Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 2:17

His disciples remembered that it was written, " Zeal for Your house will consume me ."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Quotations and Allusions;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Activity;   Earnestness-Indifference;   Fervour;   Zeal;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Christ, Character of;   Prophecies Respecting Christ;   Temple, the Second;   Zeal;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Courage;   David;   Jealousy;   Psalms, book of;   Quotations;   Temple;   Wrath;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Anger;   Building;   Psalms, Theology of;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Marriage;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dove;   Jordan;   Nehemiah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Marriage;   Mary;   Of;   World;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Anger (2);   Axe;   Call, Calling;   Dates (2);   Debt, Debtor (2);   Dispersion ;   Enthusiasm;   Example;   Feasts;   Humanity of Christ;   Individualism;   Indolence;   Jealousy;   Jealousy (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Nationality;   Old Testament (I. Christ as Fulfilment of);   Old Testament (Ii. Christ as Student and Interpreter of).;   Presentation ;   Psalms (2);   Quotations (2);   Scripture (2);   Septuagint;   Slothfulness;   Temple (2);   Zeal;   Zeal (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - New Testament;   22 Envy Zeal Emulation Jealousy;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cana;   Passover;   Testimony;   Veil;   Zeal;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Debt;   Law in the New Testament;   Remember;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for October 16;   Every Day Light - Devotion for June 2;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The zeal of thine house - See Psalm 59:10. Zeal to promote thy glory, and to keep thy worship pure.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 2:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-2.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

It was written … - This is recorded in Psalm 69:9. Its meaning is, that he was affected with great zeal or concern for the pure worship of God.

The zeal of thine house - “Zeal” is intense ardor in reference to any object. The “zeal of thine house” means extraordinary concern for the temple of God; intense solicitude that the worship there should be pure, and such as God would approve.

Hath eaten me up - Hath absorbed me, or engaged my entire attention and affection; hath surpassed all other feelings, so that it may be said to be the one great absorbing affection and desire of the mind. Here is an example set for ministers and for all Christians. In Jesus this was the great commanding sentiment of his life. In us it should be also. In this manifestation of zeal he began and ended his ministry. In this we should begin and end our lives. We learn, also, that ministers of religion should aim to purify the church of God. Wicked men, conscience-smitten, will tremble when they see proper zeal in the ministers of Jesus Christ; and there is no combination of wicked men, and no form of depravity, that can stand before the faithful, zealous, pure preaching of the gospel. The preaching of every minister should be such that wicked men will feel that they must either become Christians or leave the house of God, or spend their lives there in the consciousness of guilt and the fear of hell.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-2.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 2:17

The zeal of Thine house hath eaten Me up

I.
ZEAL FOR THE STRUCTURE OF THE HOUSE.

1. It is the duty of the Church to provide convenient places for the public worship of God. Over-building is a lamentable waste of strength; but under-building is a sin. The Church who neglects to provide proper accommodation for the fast growing population of the country, is guilty of a grievous breach of Christian trust.

2. The house of God should be in consonance with the most chastened taste. Beauty is as cheap as ugliness. The fiat roof was prevalent in antiquity, but Christianity, elevating the human mind, has given us the dome and the spire. Our conscience, like David’s, should smite us when our house is better than God’s.

3. The same zeal which prompts us to build and beautify should prompt us to pay, and not leave a burden of debt to coming generations; but those who inherit the burdens should believe in the strength of God and remove them. Many have been obliged to go through the bankruptcy court because of too much liberality in the cause of the devil; none through over liberality in the cause of God.

II. ZEAL FOR THE ORDINANCES OF THE HOUSE.

1. The means of grace, the ordinary services; if we neglect the means we shall not have the grace. God promised to be a “small sanctuary” to the Babylonish exiles; so He will be to those who are in sore captivity through affliction. But if in health, God expects you to be in the assembly of His people. The social character of Christianity must be thus maintained.

2. Two institutions in particular go under the name of ordinances. About these there has been much controversy. Extremes are to be avoided

3. There must be zeal not only for but in ordinances. Warmth is always attractive and contagious. One of the objects of the gospel is to warm man’s natural frigidity. Fervour in the pulpit, in the prayer-meeting, etc., imperative. “But it is not respectable!” God preserve us from respectability, then. But there is enthusiasm enough in political and social gatherings and in business.

III. FOR THE DISCIPLINE OF THE HOUSE.

1. Wickedness should be rebuked. Purity must be maintained at all costs. Some churches need the scourge of small cords to drive out the men who, by their negligence or immorality, disgrace the altars of God.

2. Virtue should be fortified. In the family and the Church, discipline should aim at the development of goodness, so that the doctrine of God our Saviour may be adorned in all things.

3. Our interest in the holiness of the Church should be all aflame with sacred zeal. In proportion as we are zealous for God, He will bless our efforts at evangelization.

IV. FOR THE DOCTRINES OF THE HOUSE. It is the Church s vocation, not that of the ministry as an official order to defend the faith.

