Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:7

If you had known Me, you would have known My Father also; from now on you know Him, and have seen Him."
New American Standard Version
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  1. Adam Clarke Commentary
  2. Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible
  3. Coffman Commentaries on the Bible
  4. John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible
  5. Geneva Study Bible
  6. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible
  7. John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels
  8. People's New Testament
  9. Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament
  10. Vincent's Word Studies
  11. Wesley's Explanatory Notes
  12. The Fourfold Gospel
  13. Abbott's Illustrated New Testament
  14. Calvin's Commentary on the Bible
  15. Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books
  16. John Trapp Complete Commentary
  17. Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible
  18. Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament
  19. Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary
  20. Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament
  21. Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament
  22. Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible
  23. Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament
  24. Whedon's Commentary on the Bible
  25. Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible
  26. Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable
  27. Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament
  28. The Expositor's Greek Testament
  29. Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments
  30. George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary
  31. E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes
  32. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged
  33. The Bible Study New Testament
  34. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers
  35. Treasury of Scripture Knowledge
  36. Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms
  37. Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Apostles;   God;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Wisdom;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Divine;   Divinity;   Divinity-Humanity;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   The Topic Concordance - Jesus Christ;   Knowledge;   Seeing;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ Is God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Father;   Jesus christ;   Mediator;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Know, Knowledge;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Trinity;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Time, Meaning of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   English Versions;   Faith;   God;   Holy Spirit;   John, Theology of;   Logos;   Sanctification, Sanctify;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Attributes of Christ;   Children of God;   Communion (2);   Consciousness;   God;   Ignorance (2);   Mission;   Prayer;   Son of God;   Teaching of Jesus;   Trinity (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Trinity;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for November 1;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father - Because I and the Father are One, John 10:30. Or, if ye had properly examined the intention and design of the law, ye would have been convinced that it referred to me; and that all that I have done and instituted was according to the design and intention of the Father, as expressed in that law.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

If ye had known me - By this Jesus does not intend to say that they were not truly his disciples, but that they had not a full and accurate knowledge of his character and designs. They still retained, to a large extent, the Jewish notions respecting a temporal Messiah, and did not fully understand that he was to die and be raised from the dead.

Ye should have known my Father also - You would have known the counsels and designs of my Father respecting my death and resurrection. If you had been divested of your Jewish prejudices about the Messiah, if you had understood that it was proper for me to die, you would also have understood the purposes and plans of God in my death; and, knowing that, you would have seen that it was wise and best. We see here that a correct knowledge of the character and work of Christ is the same as a correct knowledge of the counsels and plans of God; and we see, also, that the reasons why we have not such a knowledge are our previous prejudices and erroneous views.

From henceforth - From this time. From my death and resurrection you shall understand the plans and counsels of God.

Ye know him - You shall have just views of his plans and designs.

Have seen him - That is, they had seen Jesus Christ, his image, and the brightness of his glory Hebrews 1:3, which was the same as having seen the Father, John 14:9.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

If ye had known me, ye would have known my Father also: from henceforth ye know him and have seen him.

There is hardly a paragraph in this whole Gospel where the deity of Jesus is not either stated dogmatically, or, as here, emphatically implied. Here is another example of it. Knowing Jesus is equivalent to knowing God. Jesus' revelation to men, as far as verbal teaching goes, had here been completed.

From henceforth ... From that point onward, the apostles had in their full possession the sufficient knowledge of God as revealed in Jesus Christ to enable them to find eternal life. Although not yet fully realized by them, the verbal statement of it was complete. However, the Lord would add other significant statements of the great truth before the evening ended.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

