Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:2

In My Father's house are many dwelling places; if it were not so, I would have told you; for I go to prepare a place for you.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   God;   Heaven;   House;   Jesus, the Christ;   Mansion;   Righteous;   Scofield Reference Index - Christ;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflicted, Promises, Divine;   Afflictions;   Citizenship, Heavenly;   Future, the;   God's;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Morning Glories, Seven;   Preparation;   Promises, Divine;   Providence, Divine;   Seven;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Fear;   Jesus Christ;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Affliction, Consolation under;   Ascension of Christ, the;   Heaven;   Houses;   Reward of Saints, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ascension;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Thomas;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Citizenship;   Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life;   Immortality;   Jesus Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Ascension of Christ;   Heaven;   Holy Ghost;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Abimelech;   Heaven;   Rehoboth (1);   Thomas;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ascension;   Ascension of Christ;   Father's House;   Heaven;   Hope;   Mansion;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   English Versions;   Forerunner;   God;   Holy Spirit;   Hope;   John, Theology of;   Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Mansion;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abiding;   Angels (2);   Ascension;   Authority in Religion;   Beauty;   Boyhood of Jesus;   Business (2);   Character;   Children of God;   Comfort (2);   Coming Again;   Communion (2);   Consciousness;   Creator (Christ as);   Dead, the ;   Father's House ;   Forerunner;   Heaven;   Home (2);   Immortality (2);   Incarnation (2);   John, Gospel of (Critical);   Life ;   Mansion ;   Messenger;   Parousia;   Pilgrim (2);   Poet;   Prayer (2);   Presence;   Redemption (2);   Son of God;   Trinity (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Advent, Second;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Mansion;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ascension of Christ;   Temple;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abide;   Christ, the Exaltation of;   Father's House;   Immortal;   Mansion;   Salvation;   Spiritual House;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for April 2;   Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for December 9;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 1;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

In my Father's house, etc. - The kingdom of glory.

Many mansions - Though I have said before that whither I am going ye cannot come now, yet do not think that we shall be for ever separated. I am going to that state of glory where there is not only a place of supreme eminence for myself, but also places for all my disciples; - various degrees of glory, suited to the various capacities and attainments of my followers.

Our Lord alludes here to the temple, which was called the house of God, in the precincts of which there were a great number of chambers, 1 Kings 6:5; Ezra 8:29; Jeremiah 35:2, Jeremiah 35:4; Jeremiah 36:10.

If - not - I would have told you - If your places were not prepared in the kingdom of God, I would not have permitted you to have indulged a vain hope concerning future blessedness.

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These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

In my Father's house are many mansions; if it were not so, I would have told you: for I go to prepare a place for you.

Hunter has a very perceptive comment on this, thus:

The day before, Jesus had sent two of his disciples to secure a "large room upstairs" for the Last Supper (Mark 14:12f). They did not know the way but had to follow the owner. Arriving, they found everything "prepared." It looks as if Jesus here made the disciples' journey of the day before a parable of eternity, in which the upper room foreshadows the home of God with its many habitations.[2]

Speculations regarding the "many mansions" are fruitless. It is enough for us to know that they are indeed a reality, despite their existence beyond the perimeter of mortal vision. The souls which are of the faith of Jesus Christ shall truly inherit the upper and better habitations, and the Lord is even now preparing for the reception of the redeemed in the eternal world.

Here in these beautiful words of Jesus lies the secret of the Christian's triumph over every mortal disaster. When things on earth have issued in their superlative worst; when even life itself ebbs and the soul contemplates that ultimate terminus in the grave, then let the worshiper lift his eyes to see the City Foursquare coming down out of heaven from God. Such a refuge only Zion's children know.

ENDNOTE:

[2] A. M. Hunter, The Gospel according to John (Cambridge University Press, 1965), p. 141.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In my Father's house are many mansions,.... This he says to draw off their minds from an earthly kingdom to an heavenly one; to point out the place to them whither he was going, and to support them with the views and hopes of glory under all their troubles. By his "Father's house" is meant heaven; see 2 Corinthians 5:1; which is of his Father's building, where he has, and will have all his family. This Christ says partly to reconcile the minds of his disciples to his departure from them, and partly to strengthen their hope of following him thither; since it was his Father's, and their Father's house whither he was going, and in which "are many mansions"; abiding or dwelling places; mansions of love, peace, joy, and rest, which always remain: and there are "many" of them, which does not design different degrees of glory; for since the saints are all loved with the same love, bought with the same price, justified with the same righteousness, and are equally the sons of God, their glory will be the same. But, it denotes fulness and sufficiency of room for all his people; for the many ordained to eternal life, for whom Christ gave his life a ransom, and whose blood is shed for the remission of their sins, whose sins he bore, and whom he justifies by his knowledge; who receive him by faith, and are the many sons he will bring to glory. And this is said for the comfort of the disciples who might be assured from hence, that there would be room not only for himself and Peter, whom he had promised should follow him hereafter, but for them all. Very agreeable to this way of speaking are many things in the Jewish writings:

"says R. IsaackF15Zohar in Deut. fol. 113. 1. , how many מדורין על מדורין, "mansions upon mansions", are there for the righteous in that world? and the uppermost mansion of them all is the love of their Lord.'

Moreover, they sayF16Praefat ad Sepher Raziel, fol. 2. 1. Nishmat Chayim, fol. 26. 2. & 27. 1. , that

"in the world to come every righteous man shall have מדור, "a mansion", to himself.'

Sometimes theyF17T. Bab. Bava Bathra, fol. 75. 1. Nishmat Chayim, fol. 32. 2. Midrash Tillim in Galatin. l. 12. c. 6. speak of "seven mansions" (a number of perfection) being prepared for the righteous in the other world, though entirely ignorant of the person by whom these mansions are prepared: who here says,

if it were not so, I, would have told you, I go to prepare a place for you. This expresses the certainty of it, that his Father had a house, and in it were many mansions, room enough for all his people, or he would have informed them otherwise, who must needs know the truth of these things, since he came from thence; and who never deceives with vain hopes of glory; and whatever he says is truth, and to be depended on; everything he here delivers; both what he said before, and also what follows: "I go to prepare a place for you"; heaven is a kingdom prepared by the Father for his saints, from the foundation of the world; and again, by the presence and intercession of Christ, who is gone before, and is as a forerunner entered into it, and has took possession of it in the name of his people; and by his own appearance there for them with his blood, righteousness, and sacrifice, he is, as it were, fitting up these mansions for their reception, whilst they are by his Spirit and grace fitting and preparing for the enjoyment of them.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

In my Father's house are many mansions: if [it were] not [so], a I would have told you. I go to b prepare a place for you.

(a) That is, if it were not as I am telling you, that is, unless there was room enough not only for me, but also for you in my Father's house, I would not deceive you in this way with a vain hope, but I would have plainly told you so.

(b) This whole speech is an allegory, by which the Lord comforts his own, declaring to them his departure into heaven; and he departs not to reign there alone, but to go before and prepare a place for them.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 14:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

In my Father‘s house are many mansions — and so room for all, and a place for each.

if not, I would have told you — that is, I would tell you so at once; I would not deceive you.

I go to prepare a place for you — to obtain for you a right to be there, and to possess your “place.”

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-14.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

2. In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.

[I go to prepare a place for you.] Compare this with Numbers 10:33; "And the ark of the covenant of the Lord went before them, to search out a resting place for them."

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 14:2". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-14.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

In my Father's house are many mansions. By the "Father's house" is meant the heavenly abode. He is about to return there, from whence he had come.

I go to prepare a place for you. If the separation was to be an eternal one, he would have forewarned them. Rather, he goes before to prepare a home for them where they can all be together. The departure of Jesus was needful to open an entrance to them and use.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:2". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Mansions (μοναιmonai). Old word from μενωmenō to abide, abiding places, in N.T. only here and John 14:23. There are many resting-places in the Father‘s house (οικιαoikia). Christ‘s picture of heaven here is the most precious one that we possess. It is our heavenly home with the Father and with Jesus.

If it were not so (ει δε μηei de mē). Ellipsis of the verb (Mark 2:21; Revelation 2:5, Revelation 2:16; John 14:11). Here a suppressed condition of the second class (determined as unfulfilled) as the conclusion shows.

I would have told you
(ειπον αν υμινeipon an humin). Regular construction for this apodosis (ανan and aorist - second active - indicative).

