Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:3

If I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself, that where I am, there you may be also.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Heaven;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Righteous;   Scofield Reference Index - Christ;   Saints;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ's;   Coming, Second Coming of Christ;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   I Will's of Christ;   In Christ's Presence;   Joys, Family;   Morning Glories, Seven;   Presence, in Christ's;   Rewards at Advent;   Second Coming of Christ;   Seven;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Fear;   Jesus Christ;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Reward of Saints, the;   Second Coming of Christ, the;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Jesus christ;   Thomas;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Ascension of Jesus Christ;   Citizenship;   Eternal Life, Eternality, Everlasting Life;   Immortality;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Heaven;   Holy Ghost;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Hope;   Second Coming, the;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ascension;   Children (Sons) of God;   English Versions;   Ethics;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Character;   Children of God;   Coming Again;   Communion (2);   Consciousness;   Dead, the ;   Father's House ;   Gospel (2);   Heaven;   Incarnation (2);   John, Gospel of (Ii. Contents);   Life ;   Messenger;   Parousia;   Presence;   Redemption (2);   Spirit ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Advent, Second;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Christ, the Exaltation of;   Immortal;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for April 2;   Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for December 9;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 1;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And if I go - And when I shall have gone and prepared a place for you - opened the kingdom of an eternal glory for your reception, and for the reception of all that shall die in the faith, I will come again, after my resurrection, and give you the fullest assurances of this state of blessedness; and confirm you in the faith, by my grace and the effusion of my Spirit. Dr. Lightfoot thinks, and with great probability too, that there is an allusion here to Numbers 10:33; : And the ark of the Lord went before them to search out a resting place for them.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And if I go and prepare a place for you, I come again, and will receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.

And if I go ... is not a statement of uncertainty but an argument that, as certainly as the Lord shall go, that certainly will he return and receive his own.

I come again ... The second coming of Jesus is dogmatically affirmed here and throughout the New Testament. As Dorris said:

Some refer this to the resurrection of Christ, others to the death of a believer as in the case of Stephen, and still others to the coming of the Holy Spirit. We think these positions inadmissible. The reference is not to Christ's return from the grave, but to his return from heaven, the second coming of the Lord, which is a part of the Christian faith.[3]

THE SECOND ADVENT

Not only here but in Acts 1:11; 3:21; 2 Thessalonians 4:13-17, etc., the doctrine of the second coming of Christ is emphatically taught, the same being one of the foundational teachings of Christianity.

I. What Christ will not do upon his return. A. He will not offer himself a second time for the sins of the world (Hebrews 9:26-28). B. He will not restore any phase of fleshly or national Israel. The Scripture makes it absolutely clear that race is nothing with God (Galatians 3:27). C. He will not set up a kingdom, having already done that, the church being his kingdom. It has existed continuously since the first Pentecost after the resurrection, and wherever the Lord's Supper is, there is the kingdom (Luke 22:30). D. He will not extend a second chance for unbelievers to repent (Hebrews 9:27).

II. What Christ will do upon his return. A. All the dead shall be raised to life (John 5:24-29). B. The judgment will occur (John 5:24-29; Matthew 25:31-36). C. The wicked shall be destroyed and the righteous rewarded (2 Thessalonians 1:7-10). D. The crown of life shall be given to the faithful (2 Timothy 4:7,8). E. Christ will stop reigning, delivering up the kingdom to God (1 Corinthians 15:28).

III. What Christ is now doing. A. He is reigning until all of his enemies have been put under foot (1 Corinthians 15:25f). B. He is interceding for the redeemed (Hebrews 7:25). D. He is administering all authority in heaven and upon earth (Matthew 28:18-20). E. He is providentially overseeing the fortunes of his church on earth (Matthew 28:19,20). F. He is preparing a home for the faithful (John 14:3).

ENDNOTE:

[3] C. E. W. Dorris, A Commentary on the Gospel by John (Nashville: The Gospel Advocate Co., 1939), p. 200.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And if I go and prepare a place for you,.... Seeing I am going to prepare, and will prepare a place for you, of the truth of which you may be fully assured:

I will come again; either by death or in person a second time, here on earth:

and receive you unto myself; I will take you up with me to heaven; I will receive you into glory;

that where I am there you may be also: and behold my glory, and be for ever with me, and never part more.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

2 And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will c come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, [there] ye may be also.