If ye had known me,.... Christ having made mention of his Father's house, and of himself, as the way thither, and the way of access to the Father, was willing to inform his disciples better concerning him before his departure from them, which he introduces, saying: "if ye had known me"; that is, more fully and perfectly; for that they knew Christ to be the Son of God, the Saviour of the world, and true Messiah, is certain, though they were not so thoroughly acquainted, as afterwards, with his person, power, and office:

ye should have known my Father also; for the knowledge of the Father, and of Christ, go together; he that sees the one, sees the other; he that believes in the one, believes in the other; and the knowledge of both is necessary to eternal life; and as a person increases in the knowledge of the one, so of the other. The disciples had some knowledge of them both, but what was very small and obscure, in comparison of what they afterwards had:

and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him; some read these words, "henceforwards ye shall know him, and see him"; that is, in a very short time, when the Spirit is poured down from on high upon you, and you have received the gifts of the Holy Ghost, you shall then have an enlarged knowledge both of me and my Father. Others render them, as an exhortation, "henceforward know ye him"; acknowledge the Father in all that I have done, believing that you see the Father in me, and in all my works; though they are rather to be considered as an assertion, declaring, that they then had some knowledge of the Father; "and now ye know him, and", or "because ye have seen him"; in me, who am "the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person".

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

e If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.

(e) It is plain by this verse that to know God and to see God is the same thing. Now whereas he said before that no man saw God at any time, it is to be understood in this way: without Christ, or were it not through Christ, no man could ever see God, nor ever saw God, at any time: for as Chrysostom says, the Son is a very concise and plain setting forth of the Father's nature to us.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 14:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

from henceforth — now, or from this time, understand.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-14.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

7. If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.

[If ye had known me, &c.] It was a very difficult thing to spell out the knowledge of the Messiah from the law and the prophets under the first Temple; but it was doubly more difficult under the second. For, under the first Temple, Moses had only his own veil over him, and the prophets only their own proper and original obscurity: but under the second Temple, the obscurity is doubled by the darkness and smoke of traditions; which had not only beclouded the true doctrines of faith and religion, but had also brought in other doctrines diametrically contrary to the chief and principal articles of faith: those for instance concerning justification, the person, reign, and office of the Messiah, &c.

With what measures of darkness these mists of tradition had covered the minds of the apostles, it is both difficult, and might be presumptuous, to determine. They did indeed own Jesus for the true Messiah, John 1:41; Matthew 16:16: but if in some things they judged amiss concerning his office, undertaking, and government, we must put it upon the score of that epidemical distemper of the whole nation which they still did in some measure labour under. And to this may this clause have some reference, "If ye had known me, and had judged aright concerning the office, undertaking, and authority of the Messiah, ye would, in all these things which I teach and do, have known the will, command, and authority of the Father."

[And from henceforth ye know him.] We may render it, Henceforward therefore know him: "Henceforward acknowledge the Father in all that I have done, brought in, and am to introduce still, and set your hearts to rest in it: believing that you see the Father in me, and in the things that I do."

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 14:7". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-14.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also. The great truth declared is that the way to study God and know him is to know Christ.

From henceforth ye know him, and have seen him. From the cross. On the next morning they would see Christ dying. From the sepulcher would burst forth upon their minds a new revelation of the character and mission of the Son.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:7". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

If ye had known me (ει εγνωκειτε μεei egnōkeite me). Past perfect indicative of γινωσκωginōskō to know by personal experience, in condition of second class as is made plain by the conclusion (αν ηιδετεan ēidete) where οιδαoida not γινωσκωginōskō is used. Thomas and the rest had not really come to know Jesus, much as they loved him.

From henceforth ye know him (απ αρτι γινωσκετε αυτονap' arti ginōskete auton). Probably inchoative present active indicative, “ye are beginning to know the Father from now on.”

And have seen him
(και εωρακατεkai heōrakate). Perfect active indicative of οραωhoraō Because they had seen Jesus who is the Son of God, the Image of God, and like God (John 1:18). Hence God is like Jesus Christ. It is a bold and daring claim to deity. The only intelligible conception of God is precisely what Jesus here says. God is like Christ.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Had known ( ἐγνώκειτε )

Rather, had learned to know, through my successive revelations of myself.

Ye should have known ( ἐγώκειτε ἄν )

The same verb as above. Some editors, however, read ᾔδειτε , the verb signifying absolute knowledge, the knowledge of intuition and satisfied conviction. If this is adopted, it marks a contrast with the progressive knowledge indicated by ἐγνώκειτε . See on John 2:24.

My Father

Not the Father, as John 14:6. It is the knowledge of the Father in His relation to the Son. Through this knowledge the knowledge of God as the Father, “in the deepest verity of His being,” is attained. This latter knowledge is better expressed by οἷδα . See on John 4:21.