For I go
(οτι πορευομαιhoti poreuomai). Reason for the consolation given, futuristic present middle indicative, and explanation of his words in John 13:33 that puzzled Peter so (John 13:36.).

To prepare a place for you
(ετοιμασαι τοπον υμινhetoimasai topon humin). First aorist active infinitive of purpose of ετοιμαζωhetoimazō to make ready, old verb from ετοιμοςhetoimos Here only in John, but in Mark 10:40 (Matthew 20:23). It was customary to send one forward for such a purpose (Numbers 10:33). So Jesus had sent Peter and John to make ready (this very verb) for the passover meal (Mark 14:12; Matthew 26:17). Jesus is thus our Forerunner (προδρομοςprodromos) in heaven (Hebrews 6:20).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

House ( οἰκίᾳ )

The dwelling-place. Used primarily of the edifice (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 8:14; Matthew 9:10; Acts 4:34). Of the family or all the persons inhabiting the house (Matthew 12:25; John 4:53; 1 Corinthians 16:15; Matthew 10:13). Of property (Matthew 23:14; Mark 12:40). Here meaning heaven.

Mansions ( μοναὶ )

Only here and John 14:23. From μένω tostay or abide. Originally a staying or abiding or delay. Thus Thucydides, of Pausanias: “He settled at Colonae in Troas, and was reported to the Ephors to be negotiating with the Barbarians, and to be staying there ( τὴν μονὴν ποιούμενος , Literally, making a stay ) for no good purpose” (i., 131). Thence, a staying or abiding-place; an abode. The word mansion has a similar etymology and follows the same course of development, being derived from manere, to remain. Mansio is thus, first, a staying, and then a dwelling-place. A later meaning of both mansio and μονή is a halting-place or station on a journey. Some expositors, as Trench and Westcott, explain the word here according to this later meaning, as indicating the combination of the contrasted notions of progress and repose in the vision of the future. This is quite untenable. The word means here abodes. Compare Homer's description of Priam's palace:

“A palace built with graceful porticoes,

And fifty chambers near each other, walled

With polished stone, the rooms of Priam's sons

And of their wives; and opposite to these

Twelve chambers for his daughters, also near

Each other; and, with polished marble walls,

The sleeping-rooms of Priam's sons-in-law

And their unblemished consorts.”

Iliad,” vi., 242-250.

Godet remarks: “The image is derived from those vast oriental palaces, in which there is an abode not only for the sovereign and the heir to the throne, but also for all the sons of the king, however numerous they may be.”

If it were not so, I would have told you ( εἰ δὲ μὴ εἶπον ἂν ὑμῖν ).

Wyc., If anything less, I had said to you.

I go to prepare, etc.

Many earlier interpreters refer I would have told you to these words, and render I would have told you that I go to prepare a place for you. But this is inadmissible, because Jesus says (John 14:3) that He is actually going to prepare a place. The better rendering regards if it were not so, I would have told you, as parenthetical, and connects the following sentence with are many mansions, by means of ὅτι , for or because, which the best texts insert. “In my Father's house are many mansions (if it were not so, I would have told you), for I go to prepare a place for you.”

I go to prepare

Compare Numbers 10:33. Also Hebrews 6:20, “whither the forerunner is for us entered, even Jesus.”

A place ( τόπον )

See on John 11:48. The heavenly dwelling is thus described by three words: house, abode, place.

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The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.

In my Father's house are many mansions — Enough to receive both the holy angels, and your predecessors in the faith, and all that now believe, and a great multitude, which no man can number.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

In my Father's house are many mansions1; if it were not so, I would have told you2; for I go to prepare a place for you3.

  1. In my Father's house are many mansions. Many abiding places or homes. They were not to be homeless always.

  2. If it were not so, I would have told you. That is to say, if heaven had been of such limited capacity that there was little or no hope that you could follow me, I should have dealt plainly with you, and should have disabused your mind of all vain hopes. But there is room (Luke 14:22), and you may follow (John 13:36).

  3. For I go to prepare a place for you. We are familiar with the thought that the going, or death, of Jesus prepared a way for us by providing a fountain for the cleansing of our sin, and by rending the veil of the temple, "thus signifying that the way into heaven is now open". But the thought here is different. Jesus departed to prepare places for his own in the Father's house.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

В доме Отца Моего. Поелику Его отсутствие могло вызвать ропот, Христос свидетельствует, что не уходит с целью отделиться от учеников. Ведь и для них имеется место на небесах. Могло возникнуть подозрение, что Христос восходит к Отцу, пренебрегая Своими оставленными на земле людьми. Это место грубо извращают, толкуя его так, словно Христос учит о наличии в Царстве Небесном разных степеней блаженства. Но Он говорит о многих, а не о разных или неравных обителях, о таких, которые достаточны для многих людей. Он как бы говорит: там есть место не только для Меня, но и для всех Моих учеников.

А если бы не так. Здесь толкователи разногласят. Одни читают все в одном контексте. Как-то: Если бы вам не были готовы обители, Я сказал бы, что иду заранее их подготовить. Я же скорее соглашусь с мнением тех, кто разделяет предложение следующим образом: Если бы небесная слава полагалась одному Мне, Я не внушал бы вам ложные ожидания. Я сказал бы: никому кроме Меня нет места у Отца Небесного. Однако дело обстоит иначе. Я предваряю вас, чтобы приготовить вам место.

По моему мнению, сам контекст заставляет нас читать таким образом. Ибо сразу же затем следует: если же пойду, чтобы приготовить место. Этими словами Христос хочет сказать: цель Его ухода в том, чтобы приготовить место для учеников. Итог же таков: Сын Божий взошел на небеса не как частное лицо, чтобы жить там в одиночестве. Скорее небеса – общее наследие всех благочестивых, и Глава всегда останется соединенной со Своими членами. Однако встает вопрос: каким было посмертное положение ветхозаветных отцов, прежде чем Христос взошел на небеса? В народе бытует мнение, что души верных были заключены в лимбе. Ведь Христос говорит, что только Его уход приготовил на небесах место. Но ответ весьма прост. Место, о котором говорится, готовится на день воскресения. По природе человеческий род изгнан из Царства Божия. Сын же, единственный наследник небес, принял наследство от нашего имени, дабы через Него доступ к наследию открылся и нам. Ибо в Его лице мы уже в надежде обладаем небесами, как учит Павел в Еф.1:3, но мы не будем Им обладать, покуда Он снова не явится с неба. Итак, здесь не проводится различение между посмертным положением отцов и нашим состоянием, ибо Христос приготовил место как для нас, так и для них. И в это место Он заберет всех в последний день. До примирения души верных словно в зеркале взирали на обещанное искупление, а теперь они наслаждаются блаженным покоем, доколе их искупление не завершится полностью.

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

HEAVEN

‘I go to prepare a place for you.’

John 14:2

Jesus Christ Himself is our home, our furniture, our resting-place all in one.

I. We live in Him.—‘Thou art a place to hide me in.’ It was the bitter gloom of separation from Him that cast this fluttering dismay upon the Apostles. His words were designed to reassure them. He was going before them to be ready to receive them on the other side, in the home which He had set apart for them, in the abode which He would get ready for them. The Jewish tradition had always made so much of God’s Presence here in their midst, that death seemed to them to be a going out from it into a region which had to them been only imperfectly explored, and of which they had no sure evidence. It was part of our Blessed Lord’s mission to bring life and immortality to light through the Gospel. And yet it is not for us contemptuously to despise the Jews for their scantier knowledge. At least they found God here, and that after all is the best beginning for finding Him hereafter. That ‘I may know Him and the power of His Resurrection.’ How much is contained in those words! There was a time when St. Paul had been constrained to say, ‘Who art Thou, Lord?’ It is the outpouring of a great longing when He says, ‘Then shall I know.’ We can read in the history of the martyrs how very much this meant to them as a support in their trials. ‘I see Jesus standing at the right hand of God,’ seems to have lifted St. Stephen up out of his pains and humiliation into a region where it had become true. ‘Thou shalt hide them privily by Thine own Presence from the provoking of all men: Thou shalt keep them secretly in Thy tabernacle from the strife of tongues.’ We know, perhaps, in our own experience, what it is suddenly to come across a friend in strange and difficult surroundings, where we know neither the language nor the manners of the people, and we say, ‘It seems quite like home to see you here.’

