Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:8

Philip *said to Him, "Lord, show us the Father, and it is enough for us."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Apostles;   Doubting;   God;   Jesus, the Christ;   Philip;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Divine;   Divinity;   Divinity-Humanity;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Philip;   The Topic Concordance - Jesus Christ;   Seeing;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ Is God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Philip;   Revelation;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jesus Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Philip;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Philip the Apostle;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Contentment;   Philip;   Time, Meaning of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Logos;   Philip;   Sanctification, Sanctify;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Children of God;   Coming Again;   Consciousness;   God;   Mission;   Nathanael ;   Patience ;   Philip ;   Trinity (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Philip ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Philip;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Phil'ip;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Philip;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Philip (2);  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 3;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 1;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Show us the Father - As if he had said, We have seen and adored thee, and our happiness will be complete if thou show us the Father. The demand of Philip was similar to that made by Moses, Exodus 33:18. He wished to see the glory of God. In Peter, James, or John, this would have been inexcusable; but Philip had not seen the transfiguration on the mount. The Jewish history is full of the manifestations which God made of himself, and especially when he gave the law. As Christ was introducing a new law, Philip wished to have an additional manifestation of God.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Lord, show us the Father - Philip here referred to some outward and visible manifestation of God. God had manifested himself in various ways to the prophets and saints of old, and Philip affirmed that if some such manifestation should be made to them they would be satisfied. It was right to desire evidence that Jesus was the Messiah, but such evidence “had been” afforded abundantly in the miracles and teaching of Jesus, and that “should” have sufficed them.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Philip saith unto him Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us.

Philip ... For discussion of this apostle, see under John 1:43. It seems that Philip was slow in comprehending the world-shattering truth of God in Jesus Christ; but his limitation was that of all men. Moreover, he did not have the advantage possessed by those who view the events of Jesus' ministry in the light of subsequent history.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Philip saith to him, Lord,.... Another of his disciples addresses him in a reverend and becoming manner, as Thomas before had done, calling him Lord, and saying to him, "show us the Father, and it sufficeth us": he speaks in the name of them all, seems to own their ignorance of the Father, and expresses their desire of seeing him:

shew us the Father; it was a corporeal sight of him he asked for; such a sight of the glory of God as Moses desired, and the elders of Israel had at Mount Sinai; and signifies, that if this could be obtained, it would give them full satisfaction:

and it sufficeth us; we shall be no more uneasy at thy departure from us; we shall have no doubt about thy Father's house, and the many mansions in it; or of thyself, as the way unto it, and of our everlasting abode with thee in it; we shall sit down easy and contented, and trouble time no more with questions about this matter.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

8. Philip saith unto him, Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us.

[Shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us.] "When the law was given to Moses, the Israelites saw God in his glory: do thou, therefore, now that thou art bringing in a new law and economy amongst us, do thou shew us the Father, and his glory, and it will suffice us; so that we will have no more doubt about it."

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 14:8". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-14.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

Shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us. Philip fails to comprehend that the Father was to be seen in Christ, and when the Lord declares that henceforth they have seen the Father, he at once requests such a revelation.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:8". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Show us (δειχον ημινdeixon hēmin). Philip now speaks up, possibly hoping for a theophany (Exodus 33:18.), certainly not grasping the idea of Jesus just expressed.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

Philip saith unto him, Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us1.

  1. Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us. As Thomas asked for a physical instead of a spiritual approach to God (John 14:5), so Philip asked for a physical instead of a spiritual revelation of him.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:8". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Покажи нам Отца. Вопросы, которые апостолы время от времени задают Господу, кажутся весьма абсурдными. Зачем же тогда Он учил как раз тому, о чем спрашивает Филипп? Однако нет такого описываемого здесь порока, который не принадлежал бы и нам. Мы говорим, что страстно ищем Бога. Но только Он предстает перед нами, как мы стразу же слепнем.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

ON KNOWING GOD

‘Lord, shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us.’

