Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:4

I glorified You on the earth, having accomplished the work which You have given Me to do.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Glorifying God;   Jesus Continued;   Obedience;   Prayer;   Salvation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Christ;   Christ's;   Church;   Completion;   Family;   Glorified, God;   Glorifying God;   God;   Importunity;   Life's Purpose;   Prayer;   Purpose;   Secret Prayer;   Task, Christ's;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   Work, Religious;   Work-Workers, Religious;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Belonging;   Declaration;   Disciples/apostles;   Giving and Gifts;   Glory;   Hate;   Jesus Christ;   Judas Iscariot;   Knowledge;   Losing and Things Lost;   Love;   Manifestation;   Sanctification;   Sending and Those Sent;   Truth;   Unity;   Will of God;   Word of God;   World;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Devotedness to God;   Glorifying God;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Consecration;   Holy spirit;   Jesus christ;   Son of god;   Transfiguration;   Work;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Mediator, Mediation;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Commentary;   Covenant;   Intercession of Christ;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Predestination;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Hypostatic union;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Covenant;   Glorify;   Perseverance of the Saints;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Children (Sons) of God;   John, the Gospel of;   Unity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Ephesians, Epistle to;   Ethics;   Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Attributes of Christ;   Complacency;   Death of Christ;   Devotion;   Eunuch ;   Fulfilment;   Hopefulness ;   Ideas (Leading);   Merit;   Miracles;   Mission;   Names and Titles of Christ;   Old Testament (I. Christ as Fulfilment of);   Providence;   Reverence;   Self-Control;   Simple, Simplicity ;   Son of God;   Temperance;   Work;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Offerings, the;   Son, the;   ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Body;   Finish;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Glorify;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Children of God;   Christ, the Exaltation of;   Eunuch;   Finish;   James;   Prayers of Jesus;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for August 4;   Every Day Light - Devotion for October 10;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I have glorified thee - Our Lord, considering himself as already sacrificed for the sin of the world, speaks of having completed the work which God had given him to do: and he looks forward to that time when, through the preaching of his Gospel, his sacrifice should be acknowledged, and the true God should be known and worshipped by the whole world.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Have glorified thee - In my instructions and life. See his discourses everywhere, the whole tendency of which is to put honor on God.

I have finished the work - Compare John 19:30. When he says “I have finished,” he probably means to include also his death. All the preparations for that death were made. He had preached to the Jews; he had given them full proof that he was the Messiah; he had collected his disciples; he had taught them the nature of his religion; he had given them his parting counsel, and there was nothing remaining to be done but to return to God. We see here that Jesus was careful that his great and important work should be done before his dying hour. He did not postpone it to be performed just as he was leaving the world. So completely had he done his work, that even before his death he could I say, “I have finished the work.” How happy would it be if men would imitate his example, and not leave their great work of life to be done on a dying bed? Christians should have their work accomplished, and when that hour approaches, have nothing to do but to die, and return to their Father in heaven.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-17.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I glorified thee on earth, having accomplished the work which thou hast given me to do. And now, Father, glorify thou me with thine own self with the glory which I had with thee before the world was.

I glorified thee ... refers to Jesus' life of perfect trust and obedience, including his sufferings and death, here prophetically regarded as already accomplished.

Glorify thou me ... refers to the receiving of Jesus back into the bosom of the Father where he had resided eternally. This necessarily included Jesus' death, resurrection, and ascension.

Before the world was ... In such a statement as this, Jesus affirmed his eternal existence, his oneness with the Father, and his equality with God (see John 1:1-11). In the beautiful words of Lipscomb:

Jesus here goes back of history, back of creation itself, and speaks of the glory which he then had with the Father. This can be understood only in the light of the opening verses of the first chapter.[14]

The implications of this passage are profound. Christ was here praying for the Father to glorify him with the glory that he had possessed from before all time; but it was as a HUMAN BEING that Christ would ascend to the Father and be endowed with everlasting glory; thus, man himself, in the person of Christ, is now seated on the Throne! It is OUR NATURE that has been glorified in Christ.

