Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:12

While I was with them, I was keeping them in Your name which You have given Me; and I guarded them and not one of them perished but the son of perdition, so that the Scripture would be fulfilled.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Grace of God;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Judas (Jude);   Prayer;   Reprobacy;   Wicked (People);   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Believers;   Christ;   Christ's;   Church;   Family;   Fulfilment of Prophecy;   Importunity;   Perdition;   Prayer;   Prophecy;   Secret Prayer;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Declaration;   Disciples/apostles;   Giving and Gifts;   Glory;   Hate;   Jesus Christ;   Judas Iscariot;   Knowledge;   Losing and Things Lost;   Love;   Manifestation;   Sanctification;   Sending and Those Sent;   Truth;   Unity;   Word of God;   World;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prayer, Intercessory;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Judas;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Backsliding;   Judas;   Priest;   Shepherd;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - God, Name of;   Mediator, Mediation;   Obedience;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Commentary;   Covenant;   Intercession of Christ;   Perseverance;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Predestination;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Hypostatic union;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Judas Iscariot;   Perdition;   Shepherd;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Election;   John, the Gospel of;   Perdition;   Security of the Believer;   Unity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Ephesians, Epistle to;   Perdition;   Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Call, Calling;   Communion (2);   Complacency;   Destruction (2);   Elect, Election ;   Endurance;   Force;   Foresight;   Impotence;   Interpretation;   Judas Iscariot (2);   Lost;   Love;   Mental Characteristics;   Merit;   Necessity;   Numbers;   Old Testament (I. Christ as Fulfilment of);   Perdition;   Prayer (2);   Quotations (2);   Salvation;   Scripture (2);   Son, Sonship;   Spirit ;   Universalism (2);   Waste;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Body;   Jerusalem;   Keeper;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Damn;   Inspiration;   Judas Iscariot;   Perdition;   Prayers of Jesus;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for July 13;   Every Day Light - Devotion for October 10;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I kept them in thy name - In thy doctrine and truth.

But the son of perdition - So we find that Judas, whom all account to have been lost, and whose case at best is extremely dubious, was first given by God to Christ? But why was he lost? Because, says St. Augustin, he would not be saved: and he farther adds, After the commission of his crime, he might have returned to God and have found mercy. Aug. Serm. 125; n. 5; Psalm 146:1-10. n. 20; Ser. 352, n. 8; and in Psalm 108:1-13. See Calmet, who remarks: Judas only became the son of perdition because of his wilful malice, his abuse of the grace and instructions of Christ, and was condemned through his own avarice, perfidy, insensibility, and despair. In behalf of the mere possibility of the salvation of Judas, see the observations at the end of Acts 1 (note).

Perdition or destruction is personified; and Judas is represented as being her son, i.e. one of the worst of men - one whose crime appears to have been an attempt to destroy, not only the Savior of the world, but also the whole human race. And all this he was capable of through the love of money! How many of those who are termed creditable persons in the world have acted his crime over a thousand times! To Judas and to all his brethren, who sell God and their souls for money, and who frequently go out of this world by a violent voluntary death, we may apply those burning words of Mr. Blair, with very little alteration:

"O cursed lust of gold! when for thy sake

The wretch throws up his interest in both worlds,

First hanged in this, then damned in that to come."

That the scripture might be fulfilled - Or, Thus the scripture is fulfilled: see Psalm 41:9; Psalm 109:8; compared with Acts 1:20. Thus the traitorous conduct of Judas has been represented and illustrated by that of Ahitophel, and the rebellion of Absalom against his father David. Thus what was spoken concerning them was also fulfilled in Judas: to him therefore these scriptures are properly applied, though they were originally spoken concerning other traitors. Hence we plainly see that the treachery of Judas was not the effect of the prediction, for that related to a different case; but, as his was of the same nature with that of the others, to it the same scriptures were applicable.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:12". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

While I was with them in the world - While I was engaged with them among other men - surrounded by the people and the temptations of the world. Jesus had now finished his work among the men of the world, and was performing his last offices with his disciples.

I kept them - By my example, instructions, and miracles. I preserved them from apostasy.

In thy name - In the knowledge and worship of thee. See John 17:6-11.

Those that thou gavest me … - The word “gavest” is evidently used by the Saviour to denote not only to give to him to be his real followers, but also as apostles. It is used here, probably, in the sense of giving as apostles. God had so ordered it by his providence that they had been given to him to be his apostles and followers; but the terms “thou gavest me” do not of necessity prove that they were true believers. Of Judas Jesus knew that he was a deceiver and a devil, John 6:70; “Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil?” Judas is there represented as having been chosen by the Saviour to the apostleship, and this is equivalent to saying that he was given to him for this work; yet at the same time he knew his character, and understood that he had never been renewed.

None of them - None of those chosen to the apostolic office.

But the son of perdition - See the notes at Matthew 1:1. The term son was given by the Hebrews to those who possessed the character described by the word or name following. Thus, sons of Belial - those who possessed his character; children of wisdom those who were wise, Matthew 11:19. Thus Judas is called a son of perdition because he had the character of a destroyer. He was a traitor and a murderer. And this shows that he who knew the heart regarded his character as that of a wicked man one whose appropriate name was that of a son of perdition.

That the scripture … - See the notes at John 13:18. Compare Psalm 12:9.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-17.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

While I was with them, I kept them in thy name which thou hast given me: and I guarded them, and not one of them perished, but the son of perdition; that the Scriptures might be fulfilled.

Thy name which thou hast given me ... Again, the compound title of John 17:3 is suggested.

I guarded them ... Jesus Christ successfully accomplished the work God gave him to do, choosing, instructing, guarding, correcting, and encouraging the Twelve; and he was then praying for them with all of his heart, adding prophetically that not one of them would be lost except Judas.