Have seen

See on John 1:18.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.

Ye have known — Ye have begun to know him.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 14:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

If ye had known me, ye would have known my Father also1: from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him2.

  1. If ye had known me, ye would have known my Father also. The unity of nature and of character is so perfect that to know the Son is to know the Father also.

  2. From henceforth ye know him, and have seen him. This saying is the outgrowth of what is said in John 14:6. Since we can only come to the Father's likeness by the imitation of Jesus, then the truth here uttered follows; viz.: that to see Jesus is to see the Father.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:7". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Have seen him; seen him in Christ.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-14.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Если бы вы знали Меня. Христос подтверждает сказанное Им ранее: глупо и вредно любопытство, когда люди, не довольствуясь Христом, идут к Богу окольными путями. Они согласны, что нет ничего лучше познания Бога. Когда же Он близок к ним и дружески к Себе зовет, они пускаются в рассуждения и ищут над облаками Того, Кого не захотели узреть на земле. Христос упрекает Своих учеников. Они не понимают, что в Его лице им явлена вся полнота божества. Я вижу, – говорит Христос, – вы до сих пор неправильно обо Мне мыслите. Вы до сих пор не различаете во Мне ясный, отпечатленный образ Отца.

И отныне. Христос добавляет это не только для того, чтобы смягчить суровость упрека, Он обвиняет учеников в лености и неблагодарности. Они не понимают и не ценят того, что им уже даровано. Так что это сказано Христом скорее в похвалу Своего учения, чем в похвалу их веры. Смысл таков: если они откроют глаза, то увидят, что Бог им уже явился. Слово же «жизнь» означает здесь неколебимость веры.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 7. "If you had known me, you would have known my Father also; and from henceforth you know him and have seen him."

This verse reproduces the idea of the last clause of the preceding verse, that of coming to the Father through Jesus. If Jesus is really the manifestation of God (John 14:6), to have well known Him Himself would be enough for the arriving through Him at the knowledge of God (pluperfect ἐγνώκειτε). This is the sense of the received reading which is perfectly suitable; it is also that of the reading of some Alexandrian authorities which read ἤδειτε for the second ἐγνώκειτε . It seems that Jesus hereby denies to them this twofold knowledge; and in fact it is only after having received the Spirit that they will possess it fully (John 14:20). Yet He afterwards partially concedes it to them, because they possess the beginning of it already.Meyer takes the term from henceforth literally: "since my preceding declaration" (that of John 14:6). This sense is too restricted and even insignificant. Chrysostom and Lucke find here an anticipatory indication of the approaching illumination at Pentecost; but how can the from henceforth and the pluperfects allow this sense? Jesus alludes to all that has just occurred in the course of this last evening. The washing of the feet and the dismissal of Judas, with all that He had said to them since then, were well fitted to bring to light the true character of God and the spiritual nature of His kingdom. The germ of the true knowledge of God had from henceforth been deposited in them. By showing Himself to them, as He had just done, even the inmost depths of His heart, Jesus had revealed to them forever the essence of God. The reading of א D, adopted by Tischendorf (8th ed.): "If you have known me, you will know my Father also," comes doubtless from the scruple which the copyists felt at making Jesus say that His disciples had not known Him up to that moment (seeLuthardt).— Weiss, accepting the reading of some Alexandrian authorities which omit the καί (and) before ἀπ᾿ ἄρτι, from henceforth, makes γινώσκετε an imperative, in this sense: "Know Him from henceforth as He is revealed to you in me, and thereby you will have seen Him; you will be in possession of the life." But this imperative scarcely suits the adverb: from henceforth; and we do not say: Know God, as we say: "Believe in God" (John 14:1).

This last word: you have seen Him, seems intended, as already John 14:4, to call forth the expression of some opposite thought. It is, as it were, a new challenge offered to this inward trouble which Jesus perceives in them. To have become beholders of God (perfect, ἑωράκατε)—was it not the greatest thing which the apostles could desire? This privilege had, to a certain degree, been granted to Moses and to Elijah, under the old covenant. Certainly, if Jesus could cause them to enjoy it, their faith would for the future be immovable. Isaiah had positively made this promise for the Messianic times: "The glory of the Lord shall be manifested, and all flesh shall see it" (Isaiah 40:5). Thus is the demand of Philip naturally explained: "Thou sayest: you have seen; we answer: show us!"