(2) Christ did not go away from us with the intent of forsaking us, but rather that he might eventually take us up with him into heaven.

(c) These words are to be understood as being said to the whole Church, and therefore the angels said to the disciples when they were astonished, "Why do you stand gazing up into heaven? This Jesus will so come as you saw him go up", (Acts 1:11). And in all places of the Scripture the full comfort of the Church is considered to be that day when God will be all in all, and is therefore called the day of redemption.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 14:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I will come again and receive you unto myselfstrictly, at His Personal appearing; but in a secondary and comforting sense, to each individually. Mark again the claim made: - to come again to receive His people to Himself, that where He is there they may be also. He thinks it ought to be enough to be assured that they shall be where He is and in His keeping.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-14.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

I will come again, and receive you unto myself. The reference is not to Christ's return from the grave, but to a return from heaven, the second coming of the Lord, which is a part of the Christian faith. Compare 1 Thessalonians 4:17; Philemon 1:23.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:3". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

If I go (εαν πορευτωean poreuthō). Third-class condition (εανean and first aorist passive subjunctive of πορευομαιporeuomai).

And prepare (και ετοιμασωkai hetoimasō). Same condition and first aorist active subjunctive of the same verb ετοιμαζωhetoimazō

I come again
(παλιν ερχομαιpalin erchomai). Futuristic present middle, definite promise of the second coming of Christ.

And will receive you unto myself
(και παραλημπσομαι υμας προς εμαυτονkai paralēmpsomai humas pros emauton). Future middle of παραλαμβανωparalambanō Literally, “And I shall take you along (παραpara -) to my own home” (cf. John 13:36). This blessed promise is fulfilled in death for all believers who die before the Second Coming. Jesus comes for us then also.

That where I am there ye may be also
(ινα οπου ειμι εγω και υμεις ητεhina hopou eimi egō kai humeis ēte). Purpose clause with ιναhina and present active subjunctive of ειμιeimi This the purpose of the departure and the return of Christ. And this is heaven for the believer to be where Jesus is and with him forever.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

If I go ( ἐὰν πορευθῶ )

Πορεύομαι , go, of going with a definite object. See on John 8:21.

I will come again ( πάλιν ἔρχομαι )

The present tense; I come, so Rev. Not to be limited to the Lord's second and glorious coming at the last day, nor to any special coming, such as Pentecost, though these are all included in the expression; rather to be taken of His continual coming and presence by the Holy Spirit. “Christ is, in fact, from the moment of His resurrection, ever coming into the world and to the Church, and to men as the risen Lord” (Westcott).

And receive ( παραλήψομαι )

Here the future tense, will receive. Rev., therefore, much better: I come again and will receive you. The change of tense is intentional, the future pointing to the future personal reception of the believer through death. Christ is with the disciple alway, continually “coming” to him, unto the end of the world. Then He will receive him into that immediate fellowship, where he “shall see Him as He is.” The verb παραλαμβάνω is used in the New Testament of taking along with (Matthew 4:5, note; Matthew 17:1, note; Acts 16:33, note): of taking to (Matthew 1:20; John 14:3): of taking from, receiving by transmission; so mostly in Paul (Galatians 1:12; Colossians 2:6; Colossians 4:17; 1 Thessalonians 2:13, etc. See also Matthew 24:40, Matthew 24:41). It is scarcely fanciful to see the first two meanings blended in the use of the verb in this passage. Jesus, by the Spirit, takes His own along with Him through life, and then takes them to His side at death. He himself conducts them to Himself.

I am

See on John 7:34.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And if I go and prepare a place for you, I come again1, and will receive you unto myself; that where I am, [there] ye may be also.

