Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 2:13

The Passover of the Jews was near, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Feasts;   Jesus, the Christ;   Passover;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Resurrection;   The Topic Concordance - Theft;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Feast of the Passover, the;   Prophecies Respecting Christ;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Courage;   John, gospel of;   Law;   Month;   Passover;   Temple;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Anger;   Jerusalem;   Priest, Christ as;   Psalms, Theology of;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Marriage;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dove;   Gospels;   Jerusalem;   Jesus Christ;   Jordan;   Miracles;   Nehemiah;   Sacrifice;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Chronology of the Biblical Period;   Fulfill;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   John, the Gospel of;   Pilgrimage;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jesus Christ;   Marriage;   Mary;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Apostles;   Business (2);   Dates (2);   Debt, Debtor (2);   Dispersion ;   Example;   Feasts;   Goodness;   Individualism;   Influence;   Jews;   John (the Apostle);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Manliness;   Ministry;   Pilgrim (2);   Preparation ;   Profaning, Profanity;   Purim;   Religion (2);   Temple (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - New Testament;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cana;   Passover;   Veil;   Zeal;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Passover;   Smith Bible Dictionary - John, Gospel of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Andrew;   Debt;   Jesus Christ (Part 1 of 2);   Passover;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for June 2;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And the Jews' passover was at hand - This was the reason why he stayed but a few days at Capernaum, John 2:12, as he wished to be present at the celebration of this feast at Jerusalem.

This was the first passover after Christ's baptism. The second is mentioned, Luke 6:1. The third, John 6:4. And the fourth, which was that at which he was crucified, John 11:55. From which it appears,

  1. That our blessed Lord continued his public ministry about three years and a half, according to the prophecy of Daniel, Daniel 9:27. And,
2. That, having been baptized about the beginning of his thirtieth year, he was crucified precisely in the middle of his thirty-third. See Martin.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 2:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The Jews‘ passover - The feast among the Jews called the Passover. See the notes at Luke 6:1; another John 6:4, and the last one on the night before he was crucified, John 11:55. As his baptism when he entered on his ministry had taken place some time before this - probably not far from six months - it follows that the period of his ministry was not far from three years and a half, agreeably to the prophecy in Daniel 9:27.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-2.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the passover of the Jews was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.

CLEANSING THE TEMPLE

The passover of the Jews ... Writing near the end of the first century, John no longer referred to the passover as a feast of God, but of the "Jews". Whatever ordinances or observances are undertaken upon man's initiative only, such ordinances, even though originally commanded by God, become in a special sense the ordinances of men. Jesus' saying of the temple, "Behold your house is left unto you desolate" (Matthew 23:38), is in the same vein of thought.

The cleansing of the temple about to be related should not be confused with a second cleansing during the final week of our Lord's life on earth (Matthew 21:12f; Mark 11:15; Luke 19:45). In this cleansing, Jesus made use of a scourge, but none was mentioned in the synoptic accounts of the second cleansing. Far from being any difficulty, John's relation of this dramatic cleansing gives the explanation of the implacable hatred of the Pharisees and other keepers of the temple concessions, the hatred being evident enough in the synoptics, but this practical reason for it at so early a date appearing only in John.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the Jews' passover was at hand,.... That feast which was kept on the fourteenth day of Nisan, in commemoration of the Lord's passing over, and by the houses of the Israelites, when he slew the firstborn in Egypt: and it is called the Jews' passover, because they only were obliged to keep it: nor was it obligatory upon the Gentiles; and, besides, was now abolished when John wrote this Gospel, though still retained by the Jews. And moreover, John was now among the Gentiles, and for whose sake he penned this Gospel; and therefore so distinguishes this feast, which was typical of the Christian passover, or of Christ our passover that is sacrificed for us. This was the first "passover" after Christ's baptism, which is generally thought to have been about half a year before; though so much time cannot be made out from the scriptural account; for from his baptism, to his return out of the wilderness to John, were forty days; and from thence, to his coming to Cana, four or, five days more; and perhaps he might be seven days in Cana; for so long a wedding was usually kept; and his stay at Capernaum was but a few days; all which do not amount to above eight or nine weeks at most: the second passover after this, is, by some, thought to be the feast mentioned in John 5:1, and the third in John 6:4, and the fourth and last, at which he suffered, in John 18:28. The Evangelist John is the only writer that gives an account of the passovers after Christ entered on his public ministry; by which is known the duration of it, which is generally thought to be about three years and a half. "Three years and a half", the Jews sayF1Praefat. Echa Rabbati, fol. 40. 4. , the Shekinah sat upon the Mount of Olives, expecting that the Israelites would repent, but they did not; and this seems to be the term of time for disciples to learn of their masters: it is saidF2Echa Rabbati, fol. 44. 4. , one came from Athens to Jerusalem, and he served "three years and a half" to learn the doctrine of wisdom, and he learned it not.