II. So we ought to live that life of personal union with Christ, that we may be able to understand without an effort that heaven is a state rather than a place. And that whatever may be the environment to which our risen life corresponds, whatever may be the analogous counterpart of our ministering senses, we may be able to find our fullness and completeness in Him. ‘And this is life eternal, that they might know Thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, Whom Thou hast sent.’ ‘We are complete in Him.’ He gathers up all our affection, He purifies all our works. Where He is, there is heaven and happiness. Where He is not there is hell and misery. The Word was made flesh, and tabernacled among us, that He might raise us up to sit with Him in heavenly places, in the special home which He has prepared for us, in the mansion where He vouchsafes to meet us.

—Canon Newbolt.

Illustration

‘There is a story which comes to us from the days of the martyrs, that a Christian condemned to die a cruel death for his allegiance to Christ was sleeping peacefully the night before his martyrdom when he was disturbed by a dream. He dreamed that he was in heaven, where everything around him was of pure transparent glass. The ground he trod, the streets and gardens, all clear and transparent, and the blessed spirits of the righteous as they swept by, were of glass also; but to his dismay, each, as they passed him, pointed at him in amazement and pain, as if wondering at his presence in such a pure abode. And, looking down, he saw on his breast a black spot at which all were pointing. He clasped his hands over the place, but being himself of glass his hands were transparent, the defilement shone through. In his agony he awoke and remembered some breach of charity of which he had been guilty. He sought pardon of God and man, and passed away through martyrdom, to the realisation of the country of his dream.’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

THE LORD’S DEPARTURE

Thus the Lord announces the necessity and the object of His removal from the disciples.

I. The necessity for our Lord’s departure.—If He had remained here below various great ends of His mission must have remained unfulfilled. The glorification of His manhood, and of us in Him could not have been. Again, it was God’s purpose to build up again that image which in our first parents had been ruined, and this could not be accomplished without His being taken from them. It was to be the special work of the Holy Spirit dwelling in and operating on men’s hearts, and the Comforter would not come unless our Lord first went to the Father. The Ascension was necessary also for the manifestation of Christ’s sovereignty (Romans 14:9), and for the work of His High Priesthood in heaven.

II. The manner of His departure was open and undoubted. The Ascension into heaven is an article of faith resting on irrefragable testimony of the whole apostolic body.

III. The results of His departure with a view to our own faith and practice.

(a) It is the token of our acceptance. He is preparing a place and He is coming again. Let us look on the world’s progress and our own as parts of great preparation to that end.

(b) Let His Ascension draw our thoughts upward.

(c) His merciful intercession should also be in our minds. He is the Way, and no man cometh to the Father but by Him.

Dean Alford.

Illustration

‘The foreigner in some countries still is the subject of severe criticism, contempt, and sometimes danger. His appearance is strange, his dress is foreign, his customs are incongruous, he does not fit in with his surroundings; his presence is an insult. God forbid that we should attribute such feelings to the courts of heaven, where we read “there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth”! But it may be true, for all that, that man as man would be a sorry occupant for the unsullied streets of the golden city. Man was created in the image and likeness of God, dowered with freewill and spiritual power, and so man was meant to be a kind of first-fruits of God’s creatures. But read the history of the Old Testament saints and their serious imperfections. Read the lives of the Christian saints and their manifold limitations. Look at the average man, and the almost grotesque incongruity between his life and the life of any heaven which our imagination can bring before us. Look at our conception of beatitude. If the end of man is to know God and enjoy Him for ever—if this indeed be life eternal to know God, and Jesus Christ Whom He has sent, how can it be, how can we wish it so to be—we who know so little of God in our daily lives, we before whose lives He spreads His beauty, on which we turn our backs in silent contempt?’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 14:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.

Ver. 2. I would have told you] And not have fed you with false hopes of a Utopian happiness, as the devil deals by his, whom he brings into a fool’s paradise; as Mahomet by his, to whom he promises in paradise delicious fare, pleasant gardens, and other sensual delights eternally to be enjoyed, &c. Christ is no such impostor.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 14:2

The truthfulness of Jesus Christ

I. These words were an appeal to the disciples' knowledge of Christ. Had He ever painted His discipleship in false colours? Had He kept back any hard terms? Had He softened down any harsh conditions, that He might parade among His followers as One whom it was policy to conciliate? "One thing thou lackest," He had said to the rich young ruler, and that one thing was the sacrifice of his all. It was so in everything. The same voice which said, "In the world ye shall have tribulation," would have said, if it was the truth: I have no revelation and no promise, of another "life." I can but speak of truth and of duty. I can but share with you the sorrows of time, and leave you at the gate of that mystery which none can solve—what, or whether anything, shall be hereafter.

II. "If it were not so, I would have told you"—and in the telling there would have lain for Me no defeat and no discomfiture. I might still have come into the life; I might still have been the Comforter, the Sympathiser, and the Friend. If, then, He does not tell us that there is no life beyond this life—shall we not believe that He speaks that He doth know? I will insult the intelligence of no man by supposing that he will accuse Jesus Christ—whose character (I speak as a man) he knows perfectly well by biography and by history—of wilfully fabricating revelations of the truth of which He Himself was not persuaded. Either he must say, if he is a man of sense and honesty, "We have not His real words," or he must say, "He was Himself deluded." The third thing he durst not say—durst not, I mean, for his intellectual character's sake—"Though He knew that it was so, yet He said it." The hearing ear is from above; but prayer will draw down the gift. If we believe in the home above; if we believe that Jesus lives; if we believe that He will come again to receive us unto Himself—let us look now at the things not seen but eternal, let us live the life now which alone can survive death.

C. J. Vaughan, Temple Sermons, p. 361.


Man's hope of immortality uncontradicted by God

I. Our position with God is similar to that in which the disciples stood to Christ—we are looking to Him for the fulfilment of hopes which reach beyond our present life.

II. The same considerations which would have led Christ to undeceive His disciples, had they been in error, apply to God in His position to us. These reasons fall under a twofold division—those which lie in God's own character, and those which lie in the relation between Him and us. Whatever could press on Christ as a moral obligation to speak out to His disciples, would lead us to expect that, if we were deceiving ourselves, God would speak out to us.

J. Ker, Sermons, p. 245.


References: John 14:2.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. x., p. 72; Homilist, vol. v., p. 87; T. S. Berry, Expositor, 2nd series, vol. iii., p. 397; Preacher's Monthly, vol. viii., p. 363; A. Blomfield, Sermons in Town and Country, p. 124; R. L. Browne, Sussex Sermons, p. 1; H. J. Wilmot-Buxton, Sunday Sermonettes for a Year, p. 97. John 14:2-3.—Christian World Pulpit, vol. vi., p. 127; vol. ix., p. 90.

I. Had the Lord Jesus remained with us here below, various great ends of His mission must have rested unfulfilled. (1) Both His crucifixion and His resurrection were but steps in the way of the greatest event of His whole appointed course—the glorification of His manhood and of us in Him. Had He remained below, we may not say that this could not have been; because it is not for us to limit God to any defined place in His workings; but according to His own declaration, it would not have been. (2) Again, it was not the purpose of God in redemption merely to clear us from guilt, nor merely to place us in acceptance, but to renew us after the Divine likeness—to build up again, infinitely more glorious for the conflict with sin and suffering, that image which in our first parents had been ruined. And this, our Lord again and again taught His disciples, could not be accomplished without His being taken from them. It was to be the especial work of the Holy Spirit, and this Holy Spirit, the Comforter, the Builder-up and Strengthener of Mankind, would not come unless our Lord first went to the Father. (3) Moreover, the Ascension was necessary for the manifestation of Christ's sovereignty. No manifestation of majesty here below could ever have been equivalent to the resumption by Him of the glory which He had with the Father before the world was—still less to the accession of glory with which Redemption has crowned Him. (4) Another great necessity for our Lord's removal from us, is the work of His High Priesthood in heaven.

II. Consider the results of the Ascension with a view to our own faith and practice. (1) It is the token to us of the entire acceptance of the Saviour's finished work in our nature. (2) The Ascension of our Lord should draw our present thoughts and affections to the place whither He is gone before. If we really love our Saviour, if His glorified humanity is to us the spring of our joys, and the centre of our interests, the world may catch our fleeting thoughts and employ our less earnest attentions, but He will have all our serious determinations, all our deepest affections; the world may be our tabernacle, but the place where He is will be our home.