  1. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I come again. The cause for the departure becomes the assurance of the return.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:3". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

И когда пойду (И если пойду). Условный союз надо разуметь как обстоятельство времени. Как если бы Христос сказал: После того, как Я уйду, снова возвращусь к вам. Кроме того, возвращение не следует понимать здесь как сказанное о Святом Духе. Словно Христос явил ученикам новое присутствие в виде Духа. Верно, что Он обитает с нами и в нас через Свой Дух, но здесь говорится о последнем судном дне, когда Он придет собрать Своих людей. Действительно, Христос ежедневно готовит для нас место, если иметь в виду всю Его Церковь. Отсюда следует: день нашего окончательного восшествия на небеса еще не настал.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 3. "And if I shall have gone and prepared a place for you, I will come again and take you to myself, that where I am, there you may be also."

The place being once assured and prepared for them, they must be brought to reach it. It is He who will also charge Himself with this office. The rejection of καί, and, before ἑτοιμάσω in some MSS. ("and when I shall have gone, I will prepare") would introduce an unnatural and even absurd asyndetonbetween the idea of preparing and that of returning which follows, and would at the same time lead to a complete tautology with the preceding sentence. The reading ἑτοιμᾶσαι, to prepare, is a further correction which was rendered almost indispensable by the rejection of the καί .

To the two verbs: "when I shall have gone and shall have prepared," correspond the two verbs of the principal clause: I will come again (literally, I come again) and I will take you to myself. The present I come again indicates imminence. Notwithstanding this, Origen and other Fathers, Calvin, Lampe, and, among the moderns, Hofmann, Luthardt, Meyer, Weiss, and Keil, refer this term to the final and glorious coming of the Lord. Undoubtedly this promise is addressed to believers in general, but it has in view, nevertheless, first of all, the disciples personally, whom Jesus wishes to strengthen in their present disheartenment; and He consoles them, it is said, by means of an event which no one of them has seen and which is still future at this hour! In thus explaining the word I come, it is forgotten that Jesus never affirmed the nearness of His Parousia, and that, indeed, He rather gave an indication of the opposite: "As the bridegroom delays his coming" (Matthew 25:5); "If the master comes in the second watch, or if he comes in the third" (Luke 12:38); "At evening or at midnight or at the cock-crowing or in the morning" (Mark 13:35); comp. also the parables of the leaven and the grain of mustard seed. Moreover, we have the authentic explanation of this word come in John 14:18, where, as Weiss acknowledges, it cannot be applied to the Parousia.

Ebrard thinks that the point in question is theresurrection of Jesus. But the true reunion, after the separation caused by the death of Jesus, did not yet take place at the resurrection. The appearances of the Lord were transient; their design was simply, through faith in the resurrection, to prepare for the coming of the Spirit. Grotius, Reuss, Lange, Hengstenberg, and Keil refer the wordcome to the return of Jesus at the death of each believer; comp. the vision of Stephen. But in John 14:18 this sense is altogether impossible, and no example can be cited, not even John 21:23, where it would lead to an intolerable tautology. This coming refers, therefore, as has been recognized by Lucke, Olshausen, Neander, to the return of Jesus through the Holy Spirit, to the close and indissoluble union formed thereby between the disciple and the glorified person of Jesus; comp. all that follows in John 14:17; John 14:19-21; John 14:23; especially John 14:18, which is the explanation of our: I come again. Weiss alleges against our view that the question here is of a personal return. We defer this to John 14:18.—The following verb: I will take you to myself, indicates another fact, which will be the result of this spiritual preparation.

This is the introduction of the believer into the Father"s house, at the end of his earthly career, either at the moment of his death, or at that of the Parousia, if he lives until that time. καί, and, has the sense of and consesequently, or of, and afterwards, as is indicated by the contrast between the present (I come) and the future (I will take). This will be the entrance of the believer, prepared by spiritual communion with Jesus, into the abode secured for him by the mediation of this same Jesus. πρὸς ἐμαυτόν, to myself (John 12:32); He presses him to His heart, so to speak, while bearing him away. There is an infinite tenderness in these last words. It is for Himself that He seems to rejoice in and look to this moment which will put an end to all separation: "That where I am, there you may be also;" comp. John 17:24. The community of place ("there where") implies that of state.Otherwise the return of Jesus in spirit would not be necessary in order to prepare in each particular case this reunion. What touching simplicity and what dramatic vivacity in the expression of these ideas, so profound and so new! The Father"s house, the preparation of the dwelling-place, the coming to find, finally the taking to Himself, this familiar and almost childlike language resembles sweet music by which Jesus seeks to alleviate the agony of separation in the minds of the apostles. Thus ends the first conversation, called forth by the question of Peter: "Why cannot I follow thee?" Answer: "Even thy martyrdom would not be sufficient to this end; my return in the Spirit into thy heart: this is the condition of thy entrance into my heavenly glory." Comp. John 3:5.