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-14.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

7 If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.

Ver. 7. And from henceforth ye know him] Or else the more shame for you, having had me (his express image) so long among you. Christians have a privilege above the Church of the Old Testament. The sea about the altar was brazen, 1 Kings 7:23, and what eyes could pierce through it? Now, our sea about the throne is glassy, Revelation 4:6, like the crystal, clearly conveying the light and sight of God in Christ to our eyes.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 14:7. If ye had known me, ye should have known, &c.— If "you had an adequate idea of my character, from the miracles that I have performed, and from the marks of goodness, justice, and wisdom, which manifest themselves in mylife and doctrines, you could not have been ignorant of my Father, because his attributes are the same; and he being in his nature invisible, by seeing me, and the manifestation of the divine perfections in me, you have as true a sight of him as possible here below."

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 14:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-14.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. What a gross conception the apostles had, and St. Philip in particular, of the divine nature and being, as if God the Father could be seen with mortal eyes. Shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us. It is not easy to determine what degrees of ignorance may consist with saving grace; doubtless, as the degrees of revelation and means of knowledge are more or less, so a person's ignorance is more or less excusable before God.

Observe, 2. How meekly our Saviour reproves their ignorance, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? and then proceeds to instruct them in, and farther acquaint them with, the oneness of himself with the Father, and the personal union of the divine and human nature in himself.

Learn hence, That the Father being invisible in his essence, to know or see him with mortal, bodily eyes is impossible; but he was seen in his Son, who is the express image of the Father, being one in essence with him, and one in operation also: He that hath seen me, hath seen the Father.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 14:7". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-14.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

7.] See ch. John 8:19.

ἀπʼ ἄρτι] There is no difficulty, if we bear in mind the νῦν of ch. John 13:31. The henceforth is the future time, beginning with our Lord’s glorification, which was now at hand. Lücke remarks: “ ἀπʼ ἄρτι is not entirely future nor entirely present, but the moment of transition, the identification of the present and future. Christ speaks here proleptically, in reference to the hour of His glorification being come” (ii. 598).

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:7". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:7. Had you known me (for they had indeed not known that He was the Way), you would also have known the Father (of their non-acquaintance with whom their οὐκ οἴδαμεν, ποῦ ὑπάγεις, John 14:5, had testified).

The emphasis changes (otherwise in John 8:19); it lies in the protasis on ἐγνώκ., not on the enclitic μέ; in the apodosis on τ. πατ. μον.

καὶ ἀπʼ ἄρτι, κ. τ. λ.] and—which I can nevertheless now add—from henceforward (after I have told you in John 14:6 so definitely and fully what I am) you know Him, and have (in me, John 14:9) beheld Him. This view of the meaning, which flows immediately out of the context, John 14:6; John 14:9, the point of which is the idea of the adequate self-revelation of God in Christ, entirely excludes any interpretation of the two verbs in a future sense (Chrysostom, Kuinoel, and many others), and the reference to a future terminus a quo (Chrysostom, Lücke, Ewald, and several others), which is wont to be assumed as the time of the communication of the Spirit, nay, even a mentally supplied “I hope” (De Wette) with ἀπάρτι. The reference of ἀπάρτι to the whole time of their fellowship with Christ since their conversion (Hengstenberg), is, even in a linguistic point of view, impossible. See on John 13:19, John 1:51. In that case only νῦν could stand. Godet’s remark is also incorrect: “at the point at which my teaching has now arrived,” as if ἄρτι merely were expressed.