ENDNOTE:

[14] David Lipscomb, A Commentary on the Gospel of John (Nashville: Gospel Advocate Company, 1960), p. 263.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I have glorified thee on the earth,.... This is made use of as a reason and argument, why the Father should glorify him: Christ glorified his Father personally, as he held forth and expressed the glory of his person; and verbally, by ascribing, on all occasions, praise and glory to him; and really, or by deeds, and that by various ways: as in and by his ministry; by asserting he had his mission, qualifications, and doctrine, from him as a prophet; his principal work was to declare his Father's mind and will, his love and grace; nor did he seek his own, but his Father's glory: and by his miracles: for though these were proofs of his deity and Messiahship, and displays of his own glory; yet the glory of his Father, especially of his power, was eminently seen in them, for he referred them to him; and these were often the means of men's glorifying the God of Israel: and by his whole life and conversation, which was entirely according to the will of God; and every action of it was directed to his glory; particularly he glorified him by his early regard to his will, and the business he sent him about; by his zeal for his Father's house; and by the exercise of the various graces of faith, hope, and love upon him: and as by his life, so at his death, even all the while he was "on the earth"; where God had been dishonoured by the sin of men; where Christ now was debased in human nature, and even that was for the glory of God; and this is said in distinction from heaven, where God is glorified by the angels, and where Christ would shortly be glorified in his human nature:

I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do; by "the work" is meant obedience to the will of God; the destruction of all spiritual enemies, as sin, Satan, the world, and death; and the redemption and salvation of his people, which was "given" him to do: he did not take it upon himself, but being called to it he readily accepted of it; it was appointed, and cut out for him, in the council and covenant of grace; he was thoroughly acquainted with it; and though it was difficult, it was pleasant and delightful to him; nor did he leave it till he could say it is "finished"; as it was by himself alone, without the help of man; and is so complete that nothing can be added to it; and so firmly done, that it cannot be unravelled by men and devils: he speaks of it as done, because the time was come to finish it, and he was sure of the accomplishment of it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

People's New Testament

I have glorified thee on the earth. He had done this because he could say, "I have finished the work that thou gavest me to do."

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 17:4". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-17.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I glorified thee on the earth (εγω σε εδοχασα επι της γηςegō se edoxasa epi tēs gēs). John 17:3 is parenthetical and so John 17:4 goes on after John 17:2. He had prayed for further glorification.

Having accomplished (τελειωσαςteleiōsas). First aorist active participle of τελειοωteleioō old verb from τελειοςteleios (perfect). Used in John 4:34 by Jesus with το εργονto ergon as here. That was Christ‘s “food” (βρωμαbrōma) and joy. Now as he faces death he has no sense of failure as some modern critics say, but rather fulness of attainment as in John 19:30 (τετελεσταιtetelestai). Christ does not die as a disappointed man, but as the successful messenger, apostle (απεστειλαςapesteilās John 17:3) of the Father to men.

Thou hast given
(δεδωκαςdedōkas). Perfect active indicative of διδωμιdidōmi regarded as a permanent task.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I have glorified - I have finished ( ἐδόξασα - ἐτελείωσα )

The best texts read, τελειώσας , having finished; the participle defining the manner in which He had glorified the Father upon earth. So Rev.

To do ( ἵνα ποιήσω )

Literally, in order that I should do (it ).

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-17.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.