But Jesus observes that many questions were still rising in their minds, that their hearts were a prey to many doubts, and, in order to incite them to ask Him, He throws out to their ignorance a sort of challenge, by saying to them:

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-14.html.

Scofield's Reference Notes

receive you unto myself

This promise of a second advent of Christ is to be distinguished from His return in glory to the earth; it is the first intimation in Scripture of "the day of Christ". (See Scofield "1 Corinthians 1:8"). Here He comes for His saints 1 Thessalonians 4:14-17 there Matthew 24:29; Matthew 24:30. He come to judge the nations, etc.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 14:3". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-14.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

3 And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.

Ver. 3. I will come again, &c.] Oh, look up and long for this "consolation of Israel;" say as Sisera’s mother, "Why are his chariots" (those clouds) "so long in coming?"

" Heu pietas ubi prisca? profana o tempora! Mundi

Fax! Vesper! prope Nox! o mora! Christe veni."

There may ye be also] Christ counts not himself full till he have all his members about him: hence the Church is called "the fulness of him that filleth all things," Ephesians 1:23.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 14:3

With Christ for Ever

I. This whole passage is beautifully calculated to place in their right proportions that hope which every one feels of meeting again in heaven those that are gone before us, and the one all-satisfying anticipation of being with Christ. I feel persuaded that many are far too much afraid of dwelling on the idea of our knowing and loving and enjoying one another again in the future state. I believe, if rightly understood, the danger lies more on the side of thinking of it too little, than of magnifying it too much. Are we not to know all things—to know even as we are known, and if all things, then certainly one another?

II. But perhaps the real mistake and confusion of thought is in this, that we do not connect and identify the saints, as we ought to do, with Christ. Now it is a deep mystery, but it is a most certain fact, that Christ is not a complete Christ without His members. We know and admire Christ in every one of His members, and every one of His members in Christ, and so the very fact of the rejoining of the departed, which some think to be contravened by the text, is by the text promoted and established, and is actually in the words when Christ says, "That where I am, there ye may be also."

III. The nearest approach we can make to the idea of glory lies, I think, in the text. Let any child of God take what Christ's felt presence has been to his soul, in its most favoured season of spiritual communion. Let him conceive that sweet ecstasy rid of its clogs—multiplied a thousand-fold, and perpetuated for ever—and then this, not any picture of colour or shape, place or circumstance, will be the closest approximation he can make to a true imagination of the heavenly state. He will see how independent everlasting happiness becomes of those things of which the natural heart generally makes it to consist; and how there is enough, and more than enough, for eternity in that single assurance, "Where I am, there ye shall be also."

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 5th series, p. 31.


Reference: John 14:5, John 14:6.—H. P. Liddon, Christmastide Sermons, p. 18.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:3. I will come again, and receive you The idea of a fore-runner is preserved, who, after he had prepared for the entertainment of a guest, used to return, in order to introduce him into the house where the preparations were made for him. This coming ultimately refers to Christ's solemn appearance at the last day, to receive at his servants to glory; yet it is a beautiful circumstance, that the death of every particular believer, considering the universal power and providence of Christ, may be regarded as Christ's coming to fetch him home. See the note on Luke 12:37 -

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:3". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

3.] On ἐάν (not ‘when,’ here or any where), see note, ch. John 12:32. Here there is no translation of feeling: only in the extract from Hermann there, we may read ‘experientiâ (vestrâ) cognoscetur.’