H. Alford, Quebec Chapel Sermons, vol. i., p. 366.


I. Our Lord teaches us to connect with heaven the thought of permanence. It is a place of mansions.

II. Our Lord teaches us to connect with heaven the thought of extent and variety. It has many mansions.

III. Our Lord further teaches us to connect with the heavenly world the thought of unity. It is a house of many mansions.

IV. Our Lord teaches us to carry to the thought of heaven a filial heart. It is the Father's house, a paternal home.

V. Our Lord has taught us to connect heaven with the thought of Himself—"My" Father's house. "No man cometh into the Father but by Me."

J. Ker, Sermons, 2nd series, p. 247.


References: John 14:2.—J. S. Davies, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxv., p. 321; J. H. Hitchens, Ibid., vol. xxix., p. 6; J. Keble, Sermons from Ascension Day to Trinity, p. 72; J. Vaughan, Sermons, 6th series, p. 141. John 14:2, John 14:3.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. xiii., p. 228; H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxvii., p. 87. John 14:2-4.—Homilist, vol. ii., p. 583.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:2. In my Father's house, &c.— Our Lord here has been thought by some to allude to the various apartments in the temple, and the vast numbers of people lodged there. Perhaps the allusion may be more general to the palaces of kings, and the various apartments there. The word μοναι signifies quiet and continued abodes, and therefore seems happily expressed by our English word mansion, the etymology and import of which is just the same. Our Saviour here intends the encouragement and comfort of his disciples, by assuring them, that in the place whereto he was going before them, there was ample room to receive them, and every thing to accommodate them in the most delightful manner. When the glory of heaven is spoken of as prepared before the foundation of the world, (Matthew 25:34.) this only refers to the divine purpose; but as that was founded in Christ's mediatorial undertaking, (Ephesians 1:4-6.) it might properly be said, that when Christ went into heaven, as our high-priest, to present, as it were, his own blood before the Father on our account, and as our fore-runner to take possession of it, he did thereby, prepare a place for us: which the apostle to the Hebrews 9:23-24 expresses by his purifying or consecrating the heavenly places,in which the faithful are to dwell; as the tabernacle of Moses, when new made; on which account an atonement for the altar itself, which was considered as most holy, was the first act performed in it when it was opened. (Exodus 29:36-37.) It may not be improper to observe, that the word τοπος is often translated room, as in Luke 2:7; Luke 14:10; Luke 14:22. 1 Corinthians 14:16. And thus the signification here may be, that Christ went to heaven to make room for them, or to remove those things out of the way which obstructed their entrance. This may at least be included; though the word ετοιμασαι may express still more. It is the same term which is used of John the Baptist, the fore-runner of our Lord. See Matthew 3:3; Matthew 3:17.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2.] This comfort—of being reunited to their Lord—is administered to them as τεκνία, in forms of speech simple, and adapted to their powers of apprehension of spiritual things. The οἰκία is Heaven: Psalms 33:13-14; Isaiah 63:15. In it are many (in number—not in degree of dignity, as Clem. Alex(185), Basil., Theod., Chrys., Theophylact, Tert(186), Hil(187), Aug(188), &c., at least no such meaning is here conveyed) abiding-places; room enough for them all;ἱκαναὶ δέξασθαι καὶ ὑμᾶς συνεσομένους ἡμῖν ἀεί. Euthym(189) If not,—if they could not follow Him thither, He would not have concealed this from them. This latter assurance is one calculated to beget entire trust and confidence; He would not in any matter hold out vain hopes to them;—His word to them would plainly state all difficulties and discouragements,—as indeed He does, ch. John 15:18; John 16:1; John 16:4; which last verse ἵνα μνημ ὅτι ἐγὼ εἶπον ὑμῖν, is decisive for the above interpretation here, against those who would join ὅτι πορεύομαι … with εἷπον ἂν ὑμῖν (Euthym(190), Aug(191), Erasm., Luther, Bengel):—which besides does violence to the next verse, where the ‘going to prepare a place’ is stated as a fact. The ὅτι may, it is true, have been inserted as a ὅτι recitantis, to favour the view just controverted: but it is much more probably genuine, signifying because, and belongs to the whole sense of John 14:1-2, as a reason why their heart should not be troubled.

The sense confidently proposed for the many mansions by a correspondent,—that He was going to one part of His Father’s house, while they would remain in another, that house being not Heaven, but the Universe,—is entirely put out of the question, as being frigid in the extreme under the solemn circumstances,—as being contrary to all Scripture analogy of expression,—and as inconsistent with the πορεὑομαι ἑτοιμάσαι τόπον ὑμῖν, where the τόπος is of necessity correlative with the μοναί, which are in that οἰκία whither He is going. Besides, their earthly μικρὸς χρόνος could in no sense be called a μονή. The ἑτοιμάσαι τόπον is that of which we sing,—“When Thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, Thou didst open the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers:” see note on Luke 23:43. And thus it is τόπον, not τὰς μονάς:—the place as a whole, not each man’s place in it.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:2. οἰκίᾳ, house) He shows already whither He is going.—V. g.] A rare appellation of the heavenly habitation: a house of residence, into which are admitted children, and in which the Father dwells. Jesus looks beyond His sufferings to the goal. Comp. Hebrews 12:2, “Who, for the joy that was set before Him, endured the cross;” 2 Timothy 4:7, [so Paul in a dungeon before his martyrdom] “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith.”— τοῦ πατρός μου, of My Father) In the beginning of this sermon, Jesus often adds the pronoun to the mention of His Father; but as He gets forward in it, and at its close, after that He has taken precaution to establish His own pre-eminence above believers, and has stirred up the disciples to faith, He speaks as it were more in common, calling God, the Father, namely, Mine, and at the same time also yours.— μοναί, mansions) This refers to place, not to time [places of abode; not times of abode]; and it is said in the plural, on account of the multitude of those whom that common mansion contains.— πολλαί) many, so as to contain angels and your predecessors in the faith, and you, and very many more. By the plural number itself there appears also to be implied a variety of the mansions: for He does not say, a great mansion, but many mansions. Comp. Revelation 21:16, note, “The city lieth four-square,” etc.— εἰσίν, there are) already now, and from the beginning.— εἰ δὲ μή, but if it were not so) If there were not already [many mansions].— εἷπον ἄν) I would tell, or rather, I would have told you. Concerning the pluperfect, comp. ch. John 4:10, note [ σὺ ἂν ᾔτησαςκαὶ ἔδωκεν ἄν]. “What would He have told them? This very thing, which follows, πορεύομαι, I go. Parodying [an adaptation of] the very similar passage, ch. John 16:26, illustrates the sentiment here: I have not said to you, that I would prepare a place for you; for already there ARE mansions, and those numerous.— πορεύομαι, I go) to the home of My Father.— ἑτοιμάσαι, to prepare) He does not altogether deny that He prepares the place, with which comp. the following verse, where He Himself affirms it: but each of the two statements mutually qualifies the other. But see, what force there may lie in the order of the words: in John 14:2 it is said, τόπον ὑμῖν, a place for you; in John 14:3, ὑμῖν τόπον, for you a place: the first word in each instance respectively containing the emphasis, as in 1 Corinthians 7:22, note [ κληθεὶςἀπελεύθερος,— ἐλεύθερος κληθείς]. The place itself is already prepared: but for you it has yet to be prepared. The one preparation is absolute, the other relative. The beginning of the third verse, καὶ ἐάν, and if, does not depend on εἶπον, I would have told you, but stands by itself.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Our Lord’s first argument brought to comfort them, from the place whither he was going, and the end of his going thither. The place whither he was going was his

Father’s house, so as they needed not to be troubled for him, he was but going home; nor was God his Father only, but theirs also, as he afterwards saith, I go to my Father, and your Father. And here he tells them, that in his Father’s house there was not only a mansion, that is, an abiding place for him, but for many others also.

Our days on the earth (saith David, 1 Chronicles 29:15) are as a shadow, and there is no abiding; but in heaven there are monai, abiding places. We shall (saith the apostle, 1 Thessalonians 4:17) be ever with the Lord. And the mansions there are many; there is room enough for all believers. I would not have deceived you; if there had been no place in heaven but for me, I would have told you of it; but there are many mansions there.