I have finished the work — Thus have I glorified thee, laying the foundation of thy kingdom on earth.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 17:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

I glorified thee on the earth, having accomplished the work which thou hast given me to do1.
    John 17:4,5

  1. I glorified thee on the earth, having accomplished the work which thou hast given me to do. As the hour for finishing his work had arrived, Jesus speaks of it as already finished.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:4". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Я прославил Тебя. Христос говорит так потому, что Бог воссиял миру и в Его учении, и в Его чудесах. Слава Божия утверждается тогда, когда мы познаем, каков Бог на деле. Добавляя же, что Он исполнил дело, Христос имеет в виду, что исполнил все, к чему был призван. Так что настало время принять Его в небесную славу. И здесь идет речь не только об учительском служении. Христос намекает и на другие Свои обязанности. Ему еще оставалось исполнить главное дело, а именно: пойти на смерть и принести Себя в жертву, дабы изгладить грехи всех. Но поскольку час Его смерти почти настал, Он говорит так, словно уже ей покорился. Итог таков: Отец должен ввести Его в обладание царством. Ведь ристалище уже было пройдено, и Христу оставалось только явить плод всего того, что Он совершил на земле по Отчему поручению. Согласно словам Павла (Фил.2:7,10): Он опустошил Самого Себя, приняв образ раба, и посему Отец превознес Его и дал Ему имя, и т.д.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE WORK OF LIFE

‘I have glorified Thee on the earth: I have finished the work which Thou gavest Me to do.’

John 17:4

If we might each choose his own epitaph, who would not choose this if he could? It is plain that before we can say to God that our work is finished we must be able to say it is begun; we must be clear that we have such a work.

I. What, then, is our work?—Undoubtedly it has many parts, and the details are peculiar to each, but, speaking broadly, we may distinguish certain universal elements in it.

(a) First, we may say that our work here is the formation of our character.

(b) We have also each our share in the making of others; and it is perhaps true that while we must keep a clear eye open to our besetting faults, we cure them best in the course of that other work which is not so self-conscious. Such work for others we all have.

(c) Again, there is that work by which we take our place in the commonwealth. This, too, is from God, for ‘the powers that be are ordained of God,’ and this too must be for God.

II. But all work that is real work, so far as it bears on the lives of men, is work in accordance with the Divine will, and brings its blessings.—Even work that may seem but play—the work of amusing the nation—which absorbs at the present day so much skill, if that also is sound in its influence, is work for God.

III. What are the helps and the hindrances?

(a) First, time. Time is both a help and a hindrance. When we are young it stretches before us so endlessly long that there seems nothing that may not be done and won in such length of days; and yet, just because it seems so endless, it slips away without being used, ‘like water that runneth apace.’

(b) And the second help God gives us, which also, if we please, we may convert into a hindrance, is what in one word we call our circumstances, our health or sickness, our riches or poverty, our position in society, our chances. The whole power of circumstances to hinder has been compressed into that one sentence of the Book of Proverbs: ‘The fool saith, There is a lion in the path.’ But experience teaches us that what we in our weakness call adverse circumstances are only God’s medicines to fashion a strong heart in us. We know that the moral order of the world is so contrived that out of danger is begotten courage, and out of difficulty strength and patience, and out of pain fortitude and sympathy, and out of strife victory, and at the last, out of death itself—mourn over it as we may when it happens to others—life, new and uncircumscribed and everlasting.

—Rev. Canon Beeching.

Illustrations

(1) ‘Some of you may recall the story of the monk told by Anatole France, who, before he entered religion, had been an acrobat, and used to shut himself up in the church to tumble before the high altar; his feats of skill being the one thing of his own he had to offer. One feels in reading it that although, no doubt, God accepted his offering, yet it had been true work for God if he had used his talent for the recreation of his brethren.’