And Jesus went up to Jerusalem; not alone, but his disciples with him, as appears from John 2:17, to keep the passover as he had been wont to do, and as the law required; and he being under the law, as a son of Abraham, and the surety of his people, it became him to fulfil all righteousness, ceremonial, as well as moral, and which he strictly observed. He is said to go up to Jerusalem, because that stood on higher ground than the low lands of Galilee, and was the only place where the passover might be kept; see Deuteronomy 16:2.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 2:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

3 And the Jews' passover was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem,

(3) Christ being made subject to the law for us, satisfies the law of the passover.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 2:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-2.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

John 2:13-25. Christ‘s first Passover - First cleansing of the Temple.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-2.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

The Jews' passover was at hand. See Exodus, chapter 12, for institution of the passover. It was celebrated yearly at Jerusalem. This is the first that the Lord attended after he began his ministry, and of this attendance there is no mention in the other Gospels.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 2:13". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-2.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The passover of the Jews (το πασχα των Ιουδαιωνto pascha tōn Ioudaiōn). The Synoptics do not give “of the Jews,” but John is writing after the destruction of the temple and for Gentile readers. John mentions the passovers in Christ‘s ministry outside of the one when Christ was crucified, this one and one in John 6:4. There may be another (John 5:1), but we do not know. But for John we should not know that Christ‘s ministry was much over a year in length.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The Jews' passover

On John's use of the term Jews, see on John 1:19. So it is used here with an under-reference to the national religion as consisting in mere ceremonies. The same hint underlies the words in John 2:6, “after the Jews' manner of purifying.” Only John mentions this earliest passover of Christ's ministry. The Synoptists relate no incident of his ministry in Judaea, and but for the narrative of John, it could not be positively asserted that Jesus went up to Jerusalem during His public life until the time of His arrest and crucifixion.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-2.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And the passover of the Jews was at hand1, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem2.
    JESUS ATTENDS THE FIRST PASSOVER OF HIS MINISTRY (Jerusalem, April 9, A.D. 27.) A. JESUS CLEANSES THE TEMPLE. John 2:13-25

  1. And the passover of the Jews was at hand. We get our information as to the length of our Lord's ministry from John's Gospel. He groups his narrative around six Jewish festivals: (1) He here mentions the first passover; (2) another feast, which we take to have been also a passover (John 5:1); (3) another passover (John 6:4); (4) the feast of tabernacles (John 7:2); (5) dedication (John 10:22); (6) passover (John 11:55). This gives the entire length of our Lord's ministry as three years and a fraction.

  2. And Jesus went up to Jerusalem. It was fitting that he should enter upon his full ministry in this city, as it was still the center of what was recognized as a heaven-revealed worship. The fitness of Jerusalem for such beginnings was afterwards recognized in the preaching of the gospel of the New or Christian dispensation (Acts 1:8).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 2:13". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-2.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Приближалась Пасха Иудейская, и Иисус пришел в Иерусалим (посему Иисус пришел в Иерусалим). По-гречески дословно будет так: и пришел. Но Евангелист употребил соединительный союз вместо союза причинного. Он хочет сказать, что Христос пришел для того, чтобы отметить в Иерусалиме Пасху. Его цель была при этом двоякой. Поскольку Сын Божий покорился закону из-за нас, Он захотел, точно исполнив все заповеди закона, явить в Своем лице пример полного и совершенного послушания. Кроме того, поскольку Христос мог больше преуспеть в учении при большом стечении народа, Он почти всегда пользовался этим обстоятельством. Итак, всякий раз когда впоследствии говорится, что Христос приходил в Иерусалим в праздничные дни, пусть читатели знают: Он поступил так потому, чтобы, во-первых, вместе с остальными исполнить установленные Богом благочестивые упражнения, а, во-вторых, чтобы обнародовать Свое учение при большом стечении народа.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-2.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 13. "And the Passover of the Jews was near, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem."

