Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 14:9

Jesus *said to him, "Have I been so long with you, and yet you have not come to know Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; how can you say, ‘Show us the Father'?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Apostles;   Chiding;   Doubting;   God;   God Continued...;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Philip;   Scofield Reference Index - World-System;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Discernment-Dullness;   Divine;   Divinity;   Divinity-Humanity;   Dullness;   Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Ignorance;   Knowledge-Ignorance;   Seeing God;   Unknown, Christ;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Giving and Gifts;   Holy Spirit;   Jesus Christ;   Love;   Obedience;   Prayer;   Seeing;   Understanding;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ Is God;   Unity of God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - God;   Head;   Image;   Jesus christ;   John, gospel of;   Philip;   Revelation;   Son of god;   Trinity;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christians, Names of;   Image of God;   Jesus Christ;   Testimony;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Jesus Christ;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Philip;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Form;   Idol;   Jesus Christ;   Philip the Apostle;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Anthropology;   Anthropomorphism;   Christ, Christology;   Contentment;   Gospel;   Incarnation;   John, the Gospel of;   Likeness;   Mission(s);   Philip;   Revelation of God;   Time, Meaning of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Christianity;   God;   Holy Spirit;   Image;   Incarnation;   John, Theology of;   Logos;   Philip;   Sanctification, Sanctify;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Advent (2);   Authority in Religion;   Children of God;   Coming Again;   Consciousness;   Creator (Christ as);   Divinity of Christ;   Example;   God;   Humanity of Christ;   Image;   Love (2);   Mediator;   Mission;   Obedience (2);   Oneness;   Philip ;   Pity;   Preaching;   Preaching Christ;   Prophet;   Religion (2);   Reproach (2);   Revelation (2);   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Seeing;   Sight;   Slowness of Heart;   Son of God;   Sorrow, Man of Sorrows;   Trinity (2);   Union with God;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Philip ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Fruit;   Pentecost;   Samuel;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Philip;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Atonement;   Authority in Religion;   Children of God;   Image;   Johannine Theology, the;   Person of Christ;   Trinity;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for June 8;   Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 3;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 1;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He that hath seen me hath seen the Father - Could any creature say these words? Do they not evidently imply that Christ declared himself to his disciples to be the everlasting God?

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 14:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

So long time - For more than three years Jesus had been with them. He had raised the dead, cast out devils, healed the sick, done those things which no one could have done who had not come from God. In that time they had had full opportunity to learn his character and his mission from God. Nor was it needful, after so many proofs of his divine mission, that God should “visibly manifest” himself to them in order that they might be convinced that he came from him.

He that hath seen me - He that has seen my works, heard my doctrines, and understood my character. He that has given “proper attention” to the proofs that I have afforded that I came from God.

Hath seen the Father - The word “Father” in these passages seems to be used with reference to the divine nature, or to God represented “as a Father,” and not particularly to the distinction in the Trinity of Father and Son. The idea is that God, as God, or as a Father, had been manifested in the incarnation, the works, and the teachings of Christ, so that they who had seen and heard him might be said to have had a real view of God. When Jesus says, “hath seen the Father,” this cannot refer to the essence or substance of God, for He is invisible, and in that respect no man has seen God at any time. All that is meant when it is said that God is seen, is that some manifestation of him has been made, or some such exhibition as that we may learn his character, his will, and his plans. In this case it cannot mean that he that had seen Jesus with the bodily eyes had in the same sense seen God; but he that had been a witness of his miracles and of his transfiguration - that had heard his doctrines and studied his character - had had full evidence of his divine mission, and of the will and purpose of the Father in sending him. The knowledge of the Son was itself, of course, the knowledge of the Father. There was such an intimate union in their nature and design that he who understood the one understood also the other. See the notes at Matthew 11:27; also Luke 10:22; John 1:18.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and dost thou not know me, Philip? He that hath seen me hath seen the Father: how sayest thou, show us the Father?