(2) ‘There is a story in Herodotus of an Egyptian king to whom it was foretold that he had but five years to live, and he scornfully replied to the oracle of his envious god that he could make it ten by turning night into day. If that is a fable, it has a moral. But there is a true story told of a great French statesman who, observing that his family had generally died before fifty, made up his mind when he came of age that he must begin at once if he was to accomplish any work for the good of his country. So must each Christian say, “Oh, gentlemen, the time of life is short!”’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 17:4". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-17.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

4 I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.

Ver. 4. That thou gavest me to do] Our Saviour counts his work a gift; so should we take it for a favour, that he employs us, that we may have any office about him, that we may magnify him with our bodies, "whether by life or death," Philippians 1:19. As a heretic I am condemned, said Mr Bradford, and shall be burned, whereof I ask God heartily mercy that I do no more rejoice than I do, having so great cause as to be an instrument, wherein it may please my dear Lord God and Saviour to suffer. And the greatest promotion, said Latimer, that God giveth in this world, is, to be such Philippians to whom it is given, not only to believe, but also to suffer. Ignatius professed he would rather be a martyr than a monarch. John Noyes took up a fagot at the fire, and kissed it, saying, Blessed be the time that ever I was born to come to this. The apostles rejoiced that they were graced so as to be disgraced for Christ, Acts 5:41.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 17:4

I do not think that here in this text our Lord intended to refer to the final and completing act—the blood-shedding which was remission. I believe He reviewed His life—the subjection, the pain, the obedience learned by the things He suffered, the teaching and the trial, the subjection to indignities, to time and space, to cold and hunger, to devils and to men—in the light of all these visionary recollections, He said: "I have finished the work which Thou gavest Me to do." This saying of our Lord—it is a very arrow of light gleaming across the burdened valley of our being—"I have finished the work which Thou gavest Me to do." In this speciality, which was the Saviour's triumph, lies the ground also of the Christian's consolation—speciality, I say, for God sets the work, God hems the work around with difficulties. We succeed, it is because He has aided us; we fail, it is because He would teach us; and thus often failure becomes the footstool of the highest success. It is an illustrious thought, and it is the bright, red light along the horizon of life, that every one has his appointed field. "Thou shalt choose our inheritance for us."

I. Sorrow is work. Was not His sorrow work? Sorrow is the rain which descends down to the very roots of our being. Sorrow has an influence on the heart like that of the atmospheric action on the hard rocks and hills: it loosens, it softens, it disintegrates, it levels, and from the mould it makes the flowers and the fruits of the heart, as the flowers and fruits of earth spread their bloom.

II. Temptation is work. Man does not see the victory or the triumph; but God does.

III. Faith is work. But this is our work in relation to God, and sympathy is work—our work in relation to man.

Think how Divine is work—in its lowest as well as in its highest form—to make something. Not one is forgotten before God. The fisherman going forth to the rivers, the ploughboy to the fields, the dairyman to the farmyard, the artisan to the shop, much-enduring man to toil. How Divine, how godlike is work—to draw the silken thread of Spirit through the hard needle of difficulty.

E. Paxton Hood, Sermons, p. 306.


Consider what were the purposes of God which by the death of our Lord were answered, and which without it, as far as we can see, could not have been answered so that God was thereby glorified.

I. And first, I think, we must feel that hereby a mark was set upon the devil's work, sin, which no other conceivable procedure could have set upon it. Its hatefulness to God; its exceeding atrocity; the fearfulness of being tempted to commit it; was hereby made intelligible to all—that nothing less than this agonising torture inflicted on the Son of God could expiate it.

II. The next important purpose answered by the sufferings of our blessed Master, and the manifest carrying out of God's will thereby, is their eminent adaptation to establish a spiritual kingdom as wholly distinct from a carnal one. His kingdom was manifestly not of this world. Pilate marvelled that it could be called a kingdom at all, not comprehending the power of holy example, of hearty doctrine, of humble patience. Yet herein was our Father glorified, and hereby were won such glorious triumphs as worldly policy, or force of arms, or outward wealth and influence could never have achieved. For these do but for a while affect the present interests of mankind; whereas the patient endurance, the cheerful alacrity of our blessed Lord unto every good work, His humility, His meekness, His constancy, His love, His gentleness, His unexampled self-denial on all occasions, have left behind them solid and everlasting memorials—have in all ages of the world been the stay of sufferers, the comfort of mourners, the strength of them that wrestled with temptation, the hope of downcast, afflicted souls; and not only so, but have sanctified all the instrumentalities wherewith the purposes of this world are carried out.