John 14:8

Was it well or ill spoken, this word of St. Philip? It evidently came from his heart. It was no captious objection. Shall we then commend or blame him for his inquiry? We must blame him for the sad ignorance betrayed. But we commend him for the splendid faith evinced. ‘And it sufficeth us,’ he says in the midst of his heaviness of heart.

I. Faith in God was the sheet-anchor of his soul.—But his knowledge of God was so limited and indistinct. To really see God this would solve all his difficulties, lighten his burdens, and sweeten every bitter sorrow. Then the world could no longer deceive and ensnare, sin would be powerless to conquer and corrupt, the old enemy self would vanish out of sight. This was his splendid faith. Surely for this splendid faith, and for this sublime ambition in his hour of disappointment and suspense, St. Philip deserves all praise. In spite of the ignorance it betrays, we are glad that he made the appeal in such a tone of enthusiastic and confident expectation.

II. How do we compare with St. Philip?—Nineteen centuries have passed since his day. We have had revealed to us the full meaning of all that was then troubling and perplexing those disciples. We know that their immediate loss was ultimate gain and the world’s salvation—that Christ went to the Father by the way of the Cross, that He might open the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers, and return in the power of the Spirit to dwell in our hearts. We have learned to believe in and to draw near to the living God. In what spirit do we draw near? Have we St. Philip’s strong desire to see the Father? Is it our one ambition to know God? Have we the same sublime assurance that complete and lasting satisfaction is found in knowing God? Are we entirely freed from his sad ignorance? Or has the Saviour to utter the same sad reproach to some of His professed disciples to-day? ‘Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known Me, Philip?’

III. To desire to know God should be the supreme longing in every Christian heart.—This is the end of our redemption. Christ died to bring us to God. This is the object of the gift of eternal life. This is the condition of all spiritual progress, of all increase in likeness to God. This is the remedy for all earth’s sorrows and disappointments, the secret of abiding satisfaction and delight. It should be the constant cry of every believing heart, ‘Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us.’

Rev. F. S. Webster.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 14:8". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

8 Philip saith unto him, Lord, shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us.

Ver. 8. Lord, show us the Father] They would have seen the Father face to face with their bodily eyes, as they saw the Son. But that no man can do and live, Exodus 33:20. We cannot see the sun in rota, in its orbit, as the schools speak, in the circle wherein it runs, but only in the beams. So neither can we see God in his essence; in his Son we may, who is the resplendence of his Father’s glory, απαυγασμα, Hebrews 1:3.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:8". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:8. Lord, shew us the Father, Philip, hearing our Lord's words, says to him with a pious ardour becoming his character, "Lord, do but shew us the Father, and bring us to the sight and enjoyment of him, and it is happiness enough for us. We desire no more, and resign every other hope, in comparison of this." This seems a very probable sense of this passage. One cannot apprehend that Philip, or any other of the Apostles, thought the Father visible, and therefore asked for a vision of the Father in a corporeal form. If Philip desired any thing more than what is asserted in the paraphrase above given, it could have been only to see, like Moses, the inaccessible light wherein God dwells, the acknowledged symbol of his presence in heaven.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:8". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

8.] Philip misunderstands ἑωρ. to mean ‘seeing in a vision,’—and intimates that one such sight of God would set at rest all their fears, and give them perfect confidence.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:8". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:8. ἀρκεῖ, it sufficeth) So that we may not desire to ask further questions, and may no more be troubled in mind. This αὐτάρκεια, acquiescence [in God’s way], they attain to in ch. John 16:30, “Now are we sure that Thou knowest all things, and needest not that any man should ask Thee: by this we believe that Thou camest forth from God.” Comp. Psalms 17:15, “I shall be satisfied, when I awake in Thy likeness;” Psalms 22:23; Psalms 22:26, “The meek shall eat and be satisfied: they shall praise the Lord that seek Him;” Psalms 69:30; Psalms 69:32, “The humble shall see this and be glad; and your heart shall live, that seek God.”