Something in the mind of natural man is reluctant to accept the evidence that Jesus of Nazareth was actually Almighty God in human form. This reluctance on Philip's part might have been the thing that prevented his becoming a very distinguished apostle. About all that has come down to us concerning him is his name and the reluctance evidenced by passages like this.

He that hath seen me hath seen the Father ... Could Jesus have stated the fact of his deity any more clearly than here? All that he had said of himself as the door, the good shepherd, the living water, the Son of God, the Son of man, the light of the world, the bread of life, the way, the truth, and the life coupled with his mighty signs - all of this had still left Philip unable to make the great step of faith in Jesus as God; and there seems to be in the Saviour's words here an element of wonder that Philip had somehow failed to take it in.

Show us the Father ... We do not know just what Philip meant by this request, but Hunter thought he desired to see a theophany:

He asks for such a revelation of God as Moses enjoyed (Exodus 24:9-1; 33:18) ... He would like Jesus to pull aside the veil separating the seen from the unseen - to disclose a great Father-figure. But such a theophany is quite unnecessary.[6]

ENDNOTE:

[6] A. M. Hunter, op. cit., p. 142.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Jesus saith unto him, have I been so long time with you,.... Conversing familiarly with you, instructing you by my ministry, and performing so many miraculous works among you, for so long a time; see Hebrews 5:11;

and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? Surely you cannot be so ignorant as this comes to; as you have seen me with your bodily eyes, as a man, you must, know that I am God by the doctrines I have taught you, and the miracles I have wrought among you: and

he that hath seen me; not with the eyes of his body, but with the eyes of his understanding; he that has beheld the perfections of the Godhead in me:

hath seen the Father; the perfections which are in him also; for the same that are in me are in him, and the same that are in him are in me: I am the very image of him, and am possessed of the same nature, attributes, and glory, that he is; so that he that sees the one, sees the other:

and how sayest thou then show us the Father? such a request is a needless one, and betrays great weakness and ignorance.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 14:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-14.html. 1999.

People's New Testament

He that hath seen me hath seen the Father. Philip wanted a literal sight of God with the natural eyes, when God incarnate had been present with him for three years, manifesting the mind, the purity, the saving power, the fatherly tenderness, the unutterable love of the Father.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 14:9". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-14.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

So long time (τοσουτον χρονονtosouton chronon). Accusative of extent of time.

And dost thou not know me? (και ουκ εγνωκας μεkai ouk egnōkas me). Perfect active indicative of γινωσκωginōskō Jesus patiently repeats his language to Philip with the crisp statement: “he that hath seen me hath seen the Father” (ο εωρακως εμε εωρακεν τον πατεραho heōrakōs eme eōraken ton patera). Perfect active participle and perfect active indicative of οραωhoraō state of completion.

Thou
(συsu). Emphatic - After these years together.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Have I been ( εἰμι )

Literally, am I.

Known ( ἐγνωκάς )

Come to know.

Sayest thou ( σὺ )

Emphatic. Thou who didst say, “We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write” (John 1:46). Omit and before how sayest thou.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and dost thou not know me1, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father2; how sayest thou, Show us the Father?

  1. Have I been so long time with you, and dost thou not know me,
  2. Philip? The answer of Jesus tenderly rebukes Philip. The excellency of God is not physical, but spiritual. Righteousness, truth, love, holiness, etc. are all spiritual.

  3. He that hath seen me hath seen the Father. A physical revelation of God, if such a thing had been practicable or even possible, would have been of little or no benefit to the apostles. All the physical demonstrations at Mt. Sinai did not prevent the manufacture and worship of the golden calf.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 14:9". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Столько времени Я с вами. Христос по праву упрекает Филиппа. Очи его веры замутнены. Бог явился ему во Христе, а он Его не заметил. Что же помешало ему, кроме собственной неблагодарности? Так и сегодня плохо преуспевают в Евангелии те, кто, не довольствуясь одним Христом, бросаются в тонкие спекуляции и в них пытаются искать Бога. Эта глупая жажда рождается от презрения к смирению Христову, весьма на их взгляд недостойному: ведь в нем Он явил нам безмерную благость Отца.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

POWER THROUGH CHRIST

‘Because I live, ye shall live also.’