III. Consider how entirely Christ, by His life and death, has shut out all shams and pretences to religion,—has made it impossible for insincerity and worldliness to indulge in the flattering hope of entering in through the door whose posts and lintels are all sprinkled with blood. What is this blood, and what does it signify? It is the blood of the Lamb that was slain, of the only begotten Son of God, Who gave His life for our lives, due to God for sin.

Bishop Thorold, Penny Pulpit, No. 410, new series.

As regards the finished work of Christ, our duty is (1) to understand, value, believe and appropriate it; (2) to cultivate and carry to the highest degree possible an inner life of pious thoughts and feelings in communion with God, and an outer life of holiness, whereby we shall gradually grow meet for the eternal presence, and services and enjoyments of Almighty God; and (3) we have to do such good works here, as God hath before ordained that we should walk in them for the good of our fellow creatures and the extension of the kingdom of Christ. It is the third work which I now desire to consider.

I. The worst of all possible conditions is the state of those who live without the testimony of their own conscience that they have some work that they are doing for God. And yet, it is the position of thousands. They live, in this sense at least, a pointless and an aimless life, and they incur the retributive consequence—they pass a restless, because a Christless; and a joyless, because a useless existence. Life has never been traced up to its true bearing, and therefore, the character is weak, the energies are loose and the happiness vapid. And very solemn at last will be the evening, when the Lord of the vineyard meets these workless ones.

II. We lay it down first, that every one's natural position, his providential circumstances, his work or business, or profession, which he has chosen, determines his chief work in life which, taken from God, he is to execute for God. There is many a man and many a woman whose work through life is to glorify God in some quiet home scene, in the daily Christian performance of unnoticed duties, and the unworldly discharge of some worldly service,—only let each accept it as from heaven, and be careful to throw heaven into it. Then, it is a training and a discipline for the higher services of another world. But whether you find it in your place in the family, in your business in the world, or whether it lie in something that you have undertaken more expressly for the cause of religion and for God, only look well to this, that it be real work—that you distinctly feel you have a mission to it—that it is a work given to you, and that it be done piously for God, in God, to God. "I have finished the work which Thou gavest Me to do."

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 5th series, p. 149.


References: John 17:4, Homilist, 2nd series, vol. iv., p. 933. John 17:4, John 17:5.—J. Keble, Sermons from Ascension Day to Trinity, p. 82. John 17:5.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. ii., p. 267. John 17:8-11.—W. Roberts, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xii., p. 357. John 17:11.—J. Vaughan, Sermons, 14th series, p. 76. John 17:11, John 17:12.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxxii., No. 1883.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-17.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Learn hence, that the whole life of Christ, while here on earth, was a glorifying of his Father; he glorified his Father by the doctrine which he preached; he glorified his Father by the miracles which he wrought; he glorified his Father by the unspotted purity and innocency of his life, and by his unparalleled sufferings at his death.

That is, I am now about to finish it: he speaks of what he was resolved to do as already done.

Here note, 1. That it is work that glorifies God.

2. That every man has his work, his proper work, assigned him by God.

3. This work must be finished here upon earth.

4. That, when we have done our proportion of work, we may expect our proportion of wages.

5. That it is a blessed thing at the hour of death to be able to say in sincerity and uprightness, that we have glorified God in the world, and have finished the work which he appointed us to do; Father, I have glorified thee on earth; and have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:4". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

4.] The past tenses are proleptical. In the rendering of this whole chapter they should be kept indefinite, not made into perfects as in E. V., which destroys this proleptical character. I glorified Thee … I finished … What view of the aorist has led to Bp. Wordsworth’s explanation here,—“the aorist is used, not the perfect, masmuch as the work of glorification was still going on, and not to be completed before His Passion, when He would say τετέλεσται,”—I am quite unable to imagine. That the aorist implies present continuance, is at least a startling doctrine. The force of it here surely is, that our Lord stands by anticipation at the end of His accomplished course, and looks back on it all as past, as historically gathered up in one act: which is the very sense and propriety of the aorist.