On καί, which, without altering its meaning, significantly subjoins an adversative clause (and … i.e. and nevertheless), see on John 7:28.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 14:7". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-14.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:7. εἰ, if) This if does not altogether deny [that they knew Him], but it draws their souls to onward progress: John 14:28.(345) [So Luke 17:6. “If ye had faith as a grain of mustard seed:” after they had said, “Lord, increase our faith.”]— ἑωράκατε, ye have seen) The preterite: ye have begun to see, and see Him.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:7". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

If ye had known me as you ought to have known me, as I am indeed the eternal Son of God, sent by my Father into the world, you should have known my Father, with whom I am equal, and one and the same God, so as in knowing one of us, you must have known both: but you stick in my outward form and appearance, while I appear to you in the form of a man; and you stick in your prejudices sucked in from the notion you have of the Messiah, expecting I know not what temporal prince: these things blind you as to my Divine nature, (personally united to my human nature), that you see nothing of my Godhead, which if you had clearly known and believed, you would not have been at a loss to know the Father, the brightness of whose glory, and the express image of whose person, I am, though my glory be veiled by my human nature. And if you will yet believe what I say, from henceforth you do know the Father, and you have seen the Father so oft as you have seen me.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Known my Father; the reason of this is, their oneness; he being the brightness of the Father’s glory, and the express image of his person. Chapter John 10:30; Hebrews 1:3.

From henceforth ye know him; from this time onward begins your more perfect knowledge through me of the Father. It was in connection with the removal from the disciples of his personal presence, which was now just at hand, that the Comforter should be sent to teach them of Christ and the Father.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7.Known me’ known my Father—For Christ the Son is at the same time the incarnation of God entire, of the entire Trinity at once. He is the human personation of God; showing to men how God would be, and how God would act, if God were himself a man. God in Christ became man-like that he might show man how to become godlike. Said the infidel Rosseau, “Socrates died like a philosopher, but Jesus Christ died like a god.”

Have seen him—They have not indeed seen the substance of the invisible God; for God the Spirit can be seen only by the spirit’s eye; but they had seen God as they had seen man, with the bodily eye, by looking upon the bodily person of Jesus.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“If you had fully known me you would have known my Father as well. And from now on you do know him and have seen him.”

Jesus now confirms His uniqueness. The question is, have they fully known Him? Let them now recognise Who He really is. He is the One Who has fully revealed the Father in such a way that to have known Him is to have fully known the Father. That is why John, in amazed wonder when enlightenment had fully come, could say, ‘We beheld his glory, the glory as of the only Son of the Father’ (John 1:14), and this is what Jesus is saying here. He is saying that as ‘the only Son of the Father’, that is as the only One of the same substance and essence as the Father, He is the only One Who reveals what God essentially is. In the words of Hebrews ‘He is the outshining of His glory and the exact representation of His substance’ (Hebrews 1:3). In consequence they not only know the Father through Him, but have actually seen the Father in Him in such a way as to describe it as having actually seen the Father. Through knowing Him they have known the Father in His essential Being.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-14.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The construction of the first clause in the Greek text suggests that the condition was true for the sake of the argument. We could translate this "first class condition" as "Since ..." The Eleven had come to know by personal experience (Gr. ginosko) who Jesus really was. This knowledge was the key to their coming to know God the Father as well.

Since they had come to know who Jesus really was, they had come to know God. Their knowledge of God virtually amounted to seeing God. John used "knowing God" and "seeing God" synonymously in1John as well (cf. 1 John 2:3-11; 1 John 3:2-3). "From now on" (Gr. ap arti) also means "assuredly." Since the Eleven had come to know who Jesus really was, they had assuredly come to know the Father as well. Jesus was probably assuring the Eleven with this sentence rather than rebuking them, as some translations suggest.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:7. If ye had learned to know me, ye would know my Father also. The change in this verse from ‘the Father’ of John 14:6 to ‘my Father,’ as well as the use in the original of two different verbs for ‘know,’ is peculiarly instructive. The meaning seems to be, that when we have gained a knowledge of the Son, we find ourselves possessed of a knowledge of His Father; then, in that knowledge, the veil which hides from us in our natural condition the true knowledge of God is withdrawn, and we possess the highest knowledge of all, the knowledge of God in the deepest verity of His being, the knowledge of ‘the Father.’ It is true that we immediately read, Prom henceforth ye learn to know Him, and have seen Him. But we must bear in mind that possession of a perfect knowledge of God is never reached by us. Each stage of ‘knowing’ is but the beginning of a new stage of ‘learning to know’ more; ‘forgetting the things that are behind,’ we start ever afresh towards a knowledge of ‘the Father,’ always increasing but never consummated. The same remark applies to ‘have seen,’ by which we are to understand ‘have begun to see.’ This knowledge, this sight, the disciples have ‘from henceforth.’ The point of time is not Pentecost anticipated. It dates from the great ‘Now’ of chap. John 13:31, and the explanation is to be found in the peculiar circumstances in which the disciples have been placed since then. They have been separated from all worldly thoughts of Jesus; His true ‘glory’ and the true glory of the Father in Him have been revealed in all their brightness; and in an intimacy of communion with their Lord never enjoyed before they ‘learn to know’ with an inward spiritual discernment, they ‘have seen’ with a sharpness of spiritual intuition, not previously possessed by them. Another difficulty arises in the breast of Philip.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:7. He is the essential knowledge, ’ Some press the distinction between and , “the first representing a knowledge acquired and progressive; the second a knowledge perceptive and immediate”. But this discrimination is here inappropriate. The clause explains the foregoing. The Father is in Jesus, and to know Him is to know the Father. They had unconsciously been coming to the Father and living in Him. Now they were to do so consciously: . The repeated brings out the point, that it was the Father that was henceforth to be recognised by them when they saw and thought of Jesus: “ye know Him and have seen Him”.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:7". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