I go to prepare a place for you: the place was prepared of old; those who shall be saved, were of old ordained unto life. That kingdom was prepared for them before the foundation of the world; that is, in the counsels and immutable purpose of God. These mansions for believers in heaven were to be sprinkled with blood: the sprinkling of the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the ministry, were typical of it; but the heaven things themselves with better sacrifices than these, saith the apostle, Hebrews 9:21,23. By his resurrection from the dead, and becoming the first fruits of those that sleep; by his ascension into heaven, as our forerunner, Hebrews 6:20; by his sitting at the right hand of God, and making intercession for us; he prepares for us a place in heaven. And thus he comforteth his disciples, (as to the want of his bodily presence), as from the consideration of the place whither he went, so from the end of his going thither, which was, to do those acts which were necessary in order to His disciples’ inheriting those blessed mansions which were prepared for them from before the foundation of the world.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

In my Father’s house; in heaven.

Many mansions; dwelling-places.

I go to prepare a place for you; this going was begun by the Saviour’s death-after which he never abode permanently with his disciples-and completed at his ascension. His death, resurrection, and ascension to heaven, were all parts of the one act of going to the Father to prepare a place for his followers.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2.My Father’s house—By this is meant, not the universe, as some suppose; though the universe be the house of God and its mansions many. But it is the house not made with hands, the heavenly world.

Many mansions—Many abodes or residences. This implies not merely that there is room enough for every one in heaven; nor simply that there are various grades and degrees of glory suited to the various grades of human moral character. It means these and more. We understand it to mean, that there is a great variety of compartments in the heavenly world for the various species and orders of heavenly existences. There are angels, principalities, and powers; there are angels and archangels; there are those who have never fallen from their holy estate; and Jesus now goes to prepare the heavenly apartment for the fallen but redeemed of men, by them to be occupied beyond the resurrection and the judgment-day. By his atoning death and his resurrection, he has won this right to place his redeemed, clothed in his merits, and crowned with his glory, in a high place in the heavenly world.

If it were not so—If all were limited to this world alone and to this life; if I had but a glorious Messianic kingdom here on earth and no glory in the world of glory.

I would have told you—I would do what I never have done, limit your views to an earthly glorification.

I go to prepare a place—Through whatever agonies and humiliations you see me pass, my destination is to go to the heavenly world and prepare your heavenly abode.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus next explained the reason the disciples should stop feeling troubled at the thought of His leaving them. He was departing to prepare a place for them, and He would return for them and take them there later ( John 14:3; John 14:28).

The Father"s house is heaven. This is the most obvious and simple explanation, though some commentators understood it to mean the church. However the fourth Gospel never uses the house metaphor for the church elsewhere, and the phrase "the Father"s house" occurs nowhere else in Scripture as a figure of the church. Neither can it refer to the messianic kingdom since Jesus said He was about to go there. The messianic kingdom did not exist and will not exist until Jesus returns to the earth to set it up (cf. Daniel 2:44; et al.)

There are many dwelling places (Gr. mone, cognate with the verb meno, meaning "to abide" or "remain") in heaven. The Latin Vulgate translated the noun mansiones that the AV transliterated as "mansions." The NIV "rooms" is an interpretation of mone. The picture that Jesus painted of heaven is a huge building with many rooms or suites of rooms in which people reside. The emphasis is not on the lavishness of the facility as much as its adequacy to accommodate all believers. Other revelation about heaven stresses its opulence (e.g, Revelation 21:1 to Revelation 22:5).

"The imagery of a dwelling place ("rooms") is taken from the oriental house in which the sons and daughters have apartments under the same roof as their parents." [Note: Tenney, " John," p143.]

"This truth may reflect the marriage custom of the bridegroom, who would go to the bride"s house and bring her to his father"s house, where an apartment would have been built for the new couple." [Note: Bailey, p184.]

Jesus assured His disciples that if heaven were otherwise He would have told them just how it was. This assurance recalls John 14:1 where Jesus urged them to trust Him.

Jesus had previously spoken of His departure as including His death, His resurrection, and His ascension ( John 13:31-32; John 13:36). Consequently He probably had all of that in view when He spoke about going to prepare a place for believers. His death and resurrection, as well as His ascension and return to heaven, would prepare a place for them. [Note: Edersheim, 2:514.] The place, the Father"s house or heaven, already existed when Jesus spoke these words. He would not go to heaven to create a place for believers there. Rather all that He would do from His death to His return to heaven would constitute preparation for believers to join Him there ultimately. The idea that Jesus is presently constructing dwelling places for believers in heaven and has been doing so for2,000 years is not what Jesus meant here. Jesus" going itself prepared the place.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:2. In my Father’s house are many places of abode: if it were not so, I would have told you; because I go to prepare a place for you. All the substantives here used—‘house,’ ‘places of abode,’ ‘place’—are full of meaning. The first is not the material building, but the building as occupied by its inmates (comp. chaps, John 2:16, John 11:20, with John 4:53, John 8:35, John 11:31); the second, used in the New Testament only in this verse and in John 14:23, is connected with the characteristic ‘abide’ of our Gospel; and the third embodies the idea of something fixed and definite—something that we may call our own (comp. chap. John 11:48). But the full force and beauty of the words are only understood by us when we look at them in a light different from that in which they are generally regarded. For ‘my Father’s house’ does not mean heaven as distinguished from earth, nor are the ‘abiding places’ confined to the world to come. Earth as well as heaven is to the eye of faith a part of that ‘house:’ abiding places are here as well as there. The universe, in short, is presented to us by our Lord as one ‘house’ over which the Father rules, having ‘many’ apartments, some on this side, others on the other side, the grave. In one of these the believer dwells now, and the Father and the Son come unto him, and make their abode with him (John 14:23): in another of them he will dwell hereafter. When, therefore, Jesus ‘goes away,’ it is not to a strange land, it is only to another chamber of the one house of the Father: and thus ‘many’ is not to be understood in the sense of variety,—of different degrees of happiness and glory provided for different persons. The main thought is that wherever Jesus is, wherever we are, we are all in the Father’s house: surely such separation is no real separation. Had not this been the true nature of the case,—had it not been essentially involved in the mission of Jesus that His disciples, once united to Him, could never be separated from Him, He would ‘have told’ them, His teaching would have been entirely different from what it had been; but, because wherever He was there He would prepare a place for them also, He had not thought it necessary till now to speak either of being separated or of being united again. It will thus be seen that the words beginning with ‘because’ are to be connected with those going immediately before, and not with the earlier part of the verse.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:2. As an encouragement to this trust, He adds, . He is going home to His Father’s house, but had there been room in it only for Himself He would necessarily have told them that this was the case, because the very reason of His going was to prepare a place for them, assigns the reason for the necessity of explanation: the reason being that His purpose or plan for His future would require to be entirely altered had there been no room for them in His Father’s house. “My Father’s house” is used in John 2:16 of the Temple: here of the immediate presence of the Father and of that condition in which His love and protection are uninterruptedly and directly experienced. This is most naturally thought of as a place, but with the corrective that “it is not in heaven one finds God, but in God one finds heaven”. Cf. Godet. In this house, as in a great palace, cf.Iliad, vi. 242, . ( ), only here and in John 14:23, means a place to abide in, and was used of a station on a journey, a resting place, quarters for the night, and in later ecclesiastical Greek a monastery. See Soph., Lexicon. “Mansions” reproduces the Vulgate “mansiones”. See further Wright’s Bible Word-Book. ’ “were it not so, I would have told you,” “ademissem vobis spem inanem,” Grotius. Had there been no such place and no possibility of preparing it, He necessarily would have told them, because the very purpose of His leaving them was to prepare a place for them. , a figure derived from the custom of sending forward one of a party to secure quarters and provide all requisites. Cf. the Alcestis, line 363: , , , . What was involved in the preparation here spoken of is detailed in Hebrews. Cf. Selby’s Ministry of the Lord, 275.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

In my Father's house. He does not say of your Father: for though God be the Father of all by creation, and of the just, by the grace of adoption; yet Christ in several places, calls him his Father, in a quite different sense, that is, as he was his eternal Father, as the ancient interpreters observe. (Witham) --- These many mansions signify different degrees of glory in heaven. (St. Jerome, lib. ii. adv. Jovin.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:2". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

In. Greek. en. App-104.