τὸ ἔργον is not only the ministerial life of our Lord, but the whole Life, with all its appointed manifestations of humility and purity,—the perfect righteousness which by that life He has planted in our nature,—and His prophetic and declarative office, terminated by His Passion and Death.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 17:4". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-17.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:4. ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς, upon earth) In antithesis to παρὰ σεαυτῷ, with Thine own self, viz., in heaven, John 17:5. The earth had revolted from God.— ἐτελείωσα, I have consummated [finished]) Hereby is explained the expression, I have glorified Thee.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:4". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I have glorified thee on the earth; by preaching the gospel, by living up to the rule of thy law, by the miracles which I have wrought. God could not be glorified by Christ, by the addition of any thing to his essential glory; only by manifesting to the world his Father’s goodness, justice, mercy, truth, wisdom, and other of his attributes. One way by which he had glorified his Father, is expressed, viz. by finishing the work which he had given him in commission. But how could Christ say this, who had not yet died for the sins of men, which was the principal piece of his work?

Answer. It was so nigh, that he speaks of it as already done: so, John 17:11, he saith, I am no more in the world, because he was to be so little a time in the world. Again, he speaks of what he was fully resolved to do, as if it were already done.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Glorified thee on the earth; by doing in all things what he was commissioned of the Father to do.

Finished the work; the work to which he was appointed.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4.Glorified thee on the earthOn the earth in antithesis with in heaven. In the former he had glorified God; in the latter God will glorify him. He had glorified God on earth by exhibiting to mankind the perfect ideal of God in man; miraculously showing forth the wisdom and power of God, but especially revealing God’s mercy for the salvation of the world.

Have finished the work—The great mission for divine manifestation and human redemption. By this great work he had purchased the right to save all who by faith should accept his mission.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:4. I glorified thee on the earth, having accomplished the work which thou hast given me to do. The first petition of Jesus in this prayer had been ‘glorify Thy Son.’ That petition is now to be repeated in a more emphatic form (John 17:5), but first we have a fuller statement of the ground on which it rests. In John 17:2-3, the petition had been connected with the design of the Father; now it is connected with the accomplishment of that design; and the general prayer for glorification is to rise into the prayer ‘Glorify Thou Me now.’ This glorifying of the Father is said to have taken place ‘on the earth,’ that is, amidst the humiliations and sorrows of the Lord’s earthly life. There in word, and deed, and suffering even unto death, Jesus revealed the Father’s loving will for the salvation of men; there He accomplished the purpose for which the Father sent Him; there He glorified the Father. It will be observed that all is spoken of as past, for the whole work of Jesus is at this moment looked upon as finished. It is not indeed entirely finished, for He has not yet been nailed to the cross; but that final part of it may still be connected in thought with the whole suffering life, and may be spoken of as if it had been met. All the life of Jesus had been a death; in all of it He had been accomplishing His work and glorifying the Father: the one step still remaining, and already fully taken in will, may thus be easily associated with the rest, and the whole be contemplated as over. Therefore Jesus prays.

The predicative ‘Christ’ requires the verb to express knowledge of a fact: the impression given by the verse is that great stress belongs to ‘know’ in the sense of acquaintance with a Person.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 17:4. . This is a fresh ground for the petition of John 17:1 renewed in John 17:5: “glorify Thou me”. The ground is “I have glorified Thee on the earth; having finished perfectly accomplished, cf. of the cross] the work which Thou gavest me to do”. But it is not the idea of reward that is prominent here, although that idea is found in Philippians 2:6-11; Hebrews 2:9-11; Hebrews 5:4-10; the immediate thought here is of the necessary progress which the hour demanded. There remained no longer any reason for His continuance on earth. He did not desire, and did not need, any prolongation of life below. Beyschlag’s objection (N.T. Theol., i. 254) is therefore baseless, as also is Grotius’ “ostendit, non iniquum se petere”.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 17:4". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-17.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

on. Greek. epi. App-104.

earth. App-129.