John 14:7. If ye had known me — As ye might and ought to have known me. If ye had earnestly sought and obtained that knowledge of me which is communicated by the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, (Ephesians 1:17,) ye would have known my Father also — In his various perfections, and in those blessed relations in which he stands to such as believe on Christ with a living faith, and are accepted through him, the beloved. “If you had had an adequate idea of my character, from the miracles I have performed, and from the marks of goodness, justice, and wisdom, which have manifested themselves in my life and doctrine; you could not have been ignorant of my Father; because his attributes are the same.” And from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him — As it may be truly affirmed, considering the discoveries that I have made of him, and the manifestation of the divine perfections which you have seen in me.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on John 14:7". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/john-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

===============================

[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Cognoscetis eum, in the present Greek copies (one excepted) we read, cognoscitis, Greek: ginoskete; Maldonatus judges it the true reading. But not only St. Augustine and the Latin Fathers, but even St. John Chrysostom reads it in the future tense, Greek: gnosesthe: and takes particular notice of this reading. Greek: to men mellontos, hom. lxxiii. tom. 8. p. 432. Ed. Montfaucon.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

If, &c. App-118.

known. App-132.

from henceforth = from (Greek. apo. App-104. iv) now.

seen. App-133. Compare 1 John 1:1.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.

If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth, [ ap' (Greek #575) arti (Greek #737)] - 'from now,' or from this time forth, that I have explained it to you,

Ye know him, and have seen him. Here also our Lord, by what He says, intends rather to gain their ear for further explanation, than to tell them how much they already knew.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

7. You will know my Father also. To see Jesus is to see the Father. Jesus had been leading them to the Father. Now they are to deliberately come to the Father.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:7". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also.—The thought here is made quite plain by what has preceded; but the form in which it is expressed demands attention. The emphasis of the first part of the sentence is not upon “Me” as is generally supposed, but upon “known.” In the second part the emphatic words are “My Father.” The English word “known” represents two Greek words in the better text which are not identical in meaning. The former means, to know by observation, the latter to know by reflection. It is the difference between connaître and savoir; between kennen (ken, k(e)now), and wissen (wit, wisdom). We may express the meaning more exactly thus, “If ye had recognised Me, ye would have known My Father also.” If ye had recognised who I really am; ye would have known that I and My Father are one.

And from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.—Comp. John 13:31, where the glorifying of the Son of Man is regarded as in the future which is immediately present. He can, therefore, say that from this time onwards, after the full declaration of Himself in John 14:6; John 14:9 et seq., they know and have seen the Father.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.
ye
9,10,20; 1:18; 8:19; 15:24; 16:3; 17:3,21,23; Matthew 11:27; Luke 10:22; 2 Corinthians 4:6; Colossians 1:15-17; 2:2,3; Hebrews 1:3
from
16-20; 16:13-16; 17:6,8,26
Reciprocal: Numbers 12:8 - similitude;  Matthew 7:21 - my;  John 17:7 - they;  Philippians 3:8 - the excellency;  1 John 2:13 - because

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 7. "If ye had known Me, ye should have known My Father also: and from henceforth ye know Him, and have seen Him."