But the son of perdition ... This reference to Judas sheds light on the identity of "the man of sin" (2 Thessalonians 2:3), indicating that he will be another pretender ascribing to himself apostolic authority and power. Any self-styled "apostle" today must be judged in the light of these Scriptures.

That the Scriptures might be fulfilled ... refers to Psalms 41:9. See under John 13:2 and John 13:18.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

While I was with them in the world,.... This does not imply that Christ was not in the world now, for he was; but signifies that he was just going out of it; and that his continuance in it was very short: nor that he was, and would be no longer with his disciples; for this is to be understood of his bodily, not of his spiritual presence; in which respect Christ is with his people whilst they are on earth, and they are with him when he is in heaven:

I kept them in thy name; by his Father's authority and power, in his doctrine:

those that thou gavest me I have kept; that is, those that were given him to be his apostles;

and none of them is lost; these he kept close to himself, and from the evil of the world, and from temporal and eternal ruin:

but the son of perdition; Judas, a child of Satan, whose name is Apollyon the destroyer, who was now about to betray his Lord and master; and was one that was appointed to eternal ruin and destruction, of which he was justly deserving; and which is no instance of the apostasy of saints, since though he was given to Christ as an apostle, yet not in eternal election, to be saved by him:

that the Scripture might be fulfilled; this respects either Christ's keeping of his people, and their final perseverance, whereby the Scriptures that speak of it are fulfilled; or rather the destruction of Judas, whereby such passages as speak of that, have their accomplishment, particularly Psalm 109:8; Some have thought that this only refers to the general sense of the Scriptures, both the law and prophets; that some are chosen to everlasting life, and others are appointed to wrath; that some are saved, and others lost; some sons of God, and others sons of perdition; but it rather seems to regard some particular passage or passages of Scripture relating to Judas, his character, condition and end, and which are very manifestly pointed at, in the psalm referred to;

"As for the servants whom I have given thee, there shall not one of them perish; for I will require them from among thy number.' (2 Esdras 2:26)

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I kept — guarded.

them in thy name — acting as Thy Representative on earth.

none of them is lost, but the son of perdition — It is not implied here that the son of perdition was one of those whom the Father had given to the Son, but rather the contrary (John 13:18) [Webster and Wilkinson]. It is just as in Luke 4:26, Luke 4:27, where we are not to suppose that the woman of Sarepta (in Sidon) was one of the widows of Israel, nor Naaman the Syrian one of the lepers in Israel, though the language - the same as here - might seem to express it.

son of perdition — doomed to it (2 Thessalonians 2:3; Mark 14:21).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-17.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

None of them is lost, but the son of perdition. God had given him twelve; he had kept them in the name of the Father, and only one was lost, Judas, the traitor, the son of perdition, which the Scripture had predicted. See Psalm 41:9.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 17:12". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-17.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I kept (ετηρουνetēroun). Imperfect active of τηρεωtēreō “I continued to keep.”

I guarded (επυλαχαephulaxa). First aorist (constative) active of πυλασσωphulassō Christ was the sentinel (πυλαχphulax Acts 5:23) for them. Is he our sentinel now?

But the son of perdition
(ει μη ο υιος της απωλειαςei mē ho huios tēs apōleias). The very phrase for antichrist (2 Thessalonians 2:3). Note play on απωλετοapōleto perished (second aorist middle indicative of απολλυμιapollumi). It means the son marked by final loss, not annihilation, but meeting one‘s destiny (Acts 2:25). A sad and terrible exception (Mark 14:21).

The scripture
(η γραπηhē graphē). It is not clear whether this is John‘s own comment or the word of Jesus. Not in John 18:9. The Scripture referred to is probably Psalm 41:9 quoted in John 13:18 with the same formula ινα πληρωτηιhina plērōthēi which see there.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

In the world

Omit.

I kept ( ἐτήρουν )

Imperfect tense. I continued to keep. The I is emphatic: I kept them, now do Thou keep them.

I kept ( ἐτήρουν )

Rev., rightly, I guarded. The A.V. overlooks the distinction between the two words for keeping. The former word means, I preserved them; the latter, I guarded them as a means to their preservation. See on reserved, 1 Peter 1:4.

Is lost - perdition ( ἀπώλετο - ἀπωλείας )

A play of words: “None of them perished, but the son of perishing ” (Westcott).

The scripture ( ἡ γραφὴ )

See close of note on John 5:47, and see on Mark 12:10.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-17.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.

Those whom thou hast given me I have guarded, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition — So one even of them whom God had given him is lost. So far was even that decree from being unchangeable! That the Scripture might be fulfilled - That is, whereby the Scripture was fulfilled. The son of perdition signifies one that deservedly perishes; as a son of death, 2 Samuel 12:5; children of hell, Matthew 23:15, and children of wrath, Ephesians 2:3, signify persons justly obnoxious to death, hell, wrath. Psalm 109:8.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 17:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

While I was with them, I kept them in thy name which thou hast given me: and I guarded them, and not one of them perished1, but the son of perdition2; that the scripture might be fulfilled3.

  1. While I was with them, I kept them in thy name which thou hast given me: and I guarded them, and not one of them perished. Jesus emphasizes the fervency of his petition by urging his own conduct as to that which he asks. He asks the Father to care for those for whom he had himself been so painstakingly careful that not one had been lost, save him whom it was impossible to save, and whose loss the Scripture had predicted--a loss in no way chargeable against the loving fidelity of the Good Shepherd.