I have finished. The texts read "having finished". Compare John 4:34; John 5:36; John 19:30.

gavest = hast given.

to do = in order that (Greek. hina, as in John 17:1) I should do it.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do. I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do - or, keeping to the strict sense of the tenses here employed, 'I glorified Thee on the earth: I finished the work which Thou hast given Me to do' [ edoxasa (Greek #1392) ... teleioosas (Greek #5048) dedookas (Greek #1325)]. Observe here, first, the light in which Jesus presents Himself and His work before His Father's view. His whole life here below was, He says, a glorification of the Father; but in this He only did, He says, a prescribed work-a work "given Him to do." But observe, next, the retrospective light in which He speaks of this. He refers to the time when He was "on the earth," as a past time: His glorification of the Father was now completed; the "work given Him to do" was a "finished" work. Manifestly the work meant was not so much of His work merely as was over at the moment when He now spake; for the great consummating surrender of His life was yet to come. It is His entire work in the flesh of which He speaks as now finished. And in the sublime and erect consciousness that He was presenting before the Father's eye a glorification of Him in which He would see no flaw, a finished work in which would be found nothing lacking, He now asks the fitting return.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

4. I showed your glory on earth. There was no longer any reason for him to stay on earth. He had finished the work leading up to the Cross.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 17:4". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-17.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work . . .—Better, I glorified Thee on earth: I finished the work . . . The former sentence is .explained by the latter. God was glorified in the completion of the Messianic work of Christ. For this conception of the work of life, which includes the whole life as manifesting God to man, comp. Notes on John 5:36; John 9:4; John 10:25 et al.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.
glorified
12:28; 13:31,32; 14:13
finished
4:34; 5:36; 9:3; 14:31; 15:10; 19:30; Acts 20:24; 2 Timothy 4:7
Reciprocal: Exodus 40:33 - So Moses;  Numbers 6:20 - and after;  1 Samuel 2:30 - them;  Psalm 2:8 - Ask;  Isaiah 42:4 - shall not;  Isaiah 42:21 - it;  Isaiah 49:3 - GeneralIsaiah 49:4 - yet;  Mark 1:38 - for;  Mark 16:19 - he was;  Luke 2:14 - Glory;  Luke 13:32 - I shall;  John 5:30 - because;  John 5:43 - come;  John 6:62 - GeneralJohn 7:18 - seeketh his glory;  John 8:29 - for;  John 8:49 - but;  John 9:4 - must;  John 10:17 - GeneralJohn 10:36 - sent;  John 16:5 - I;  John 17:1 - glorify;  Hebrews 3:2 - faithful;  Hebrews 5:7 - and;  Revelation 11:7 - when

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

4.I have glorified thee. His reason for saying this is, that God had been made known to the world both by the doctrine of Christ, and by his miracles; and the glory of God is, when we know what he is. When he adds, I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do, he means that he has completed the whole course of his calling; for the full time was come when he ought to be received into the heavenly glory Nor does he speak only of the office of teaching, but includes also the other parts of his ministry; for, though the chief part of it still remained to be accomplished, namely, the sacrifice of death, by which he was to take away the iniquities of us all, yet, as the hour of his death was already at hand, he speaks as if he had already endured it. The amount of his request, therefore, is that the Father would put him in possession of the kingdom; since, having completed his course, nothing more remained for him to do, than to display, by the power of the Spirit, the fruit and efficacy of all that he had done on earth by the command of his Father, according to the saying of Paul,

He humbled and annihilated himself, (111) by taking the form of a servant. Therefore God hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name,
(
Philippians 2:7.)

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:4". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.