In order to understand this, we must bear in mind what Stier well calls the ‘perspective’ of prophecy. The coming again of the Lord is not one single act,—as His resurrection, or the descent of the Spirit, or His second personal advent, or the final coming to judgment; but the great complex of all these, the result of which shall be, His taking His people to Himself to be where He is. This ἔρχομαι, is begun (John 14:18) in His Resurrection—carried on (John 14:23) in the spiritual life (see also ch. John 16:22 f.), the making them ready for the place prepared;—-further advanced when each by death is fetched away to be with Him (Philippians 1:23); fully completed at His coming in glory, when they shall for ever be with Him (1 Thessalonians 4:17) in the perfected resurrection state.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:3". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:3. ἐάν, if) A mild particle, used for ὅταν, when.— ἔρχομαι, I come [am coming]) The Present, as concerning His speedy coming: John 14:18, “I will not leave you comfortless; I come to you.” It is a peculiar idiom of speech, that the Lord is not wont to say, I will come, but I come, even when another verb in the future tense is added. Comp., however, also Matthew 17:11 concerning the forerunner [ ἡλίας ἔρχεται, καὶ ἀποκαταστήσει πάντα], and the LXX., 2 Samuel 5:3 [ ἔρχονταιοἱ πρεσβύτεροικαὶ διέθετο αὐτοῖς βασιλεύς].— καί, and) The end of My departure infers [carries with it] this very consequence, that I am to come again.— πρὸς ἐμαυτόν, to Myself) An expression full of majesty. The house of the Father is the house of the Son: ch. John 16:15, “All things that the Father hath are Mine;”

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:3". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The particle if in this place denotes no uncertainty of the thing whereof he had before assured them; but in this place hath either the force of although, or after that: When, or after that, I have died, ascended, and by all these acts, as also by my intercession, shall have made places in Heaven fully ready for you, I will in the last day return again, as Judge of the quick and the dead, and take you up into heaven, 1 Thessalonians 4:16,17; that you may be made partakers of my glory, John 17:22. This is called, Romans 8:17, a being glorified together with him; and elsewhere, a reigning with him. So as this is a third argument by which our Lord comforteth his disciples as to their trouble conceived for the want of His bodily presence with them, from the certainty of his return to them, and the end and consequent of his return: the end was to receive them to himself; the consequent, their eternal abiding with Christ where he was.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Come again; the perfect fulfilment of this promise will be at Christ’s second coming, when the bodies of believers, being raised in glory, will be reunited with their spirits, and they received by Christ to the everlasting mansions prepared for them in heaven. But it has also a previous blessed fulfilment to the spirit of each true Christian when he leaves this world. Luke 16:22; Luke 23:43; 2 Corinthians 5:8; Revelation 14:13.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3.Go and prepare a place—Through his death he would open a new and living way (Hebrews 10:20) into the heaven which his merit had purchased.

I will come again—According to the law of prophetic perspective, to which we have so often referred, the Second Advent of our Lord is beheld with clear distinctness in the near distance. For this reason we reject here, as elsewhere, all reference of the coming of the Son of man to the period of death. Nor does the Saviour here refer, as many commentators imagine, to a general spiritual coming, extending along the entire interval to the end of time. The day in which Christ shall come again to take believers home is the day of judgment described in Matthew 24, 25.

Unto myself’ where I am’ ye’ also—Emphatically does our Lord in these terms indicate that the happiness of heaven, both of Christ and his redeemed, will consist in their reunion in love.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The commentators noted that Jesus spoke of several returns for His own in this Gospel. Sometimes Jesus meant His return to the disciples following His resurrection and before His ascension ( John 14:18-20; John 21:1). Other times He meant His coming to them through the Holy Spirit after His ascension and before His bodily return ( John 14:23). [Note: R. H. Gundry, ""In my Father"s House are many Monai" ( John 142)," Zeitschrift fr die Neutestamentliche Wissenschaft58 (1967):68-72.] Still other times He meant His eschatological return at the end of the inter-advent age. Some interpreters view this return as the Rapture and others believe Jesus was referring to the Second Coming. Another view is that Jesus was really speaking about the believer"s death figuratively. [Note: E.g, R. H. Lightfoot, pp275-76.] Many interpreters believe some combination of the above views is most probable. [Note: E.g, Barrett, p457; R. H. Strachen, The Fourth Gospel: Its Significance and Environment, p280; and Westcott, The Gospel ... Greek Text ..., 2:168.]