John 14:9

This was the word of comfort in the ears of the disciples, and the new and added sense and joy in a certainty of personality beyond the grave strengthened their wills, purified their characters, and uplifted them with a sense of wonderful dignity.

I. The graciousness of the truth—that is, if we are in Christ, though death come and the dust fall upon our coffins, we shall be more powerfully alive to help our friends who remain on earth—is one that is as stimulating to Christ-likeness and Christ-livingness as it is of cheer to those we leave behind us.

II. The personality of the risen Christ is guarantee of the living power of men who are His friends, to help their brethren here on earth, even after they have passed to the world of spirit beyond. The joy of the Resurrection morning is for us the joy of knowing that whatever in us men and women is of Christ shall not cease as an operative principle here on earth when we cease to live and move and serve the present hour, but shall still run on to the making of our earth fit for the coming of the Kingdom. The sting of death is not only sin, but it is fear lest all we hoped and toiled for have an end. But in the light of Easter morning we know that whatever is of Christ in our hope and toil shall live on, and help the coming of the better time which Christ spoke of as the Kingdom of God.

III. The aim and end of the risen Christ is the communication of vitality, contagion of personality, transmission of character. And we who would help forward that social idea which Jesus had before His eyes, and which He always spoke of as the Kingdom of God, must in this matter put on the mind of Christ, must pray to be in such living union with the Christ Whom we strive to follow that we may become sensible that His will is being done in or through us, as individual members of His body, for the helping of our time—His will Who said, ‘Because I live, ye shall live also.’

—Canon Rawnsley.

Illustration

‘What is to save the great industrial revolution that is going forward from pure materialism and ignoble and irreligious selfishness but the bringing back into the Labour movement and into the Socialist programme the personal Christ as Saviour of all our national society? We have, as Maurice once put it, either to Christianise Socialism or Socialise Christianity. It can, I believe, only be done by bringing back, not only the ethics of Christ, but His personality and the power of it into the problems that are ahead of us. We must preach and teach that the spirit work of Jesus Christ, our risen Lord, is “to set forth the principle of personality, to awaken the higher life of persons, to make a man come to himself,” that so we may arise and go unto the Father and the Kingdom of that Father in the wealth and health of individual character.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 14:9". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?

Ver. 9. Have I been so long, &c.] May not Christ justly shame and shent us all for knowing no more of him all this while? Ignorance under means of knowledge is a blushful sin, 1 Corinthians 15:34.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 14:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 14:9

The Surprise Christ felt

I. To Christ, that He was the revealer and the image of the Father was the one foremost truth of His life. Ever since He had sense, He had felt that, and it had grown with His growth and been the one proclamation of His ministry. The blind and the deaf in heart might, He thought, see and hear it, so intense, so vivid, was it to Him. And now one of His hearers asks a question, which suddenly makes Him feel that what is to Him as the sun in heaven is not perceived at all. What wonder that we hear in the question the note of wondering surprise? "Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known Me?" At such a time our tendency is to be angry, or to turn aside with scornful silence, or to be filled with the sense of wrong; mark in contrast with his, the tenderness of Christ, a tenderness which we hear in every word of the reply. There is a faint touch of reproach in it; but it is the reproach of love, and it would not hurt the most sensitive heart. And this was said at a time when irritation might have been indeed excused, when His whole soul was darkened with pain and presentiment when He felt with exquisite surprise that all He had ever said had been mistaken.