  2. But the son of perdition. Literally, the son of perishing.

  3. That the scripture might be fulfilled. See Psalms 41:9.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:12". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Когда Я был в мире. Христос говорит, что соблюл их во имя Отца, ибо стал служителем, свершающим все лишь божественной силой. Поэтому Он хочет сказать: Было бы абсурдным, если бы они погибли теперь. Словно с Его уходом сила Божия уничтожится или умрет. Но кажется весьма глупым, что обязанность хранить верных Христос оставляет Отцу, как будто, завершая жизненный путь, перестает быть стражем Своих людей. Решение весьма просто: здесь идет речь лишь о видимой страже, завершившейся со смертью Христовой. Покуда Христос жил на земле, Он не должен был заимствовать извне силу, чтобы хранить учеников, довольствуясь лишь лицом Посредника, временно явившегося под видом раба. Теперь же Он велит ученикам: как только они лишатся Его внешней помощи, сразу же устремить свой взор к небу. Отсюда мы заключаем: Христос и сегодня не меньше хранит верных, чем хранил тогда. Но иным способом. Ведь сейчас в Нем открыто заблистало божеское величие.

Которых Ты дал Мне. Христос снова пользуется тем же самым доводом. Не подобает Отцу отвергать тех, кого Сын сохранил до конца служения по Его же заповеди. Христос как бы говорит: Я верно исполнил все, заповеданное Тобою, и сделал так, что никто не погиб, будучи в Моей руке. Теперь же Я предаю их Тебе, и Тебе прилежит обязанность следить за тем, чтобы они спаслись. Христос открыто исключает из этого Иуду, и делает так не без причины. Хотя Иуда и не был избранным и не принадлежал истинному стаду Божию, достоинство его служения создавало видимость всего этого. И никто не подумал бы о нем иначе, покуда он оставался в столь почетном сословии. Итак, что касается грамматики, то эта оговорка не уместна. Если же посмотреть на суть дела, то Христос выразился по общему людскому обыкновению. Кроме того, дабы кто не подумал, что вечное избрание Божие поколебалось в лице Иуды, Христос сразу же добавляет: он изначально был сыном погибели. Этими словами Христос хочет сказать, что падение Иуды, неожиданно случившееся перед взором людей, было заранее предузнано Богом. Ведь сыном погибели евреи называют человека, уже погибшего или предназначенного к погибели.

Да сбудется Писание. Это относится к предыдущему предложению. Иуда отпал, чтобы Писание исполнилось. Но дурно поступит тот, кто сделает вывод: падение Иуды надо приписать скорее Богу, нежели ему самому. Ведь пророчество как будто создало для него необходимость. Но исход дел не должен приписываться пророчеству только потому, что оно его предсказывает. И пророки возвещали только то, что произошло бы и при их молчании. Итак, не здесь надо искать причину событий. Признаю: ничто не происходит без божественного предустановления, но здесь идет речь только о Писании. Налагает ли его проповедь и пророчества на людей необходимость? Ложность сего мнения я только что показал. И Христос вовсе не хотел причину погибели Иуды приписать Писанию. Он лишь устраняет повод для соблазна, способного поколебать немощные души. Основание же состоит в том, что Дух Божий уже давно предсказал это событие. Мы же обычно пугаемся и боимся чего-то нового. И это – весьма полезное и широко применимое наставление. Почему сегодня большая часть людей подвержена соблазнам? Потому что им не помогают свидетельства Писания, коими Бог уберегает Своих и своевременно предсказывает, с каким злом они должны встретиться в будущем.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

world

kosmos = mankind. (See Scofield "Matthew 4:8").

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 17:12". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-17.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

12 While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.

Ver. 12. But the son of perdition] This exception shows that Judas was never of Christ’s body, for can he be a Saviour of a son of perdition? But why is he then excepted? First, by reason of his office he seemed to be of his body. Secondly, our Saviour speaketh here in particular of the twelve; and to be an apostle was in itself but an outward calling.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 17:12

Christ's Care for His Disciples

I. Observe, first, what a comforting thing it is to know that Christ would sooner work a miracle to restrain the enemies of His servants, than leave those servants to an encounter too great for their strength. The disciples, we may believe, would have been sure to fall away, had the band which seized Christ laid hands also on them; they had not yet received grace sufficient for the trial, therefore were they miraculously delivered. Apostasy would have been inevitable, and thus God never suffers it to be. But we dare not say that afterwards, when they had received grace sufficient for the trial, apostasy became impossible. It was no longer true that they must fall, through not having strength enough; it was still true that they might fall, through not using strength aright.

II. In place of procuring His followers an opportunity for escape, might not Christ have imparted an ability to endure? Though God could have given to the disciples grace adequate to martyrdom, he could not have given it consistently with the laws which prescribe His dealings with accountable creatures. It would have taken more grace than could be bestowed without destroying all freedom of will. Remember that grace is that in which you are bidden to grow; and in spiritual stature no more than in bodily is the infant made the giant with no stage between. The spiritual temple rises stone by stone, as beneath the hands of a builder; it does not soar at once, wall—dome—pinnacle—complete, as beneath the wand of an enchanter.

III. Christ's promises and purposes in regard of His people are large and comprehensive. In covenanting to give us eternal life, Christ hath also covenanted to put His shield round us, that we may be kept from all the power of the enemy. The saving of the disciples from bodily danger might be taken as an assurance that Christ would not fail to conduct them safely to His heavenly kingdom; and therefore was it a sort of primary accomplishment of the gracious purpose that none of them should be lost. What a brightness would it shed over present deliverances, what a sweetness would it give to present mercies, were all in the habit of regarding them as so many earnests of a rich inheritance above!

