To believe in God is to believe in him as he has manifested himself in his dear Son in all the fullness of his love, in all the riches of his grace, and in all the depth of his mercy. God must be seen, not in the terrors of a holy law, but in the mercy and truth of the glorious gospel of the Son of God, and thus be approached and believed in as the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, and our Father in him. How few see and realize this, and yet how severely exercised are many of the living family upon this point! To believe in God in such a way as to bring pardon and peace into their conscience; to believe in God so as to find manifest acceptance with him; to believe in God so as to call him Abba, Father, and feel that the Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are his children; to believe in God so as to find him a very present help in trouble; to receive answers to prayer, to walk in the light of his countenance, to have his love shed abroad in the heart, to be manifestly reconciled to him, and feel a sense of his manifested goodness and mercy—this is to believe in God through Jesus Christ.

And O how different is this from merely believing about God from what we see in nature that he is the Creator of all things, or from what we may have realized of his footsteps in providence that he watches over us as regards the things that perish, or from seeing in the letter of the word that he is the God of all grace to those who fear his name!

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on John 14:1". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 1. "Let not your heart be troubled: believe ye in God, and believe in Me."—"These words," observes Gerhard, "contain the sum of what was to be said; they are the theme which Christ would place at the head and bring in again at the close, that the main scope of the whole discourse might be perfectly clear." The words are an allusion to Psalms 42:5 : "Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? hope thou in God." There can be the less doubt of this, inasmuch as the Lord frequently elsewhere refers to this passage: comp. on ch. John 12:27.

Jesus Himself says in ch. John 12:27, "Now is My soul troubled;" and in ch. John 13:21, it is said of Him that "He was troubled in spirit:" consequently He cannot have required in His servants anything like a stoical apathy, which is ever the sign of a withered and hardened heart; but only that their sorrow should never have the dominion over them. It must be observed that He is here speaking not to such as were enjoying a perfect tranquillity,—so that the dehortation would refer to a dismay possible in the future,—but to souls that were profoundly moved and disquieted. To these His exhortation is, that they should not remain in their disquietude, but rise through it to that consolation from above, the necessary condition of which is a previous sorrow, such a sorrow as dead insensibility can never know. Christians have tender hearts, and therefore deep sorrows; but they have also the privilege of consolation from above. But the dehortation and the exhortation have here—as a comparison of the original Hebrew, and especially the sequel of the chapter, show—a predominantly consolatory and encouraging significance: Ye need not disquiet yourselves, ye have reason to believe.

The original refers only to God. That God, however, was not the abstract God which could not be the object of true faith and living confidence; but rather the God who had been revealed through the ages, and had dwelt in their midst, the God of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses. That God had now in Christ become perfectly revealed; and that gave the Believe in God an altogether new significance. (Bengel: Fides antiqua in Deum novo quasi colore tingitur in Jesum Christum credendo.)

Each of the two clauses suffices in itself: Believe in God and Believe in Me. The juxtaposition is only apparent. The God whom they were to trust was the Father of Christ; and the Christ whom they were to trust was the true revelation of God: they who believed in Him, believed on Him that sent Him, ch. John 12:44. If Christ and the Father are one, ch. John 10:30, it is indifferent whether we place our confidence in God or in Christ. The form of juxtaposition, as of counterparts, is adopted in order to obviate the misunderstanding which would sunder God from His manifestation in Christ, and assign to Christ only a subordinate place. But, strictly speaking, the two clauses include and are the equivalent of each other. The passage, Exodus 14:31, is in a certain sense analogous: "And the people believed the Lord, and His servant Moses." Faith was reposed in Jehovah, who was revealed through Moses, and in Jehovah, who wrought great deeds by Moses. Here also the juxtaposition is merely apparent. Jehovah sundered from Moses would not be Jehovah, but an empty idea of the imagination, which could not be the object of faith and confidence. Another Old Testament parallel is 2 Chronicles 20:20, where Jehoshaphat says to the oppressed people, "Believe in the Lord your God, so shall ye be established; believe His prophets, so shall ye prosper." There also Jehovah is not the abstract God, but, as the appendage shows, the God who dwelt among the people; and, in His organs the prophets, assumed, as it were, flesh and blood.

Those who would separate the clauses which are here inseparably connected together, who would hold to the "Believe in God," but give up the "Believe also in Me," are involved in a ruinous error. A God sundered from Christ dwells in inaccessible light—not to be apprehended, and utterly obscure. Faith, however, can apprehend only a God become incarnate; which explains the fact, that Deism everywhere in history appears as the mere forerunner of Atheism, and as nothing but a developing Atheism. But more: as the πιστεύετε denotes rather the privilege than the obligation of believing, it is of great significance that God sundered from Christ has nothing left for forgiveness or bestowment. All the Divine gifts which are individually enumerated in the sequel are bestowed through the medium of Christ; God has poured upon Him all the fulness of His gifts; and He has reserved nothing more that He could give to those who come to Him without the mediation of Christ. They are worthily dealt with in that they are sent away empty. It is the appropriate punishment of that pride which is offended by the lowliness of Christ. (Calvin: Pudet superbos homines humilitas Christi. Ideo ad incomprehensibile rei numen evolant.)