Luther: "If ye had known Me. This knowledge of Christ is not that of which St Paul speaks, the knowing after the flesh; but it is the knowing how to regard Him, what we have in Him, and how we may enjoy Him. This is not attained by high-minded hypocrites, but by the lowly, contrite hearts and troubled consciences; and by them not without care and trouble, so that "they must concern themselves mightily about it." "If ye had known Me" intimates that the disciples had not yet pressed into a perfect knowledge of Christ, and therefore of the Father; of the Father who perfectly reveals Himself in Christ, the express image of His person, in whom, as St Paul says, Colossians 2:9, the fulness of the Godhead dwelleth bodily. "From henceforth ye know Him:" this shows that, objectively considered, this knowledge of God was assured to them by the manifestation of Christ in the flesh, and their internal communion with Him; the necessary consequence being, that, in their willing docility, this knowledge was to all intents and purposes already fundamentally in them. "If ye had known Me" certainly required some following qualification, otherwise there would have arisen a contradiction with ver. 4 (the way ye know); and the disciples would have been placed on a level with the Jews, to whom Jesus in ch. John 8:19 said, "If ye had known Me, ye would have known My Father also." The objective character of the γινώσκετε—that it primarily refers to a knowledge offered—is shown by the fact that ἑωράκατε, ye have seen, is added, this being afforded directly by the manifestation of Christ. That which was intended first of all to soften the asperity of the blame, and to save the disciples from the painful feeling which the parallel with the unbelieving Jews would have excited, served at the same time as an admonition that they should ponder what was given them, and not, by a denial of the knowledge already imparted, sink down to the low and melancholy level of the Jews, who, dishonouring the Son, had lost the Father also. ἀπάρτι, from this time forward, ch. John 13:19. The now does not mean the then present moment, but the time since they had learnt to know Christ. The Lord divides the existence of the disciples into two halves, formerly and now. The line of demarcation in their life was their relation to Christ. Before they had seen and known Him, they knew not the Father; in Christ they had learnt to know the Father, and thus gained the certain way to the Father's house. In 1 Corinthians 13:12 also, ἄρτι occurs in the sense, not of a moment, but of a period.

If the γινώσκετε is at once referred to a subjective knowledge, we must either, with Lampe, interpolate an exposition, "Ye begin now to know;" or, with Lücke, we must give it a future application, and extract from it the- consolatory assurance, "that the hour is not now far distant, when the former ignorance of the disciples would be exchanged for clear know ledge." Against the latter view it may be observed, that the present, γινώσκετε, and still more the perfect, ἑωράκατε, evidence that a knowledge is meant which the disciples already enjoyed. (Both are united, as here, in the passage of Demosthenes cited by Winer: ἀνθρώπῳ ὅν ἡμωῖς γινώσκομεν οὔθʼ ἑωράκαμεν πώποτε.) But ver. 9 excludes all doubt. There Jesus mourns that Philip had denied the knowledge already imparted. That such a knowledge was intended, is shown also by the word spoken to him in ver. 8, which on any other supposition is unintelligible.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:7". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7.If you had known me. He confirms what we have just now said, that it is a foolish and pernicious curiosity, when men, not satisfied with him, attempt to go to God by indirect and crooked paths. (64) They admit that there is nothing better than the knowledge of God; but when he is near them, and speaks to them familiarly, they wander through their own speculations, and seek above the clouds him whom they do not deign to acknowledge as present. Christ, therefore, blames the disciples for not acknowledging that the fullness of the Godhead was manifested in him. “I see,” (says he,) “that hitherto you have not known me in a right and proper manner, because you do not yet acknowledge the lively image of the Father which is exhibited in me.”

And henceforth you know him, and have seen him. He adds this, not only to soften the severity of the reproof, but likewise to accuse them of ingratitude and slothfulness, if they do not consider and inquire what has been given to them; for he said this rather for the purpose of commending his doctrine than of extolling their faith. The meaning therefore is, that God is now plainly exhibited to them if they would but open their eyes. The word see expresses the certainty of faith.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.