II. The answer itself to Philip's question comes before us now, and is a striking answer, astonishing, indeed, from its sublime boldness, and separated by that from the utterances of every other prophet, none of whom dared to say anything like this: "He that hath seen Me hath seen the Father." Who knows Me, knows God; who hears Me, hears God. Nor is this an isolated saying; it is the constantly repeated thought of Christ, repeated in fifty different ways. That was Christ's teaching concerning God and Himself, and therefore concerning God and man. All our life is God's life. We are in His hand and abide in Him, and no one can pluck us out of His hand. We are eternal because He is eternal; and when all mankind shall have arrived at likeness to Christ, it will have arrived at likeness to God. He who shall see the perfected humanity shall say, "He who hath seen humanity, hath seen the Father."

S. A. Brooke, The Spirit of the Christian Life, p. 123.


References: John 14:9.—H. S. Holland, Oxford and Cambridge Journal, Nov. 22nd, 1883? A. Maclaren, A Year's Ministry, 2nd series, p. 59; G. Brooks, Five Hundred Outlines, p. 307; S. Green, Christian World Pulpit, vol. i., p. 261. John 14:10-14.—W. Roberts. Ibid., vol. ix., p. 250. John 14:10-28.—Contemporary Pulpit, vol. v., p. 309. John 14:11.—W. M. Taylor, The Gospel Miracles, p. 29. John 14:12.—C. Wilson, Christian World Pulpit, vol. x., p. 241; J. Aldis, Ibid., vol. xi., p. 376; Homilist, vol. iii., p. 493. John 14:12, John 14:13.—A. Murray, With Christ in the School of Prayer, p. 140. John 14:13.—Ibid., p. 48; E. W. Shalders, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxiv., p. 298. John 14:13-14.—Ibid., p. 180. John 16:14.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. x. p. 333. John 14:15.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxxii., No. 1932; G. Calthrop, Words Spoken to my Friends, p. 177; Parker, Christian Commonwealth, vol. vi., p. 347; Homiletic Quarterly, vol. i., p. 199.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-14.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

9.] The Son is the only Exponent of the Father to men: see ch. John 12:44-45 : Colossians 1:15; Hebrews 1:3; 1 Timothy 6:16. This seeing of the Father in Him, is not only seeing His bodily presence, but knowing Him ( οὐκ ἔγνωκάς με).

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 14:9". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 14:9. λέγει, saith) The reply to, Show us, is contained in John 14:9-11; the answer to, it sufficeth us, is contained in John 14:12, etc., “The works that I do, shall ye do also—If ye ask anything in My name, I will do it.”— οὐκ ἔγνωκάς με, hast thou not known Me?) This is expressed by the consequent. Since thou dost deny that the Father is known to thee, thou virtually [by consequence] deniest that I am known to thee. But thou dost know Me, therefore by that very fact thou knowest the Father; by reason of the consummate unity which subsists between us.— ἑωρακὼς ἐμέ, ἑώρακε τὸν πατέρα, he who hath seen Me, hath seen the Father) Just as the soul, which by itself is not perceived, is perceived by means of what it does through the instrumentality of the body: so he sees the Father, who sees Christ. In every thought concerning God, we ought to set Christ before us. See Colossians 1:15, note, “The image of the invisible God.” That expression, מַלְאַךְ פָּנָיו, Angel of His face, Bechai interprets מלאך שהוא פניו The Angel who is His face. Comp. Psalms 139:7, “Whither shall I flee from Thy presence?” Chrysostom remarks, He who seeth the creature, doth not also see the essence of God ( τὴν οὐσίαν). If any man seeth Me, saith He, he seeth My Father: but if He were of another and distinct essence, He would not have said this,—No one, who is ignorant of gold, can see the essence of gold in silver.— καὶ πῶς) καί appears to be repeated from John 14:5. N. I., almost all the Latin MSS., Iren. and Augustine, omit the καί in John 14:9.(346)

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 14:9". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Our Saviour still insists upon the oneness of himself with his Father, and the personal union of the Divine and human nature in him; for otherwise the apostles might have been with Christ a long time, and known him, and yet not have seen nor known the Father. But that supposed, none that had seen Christ, but must have seen the Father also, there being but one God.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 14:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.Hath seen me hath seen the Father—For the reasons just above mentioned, that the Father dwells in the fulness of his attributes of power, wisdom, and goodness concentrated into the human person, and made as fully visible to man as man’s sense can grasp.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-14.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Philip and the other disciples had not yet completely realized who Jesus was. They did not understand what John revealed in the prologue of this Gospel, namely, that the Son is the exact representation of the Father (cf. John 1:18). Long exposure to Jesus should have produced greater insight in these disciples. Still that insight is only the product of God"s gracious enlightenment (cf. Matthew 16:17; 1 Corinthians 2:6-16).