Since Jesus spoke of returning from heaven to take believers there, the simplest explanation seems to be that He was referring to an eschatological bodily return (cf. Acts 1:11). Though these disciples undoubtedly did not realize it at the time, Jesus was evidently speaking of His return for them at the Rapture rather than His return at the Second Coming.

" John 14:3 is the only verse in the Gospels that is commonly accepted by contemporary pretribulationists and posttribulationists alike as a reference to the rapture." [Note: Wayne A. Brindle, "Biblical Evidence for the Imminence of the Rapture," Bibliotheca Sacra158:630 (April-June2001):139.]

Other Scripture clarifies that when Jesus returns at the Rapture it will be to call His own to heaven immediately ( 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18). John 14:1-3 is one of three key New Testament passages that deal with the Rapture, the others being 1 Corinthians 15:51-53 and 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18. In contrast, when Jesus returns at the Second Coming it will be to remain on the earth and reign for1,000 years ( Revelation 19:11 to Revelation 20:15).

". . . it is important to note that Jesus did not say that the purpose of this future coming to receive believers is so that He can be where they are-on the earth. Instead, He said that the purpose is so that they can be where He Isaiah -in heaven." [Note: Renald E. Showers, Maranatha: Our Lord, Come! A Definitive Study of the Rapture of the Church, p158. Cf1Thessalonians4:17. His entire eighth chapter, pp154-75, deals with this passage and various interpretations of it.]

". . . here in John xiv the Lord gives a new and unique revelation; He speaks of something which no prophet had promised, or even could promise. Where is it written that this Messiah would come and instead of gathering His saints into an earthly Jerusalem, would take them to the Father"s house, to the very place where He is? It is something new.... He speaks then of a coming which is not for the deliverance of the Jewish remnant, not of a coming to establish His kingdom over the earth, not of a coming to judge the nations, but a coming which concerns only His own." [Note: Arno C. Gaebelein, The Gospel of John, p268.]

The emphasis in this prediction is on the comfort that reunion with the departed Savior guarantees (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:18). Jesus will personally come for His own, and He will receive them to Himself. They will also be with Him where He has been (cf. John 17:24). Jesus was stressing His personal concern for His disciples" welfare. His return would be as certain as His departure. The greatest blessing of heaven will be our ceaseless personal fellowship with the Lord Jesus there, not the splendor of the place.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:3. And if I shall have gone and prepared a place for you, I come again, and will receive you unto myself, that where I am there ye also may be. All that has preceded these words has rested upon the idea that, although Jesus is now ‘going away’ to the Father, He is not really forsaking His disciples. Even when in one sense separated from them, in another He will still be with them; and this latter presence will in due time, when they like Him have accomplished their work, be followed by their receiving again that joy of His immediate presence which they are now to lose. This double thought seems to explain the remarkable use of two different tenses of the verb in the second clause of the verse,—‘I come,’ ‘I will receive.’ He is’ wherever His people are: they ‘shall be,’ when their toils are over, wherever He is (comp. chap. John 12:26). The Second Coming of the Lord is not, therefore, resolved by these words into a merely spiritual presence in which He shall be always with His people. The true light in which to look at that great fact is as the manifestation of a presence never far away from us (comp. John 14:18). Our Lord is always with us, though (as we have yet to see) it is in the power of the Spirit that He is so now. He will again Himself, in His own person, be with us, and we with Him, when our work is ‘finished.’

Observe also the change of order in the original in the case of the words ‘I am’ and ‘ye may be,’ the effect being to bring the ‘I’ and the’ ye ‘into the closest juxtaposition (comp. on John 14:1).’

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:3. Neither will He prepare a place and leave them to find their own way to it.— . “If I go”; that is, the commencement of this work as their forerunner was the pledge of its completion. And its completion is effected by His coming again and receiving them to Himself, or “to His own home,” . Cf.John 20:10.— , “I come again and will receive”. The present is used in as if the coming were so certain as to be already begun, cf.John 5:25. For see Song of Solomon 8:2. The promise is fulfilled in the death of the Christian, and it has changed the aspect of death. The personal second coming of Christ is not a frequent theme in this Gospel. The ultimate object of His departure and return is , . Cf.1 Thessalonians 4:17, 2 Corinthians 5:8, Philippians 1:23. The object of Christ’s departure is permanent reunion and the blessedness of the Christian.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:3". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

I will come again: not only by rising the third day, but at your death, and at the day of judgment: that where I am, you also may be, and may receive the reward of eternal happiness in my kingdom.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

if. App-118.