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:8". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Still Philip understandeth not our Saviour, and further discovereth a very gross conception of the Divine Being, as if it could be seen with mortal eyes; whereas God had told Moses, Exodus 33:20, Thou canst not see my face; for there shall no man see me, and live. It is a hard thing to determine what degrees of ignorance are consistent or inconsistent with saving grace in souls; the resolution of which doth much depend upon those degrees of revelation and means of knowledge which men have.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:8". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Show us the Father; he meant an outward showing.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

8.Philip saith—Doubting Thomas had expressed his query, and now materialistic Philip would have his sight gratified.

Show us the FatherEither thicken the substance of the Father’s spirit so that our eye can see it, or quicken our eye with a supernatural sharpness so that we can see him as he is.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Philip says to him, “Lord, show us the Father and that will be sufficient for us”.’

As yet they were not fully enlightened and could not grasp this. Philip, for example, had not yet had time to contemplate the wonder of Christ, and he therefore did not quite appreciate what Jesus meant by their having seen the Father in Him. Like some today he thought that Jesus was simply referring to a kind of general ‘seeing of the Father’ by analogy. But he wanted something more. He wanted actually to see God. He wanted some wonderful revelation of God, some theophany, some manifestation of deity, like Abraham (Genesis 15:17), Moses (Exodus 3:2; Exodus 33:23), the elders (Exodus 24:9-10), the people of Israel (Exodus 24:17) and Isaiah of old (Isaiah 6:1-2). He wanted to truly ‘see the Father’. That, he knew, would confirm his and the disciples’ faith. He has not yet realised that he had in fact seen greater things than those men of old, for he has walked with God and had watched Him reveal Himself daily.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-14.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The Eleven regarded Jesus very highly. Notwithstanding they did not yet realize that He was such an accurate and full revelation of God the Father that to see Jesus was to see the Father. Philip asked for a clear revelation of the Father that would satisfy the Eleven. He apparently wanted Jesus to give them a theophany ( Exodus 24:9-10; Isaiah 6:1). People throughout history have desired to see God as He really is (cf. Exodus 33:18). Jesus in His incarnation made that revelation of the Father more clearly, fully, and finally than anyone else ever had ( John 1:14; John 1:18; John 12:45; cf. Hebrews 1:1-2).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:8. Philip saith unto him, Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us. The same bluntness of spiritual sight (that is, really the same weakness of faith) that had been exhibited by Thomas is now exhibited by Philip, though in relation to another point. Jesus had said (John 14:7) that the disciples had seen the Father, meaning that they had seen the Father in Him. Philip fails to understand; and, thinking perhaps of the revelation given to Moses in Exodus 33:18-19, misusing also those words of our Lord which alone made his request possible, he asks that he and his fellow-disciples may have granted them some actual vision of the Father (comp. his spirit in chap. John 6:7). The reply of Jesus, John 14:9-21, falls into three leading parts, of which the first is found in John 14:9-11.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:8. . Philip, seizing upon the of John 14:7, utters the universal human craving to see God, to have the same indubitable direct knowledge of Him as we have of one another. Perhaps Philip supposed some appearance visible to the eye would be granted. Always there persists the feeling that more might be done to make God known than has been done.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:8". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Philip. See John 1:43-48; John 6:5; John 12:21, John 12:22, and App-141.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:8". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Philip saith unto him, Lord, shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us.

Philip saith unto him, Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us. Philip's grossness of conception gives occasion to something more than explanation; but O how winning is even the slight rebuke!

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

8. Show us the Father. Philips wants something visible, so he can know God in the same way he knows people.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:8". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(8) Philip saith unto him.—Comp. for the character of Philip John 1:44 et seq.; John 6:5 et seq.; John 12:21 et seq. He is joined with Thomas at the head of the second group of the Apostles, in Acts 1:13.