John says: of the Jews, with reference to his Gentile readers, with whom he identifies himself in the feeling of Christian communion.

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-2.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

13 And the Jews’ passover was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem,

Ver. 13. And Jesus went up to Jerusalem] In obedience to the law, and to preach the gospel in the great congregation.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 2:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-2.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

13.] No data are given to determine whether the reason of the short stay at Capernaum was the near approach of the Passover.

Nothing is said of those who accompanied Jesus: but at all events, His already called disciples would be with Him (see John 2:22, and ch. John 3:22), and among them in all probability the Evangelist himself:—but not the rest of the Twelve, who were not yet called. Of this visit, the synoptic narrative records nothing.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 2:13". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-2.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 2:13. τὸ πάσχα, the Passover) About the times of the Passover the office of Christ was in especially fruitful exercise.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 2:13". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Concerning the Jewish passover we have once and again spoken in our notes on the other evangelists. The institution of it was Exodus 12:1-51. It was to be solemnized yearly in the place which the Lord should choose, according to the law, Deuteronomy 16:6. Christ, though he was not naturally subject to the law, yet to fulfil all righteousness, and to redeem his people from the curse of the law, Galatians 4:5, kept the passover yearly, taking also advantage from the conflux of the people to Jerusalem at that time, to make himself and his doctrine more known. None of the other evangelists make mention of more than one passover between the time of Christ’s baptism and death: John plainly mentions three, one here, another in John 6:4, the last, John 18:39; and some think that he mentions another, though more obscurely, John 5:1. Our Lord was at them all.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 2:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-2.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Пасха Иудейская Это – первая из трех упоминаемых Иоанном Пасх (ст. 13; 6:4; 11:55). В десятый день месяца иудеи выбирали агнца и праздновали Пасху в 14-ый день лунного месяца Нисан (в полнолуние в конце марта или в начале апреля). В праздник вечером, между 15 и 18 часами, они закалали агнца. Пасха служит напоминанием избавления иудеев из египетского рабства, когда в Египте ангел-губитель «прошел» (в переводе Библии на английский само слово для названия пасхи образовано от глагола, означающего «пройти», «пропустить», «оставить без внимания». – Прим. ред.) мимо домов иудеев, чьи дверные косяки были окроплены кровью (Исх. 12:23-27).

Иисус пришел в Иерусалим Путешествие Иисуса в Иерусалим на Пасху было исполнением общепринятой ежегодной обязанности каждого благочестивого мужчины старше 12 лет (Исх. 23:14-17). Иудейские паломники переполняли Иерусалим ради этого самого великого из иудейских праздников.

(2:13-17) Первый способ, которым Иоанн продемонстрировал Божью власть Христа в описании очищения храма, должен был показать Его любовь к благоговению. Только Бог использует право управлять поклонением Ему.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 2:13". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-2.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13.Jews—See note on John 1:19. It is universally agreed among evangelical commentators that there were two cleansings of the temple; one at the beginning, the other at the close of Christ’s ministry. In this first, given by John alone, (see note on Matthew 21:11-13,) Jesus uses language less severe than in the second, but performs the act with an evident exertion of supernatural power, by a positive and overruling miracle. The reasons for supposing two cleansings are: First, The propriety of both opening and closing his ministry by such a symbolic act. Second, The clearness with which the first is related by John and the second by Mark. Third, The distinct and rational connections which each has with its own immediate surrounding circumstances.

Went upUp to Jerusalem as down to Capernaum. (John 2:12.) The natural language of one familiar with the country. For the Passover see our notes on Matthew 26:2; Matthew 26:17-20.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-2.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And the Passover of the Jews was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.’