I will come, &c. = again I am coming, and I will receive you.

unto. Greek. pros. App-104.

that = in order that. Greek hires.

yemay be also = ye also may be.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.

And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again - strictly, at His Second Personal Appearing; but, in a secondary and comforting sense, to each individually, when he puts off this tabernacle, sleeping in Jesus, but his spirit "present with the Lord."

And receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also. Mark here again the extent of the claim which Jesus makes-at His Second Coming to receive His people to Himself (see the notes at Ephesians 5:27; Colossians 1:22; Jude 1:24), that where He is, there they may be also. He thinks it quite enough to re-assure them, to say that where He is, there they shall be.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

3. I will come back, He speaks here of his Second Coming, when the dead are raised to life, and all who belong to Christ will be taken to the “Wedding Feast in Heaven.” Compare 1 Thessalonians 4:17.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:3". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) And if I go and prepare . . .—For the form of the expression, comp. Notes on John 12:32, and 1 John 2:28. It does not imply uncertainty, but expresses that the fact is in the region of the future, which is clear to Him, and will unfold itself to them.

I will come again, and receive you unto myself.—This clause has been variously explained of the resurrection; of the death of individual disciples; of the spiritual presence of our Lord in the Church; of the coming again of the Lord in the Parousia of the last day, when all who believe in Him shall be received unto Himself. The difficulty has arisen from taking the words “I will come again,” as necessarily referring to the same time as those which follow—“I will receive you unto Myself,” whereas they are in the present tense, and should be literally rendered, I am coming again. They refer rather, as the same words refer when used in John 14:18, to His constant spiritual presence in their midst; whereas the reception of them to Himself is to be understood of the complete union which will accompany that spiritual presence; a union which will be commenced in this life, advanced by the death of individuals, and completed in the final coming again. (Comp. John 17:24.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.
I will
18-23,28; 12:26; 17:24; Matthew 25:32-34; Acts 1:11; 7:59,60; Romans 8:17; 2 Corinthians 5:6-8; Philippians 1:23; 1 Thessalonians 4:16,17; 2 Thessalonians 1:12; 2:1; 2 Timothy 2:12; Hebrews 9:28; 1 John 3:2,3; Revelation 3:21; 21:22,23; 22:3-5
Reciprocal: Genesis 45:10 - be near;  Exodus 23:20 - prepared;  Leviticus 16:16 - an atonement;  Joshua 3:6 - Take up;  Joshua 19:51 - These are;  Psalm 15:1 - Lord;  Psalm 45:15 - they shall;  Psalm 49:15 - shall;  Psalm 73:24 - receive;  Psalm 84:7 - in Zion;  Psalm 101:6 - that they;  Psalm 140:13 - the upright;  Ecclesiastes 3:21 - knoweth;  Song of Solomon 1:4 - the king;  Song of Solomon 6:2 - and to;  Isaiah 64:4 - seen;  Matthew 25:21 - enter;  Matthew 25:34 - prepared;  Luke 5:35 - when;  Luke 23:43 - with;  John 7:34 - GeneralJohn 10:4 - he goeth;  John 16:7 - It;  Acts 7:55 - standing;  1 Corinthians 11:26 - till;  2 Corinthians 5:1 - a building;  2 Corinthians 5:8 - present;  Ephesians 2:6 - sit;  Colossians 3:4 - ye;  2 Thessalonians 2:14 - to;  Hebrews 6:20 - the forerunner;  Hebrews 9:23 - the heavenly;  Revelation 2:25 - till

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 3. "And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto Myself; that where I am, there ye may be also."