1. Zeal for the doctrine implies mental hostility to error. The tendency of to-day is to tolerate not only heretics, which is right, but heresy, which is wrong.

2. Whilst opposing heresy, our chief concern should be the vindication and exposition of truth. Zeal not for sect and party, but for the truth--particularly the cardinal truth of the cross. (J. Cynddylan Jones, D. D.)

Christ’s zeal

I. ITS SPHERE. We cannot confine it to the temple or any other ecclesiastical structure.

1. The universe, in all the glory of its interminable spreadings, is the house of God. There is not a lonely spot which is not full of Deity.

2. And when we divide this universe into sections we know that there is some scene hououred above others with the Almighty’s presence--where angels cluster, and where the Creator may be said more emphatically to dwell.

3. The whole company of the faithful upon earth constitute “the house of God”--builded together for a habitation of God through the Spirit.

4. Nay, there is not a solitary individual, over whom the great change has passed, who is not tenanted by the High and Lofty One.

II. CHRIST’S ZEAL WORKING IN THIS SPHERE. Zeal devoured the spirit of our Saviour, and in driving out the traffickers from the temple we can recognize the workings of the principle, but we cannot limit it to this. We gather from the expression

1. That Jesus was consumed with a lofty desire to benefit the denizens of the universe.

2. Over the inhabitants of heaven Christ poured His amazing solicitudes.

3. An ardent longing to rescue this world from its degradation, and to build up its desecrated fragments into s temple of the living God, throbbed in the heart of Jesus of Nazareth. Confined, as it might have seemed, to a single race, its effect branched out into every quarter of the house of God, and orders of intelligence which needed not to be brought to the Saviour might have been confirmed and sustained by that which put man within the circles of acceptance.

4. Viewing God’s house as including the believing remnants of Adam’s descendants, we see Him entering on His course as the sun enters on his march in the firmament. His soul yearned over those who had destroyed themselves. He entered into the nature on which rested the awful curse; and when the race He had come to redeem rejected Him, the zeal of God’s house kept Him fast on His pathway of pain. (H. Melvill.)

Christ’s zeal

I. The OBJECT of zeal--“Thy house.” The Jewish temple as symbolizing

1. The Old Testament Church.

2. The world of sinners.

3. Corrupted Christian communities.

II. The NATURE of zeal. True and godly zeal, says Bp. Jewell, eateth and devoureth up the heart, even as the thing that is eaten is turned into the substance of him that eateth it; and as iron, while iris burning hot, is turned into the nature of the fire, so great and just is the grief that they which have this zeal conceive when they see God’s house spoiled, or His holy name dishonoured.

III. The MANIFESTATION of the zeal.

1. In rigidly expelling the defiling and the false.

2. In replacing and building up the pure and the true.

The zeal of Christ

It is said that sometimes when a crowd see a vessel that is going to pieces, and hear the cries of the drowning men, they seem as if they were all seized with madness, because, not being able to give vent to their kindness toward the perishing ones by any practical activity, they know not what to do, and are ready to sacrifice their lives if they might but do something to save others. Men feel that they must work in the presence of so dreadful a need. And Christ saw this world of ours quivering over the pit. He saw it floating, as it were, in an atmosphere of fire, and he wished to quench those flames and make the world rejoice, and therefore He must work to that end. He could not rest and be quiet. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

The zeal of our Lord to be imitated

Let the zeal of the house of God ever eat thee. For example: seest thou a brother running to the theatre? stop him, warn him, be grieved for him, if the zeal of God’s house hath now eaten thee. Seest thou others running and wanting to drink themselves drunk? Stop whom thou canst, hold whom thou canst, frighten whom thou canst; whom thou canst, win in gentleness: do not in any wise sit still and do nothing. (Augustine.)

Commendable zeal

The most remarkable examples of zeal are found in the records of the early itinerant ministers. Richard Nolley, one of these, came upon the fresh trail of an emigrant in the wilderness, and followed it till he overtook the family. When the emigrant saw him he said, “What? a Methodist preacher! I quit Virginia to be out of the way of them; but in my settlement in Georgia I thought I should be beyond their reach. There they were; and they got my wife and daughter into their church. Then I come here to Chocktaw Corner, find a piece of land, feel sure that I shall have some peace from the preachers; and here is one before I have unloaded my waggon!” The preacher exhorted him to make his peace with God, that he might not be troubled by the everywhere present Methodist preachers.

Christian zeal necessary

A young Brahman put this question to the Rev. E. Lewis, of Bellary--“Do the Christian people of England really believe that it would be a good thing for the people of India to become Christians?” “Why, yes, to be sure they do,” he replied. “What I mean is this,” continued the Brahman, “do they in their hearts believe that the Hindoos would be better and happier if they were converted to Christianity?” “Certainly they do,” said Mr. Lewis. “Why, then, do they act in such a strange way? Why do they send so few to preach their religion? When there are vacancies in the Civil Service, there are numerous applicants at once; when there is a military expedition, a hundred officers volunteer for it; in commercial enterprises, also, you are full of activity, and always have a strong staff. But it is different with your religion. I see one missionary with his wife here, and one hundred and fifty miles away is another, and one hundred miles in another direction is a third. How can the Christians of England expect to convert the people of India from their hoary faith with so little effort on their part?” (Chronicle of London Missionary Society.)