John constantly tells us that Jesus went up to Jerusalem for the different Feasts of the Jews, and especially for the Passover (John 1:13; John 5:1; John 7:10; John 10:22; John 11:55 with John 12:12). But even if we had not been told we would have assumed it. One point that is being made is that Jesus did not ignore the traditions of Israel. It is probable also that the writer saw these feasts as pointing forwards towards what the Christ had come to do as the Lamb of God Who would take away the sins of the world (John 1:29). This is apparently Jesus’ first Passover after taking up His calling. Perhaps John therefore intends us to link it with the final Passover, and to bring to us an awareness of the shadow that lies already over the ministry of Jesus, something that will come out in the course of the narrative. These verses emphasise that Jesus’ ministry continued over some years. All these emphases underline the Jewishness of the writer.

However, the incident he will now describe is paralleled at the end of Jesus’ life by what at a superficial first glance looks to be a similar incident before His final denunciation (Mark 11:12-19 and parallels), and this must raise the question as to whether there were two such incidents or one. It is of course always possible that John deliberately puts the incident here in order to reinforce the message that the old is passing way and the new has come (chronology was not a major factor to the Gospel writers). He does, however, put it in such a context that it suggests that it did occur early rather than late in the ministry, and on examination the incidents are in fact so dissimilar on most counts that it seems far more likely that this is a different incident altogether.

Given the fact that the trading in the Temple must always have angered Jesus this is not surprising, especially in view of Malachi 3:1-4. What is rather surprising is that He did not do something like this every time He went to Jerusalem, although we must recognise that, at least for a period after this incident, they would be on their guard, and He would perhaps realise that such repeated actions could precipitate a collision which would prematurely end His ministry. He knew, after all, that it could only be a token gesture. Having made His point He possibly felt that He had done what was necessary. But by the time of the later incident the passage of years would have convinced the guards that He was no longer a danger. They would have considered that the young hothead had matured and have relaxed their guard. After all the Temple was open to all an it would have caused great consternation among Galileans if Jesus had been excluded. Thus we might consider that two incidents, taking place years apart, might really be expected by us, the first occurring when in His new zeal He faces men up to the matter of the need for purity of worship in the Temple for the first time, the second occurring as a thought out policy in order to expose corruption before He is finally put to death. The first He gets away with as being the act of a zealous young man who may well hold promise for the future, the second is to be a seal on His death warrant.

The reason for His act here is described very differently from that in Mark 11 and parallels, and fits better into the beginnings of His ministry when He was probably not quite as aware, as He was later on, of the dishonesty that was going on in the Temple. The reason described is exactly the kind of reason that might well fire up a younger man without containing the thought out attitude revealed in the later incident. He enters quite innocently into the temple. But becoming aware of the commotion caused by incessant trading in the court of the Gentiles, He feels in His new awareness of His Messiahship that He has to do something, for they are treating God’s house like a market and making a mockery of the opportunity for Gentiles to truly worship! He may well have had in mind the words of Zechariah, ‘In that day there will be no more a merchant in the house of the Lord of Hosts’ (Zechariah 14:21), and the words of Malachi, ‘The Lord whom you seek will suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant whom you delight in --- for he is like a refiner’s fire or a launderer’s soap --’ (Malachi 3:1-3), and ‘zeal for your house will eat me up’ (Psalms 69:9). His concentration here was on emptying the temple of the cattle, sheep and doves, although the only way He could demonstrate His displeasure with the money-changers was by turning over the tables.

We should note that in the other incident in Mark 11 He enters the Temple with a deliberate aim (He had looked around earlier). Then His concentration will be on the misbehaviour of the people, and He ignores the cattle and the sheep. He also stops those who are taking a short cut through the Temple, whilst His words are about the total dishonesty of all involved. They have turned the house of prayer into a den of thieves. Given that they took place in the same Temple (there was no other) the two incidents could not be more different.