That the πιστεύετε is in both instances to be taken as imperative, is now all but universally acknowledged. (The Vulgate is incorrect: Creditis in Deum et in me credite; so Luther and the English translation.) The relation of the positive to the negative, with the comparison of Psalms 42:6, Exodus 14:31, and 2 Chronicles 20:20, are sufficient to prove this to be the correct view. πιστεύετε is after εἰς ἐμέ emphatically repeated, in order to point to the supreme dignity and importance of Christ, who is not introduced as a simple adjunct, but is on a level with the Father as a proper and real object of faith. Luther: "Ye have heard that ye should trust in God; but I would show you how you may come to that faith, so that ye may not set up for yourselves another idol under His name, after your own devices. If ye would assuredly come to Him with true faith, ye must come to Him in Me, and through Me: if ye have Me aright, ye have Him aright."—'This saying shows us, on the one hand, that characteristic of our nature which everywhere and always inclines to fear and despondency; and it also shows us, on the other hand, the dignity of Christ, who in the fulness of love takes upon Himself our infirmity, who, Himself then going to meet Satan and death, yet is so sublimely exalted above His own suffering, that He can come to His disciples' help with consolation, and arm them against danger and dread.

In vers. 2 and 33 we have the first ground of consolation, the allusion to life eternal. This is very fittingly made the first, inasmuch as eternal life is the supreme benefit, for which every other paves the way. That He would give His people eternal life, Jesus had from the very beginning declared emphatically: comp. ch. John 3:15-16. Then again it must be observed, that however glorious the gifts and graces are which Christ gives to His disciples in the present life, their condition in this life is, after all, a transitory and changeable one. The Divine gifts and influences themselves may suffer many interruptions. The sun often hides himself behind the clouds. The Church of Christ must be disciplined by the cross. There is one star of hope, however, which shines, and shines steadily, in always equal clearness. To this the Lord had pointed His people before, in the prospect of coming troubles and persecutions, Luke 6:23 : "Rejoice and be exceeding glad, for great is your reward in heaven." St Paul recommends this as an excellent defence against fear, in 2 Corinthians 4:17-18 : "For our light affliction, which endureth but a moment, worketh for us," etc.; and so in the Epistle to the Hebrews, ch. John 11:26. When once this hope is firmly rooted in the mind, the soil is at the same time and thereby prepared for the scattering of the seed of other consolations. He to whom the end is sure, cannot before the end, and in the way to it, be forsaken and lost. The heirs of eternal life must be kept by God, during the time of their pilgrimage, like the apple of His eye.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:1". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.Let not your heart be troubled. Not without good reason does Christ confirm his disciples by so many words, since a contest so arduous and so terrible awaited them; for it was no ordinary temptation, that soon afterwards they would see him hanging on the cross; a spectacle in which nothing was to be seen but ground for the lowest despair. The season of so great distress being at hand, he points out the remedy, that they may not be vanquished and overwhelmed; for he does not simply exhort and encourage them to be steadfast, but likewise informs them where they must go to obtain courage; that is, by faith, when he is acknowledged to be the Son of God, who has in himself a sufficiency of strength for maintaining the safety of his followers.

We ought always to attend to the time when these words were spoken, that Christ wished his disciples to remain brave and courageous, when they might think that every thing was in the greatest confusion; and therefore we ought to employ the same shield for warding off such assaults. It is impossible for us, indeed, to avoid feeling various emotions, but though we are shaken, we must not fall down. Thus it is said of believers, that they are not troubled, because, relying on the word of God, though very great difficulties press hard upon them, still they remain steadfast and upright.

You believe in God. It might also be read in the imperative mood, Believe in God, and believe in me; but the former reading agrees better, and has been more generally received. Here he points out the method of remaining steadfast, as I have already said; that is, if our faith rest on Christ, and view him in no other light than as being present and stretching out his hand to assist us. But it is wonderful that faith in the Father is here placed first in order, for he ought rather to have told his disciples that they ought to believe in God, since they had believed in Christ; because, as Christ is the lively image of the Father, so we ought first to cast our eyes on him; and for this reason, too, he descends to us, that our faith, beginning with him, may rise to God. But Christ had a different object in view, for all acknowledge that we ought to believe in God, and this is an admitted principle to which all assent without contradiction; and yet there is scarce one in a hundred who actually believes it, not only because the naked majesty of God is at too great a distance from us, but also because Satan interposes clouds of every description to hinder us from contemplating God. The consequence is, that our faith, seeking God in his heavenly glory and inaccessible light, vanishes away; and even the flesh, of its own accord, suggests a thousand imaginations, to turn away our eyes from beholding God in a proper manner.

The Son of God, then, who is Jesus Christ, (61) holds out himself as the object to which our faith ought to be directed, and by means of which it will easily find that on which it can rest; for he is the true Immanuel, who answers us within, as soon as we seek him by faith. It is one of the leading articles of our faith, that our faith ought to be directed to Christ alone, that it may not wander through long windings; and that it ought to be fixed on him, that it may not waver in the midst of temptations. And this is the true proof of faith, when we never suffer ourselves to be torn away from Christ, and from the promises which have been made to us in him. When Popish divines dispute, or, I should rather say, chatter, about the object of faith, they mention God only, and pay no attention to Christ. They who derive their instruction from the notions of such men, must be shaken by the slightest gale of wind that blows. Proud men are ashamed of Christ’s humiliation, and, therefore, they fly to God’s incomprehensible Divinity. But faith will never reach heaven unless it submit to Christ, who appears to be a low and contemptible God, and will never be firm if it do not seek a foundation in the weakness of Christ.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.