My Father"s. In John"s Gospel the Lord uses this expression thirty-five times, though in a few instances the texts read "the" instead of "My". It is found fourteen times in these three chapters 14-16. It occurs seventeen times in Matthew, six times in Luke (three times in parables), but not once in Mark.

mansions = abiding places. Greek. more (from meno, a characteristic word in this Gospel). Occurs only here and in John 14:23,

if it were not so = if not. Greek. ei me. There is no verb. I would, &c. All the texts add "that" (hoti), and read "would I have told you that I go", &c.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.

In my Father's house are many mansions - and so, room for all and a place for each.

If it were not so, I would have told you - and not have deceived you all this time.

I go - or, according to what is undoubtedly the true reading, 'because I go'

To prepare a place for you, [ hoti (Greek #3754), before poreuomai (Greek #4198) has decisive authority, and is inserted by all critical editors.] The meaning is, 'Doubt not, that there is for all of you a place in My Father's house, for I am going on purpose to prepare it.' In what sense? First, To establish their right to Be there; Second, To take possession of it in their name; Third, To conduct them there at last.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

2. There are many rooms. [Mansion = a room or apartment in a large building.] He is going home to his Father’s house, which has enough rooms for every one of the saved. And I am going to prepare a place for you. He will not leave them “orphans.” This time of sorrow and sadness is only a step toward a much better home than earth can give. If it were not so. He speaks the truth to them! His very purpose in leaving them, is to prepare for them to be with him in Eternity. [The preparation is the Cross including the ascension to sit at the Father’s right side, Compare Matthew 25:34; Colossians 1:20; Revelation 1:5-6; Revelation 5:9-10.]

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:2". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) In my Father’s house are many mansions.—The Greek word used for “house” here is slightly different from that used of the material temple on earth in John 2:16. The exact meaning will be at once seen from a comparison of 2 Corinthians 5:1, the only other passage in the New Testament where it is used metaphorically. The Jews were accustomed to the thought of heaven as the habitation of God; and the disciples had been taught to pray, “Our Father, which art in heaven.” (Comp. Psalms 23:6; Isaiah 63:15; Matthew 6:9; Acts 7:49; and especially Hebrews 9)

The Greek word for “mansions” occurs again in the New Testament only in John 14:23, where it is rendered abode.” Wiclif and the Geneva version read “dwellings.” It is found in the Greek of the Old Testament only in 1 Maccabees 7:38 (“Suffer them not to continue any longer”—“give them not an abode”). Our translators here followed the Vulgate, which has “mansiones “with the exact meaning of the Greek, that is; “resting-places,” “dwellings.” In Elizabethan English the word meant no more than this, and it now means no more in French or in the English of the North. A maison or a manse, is not necessarily a modern English mansion. It should also be noted that the Greek word is the substantive answering to the verb which is rendered “dwelleth” in John 14:10, and “abide” in John 15:4-10. (see Note there).

“Many” is not to be understood, as it often has been, simply or chiefly of different degrees of happiness in heaven. Happiness depends upon the mind which receives it, and must always exist, therefore, in varying degrees, but this is not the prominent thought expressed here, though it may be implied. The words refer rather to the extent of the Father’s house, in which there should be abiding-places for all. There would be no risk of that house being overcrowded like the caravanserai at Bethlehem, or like those in which the Passover pilgrims, as at this very time, found shelter at Jerusalem. Though Peter could not follow Him now, he should hereafter (John 13:36); and for all who shall follow Him there shall be homes.

If it were not so, I would have told you.—These words are not without difficulty, but the simplest, and probably truest, meaning is obtained by reading them as our version does. They become then an appeal to our Lord’s perfect candour in dealing with the disciples. He had revealed to them a Father and a house. That revelation implies a home for all. Were there not “many mansions” the fulness of His teaching could have had no place. Had there been limitations He must have marked them out.

I go to prepare a place for you.—The better MSS. read, “For I . .,” connecting the clause with the earlier part of the verse. He is going away to prepare a place for them; and this also proves the existence of the home. There is to be then no separation; He is to enter within the veil, but it is to be as Forerunner on our behalf (Hebrews 6:20). “When Thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death, Thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.
my
2 Corinthians 5:1; Hebrews 11:10,14-16; 13:14; Revelation 3:12,21; 21:10-27
if
12:25,26; 16:4; Luke 14:26-33; Acts 9:16; 1 Thessalonians 3:3,4; 5:9; 2 Thessalonians 1:4-10; Titus 1:2; Revelation 1:5
I go
13:33,36; 17:24; Hebrews 6:20; 9:8,23-26; 11:16; Revelation 21:2
Reciprocal: Genesis 45:10 - be near;  Genesis 47:11 - Rameses;  Joshua 3:6 - Take up;  Joshua 19:51 - These are;  Psalm 45:8 - ivory;  Psalm 115:16 - heaven;  Psalm 131:2 - myself;  Song of Solomon 1:4 - the king;  Zechariah 3:7 - I will;  Matthew 25:34 - prepared;  Luke 9:27 - I tell;  Luke 14:22 - and yet;  John 10:4 - he goeth;  John 14:4 - whither;  John 20:17 - I ascend;  2 Thessalonians 2:14 - to

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

The Prepared Place

John 14:2

There are two remarkable things about this statement. First of all, that the master should prepare for the servant. This upsets the ordinary course of procedure. You are expecting to entertain some chosen friends. All your appointments are made; you have sent before your face servants in whom you have confidence, and have told them to do as you have commanded, that all things may be in readiness for the invited guests. This is customary; this is considered right. But Jesus Christ says to his servants—such poor, incomplete, and blundering servants too—"I, your Lord and Master, go to prepare a place for you." This is quite in keeping with the method which Jesus Christ adopted in his ministry. This is no exceptional instance of condescension, self-ignoring, self-humiliation. "He took a towel, girded himself, and began to wash his disciples" feet." And having finished this lowly exhibition, he said, "If I, then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet, ye ought also to wash one another"s feet. I have given you an example." So his whole life was a humiliation. Wherever he was on earth he was, so to speak, out of place; if his method be measured by his original and essential dignity, his whole life was a stoop, his whole ministry a Godlike condescension. Song of Solomon, why did we begin our discourse by saying it was a remarkable thing that the servant should be prepared for by the Master? Only remarkable when looked at in the light of our little standards and false relations; but quite in keeping, perfectly and purely in harmony, with that divine condescension which marked, ruled, and glorified our dear Christ"s ministry.

The second remarkable thing about the text Isaiah,—That the divine Being, God the Song of Solomon, should ever have occasion to "prepare" anything. To prepare may signify to get ready, to put things in order, to look after arrangements, appointments, and the like, so as to have all things in due proportion and relation, that the eye may be pleased, that the ear may be satisfied, and that all our desires may be met and fulfilled. Why, Jesus Christ talks in the text as if there was a great deal of work for him to do somewhere, and he must make haste and get it done. Go to prepare? Can he who fills infinitude and breathes eternity have anything to do in the way of arranging and ordering and getting things ready for his servants? He accommodates himself to our modes of thinking. He does not always throw the infinite at us. He often steps out of his tabernacle of glory and talks our own speech,—makes a child of himself that he may be understood in this little rickety nursery of a world. He knows we are all in the cradle still; that the mightiest speaker amongst us is only a lisping babbler, and that he must continually break up his words and turn himself downwards, in order that he may convey the very dimmest hint of his unutterable meaning!

There are some things which the Master only can do. Will you go and prepare summer for us? You might try. You have seen half a hundred summers: now you go, and try to make the fifty-first! Come! You are an artificer; you have the organ of form largely developed; you have an eye for beauty; you can buy oils and paints and colours and canvas and brushes of all kinds. Why do you not go and prepare summer for us? The great Master, looking down upon this little under-world of his—this basement story of his great building—says, "I am going to prepare the summer for you." And he makes no noise, he makes no mistake in his colours, never gets things into discord. He continually renews the face of the earth, and not a man in all the busy boastful world can do it! If the servant cannot prepare the summer, how could he prepare heaven? If the saint exhausts himself when he lights a candle, how could ho fill the great heavens with the morning that should never melt into sunset?

Observe, therefore, that always the servant has to wait for the master. He can only go as he has example set before him. The servant has no original ideas. The servant is not a voice,—only an echo, muddled, indistinct. I would that we could reflect very deeply on that point,—that every now and then in life we have to stand back, and let the Master go out before us. We can do a hundred and fifty little things, and multiply the hundred and fifty by ten, and double that number, and we actually get into the notion at last that we can do anything. When you have made one little rosebud, advertise it, and we will come and look at it. When you have made one new plant, let us hear where it is to be seen, and we shall examine it. "Canst thou command the morning?" "Canst loose the bands of Orion?" Art thou known by the Pleiades? Canst thou open the gate of the Milky Way? What art thou?