Here we have the third thing: the abodes are there; Christ prepares them; and He receives His own to Himself. That which is here said of the coming of Christ, receives illustration from the example of Stephen. He, at the hour of his death, Acts 7:55, beholds the glory of God, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God. In his last word, "Lord Jesus, receive my spirit," he addresses Him as present, and yields to Him his soul, that He may introduce it into heavenly glory. We have here the comforting assurance that the Lord is personally present at every deathbed of believers; and in harmony with this assurance, we have countless records of dying experience, in which faith has been in such energetic exercise as to become sight. To set aside this consolatory truth by any qualifying interpretation, is wrong; nor is there any reason for doing so, since, according to vers. 18 seq., the entire life of believers is pervaded by manifestations of the Lord; and it is to be understood as self-evident, that He accompanies His own through the valley. The angel of the Lord, who appeared to Abraham in a bodily prelude of His incarnation, says, in Genesis 18:14, "At the time appointed I will return unto thee, and Sarah shall have a son;" and that He fulfilled His word, is manifest from ch. John 21:1, "And the Lord visited Sarah, as He had said." If, at the hour of birth, the Son of God is near, why should He not much rather be near in the hour of death? The Lord teaches us, in Luke 16:22, that in the last hour the heavenly powers are especially active: the angels carry Lazarus into Abraham's bosom. The other interpretations have sprung from the fact, that men have taken "I come again" separately from "and receive you unto Myself" (with which, however, it is so inseparably connected, that there is not even a comma between them), and have then compared with it other passages in which the coming of the Lord is spoken of, interpreting this by those. It is obvious, from the nature of the case, that the coming of the Lord is a manifold and various coming; for He is the Living One. Where a cold faith thinks only of an indefinite working from afar, there a living faith apprehends a real coming down from above. Here we have not simply a figure derived from sense, but the actual truth ofthe matter. The Lord, according to Revelation 2:1, walks in the midst of the seven golden candlesticks: He is everywhere present in His Church upon earth, and everywhere in ceaseless activity. And it is a fundamental view of the Apocalypse, that wherever He works He comes. With the coming of ver. 18 seq. the coming of our present passage has nothing to do. There it is not the receiving the disciples home that is spoken of, but rather the tokens and manifestations by which Christ declares Himself to His people during their pilgrimage to be the Living One. The eschatological interpretation (Origen: "He means His second coming from heaven;" so Lampe: "He speaks of His final coming visibly in the clouds of heaven," Acts 1:11) overlooks the fact that the Lord's utterance was primarily addressed to the Apostles, and that we must include here only what was an advantage to them personally; and it forgets the connection with the word spoken to Peter, ὕστερον δὲ ἀκολουθήσεις μοι, ch. John 13:36. There is no reason why we should rob ourselves of the gracious consolation which this declaration of our Lord reserves for the time of our departure; we should rather receive it into our heart, and overcome by it all the terrors of death, which then assumes a friendly aspect, when we know that the Lord accompanies it, to take us to Himself.—"And receive you unto Myself:" heaven is made heaven really and truly only by our entering there into the most direct personal fellowship with Christ, whom upon earth we loved. Luther: "So that ye have most assuredly, both at once, the mansions in heaven and Me with you for all eternity." Christ Himself, without any veil, and without any medium, without anything that in our present life interposes between Him and us—that is the profoundest desire of the soul in this valley of tears. And that desire will be satisfied when He shall come and receive us home to Himself.

"After Christ," observes Lampe, "had, in vers. 2 and 3, shown that eternal salvation was connected with this going away. He now enumerates the several benefits which the disciples would have to expect upon earth through Himself and for His sake." First, in vers. 4-11, to His people, through their knowledge of Him the way is open to heavenly blessedness, and to that glorious house of the Father. To be in possession of the right way to heaven, is a precious consolation in our present troubled life; through that we are enabled, in this miserable world, to wait patiently for the blessed time when we shall reach the house of our Father and the presence of our Lord.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:3". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

3.And if I go away. The conditional term, if, ought to be interpreted as an adverb of time; as if it had been said, “After that I have gone away, I will return to you again. ” This return must not be understood as referring to the Holy Spirit, as if Christ had manifested to the disciples some new presence of himself by the Spirit. It is unquestionably true, that Christ dwells with us and in us by his Spirit; but here he speaks of the last day of judgment, when he will, at length, come to assemble his followers. And, indeed, if we consider the whole body of the Church, he every day prepares a place for us; whence it follows, that the proper time for our entrance into heaven is not yet come.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:3". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.