H. Melvill, Penny Pulpit, No. 1875 (see also Voices of the Year, vol. ii., p. 195).


References: John 17:12.—S. Cox, Expositions, 1st series, pp. 331, 348. John 17:12-19.—T. Birkett Dover, The Ministry of Mercy, p. 141.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-17.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 17:12. While I was with them "During my personal abode with them, I kept them in the firm faith, and in thesteadfast practice of the precepts of my holy religion, so far as I revealed those unto them. I say the twelve men whom thou gavest me for apostles I have thus kept, insomuch that none of them have apostatized, but Judas Iscariot, that wicked person, who deserves perdition; and therefore it was long ago predicted in the scriptures, particularly in Psalms 109:8." See on ch. John 13:19. As the phrase, son of death, 1 Samuel 26:16. [Margin,] signifies one who deserves death; and a child of hell, Matthew 23:15 signifies one who deserves hell; so here son of perdition, signifies a person who deserves perdition.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 17:12". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-17.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe, here, 1. That those which shall be saved, are given unto Christ, and committed to his care and trust.

2. That none of those that are given unto Christ, as his charge, and committed to his care and trust, shall be finally lost: Those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost: it follows, but the Son of perdition.

A person may be said to be the son of perdition two ways; actively and passively.

Actively, he is so who makes it his work and business to destroy others.

Passively, he is a son of perdition, who for his wickedness in destroying others, is destroyed himself.

Judeas was a son of perdition in both these senses; his heart was maliciously set upon destroying Christ, and willfully set upon his own destruction: his coveteousness and hypocrisy prompted him to betray our Saviour, his despair provoked him to destroy himself.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:12". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

12. ἐφύλαξα] See ch. John 10:28-30. The aor. should be adhered to again: I kept them. The Lord here, as Cyril remarks, compares His keeping of His own, to that by the Father,—in a way only accountable by both Persons being of equal Power and Dignity.

οὐδεὶς εἰ μὴ] So that Judas was of the number οὓς δέδωκάς μοι of John 17:9,—shewing us (1) the sense in which those words must be understood (see above); and (2) that of such persons it is true that there is for them no ‘gratia irresistibilis,’ no ‘keeping in God’s Name’ independently of their ‘keeping God’s word,’ John 17:6, which Judas did not do.

ὁ υἱ. τ. ἀπ.] See ref. 2 Thess. As the other disciples by true τήρησις of the divine ῥήματα given to them, rose from being natural men to be the children of God, so Judas, through want of the same, sunk from the state of the natural man to that of the lost—the children of the devil (Olsh. nearly).

Remark, it is not οὐδέναἀπώλεσα, εἰ μὴ τὸν υἱὸν τῆς ἀπ.: Christ did not lost him (compare ch. John 18:9, where there is no exception), but he lost himself.

ἡ γραφή—in which this was indicated, viz. the passages alleged by Peter, Acts 1:20; see ch. John 13:18. Beware again of any evasion of the full telic sense of ἵνα.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 17:12". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-17.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:12. ἐγῶ ἐτήρουν· ἐφύλαξε, I kept them all the time: I guarded them) Jesus settles accounts (as it were) with the Father: ἐτήρουν has respect to τήρησον, John 17:11, “Keep through Thine own name.” What I have heretofore done, saith He, do thou hereafter: ἐτήρουν, I was keeping, I kept the whole time, viz. by My power: ἐφύλαξα, I guarded, viz. by My watchfulness [The Engl. Vers. loses the distinction by translating both verbs, kept]. The same verbs occur in 1 John 5:18; 1 John 5:21, “He who is begotten of God keepeth ( τηρεῖ) himself:” “Little children, guard ( φύλαξατε) yourselves from (be on your guard against) idols.”— οὐδεὶς, none) This too has reference to the future; ch. John 18:9, [Jesus to those apprehending Him saith, “I am He, if therefore ye seek Me, let these go their way. That the saying might be fulfilled, ‘Of them which Thou gavest Me, have I lost none.’ ”]— εἰ μὴ, except) A sad exception.— υἱὸς τῆς ἀπωλείας) The article is strongly demonstrative, “that son of perdition;” he of whom the prediction has been given; who has destroyed himself. Acts 1:25, “Judas by transgression fell, that he might go to his own place;” for whom it would have been good that he had not been born. He does not name Judas. Comp. Psalms 16:4, “I will not take up their names into my lips.” We indeed shall have to render an account of the individuals whom we have suffered to be lost by our neglect.—[ γραφὴ, the Scripture) Of such moment is the Scripture, that Christ Himself, even in His address to the Father, appeals to it.—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:12". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Christ speaks here of himself as one who had already died, was risen, and ascended, though none of all these things were past, because they were so suddenly to come to pass. I have, (saith our Saviour), for all the time that I have abode in the world, and conversed with them,

kept them in thy name, i.e. in the steady owning and profession of thy truth; or (if we read it, through thy name) it signifieth through thy power, and the influence of thy grace. I have not so kept all that came to hear me, but all

those whom thou gavest me by the act of thy eternal counsel; or whom thou gavest me to be my apostles: and none of them is proved an apostate, but the son of perdition: none of them is lost whom thou gavest me by thy eternal gift, none of them whom thou gavest me to be my apostles, but one who, though he was my apostle, and in that sense given to me, yet was never given me by thy eternal gift, as one to be by me redeemed, and brought to eternal life and salvation; for he was a son of perdition: we have this term applied to antichrist, 2 Thessalonians 2:3. As the son of death, 2 Samuel 12:5, signifies one appointed to die, or that deserveth to die; and the child of hell, Matthew 23:15, signifieth one who deserveth hell; so the son of perdition may either signify one destined to perdition, or one that walketh in the high and right road to perdition, or rather both; one who being passed over in God’s eternal counsels, as to such as shall be saved, hath by his own wilful apostasy brought himself to eternal perdition, or into such a guilt as I know thou wilt destroy him. And by this the Holy Scripture is fulfilled, Psalms 109:8, for that is the portion of Scripture here intended, as is apparent from Acts 1:20, where the apostle applies that text to Judas, who is here spoken of. Other scriptures also were thus fulfilled, as Psalms 41:9, compared with John 13:18.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Я соблюдал их во имя Твое Как Иисус сказал в 6:37-40, 44, Он защищал их и хранил их от мира. В 18:1-11 можно видеть один пример этого. Верующие принадлежат Христу и Богу, поэтому они имеют душевный покой. См. пояснения к 10:28, 29.