"No material image or likeness can adequately depict God. Only a person can give knowledge of him since personality cannot be represented by an impersonal object." [Note: Tenney, " John," p145.]

This was another clear claim to deity.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-14.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 14:9. Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not learned to know me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father: how sayest thou, Show us the Father? ‘Have I been with you,’ literally, ‘Am I with you,’ the very words of John 14:3. The words are those of astonishment and sorrow that the effect of all this spiritual intercourse has failed; and the declaration of Jesus in the latter half of the verse rests upon the fact that He is the complete expression of the Father (comp. chap. John 1:18). He does not say ‘my Father’ but ‘the Father,’ because He speaks not of the personal relation between the Father and Himself, but of the light in which God is revealed as Father to all who learn to know Him in the Son.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 14:9. Jesus corrects the error, and guides the craving to its true satisfaction. [ may be a gloss for the dative which is found in [85] [86] [87]. The manifestation which Philip craves had been made, and made continuously for some considerable time; for so long that it was matter of surprise and regret to Jesus that Philip needed still to be taught that he who saw Jesus saw the Father. It is implied that not to see the Father in Jesus was not to know Him.

[85] Codex Sinaiticus (sæc. iv.), now at St. Petersburg, published in facsimile type by its discoverer, Tischendorf, in 1862.

[86] Codex Bezae

[87] Codex Regius--eighth century, represents an ancient text, and is often in agreement with and B.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 14:9". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

===============================

[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Qui videt me, videt & Patrem. See St. John Chrysostom, Greek: om od. p. 435. Nov. Ed. si alterius esset substantiæ, non hoc dixisset, Greek: ei de eteras ousias en, ouk an touto eipen. See St. Cyril, p. 777.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 14:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

so long time. Philip, one of the first called. See John 1:43.

with. Greek. meta. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 14:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?

Jesus saith unto him Have I been so long time with you and yet hast thou not known me Philip? he Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father - hath seen all of the Father that can or ever will be seen; hath seen the Incarnate Manifestation of the Godhead;

And how sayest thou. Show us the Father? To strain after expected but impossible discovery can only end in disappointment. Jesus, therefore, shuts up Philip-and with him all who waste their mental energies on such fruitless alms and expectations-to Himself, in whom dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodily.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-14.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

9. Whoever has seen me. Jesus himself is the “SOMETHING VISIBLE!”

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 14:9". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-14.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip?—More exactly, . . . hast thou not recognised Me, as in John 14:7. Comp. the reference in John 14:8, from which it will be seen that Philip was one of the first-called disciples, and had occupied a prominent position in the band of Apostles. There is in our Lord’s words a tone of sadness and of warning. They utter the loneliness of a holiness and greatness which is not understood. The close of life is at hand, and Philip, who had followed Him from the first, shows by this question that he did not even know what the work and purposes of that life had been. They speak to all Christian teachers, thinkers, workers. There is a possibility that men should be in the closest apparent nearness to Christ, and yet have never learnt the meaning of the words they constantly hear and utter; and have never truly known the purpose of Christ’s life.