It is not too surprising that it is not mentioned in the other Gospels, for the other Gospels tell us little about His early ministry in Jerusalem, especially in its earlier stages, concentrating rather on His itinerant ministry, thus they tended to disregard the happenings at the trips to Jerusalem, possibly because they were not present (in John ‘His disciples’ is a vague term not necessarily always meaning the twelve), or possibly because they saw Galilee rather than Judea as the true reflection of Jesus ministry. Galilee welcomed Him. Judea put Him to death. But John, who records a number of trips to Jerusalem, perhaps did not wish to jar the account of the final visit by describing a violent visit to the Temple, and perhaps wished to finish his Gospel on a spiritual note with his concentration on the cross. He does after all leave out the physical details of the last Supper, and of Jesus’ prayers in Gethsemane, and he ignores Jesus’ actual baptism and the transfiguration, while hinting at both. His later concentration is on the new coming of the Spirit. And he might well have seen the repetition of such an event as superfluous to what he wanted to say, or even as taking attention away from what he saw as important.

But he does remember this early incident and describes it because it fits in well with his purpose, to indicate that the new has come. He is well aware that the later cleansing is already well known in the Christian church, whilst an action like this helps to explain why in the other Gospels the leaders are so antagonistic to Jesus at an early stage (e.g. Mark 3:22). And this one provides an opportunity for him to hint at the coming death and resurrection of Jesus (‘Destroy this Temple and I will raise it again in three days’).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-2.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John alone recorded that Jesus went up to Jerusalem, topographically again, for three separate Passover celebrations. He referred to a second Passover in John 6:4 and to a third one in John 11:55; John 12:1; John 13:1; John 18:28; John 18:39; and John 19:14. Some interpreters believe that he mentioned a fourth Passover in John 5:1, but this seems unlikely. This first one was evidently the Passover of April7, A.D30, the first one after Jesus began His public ministry. [Note: Herold W. Hoehner, Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ, pp55-60, 143.] He celebrated the Passover because He was a Jew who obeyed the Mosaic Law ( Deuteronomy 16:1-8), and He used the opportunity to minister. John"s description of the Passover as "the Passover of the Jews" supports the view that he wrote his Gospel late in the first century for a general audience that was mainly Gentile. It also implies that the church no longer observed this feast.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-2.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 2:13. And the passover of the Jews was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem. The expression, ‘passover of the Jews, is very remarkable, and can be explained only by the usage already noticed in John 2:6. To John’s mind the nation cannot but present itself habitually as in opposition to his Master. As yet, indeed, Jesus is not confronted by an organized band of adversaries representing the ruling body of the nation; but we are on the verge of the conflict, and the conflict itself was only the outcome of ungodliness and worldllness existing before their manifestation in the persecution of Jesus. The light was come, but it was shining in darkness: this darkness rested on what had been the temple, the city, the festivals, of the Lord. The feast now at hand is not ‘the Lord’s passover’ (Exodus 12:11), but ‘the passover of the Jews.’ The prevailing spirit of the time has severed the feast from the sacred associations which belonged to it, so that Jesus must go up rather as Prophet than as worshipper,—not to sanction by His presence, but powerfully to protest against the degenerate worship of that day. The word of prophecy must be fulfilled: ‘And the Lord whom ye seek shall suddenly come to His temple,... but who may abide the day of His coming?’ (Malachi 3:1-2).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-2.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the Jews" passover. After the revival under Ezra and Nehemiah corruption proceeded apace (see notes on p. 1296), and the Lord found the nation as described in Malachi. Hence, what were once "the feasts of Jehovah" are spoken of as what they had then become, "feasts of the Jews" (John 5:1; John 6:4; John 7:2; John 11:55; John 19:42). See note on John 1:19,

passover. Greek. pascha, Aramaic. See App-94.

went up. Greek. anabaino, same word as "ascending", John 1:51 Compare "down", John 2:12.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 2:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the Jews' passover was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem,

And the Jews' Passover (as to which see the note at Mark 14:1), was at hand. Here begins our Evangelist's distinct mention of the successive Passovers which occurred during our Lord's public ministry, and which are our only sure materials for determining the duration of it. See more on this subject at John 5:1.