сына погибели Эти слова указывают на Иуду, говоря о его участи, т.е. вечном осуждении (Мф. 7:13; Деян. 8:20; Рим. 9:22; Флп. 1:28; 3:19; 1Тим. 6:9; Евр. 10:39; 2Пет. 2:1; 3:7; Отк. 17:8, 11). Отступничество Иуды не было неудачей со стороны Иисуса, так как Писание это предвидело и предопределило (Пс. 40:10; 108:8; ср. 13:18).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 17:12". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

I kept them in thy name; by the manifestation of thy character and will in my instructions and example.

Son of perdition; Judas, whose ruin was foretold in the Scriptures. Psalms 109:8; Acts 1:20. Those manifestations of God by which he makes known his character and will, the duty and blessedness of serving him, and the sin and misery of neglecting him, are means by which he keeps his people with his mighty power, through faith unto salvation. 1 Peter 1:5.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12.While—In the five ensuing verses Jesus contemplates his apostles in relation to their earthly dangers, as by him faithfully kept, (albeit that one is lost,) in the midst of a hated world, from which they must not be withdrawn, though while in it they are not of it. While’ in the worldHere, as throughout this intercession, his standpoint is beyond this world.

I kept them—Kept them, not like a purse of coin, locked in an iron safe, as a mere thing; nor as a prisoner, locked in a bolted cell, as an unfree agent, but as a child is kept in a loved home, from which he is able to escape by a power of his own. Such keeping of a true free agent is intended to be sure only when the kept one prefers to be kept. No divine guardianship throughout the Bible engages to secure a Christian from voluntary apostacy.

The son of perdition—Stier well remarks that wherever in the Holy Scriptures the figurative phrase child of an evil thing is used, it indicates the wilful, guilty, and fixed tendency of the being. So child of hell, Matthew 23:15; children of disobedience, Ephesians 2:2; so also man of sin, 2 Thessalonians 2:3. Son of perdition, therefore, indicates one who by his own wilful, guilty, personal tending, lands in final destruction. But it is plain, from the previous part of the verse, that this son of perdition was one of those whom thou gavest me, and was kept in thy name; and yet, in spite of that keeping, he was lost; and he became a final heir of perdition. Hence we have on this sacred record, presented in the very primal twelve, a type of genuine final apostacy in the Christian Church.

Scripture might be fulfilled—This is the final good educed by God from the darkest evil: that therein his foreknowledge is verified, and God’s plans for his own conduct, which are conditioned upon the foreknowledge, are left underanged. The dark human side was for pure evil; the divine side is, that the unneeded and condemned sin does of itself fit in to the production of God’s best results.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“While I was with them I kept those whom you have given me, and I guarded them and not one of them perished except the son of perdition, that the Scripture might be fulfilled.”

Jesus has faithfully and successfully fulfilled His task with regard to those whom the Father has given Him. He has watched over them and protected them, and all are safe apart from the one who was ‘the son of perdition (or destruction)’. He was never given by the Father to Jesus, for he was marked for destruction. He was never a ‘son of God’ but always ‘a son of perdition’, one bound for and deserving destruction because he follows its ways.

‘The son of perdition’ par excellence is the one who above all personifies Satan (2 Thessalonians 2:3), the ‘man of sin’, the Antichrist. But Judas has sided with him, and revealed his true nature as one with him. John makes clear that Jesus knew the truth about him from the beginning (John 6:70). Just as at the end there will be one who will reveal Satanic control, a son of perdition, so also there was at the beginning. He was the beginning of the attempts of Satan to thwart the purposes of God.

‘That the Scripture might be fulfilled’. The main Scripture in mind is Psalms 41:9, ‘yes, my own familiar friend in whom I trusted, who ate of my bread, has lifted up his heel against me’ as Jesus tells us in John 13:18. It is not claiming that this is a specific prophecy of Judas’ failure, but that Judas’ failure follows the pattern of Scripture. What Scripture reveals that men are like in their attitude to those beloved by God here proves true.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-17.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus had kept these disciples loyal to God and had protected them from external attacks while He was with them. The only exception was Judas Iscariot who was always the traitor that the Old Testament had predicted would betray the Messiah ( Psalm 41:9; Psalm 69:25; Psalm 109:6-8; cf. John 13:18). His defection did not prove Jesus a failure but Scripture trustworthy. Jesus did not include Judas in His requests for the Eleven.

The term "son of perdition" (Gr. ho huios tes apoleias, NIV "the one doomed to destruction") could describe Judas" character (cf. Isaiah 57:4) or his destiny ( Psalm 35:4-8). He had a damnable character and would end in perdition, but the second idea seems to be stronger in the context. Perdition in the New Testament usually refers to eschatological damnation (cf. Matthew 7:13; Acts 8:20; Romans 9:22; Philippians 1:28; Philippians 3:19; 1 Timothy 6:9; 2 Peter 2:1; 2 Peter 3:7; Revelation 17:8; Revelation 17:11).