This text gives three intensely gratifying, comforting, and inspiring views of the Christian believer"s position and destiny. The Christian believer is the object of Jesus Christ"s zealous and tender care. When Jesus Christ was going away he said to his wondering disciples, "It is expedient for you that I go." When he addressed them on the occasion of the text he said, "I go to prepare a place for myself"? No! "For you." And the Apostle Paul, catching his Master"s sublime tone, said, "All things are yours." And Peter, thunder-tongued, cried out, "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance incorruptible and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you!" Yet we hang our heads, and moan and cry and fret and chafe as if we had nothing, not knowing that a man"s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth.

Wherever you find Jesus Christ you find him working for his people,—doing something for those who believe in him and love him. "He ever liveth to make intercession for us." There is a beautiful necessity of love about this arrangement. For if he were to fail here,—fail in training, educating, sanctifying the Church,—he would fail altogether. What if he has made countless millions of stars: can the stars talk to him? Can he get back the idea which he gave? Can he have sympathy with form, substance, glory, majesty, as found in mere matter? If he does not get us—poor, broken things—right into his blue, glad heaven, he has failed! That is the one work which he set himself to do. If he drops one poor little child out of his great arms because he has not capacity and strength, he could never be happy in his heaven. Think of this: Christ always thinking for us, caring for us, going out in all the passion of his love after us, and then say whether the Church ought always to have tears in her eyes and never to have peace in her heart?

Not only are Christian believers constant objects of Jesus Christ"s most zealous and tender care, but they are to be eternally his joy. "I go to prepare a place for you." The plain meaning of that Isaiah,—Fellowship, residence together in common. He said afterwards, "And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I Amos, there ye may be also"—giving us the idea of permanence, continuity of residence, and fellowship. We do some things for the moment. It is enough for God if he limits April to thirty days; he does not want it on the thirty-first day; it ceases, and goes back into his great heaven, and May begins. He does not bring back any one year that has passed, and say, "There, I have brushed it up for you, and made the best of it I can: you must try it again." No. He takes the years, blows them away; creates new ones; never gives you an old leaf, or tells you to put a faded flower into water and try to restore its colours and its fragrance again. "He is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think." "He fainteth not, neither is weary." As for these heavens, he will one day dismiss them. He will create a new heaven and a new earth. He will burn up and utterly destroy what he has made. He makes some things for the time being; but wherever we read of the place prepared for Christian believers, we have the idea of continuous, enduring time—never-ending fellowship. All true life is in the heart. Love alone is immortal. "God is love." We shall drop argument, logic, controversy, letters, technicalities, pedantries of all sorts, tongues, prophecies, hope, faith itself, and only Love shall live for ever!

The world is made poor whenever it loses pathos. Whenever the emotional goes down, man goes down. Logic is but intermediate help; it is but a poor ladder compared to heart, love, pathos, sensibility. Love must endure as God endureth. This is it which binds Christ and Christians—love. Love is knowledge. Love hath the key of interpretation. Love can explain what learning can never fathom. Love knoweth the Lord afar off,—beyond the stormy deep, in the far-away desert, in the night-time dark and cold. Love can see the invisible, and touch the distant. Do we love Christ, or are we still in the beggarly region of mere controversy and cold intellectual inquiry? If we love him we shall be with him for ever.

Seeing that Christ makes the Christian believer the object of his constant and zealous care, and that the Christian believer shall be for ever with his Lord, the Christian is entitled to look at the present through the medium of the future. The more we can bring the power of this love to bear upon the passing moments, we can look into the things which are seen and at the things which are not seen, and step out of eternity morning by morning, do our little paltry day"s work, and go back again into God"s pavilion. If in this life only we have hope, we are of all men most miserable. For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, an house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. Moses endured as seeing the invisible. Jesus Christ teaches this most beautiful doctrine: That the Christian heart is not to be troubled, because in his Father"s house are many mansions. So he brings down heaven to help up earth. He says, "When you are weary of the present, look forward to the future; when the road is steep and difficult and tortuous, think of the end and be thankful and glad." It is by this power we draw ourselves onward. We lay the hands of our expectant love on the golden bars of heaven and draw ourselves forward thereby. Some will know what I mean by that expression. You who have been in sickness and sorrow and loss—you who have been tired of looking downwards, and feel the very heart dying within you, when you saw nothing but this earth"s narrow circumference, and then have had sudden visions of God"s eternity and Christ"s blessed immortality, you draw on yourself through all the care and sorrow and bitterness and unrest of time by loving, intelligent anticipation of eternity.

Now, if Christ has gone to prepare a place for the Christian believer—what then? The place will be worthy of himself. Send a poor creature to prepare a place for you against to-morrow, and the place will be prepared according to the capacity and resources of the messenger. It is a poor person who has gone to prepare a place for you, therefore you will not see gold and silver, you will not have a sumptuous reception; but if the poor person has done all that she could, it is enough. You will see the intent of the preparation everywhere; every speck of dust that has been removed means, "I would put down gold there if I could." Every little thing, even a wild flower out of the hedgerow, put into a little glass that can hardly stand, means, "I would give you paradise, if I could." Every little deed that is done ought to be amplified by your grateful love, because it means so much more than it looks. But Jesus Christ says, ""I go to prepare a place for you. I have made worlds, stars, planets, comets; I have sent forth the lightning and uttered the thunder. Now I am going to do my greatest deed of all. I am going to get a place ready for those whom I have bought with my blood and glorified by my Spirit." What kind of place will he get ready for us, who has all things at command,—when the silver and the gold are his, when he can speak light and command worlds to fashion themselves and shine upon his children? What kind of place will he get ready? You like to be prepared for. If the person preparing for you is poor, you take every little deed as a great deed. If the person preparing for you has ample resources and receives you as if—"Really, well, you have come after all; but, at the same time, it would have been quite as well if you had lost your way,"—you naturally feel indignant, dissatisfied, resentful, because it might have been done nobly. Jesus Christ has gone to prepare a place. We judge men by the capacity of their resources. We have seen what he has done. If he has loved us with unutterable love, he will enrich us with inconceivable glory. The riches which he has are called "the unsearchable riches of Christ." "Eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, nor hath it entered into the heart of man to conceive, what God hath prepared." "Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you."

Preparation implies an interest in us, an expectation of us. He is waiting for his guests; he will open the door presently, and we shall go straight in. God has prepared nothing for the bad man. There is a place,—the pit of damnation, the worm that dieth not, and the fire that is not quenched! But it was not prepared for him. It was prepared, Christ says, for "the devil and his angels." That is the only place he has for the bad man! He made no preparation for him,—thought, perhaps, that at the very last moment he might turn and say, "God be merciful to me a sinner!" Christ did not get anything ready for you! All that there is is the devil"s pit—never, never got ready for man—man who was redeemed by the precious blood of Christ!

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Parker, Joseph. "Commentary on John 14:2". The People's Bible by Joseph Parker. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jpb/john-14.html. 1885-95.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

John 14:2

"In my Father"s house are many mansions; if it were not Song of Solomon, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you."John 14:2

O that we could lift our eyes to those blest abodes, those mansions of heavenly bliss, where no sorrow intrudes, where sin is unknown, where tears are wiped from off all faces, where there is no languishing body, no wasting sickness, no pining soul, no doubt, fear, darkness or distress; but one unmingled scene of happiness and pleasure, and the whole soul and body are engaged in singing the praises of God and the Lamb! And what crowns the whole, there is the eternal enjoyment of those pleasures which are at the right hand of God for evermore. But how lost are we in the contemplation of these things; and though our imagination may seem to stretch itself beyond the utmost conception of the mind, into the countless ages of a never-ending eternity, yet are we baffled with the thought, though faith embraces the blessed truth. But in that happy land, the immortal soul and the immortal body will combine their powers and faculties to enjoy to the uttermost all that God has prepared for those that love him.

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on John 14:2". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 2. "In My Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you."