He that hath seen me hath seen the Father.—Comp. Note on John 14:7, and Philip’s own answer to Nathanael, “Come and see” (John 1:46). The demand of Philip is one which is constantly being read, and the answer is one that constantly holds good. Men are ever thinking and saying, “Shew us the Father and it sufficeth us.” “Give us something in religion upon which the soul can rest. We are weary of the doubts, and strifes, and dogmas which are too often called religion. We want something which can be real food for the soul. We cannot feed upon the husks which the swine do eat; and we believe that in the Father’s house there is, even for the hired servants, bread enough and to spare. We are not irreligious, but we are impatient of what is put before us as religion. Give us truth! Give us life! Let it be free and open as the air of heaven, and we will gladly accept it, embrace it, live it.” All this is the heart of the child seeking the presence of the Father. That Father has been manifested in the person of the Son. In the Life and Truth revealed in Him is the full revelation of God. In Him is the Bread of Life to satisfy every want of every man. He that hath seen Him hath seen the Father. How then can men say, Shew us the Father? (Comp. Note on John 12:44-45.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?
Have
Mark 9:19
he
7,20; 12:45; Colossians 1:15; Philippians 2:6; Hebrews 1:3
how
Genesis 26:9; Psalms 11:1; Jeremiah 2:23; Luke 12:56; 1 Corinthians 15:12
Reciprocal: Exodus 23:21 - my name;  Exodus 24:10 - saw;  Numbers 14:14 - art seen;  Psalm 24:10 - The Lord;  Isaiah 40:28 - thou not known;  Micah 5:4 - in the majesty;  Zechariah 13:7 - the man;  Matthew 10:3 - Philip;  Matthew 17:4 - it is;  Matthew 23:39 - Ye shall not;  Mark 3:18 - Philip;  Mark 8:21 - How;  Mark 9:5 - it is;  Luke 9:41 - how;  John 1:14 - we;  John 1:18 - he hath;  John 1:44 - Philip;  John 2:11 - manifested;  John 5:13 - he that;  John 5:18 - God was;  John 5:37 - Ye have;  John 6:46 - any;  John 10:30 - GeneralJohn 10:38 - that ye;  John 12:21 - Philip;  John 12:41 - saw;  John 15:24 - but;  John 17:3 - the only;  John 17:5 - glorify;  John 17:21 - as;  Acts 1:13 - Philip;  1 Corinthians 8:6 - one God;  2 Corinthians 4:4 - the image;  2 Corinthians 4:6 - in the;  Colossians 2:2 - of the Father;  Colossians 2:9 - in;  1 Timothy 6:16 - whom;  2 Peter 1:17 - God;  1 John 2:13 - ye have known;  1 John 2:23 - denieth;  1 John 5:20 - This is

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 14:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-14.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 9. "Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known Me, Philip? he that hath seen Me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Show us the Father?"

Jesus could not possibly have cut off all immediate relation of believers to the Father, and required that the Father be sought only in Himself, if it were not that the being of the Father and the being of the Son perfectly coincided with each other, and the whole fulness of the Gospel dwelt in Himself bodily, and the Father had poured into Him all the riches of His essence. Otherwise, it would have been a betrayal both of the Father and of the believers. The Supreme God cannot give His glory to another; and the human heart thirsts for God, for the living God, nor can it be satisfied with any quasi-god, with any mere "divine being."

The appeal by name served to prick the disciple's conscience, and to remind him that he had become alius a seipso, an alien to himself.

Bengel rightly deduces from the Lord's utterance here the inviolable rule: In omni cogitatione de Deo debemus Christum proponere. The duty, however, is subordinate here. The main thing is the consolation, the great grace, that the God who in Himself is a hidden God, has become perfectly revealed to us in Christ. "Have I been so long time with you," has now for us become a much wader and more comprehensive truth.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 14:9". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.Have I been so long time with you? Christ justly reproves Philip for not having the eyes of his faith pure. He had God present in Christ, and yet he did not behold him. What prevented him but his own ingratitude? Thus, in the present day, they who, in consequence of not being satisfied with Christ alone, are hurried into foolish speculations, in order to seek God in them, make little progress in the Gospel. This foolish desire springs from the meanness of Christ’s low condition; and this is very unreasonable, for by that humiliation he exhibits the infinite goodness of God.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 14:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-14.html. 1840-57.