The only other occurrence of the title "son of perdition" occurs concerning the Antichrist ( 2 Thessalonians 2:3). This fact has led some interpreters to conclude that the Antichrist will be the resurrected Judas Iscariot. However, God will not resurrect unbelievers until the end of the millennium ( Revelation 20:11-15), but the Antichrist will appear and carry out his work during the Tribulation that will precede the millennium (cf. Revelation 13:1-10; Revelation 19:19-21).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-17.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:12. When I was with them, I kept them in thy name which thou hast given me, and I guarded them, and not one of them perished, but the son of perdition, that the scripture might be fulfilled. It is out of the fulness of His heart that Jesus continues to speak. The sad change that is to take place in the condition of His disciples after He has ‘gone away’ presses on His mind; He recalls tenderly the care with which He had hitherto watched over them in an evil world; and now that He can no longer show that care, He commends them with longing earnestness to the Father. He does this all the more because it was in the Father’s name given to Himself that He had kept them,—in the revelation of the Father, in the unity of His own relation to the Father, in the consciousness that God was their Father as well as His; so that the Father as well as He shall keep them, and, in keeping them, shall only continue the work that He had Himself begun. The word ‘I’ is very emphatic,—‘I kept them: now do Thou.’ The distinction between ‘kept’ and ‘guarded’ is not to be found in the thought of different spheres, such as inward and outward, to which it may be supposed that the words apply; but in the fact that the latter word points to the watchfulness by which the former is attained (comp. on chap. John 12:47). At the same time the difference of tense in the original is worthy of notice, the first verb expressing continued care, the second the completeness of the security afforded. Yet one dark cloud rested on the bright past, and the eyes of the disciples might at that moment be directed to it. Judas had not been kept: how was that? To this Jesus gives an answer in these words. The wonderful fact itself, when rightly viewed, affords evidence that He has fulfilled His promise that He will keep His own. It was in carrying out the Father’s will that not one of the Eleven had been lost: it was in carrying out the same will that Judas had met his fate. He was ‘the son of perdition,’ one who had freely chosen to move in that sphere of perishing, and therefore he perished. A scripture, too, or word of God (Psalms 41:9, already quoted in chap. John 13:18), had declared God’s will, and that will could not fail to be accomplished. To suppose that Judas is now brought before us as one originally doomed to perdition, and that his character was but the evolving of his doom, would contradict not only the meaning of the Hebraic expression ‘son of’ (which always takes for granted moral choice), but the whole teaching of this Gospel. In no book of the New Testament is the idea of will, of choice on the part of man, brought forward so repeatedly and with so great an emphasis. The history of man is taken up at that point when God’s previous dealings with him have prepared him for the exercise of a choice in which his responsibility shall appear. How far this previous discipline is the result of absolute decree is not said; but the very fact that it is discipline implies that the result might have been other than it is. They in whom the Father’s object is attained are those ‘given’ to the Son, and Judas, therefore, was not one so ‘given.’ (On the construction here compare what was said on chap. John 3:13.)

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 17:12. The protection now asked had been afforded by Christ so long as He was with the disciples. , ’ “when I was with them, I kept them in Thy name which Thou hast given me: and I guarded them, and not one of them perished, but the son of perdition, that the Scripture might be fulfilled”. On the detail of educative care spent on the disciples, and covered by , see Bernard, Central Teaching, p. 370. , cf.2 Thessalonians 2:3, in accordance with the usual Hebrew usage, the person identified with perdition, closely associated with it. Cf.Isaiah 57:4; Isaiah 33:2; Matthew 23:15. Raphel quotes from Herodotus, viii., , with the remark, “nee Graecis plane ignotus est hic loquendi modus”. The Scripture referred to is Psalms 41:10, as in John 18:18.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 17:12". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-17.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

===============================

[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Cum essem, cum eis, &c. He speaks, says St. John Chrysostom, as man, Greek: os anthropos dialegetai. (hom. Greek: pa. p. 480.) --- In the same place, nisi filius perditionis, Greek: ei me, &c. nisi, it is not, Greek: alla, sed. --- Non perdom, that is, says St. John Chrysostom in the same place, quantum in me erit, non perdam ... non me impellente, vel relinguente: quod si sponte resiliant, non ex necessitate traham. Greek: ei de aph eauton apodedosi, pros anagken ouch elko. St. Augustine, Quomodo diabolus intravit in cor Judæ, non intraret, nisi ille locum daret.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 17:12". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

While = When. with. Greek. meta. App-104.

in the world. All the texts omit.

those that. As in John 17:11, all the texts put the relative in the singular, and read "in Thy name that Thou gayest Me, and I kept them".

have kept = kept (Greek. phulasso), i.e. guarded. Compare Luke 2:8 (keep watch). 1 John 5:21. Not the same word as in former clause and John 17:6.

of = out of. Greek. ek. App-104.

lost. Greek apollumi. Occurs twelve times in John: John 6:12, John 6:39; John 12:25; John 17:12; John 18:9 (lose); John 3:15, John 3:16; John 6:27; John 10:28; John 11:50 (perish); John 10:10 (destroy); John 18:14 (die). Used of the doom of the sinner. One of the strongest words in the Greek language to express final and irretrievable destruction.

but = except. Greek. ei me.

the son, &c. This expression occurs here and 2 Thessalonians 2:3 (the Antichrist). Used in the Septuagint in Isaiah 57:4, "children of transgression". Compare Matthew 9:16; Matthew 13:38; Matthew 23:15. Luke 16:8. Acts 13:10. Ephesians 2:2, in all which passages "child "should be "son".

perdition. Greek. apoleia, a kindred word to apollumi. Occurs twenty times. Only here in John. First occurance. Matthew 7:13.

the scripture, &c. This expression occurs five times in John, here, John 13:18; John 19:24, John 19:28, John 19:36.

might be = may be, expressing certainty.

fulfilled. See on John 15:11.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.