And Jesus went up to Jerusalem,

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-2.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

13. It was almost time. This will be Jesus’ first Passover since he began his public ministry. Only John tells us about this first purifying of the temple. See notes on Matthew 21:12-13.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 2:13". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) And the Jews’ passover was at hand.—Here, again, we are on common ground with the earlier Gospels. They place a cleansing of the Temple at the close of our Lord’s ministry at the only Passover which comes within the scope of their narrative. The subject has been dealt with in Notes on Matthew 21:12 et seq. (Comp. also Introduction: The Chronological Harmony of the Gospels, p. 35) The careful reader will not fail to observe the graphic touches peculiar to this narrative—the money-changers sitting, the sacrificial animals, the making of the scourge, the money poured out, the order to remove the doves which could not be driven out. We feel all through in the presence of an eye-witness. It is worth remembering that on the eve of the Passover the head of every family carefully collected all the leaven in the house, and there was a general cleansing. He was doing in His Father’s house, it may be, what was then being done in every house in Jerusalem. The remark will be seen to have an important bearing on the question of the repetition of the cleansing.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the Jews' passover was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem,
passover
23; 5:1; 6:4; 11:55; Exodus 12:6-14; Numbers 28:16-25; Deuteronomy 16:1-8,16; Luke 2:41
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 16:7 - in the place;  Nehemiah 13:8 - I cast;  Haggai 2:7 - I will fill;  Matthew 26:2 - the feast;  Mark 11:15 - and Jesus;  Luke 19:45 - went;  John 3:22 - these;  John 4:45 - having;  Acts 17:16 - his spirit

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 2:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-2.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 13. "And the Jews Passover was at hand; and Jesus went up to Jerusalem."

It is a matter of course, that Jesus went up with the whole company mentioned in ver. 12; for this company had been formed for the pilgrimage. Why did Jesus go to the Passover? The answer is implied in what He did there. It was not for the fulfilment of a religious duty incumbent on Him, as on all the others. We find nowhere any indication that Jesus visited the temple for His own edification. This, however, would be necessary. For the religious duty was not satisfied by the mere outward appearance. If Jesus was the Lord of the Sabbath, He was also the Lord of the feasts. If, according to Matthew 17:26, He was free from the temple tribute, so also was He from the visit to the temple. The principle of avoiding offence, Matthew 17:27, might in any case be overcome by other higher considerations. Of much more importance to Christ was the exercise of His Messianic calling, which, from the significance of the temple, as the spiritual dwelling-place of the people, could not there be carried on in a mere corner. The prophets already predict that the Redeemer is to come to the daughter of Zion. The temple had already been the principal place for the prophetic agency of the Old Dispensation; and only by way of exception, and under very peculiar circumstances, had the prophets appeared elsewhere. But the exercise of His calling being of importance to Jesus, the Passover was precisely that time most adapted for His stay in Jerusalem. For at this, as the chief feast, the whole people were assembled at the temple. This feast was also especially adapted for the public and solemn announcement of His reformation, with which the Saviour would begin His activity in the temple. For it had itself a reformatory significance. The putting away of the leaven preached to the people that they should purge the old leaven from their heart and life, 1 Corinthians 5:7. The eating of the unleavened bread required that they should endeavour after "sincerity and truth;" and the words, "Let your loins be girt about, and your lamps burning," are an interpretation of this rite at the Passover.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 2:13". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-2.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

13.And the passover of the Jews was at hand; therefore Jesus went up to Jerusalem. The Greek words καὶ ἀνέβη, may be literally rendered, and he went up; but the Evangelist has used the copulative and instead of therefore; for he means that Christ went up at that time, in order to celebrate the passover at Jerusalem. There were two reasons why he did so; for since the Son of God became subject to the Law on our account, he intended, by observing with exactness all the precepts of the Law, to present in his own person a pattern of entire subjection and obedience. Again, as he could do more good, when there was a multitude of people, he almost always availed himself of such an occasion. Whenever, therefore, we shall afterwards find it said that Christ came to Jerusalem at the feast, let the reader observe that he did so, first, that along with others he might observe the exercises of religion which God had appointed, and, next, that he might publish his doctrine amidst a larger concourse of people.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 2:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-2.html. 1840-57.