Lord, shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us.—He catches at the word “seen “and thinks of some revelation of the glory of God as that vouchsafed to Moses, or it may be of a vision like that which three of their number had seen, and of which others had heard, in the Mount of Transfiguration. One such vision of the Father, he thinks, would remove all their doubts; and would satisfy the deepest longings of their hearts.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Philip saith unto him, Lord, shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us.
Philip
1:43-46; 6:5-7; 12:21,22
shew
16:25; Exodus 33:18-23; 34:5-7; Job 33:26; Psalms 17:15; 63:2; Matthew 5:8; Revelation 22:3-5
Reciprocal: Matthew 17:4 - it is;  Mark 3:18 - Philip;  Mark 9:5 - it is;  Luke 6:14 - Philip;  Luke 9:33 - it is;  John 1:44 - Philip;  Acts 1:13 - Philip;  2 Peter 1:17 - God

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:8". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 8. "Philip saith unto Him, Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us."

The Apostles had hitherto seen Christ only in the form of a servant, in the humiliation under which the glory of the Father was profoundly hidden. At the Transfiguration it was only transitorily shone through; and that sublime spectacle was witnessed not by all the disciples, but only by the most advanced. Under these circumstances, it was natural that the disciples, having in their view the prophecies of the Old Testament, which always presented a prospect of the glorious revelation of the glory of the Lord, Isaiah 40:5, and having further in their view the impending severe trials and dangers which would demand a mighty auxiliary for their faith, should be unable altogether to reconcile themselves to the fact that they were so absolutely referred to Christ in regard to their relation to the Father, and should feel a disposition to ask for a revelation of the Father besides that of Christ, in order to their invigoration in their perilous path, more especially as their spiritual eye was not yet strong enough to discern the glory which was hidden under so thick a veil of humiliation. Their rising desire was gratified when the concealed glory of Christ burst through in the resurrection, in the ascension, and in those great victories which the Church through Christ gained over the world, ver. 12. Then the Father was plainly and obviously shown to them; although not in the way here desired by Philip, beside Christ, but in Christ. That which was natural and excusable in the Apostles, if not altogether justifiable, ver. 9, because it sprang from the dimness of their vision, which could not discern the glory behind the form of a servant, would be now, after the means for sharpening the spiritual vision have been afforded through the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, and when we have before us the glorious evidences and tokens of the ascended Lord, and of His triumph through the Christian ages, a melancholy anachronism. Where a similar desire now arises, it springs from a less excusable source. Christ must dwell in the heart by faith, if His spiritual glory is to be beheld. That man in whose heart, through his own fault, He has not taken up His abode, has eyes which see not, and ears which hear not. It is his righteous punishment that he is excluded, as from the Son, so also from the Father.

The Apostles exhibit their faith in Christ in this, that they ask of Him to bring about the manifestation of the Father which they desire. And they are all the more justified in putting that request, because in the earlier days of their predecessors and types, such a manifestation of the glory of the Lord was vouchsafed to the elders of Israel for the strengthening of their faith: comp. Exodus 24:9-11. They did not consider that the mediator of the old covenant was, unlike the Mediator of the new, a weak man, who needed to exhibit to the representatives of the people an authentication direct from God, and who needed himself to be invigorated by such a manifestation to his faith. To desire such a revelation under the New Testament, was a virtual denial of the divinity of Christ, which could not but meet with such an earnest rejection. This refusal, however, could not be absolutely severe, but rather full of tenderness, inasmuch as the revelation of the Father in Christ had not yet finished its course and reached its consummation. καὶ ἀρκεῖ ἡμῖν points to the fact that they had not reached full satisfaction through any revelation of the Father in Christ which they had yet beheld: comp. 2 Corinthians 12:9.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:8". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8.Show us the Father. It appears to be very absurd that the Apostles should offer so many objections to the Lord; for why did he speak but to inform them on that point about which Philip puts the question? Yet there is not one of their faults that is here described that may not be charged on us as well as on them. We profess to be earnest in seeking God; and when he presents himself before our eyes, we are blind.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.