While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name - `I preserved them from defection through the revelation to their souls of that "grace and truth" of Thine which, whenever they were staggered and ready to give way, held them fast.'

Those that thou gavest me I have kept - `Those whom Thou hast given Me I kept,' or 'guarded' [ dedookas (Greek #1325) ... efulaxa (Greek #5442)], And none ('not one') of them is lost, but the son of perdition. If we take the expressions, "children of this world," "child of the devil," "the man of sin," "children of light," "children of Zion," to mean men who have in them the nature of the things mentioned as their proper character, then, "the son of perdition" must mean 'he who not only is doomed to, but has the materials of perdition already in his character.' So we are to understand the expression "children of wrath" (Ephesians 2:3).

That the Scripture might be fulfilled (Psalms 69:25; Psalms 109:8; Acts 1:16; Acts 1:20). The phrase 'not one but (or 'but only') the son of perdition' [ ei (Greek #1487) mee (Greek #3361)] is used in the same sense as in Luke 4:26-27 (on which see). 'It is not implied,' as Webster and Wilkinson correctly observe, 'that Judas was one of those whom the Father had given to the Son, but rather the contrary. See John 13:18.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

12. Except the man who was bound to be lost. Judas had made himself fit the prediction (Psalms 41:9).

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 17:12". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-17.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) While I was with them in the world.—Comp. the opening words of John 17:11. During His presence with them there was not this special need for commending them to the Father’s care. His relation to them now is as that of a parent blessing and praying for His children before He is taken away from them. (Comp. John 13:33.)

I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept.—Better (comp. previous verse), I kept them in Thy name which Thou gavest Me, and guarded them. The pronoun is emphatic. “While I was in the world I kept them. I am now praying that Thou wouldest keep them.” The words “kept” and “guarded” differ slightly in meaning, the former pointing to the preservation in the truth revealed to them, and the latter to the watchfulness by means of which this result was obtained. The former may be compared to the feeding of the flock, the latter to the care which protects from the wild beasts around. (Comp. John 10:28-30.)

And none of them is lost, but the son of perdition.—Better, None of them perished, except the son of perdition. The tense is the same as that of the word “guarded.” The Good Shepherd watched His flock, and such was His care that none perished but the “son of perdition.” Of him the words carefully state that “he perished.” He, then, was included in “them which Thou gavest Me.” For him there was the same preservation and the same guardianship as for those who remained in the fold. The sheep wandered from the flock, and was lost by his own act. (Comp. especially Notes on John 6:37-39; John 6:71. See also John 18:9.)

The term, “son of perdition,” is a well-known Hebrew idiom, by which the lack of qualitative adjectives is supplied by the use of the abstract substantives, which express that quality. A disobedient child is, e.g., “a son of disobedience;” other common instances are “children of light,” “children of darkness.” A “son of perdition” is one in whose nature there is the quality expressed by “perdition.” The phrase is used in Isaiah 57:4 to express the apostacy of the Israelites (in English version, “children of transgression”). It occurs once again in 2 Thessalonians 2:3, of the “man of sin.” (Comp. Notes there.) It is used, in the Gospel of Nicodemus, of the devil. In the present passage it is difficult to express the meaning in English, because we have no verb of the same root as the abstract substantive “perdition,” and no abstract substantive of the same root as the verb “perish.” No exact translation can therefore give in English the point of our Lord’s words, “And none of them perished except him whose nature it was to perish.” Here, as often (comp. Note on John 10:16), the reader who can consult Luther’s German will find that he exactly hits the sense: “Und ist keiner von ihnen verloren ohne das verlorne Kind.”

That the scripture might be fulfilled.—Comp. Note on John 13:18, and Acts 1:20.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.
I kept
6:37,39,40; 10:27,28; Hebrews 2:13
and
13:18; 18:9; Luke 4:26,27; 1 John 2:19
the son
6:70,71; 13:18; 2 Thessalonians 2:3
that
Psalms 109:6-19; Acts 1:16-20,25
Reciprocal: Exodus 39:15 - chains at the ends;  1 Samuel 22:23 - but with me;  Psalm 89:22 - son;  Jeremiah 23:4 - neither;  Matthew 1:22 - that;  Matthew 18:7 - but;  Matthew 18:14 - it is;  Matthew 26:24 - but;  Luke 22:22 - but;  Luke 22:51 - Suffer;  Luke 22:52 - captains;  John 12:38 - That;  John 13:11 - GeneralJohn 15:2 - branch;  John 16:4 - because;  John 17:11 - keep;  Acts 1:17 - he;  Acts 9:39 - while;  2 Timothy 1:12 - keep;  Hebrews 10:39 - unto;  1 Peter 1:5 - kept

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 12. "While I was with them in the world, I kept them in Thy name: those that Thou gavest Me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the Scripture might be fulfilled."

To the being given by God corresponds the election by Christ in ch. John 6:70, John 13:18. Faith is the subjective condition of both; and as Judas is numbered among those whom God had given to Christ, at the time of his call he must have possessed faith.

The Lord has Judas in His mind—without however mentioning him, because that would have been out of harmony with the solemn dignity of the prayer—in order to anticipate and obviate the conclusion which might be drawn to the prejudice of His shepherd fidelity, or, generally, of His shepherd ability, from the ruin of Judas. In his case it was necessary that the watchful care of Jesus should be wasted; for he was taken into the number of the Apostles to be dropped from it again. "It had not been the task of the Redeemer to save him, but to bear with him, and, despite his foreknown insalvabihty, to neglect nothing in his case which the relation between Master and disciple, appointed by the Father, demanded" (Schmieder).