The Father's house is His heavenly abode. Comp. Deuteronomy 26:15, "Look down from Thy holy habitation, from heaven, and bless Thy people Israel;" Isaiah 63:15, "Look down from heaven, and behold from the habitation of Thy holiness;" Psalms 33:13-14, "The Lord looketh down from heaven: He beholdeth all the sons of men. From the place of His habitation He looketh upon all the inhabitants of the earth;" 2 Chronicles 30:27, "Then prayer came up to His holy dwelling-place, even to heaven." Comp. further, Psalms 20:7; Psalms 68:6; Jeremiah 25:30. The earthly Temple, the tabernacle of congregation, the place where God is wont to hold communion with His people, where He dwells upon earth and receives His people as guests, has its antitype in heaven: comp. Psalms 11:4; Hebrews 9:24; Revelation 7:15; Revelation 11:19; Revelation 14:15. There the supreme God, who in all times and in all places is the dwelling-place of His people,—whether upon earth or in heaven, Psalms 90:1; Deuteronomy 33:27,—has His sacred abode, in which He dwells not alone, but receives to Himself all His saints after the cares and the conflicts of life.

"Many mansions:" so there is room there for you all, when the prince of this world shall leave you no more place upon earth: comp. ἔτι τόπος ἐστί, "yet there is room," Luke 14:22. Luther: "If they will not suffer you to be citizens and neighbours, or even guests, but would have all the world for themselves, let them have the world, but know that ye shall nevertheless have mansions enough." Many the mansions must be, since the Father's house will contain not only the multitude which no man can number, Revelation 7:9, of the saints made perfect, Hebrews 12:23, but also the ten thousands of angels, Deuteronomy 33:2; Hebrews 12:22. Allusion to the many gradations of dignity in that future life (Augustin: Multae mansiones diversas meritorum in una vita aeterna significant dignitates) introduces a discordant and foreign element into the passage. Here we can think only of what is common to all: if the earth has no more place for you, there is room enough in heaven. The phraseology reminds us of Genesis 24:23; Genesis 24:25. To the servant's question, "Is there room in thy father's house for us to lodge in?" Rebekah answers, "We have both straw and provender enough, and room to lodge in." The allusion can be the less doubted, inasmuch as what follows, "I go to prepare a place for you," stands in undeniable relation to that narrative: comp. ver. 31, where Laban says, "Come in, thou blessed of the Lord; wherefore standest thou without? for I have prepared the house." Sept. ἐγὼ δὲ ἡτοίμακα τὴν οἰκίαν. We see from such an allusion as this, what high value the Old Testament had in the Saviour's estimation. From a matter of common history there He derives here the words for the presentation of a supremely important truth. There is a real parallel, though not verbal, with these many mansions, in Matthew 25:34, where Jesus speaks of that kingdom which had been prepared for the blessed of the Father from the foundation of the world.

"If it were not so, I would have told you," is, in another form, the same as "Verily, verily, I say unto you," in ver. 12. The disciples might absolutely rely upon it; and in this confidence might count it for nothing that the earth seemed to have no more place for them,—comp. ch. John 16:2; Revelation 13:17,—and that the cry, ἆρον, ἆρον, John 19:15, was lifted up on all sides against them. For He who gave them this assurance was the only True Being

He of whom it is written, "There was no guile found in His mouth," Isaiah 53:9, comp. 1 Peter 3:22; and who assuredly would not deceive His disciples with fallacious hopes. Heaven is an unknown land. It will be hard for men to obtain it by letters of commendation. If these are to have any value, the person who issues them must be absolutely confident, and enjoy an unlimited amount of personal confidence. Anton: "Here He speaks to His intimates. So great was their faith, that they believed what Christ said must be true, however hard they might find the application of it."

There can be no doubt that after "I would have told you" there must be interposed a period. If the connection is made, "If it were not so, I would have told you that I go to prepare a place," the going away to prepare a place is declared to be needless. But, according to ver. 3, Christ does actually go to prepare it. The ὅτι πορεύομαι, which is found in some considerable manuscripts, sprang from a false punctuation, and with a more correct punctuation must vanish. If we place a period after εἶπον ἂν ὑμῖν, the on, can be justified only by a forced interpretation. That Christ goes away to prepare a place, is no apparent reason why there exist many mansions.

That the fact of there being many mansions does not exclude the Lord's work in preparing them, may be illustrated by the narrative of the patriarchal times, already referred to. Rebekah had said, "There is room to lodge in;" and yet Laban afterwards, "I have prepared the house, and room for the camels." The room may be there; but before it can be occupied, obstacles must be removed, and arrangements made.

In what way did our Lord provide a place for His people? He tells us Himself, in ch. John 16:10. By His departure to the Father He obtained that righteousness which is the essential condition of entrance into the Father's house. By the propitiatory virtue of His sacrifice of His life for the sheep, ch. John 10:11, the partition between heaven and earth was done away. Eternal life was won, when Christ, the antitype of the brazen serpent in the wilderness, took sin upon Himself, and expiated it as a substitute, ch. John 3:15. But with the atoning sufferings there was connected, in order to the preparation of heavenly places, the resurrection and ascension of the Redeemer. He must first enter as our πρόδρομος, our Forerunner, into eternal glory, Hebrews 6:20. The Head must be in heaven before the members can enter there. To be in heaven is to be with Christ. We can conceive of the glory of believers only as the participation in His glory, as their assumption into glorious fellowship with Him.

Our entrance into the glory of heaven being thus made so entirely dependent upon Christ, His atoning sacrifice and entrance into glory, it follows, that in the times before the Christian economy this entrance was not fully opened, and that the pious of the Old Testament were only in a state of preparation. Christ first perfectly abolished death, and brought life and immortality to light, 2 Timothy 1:10. The paradise in which, according to Luke 23:43, the penitent thief was to be with Christ, was opened first by Him.

He who receives and retains in his heart the full force of this text, must attain to an estimate of temporal things quite different from that which is held by the world. He has in himself an inalienable heritage which infinitely transcends all earthly good. St Basil, when the prefect of the Arian emperor threatened that he would persecute him by land and sea, and tauntingly asked him where he would abide then, said, with allusion to this passage, "Either under heaven or in heaven." Luther answered Cardinal Cajetan in a similar way: "If the earth has no place for me, yet heaven will."

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:2". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

2.In my Father’s house are many dwellings. As the absence of Christ was a cause of grief, he declares that he does not, go away in such a. manner as to remain separate from them, since there is room for them also in the heavenly kingdom. For it was proper that he should remove the suspicion from their minds, that, when Christ ascended to the Father, he left his disciples on earth without taking any farther notice of them. This passage has been erroneously interpreted in another sense, as if Christ taught that’ there are various degrees of honor in the heavenly kingdom; for he says, that the mansions are many, not that they are different or unlike, but that there are enough of them for a great number of persons; as if he had said, that there is room not only for himself, but also for all his disciples.

And if it were not so, I would have told you. Here commentators differ. Some read these words as closely connected with what goes before: “If the dwellings had not been already prepared, I would have said that I go before you to prepare them.” But I rather agree with those who render it thus: “If the heavenly glory had awaited me only, I would not have deceived you. I would have told you that there was no room for any one but myself in my Father’s house. But the case is widely different; for I go before, to prepare a place for you.” The context, in my opinion, demands that we read it in this manner; for it follows immediately afterwards, If I go to prepare a place for you. By these words Christ intimates that the design of his departure is, to prepare a place for his disciples. In a word, Christ did not ascend to heaven in a private capacity, to dwell there alone, but rather that it might be the common inheritance of all the godly, and that in this way the Head might be united to his members.

But a question arises, What was the condition of the fathers after death, before Christ ascended to heaven? For the conclusion usually drawn is, that believing souls were shut up in an intermediate state or prison, because Christ says that, by his ascension into heaven, the place will be prepared. But the answer is easy. This place is said to be prepared for the day of the resurrection; for by nature mankind are banished from the kingdom of God, but the Son, who is the only heir of heaven, took possession of it in their name, that through him we may be permitted to enter; for in his person we already possess heaven by hope, as Paul informs us, (Ephesians 1:3.) Still we will not enjoy this great blessing, until he come from heaven the second time. The condition of the fathers after death, therefore, is not here distinguished from ours; because Christ has prepared both for them and for us a place, into which he will receive us all at the last day. Before reconciliation had been made, believing souls were, as it were, placed on a watch-tower, looking for the promised redemption, and now they enjoy a blessed rest, until the redemption be finished.

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:2". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.