Perdition is here used, as in Revelation 17:8; Revelation 17:11, 2 Thessalonians 2:3, of ruin simply, of the perdition of hell, in contradistinction to ἡ ζωή, eternal life, in Matthew 7:13. To the son of perdition here, corresponds the child of hell in Matthew 23:15.

The son of perdition is he who belongs to perdition; and Luther's translation, das verlorne Kind—the lost son—does not exactly hit the point. We may compare the "children of the kingdom," Matthew 13:38;" children of the bride-chamber," Mark 2:19; "sons of thunder," Mark 3:17; "children of this generation," Luke 16:8; Luke 20:34; "children of light," John 12:36. This mode of designation, which all the Evangelists show to have been current with Christ, frequently occurs in the Old Testament: compare, for example, the "children of death," those who were appointed to die and belong to death as personified, that is, the dying themselves, Psalms 79:11; the "children of the needy," Psalms 72:4. The designation of Judas as the son of perdition involves the reason why ho must be lost; and thus his perdition could furnish no argument to the disparagement of Christ. He was one whose destiny was to be lost. The designation here corresponds to the words which derive his ruin from the necessity that Scripture should be fulfilled. Accordingly the subject, or child of ruin, means one who was devoted or given over to ruin.

Judas was lost, that the Scripture might be fulfilled. Christ knew, when He chose him, that notwithstanding his transitory gleam of faith, he would apostatize and betray Him. If, therefore. He received him notwithstanding into the number of the Apostles, it must have been that he might work out his own ruin, and thus that the Scripture might be fulfilled, which includes such a man among the necessary surroundings of the Redeemer. That he came to ruin was his own fault; but since, in spite of his foreseen fall, he was taken into the number of the Apostles, and would not have been thus ruined if he had not been taken into their number, it may be said that he was lost that the Scripture might be fulfilled. As he would fall, he should and did fall. It was his doom that he was admitted into the near fellowship of Christ, and thus had this peculiar occasion of falling. His election, and the concurrent ruin, were to serve for the fulfilment of Scripture. In harmony with the present text, our Lord says, in ch. John 13:18, that He had chosen Judas that the Scripture might be fulfilled.

The citation of Scripture would be matter of great uncertainty if any other scripture could be meant than that expressly quoted in ch. John 13:18; the only one which our Lord generally applied to the case of Judas. In that passage the perdition of Judas is not directly spoken of, but his traitorous act,—a traitorous act, however, which had perdition as its immediate consequence.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 17:12". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

12.While I was with them in the world. Christ says that he hath kept them in the name of his Father; for he represents himself to be only a servant, who did nothing but by the power, and under the protection, of God. He means, therefore, that it were most unreasonable to suppose that they would now perish, as if by his departure the power of God had been extinguished or dead. But it may be thought very absurd that Christ surrenders to God the office of keeping them, as if, after having finished the course of his life, he ceased to be the guardian of his people. The reply is obvious. He speaks here of visible guardianship only which ended at the death of Christ; for, while he dwelt on earth, he needed not to borrow power from another, in order to keep his disciples; but all this relates to the person of the Mediator, who appeared, for a time, under the form of a servant. But now he bids the disciples, as soon as they have begun to be deprived of the external aid, to raise their eyes direct towards heaven. Hence we infer that Christ keeps believers in the present day not less than he formerly did, but in a different manner, because Divine majesty is openly displayed in him.

Whom thou hast given me. He again employs the same argument, that it would be highly unbecoming that the Father should reject those whom his Son, by his command, has kept to the very close of his ministry; as if he had said, “What thou didst commit to me I have faithfully executed, and I took care that nothing was lost in my hands; and when thou now receivest what thou hadst intrusted to me, it belongs to thee to see that it continue to be safe and sound.”

But the son of perdition. Judas is excepted, and not without reason; for, though he was not one of the elect and of the true flock of God, yet the dignity of his office gave him the appearance of it; and, indeed, no one would have formed a different opinion of him, so long as he held that exalted rank. Tried by the rules of grammar, (118) the exception is incorrect; but if we examine the matter narrowly, it was necessary that Christ should speak thus, in accommodation to the ordinary opinion of men. But, that no one might think that the eternal election of God was overturned by the damnation of Judas, he immediately added, that he was the son of perdition By these words Christ means that his ruin, which took place suddenly before the eyes of men, had been known to God long before; for the son of perdition, according to the Hebrew idiom, denotes a man who is ruined, or devoted to destruction.

That the Scripture might be fulfilled. This relates to the former clause. Judas fell,that the Scripture might be fulfilled But it would be a most unfounded argument, if any one were to infer from this, that the revolt of Judas ought to be ascribed to God rather than to himself; because the prediction laid him under a nccesslty. For the course of events ought not to be ascribed to prophecies, because it was predicted in them; and, indeed, the prophets threaten nothing but what would have happened, though they had not spoken of it. It is not in the prophecies, therefore, that we must go to seek the cause of events. I acknowledge, indeed, that nothing happens but what has been appointed by God; but the only question now is, Do those things which it has foretold, or predicted, lay men under a necessity? which I have already demonstrated to be false.

Nor was it the design of Christ to transfer to Scripture the cause of the ruin of Judas, but he only intended to take away the occasion of stumbling, which might shake weak minds. (119) Now the method of removing it is, by showing that the Spirit of God had long ago testified that such an event would happen; for we commonly startle at what is new and sudden. This is a highly useful admonition, and admits of extensive application. For how comes it that in our own day, the greater part of men give way on account of offences, but because they do not remember the testimonies of Scripture, by which God has abundantly fortified his people, having foretold early all the evils and distresses which would come before their eyes?

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Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.