Consuming zeal

When Baxter came to Kidderminster there was about one family in a street which worshipped God at home. When he went away there were some streets in which there was not more than one family on a side that did not do it; and this was the case even with inns and public-houses. While some Divines were wrangling about the Divine right of Episcopacy or Presbytery, or splitting hairs about reprobation and free-will, Baxter was always visiting from house to house, and beseeching men, for Christ’s sake, to be reconciled to God and flee from the wrath to come. (Bp. Ryle.)

Zealous, but not furious

It is in the matter of religion as with the tending of a still; if we put in too much fire it burns, if too little, it works not: a middle temper must be kept. A heat there must be, but a moderate one. We may not be like a drowsy judge upon a Grecian bench, who is fain to bite upon beans, to keep himself from sleeping; neither may we be like that Grecian player, who acted mad Ajax on the stage; but we must be soberly fervent and discreetly active. St. Paul’s spirit was stirred within him at Athens because of its idolatry, and it breaks out of his mouth in a grave reproof: I do not see him put his hand furiously to demolish them. And if a Juventius and Maximinian, in the heat of zeal, shall rail on wicked Julian at a feast, he justly casts their death, not on their religion, but on their petulancy. It was a well-made decree in the council of Eliberis, that if any man did take upon him to break down idols, and were slain, he should not be reckoned amongst the martyrs. There must then be two moderators of zeal, discretion and charity, without either and both of which it is no other than a wild distemper; and with them, it is no less than the very life-blood of the Christian. (Bp. Hall.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 2:17". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-2.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

His disciples remembered that it was written, Zeal for thy house shall eat me up.

This quotation is Psalms 69:9; and, again from Hendriksen:

The disciples witnessing this manifestation of the zeal of their Lord for the house of his Father, are filled with fear that Jesus may suffer what David had to endure in his day, namely, that his zeal in some way would result in his being consumed.[17]

And of course, as noted above, it was precisely this manifestation of the Saviour's zeal that set in motion against him the murderous animosity of the religious apparatus in Jerusalem, which never relented until a cross arose upon Golgotha.

Jesus never lost sight of the Messianic implications of the temple cleansings; and, in the second instance of it, he reminded the selfish concessionaires that the house of God's holy religion had never been intended as their private privilege and personal domain, but that "My house shall be called a house of prayer for all nations" (Mark 11:17; Isaiah 56:7), indicating that "all nations," including the Gentiles, were intended to be benefited through the coming Messiah. Thus, the sin of the money-changers was not merely against Israel, but against all mankind also. The strong Messianic implications of this bold deed were not altogether lost on the priests, for they immediately demanded a sign that would confirm Jesus' implied claim of Messiahship. The cleansing itself was an excellent sign, but that they rejected.

ENDNOTE:

[17] William Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 123.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And his disciples remembered that it was written,.... In Psalm 69:9, which Psalm belongs to the Messiah, as is manifest from the citations out of it in the New Testament, and the application of them to Christ, as in John 15:25, compared with Psalm 69:4. Christ is represented in it, as suffering for the sins of his people; for he himself was innocent; and was hated without a cause; but having the sins of his people imputed to him, he made satisfaction for them, and so restored what he took not away. His sufferings are spoken of in it as very great; and from it we learn, that they are fitly called, by himself, a baptism, which he desired to be baptized with, Luke 12:50, since the waters are said to come into his soul, and he to be in deep waters, where the floods overflowed him; so that he was as one immersed in them: it is not only prophesied of him in it, that he should be the object of the scorn and contempt of the Jewish nation, and be rejected by them, and treated with the utmost indignity, and loaded with reproaches; but it foretold, that they should give him gall to eat, and vinegar to drink, which were literally fulfilled in him: and even the Jews themselves seem to be under some conviction, that the Psalm has respect to him; for Aben Ezra, a noted commentator of theirs, on the last words of the Psalm, has this note;

"the sense is, they and their children shall inherit it in the days of David, or in the days of the Messiah.'

It appears from hence, that the disciples of Christ were acquainted with the sacred writings, and had diligently read them, and searched into them, and had made them their study; and upon this wonderful action of Christ, called to mind, and reflected upon the following passage of Scripture, which they judged very proper and pertinent to him:

the zeal of thine house hath eaten me up. This passage, so far as it is cited, agrees exactly, word for word, with the original text in Psalm 69:9, wherefore it is very strange that SurenhusiusF6Biblos Katallages, p. 347. should remark a difference, and give himself a good deal of trouble to reconcile it: he observes, that in the Hebrew text, it is read, יהוה קנאת, "the zeal of the Lord", in the third person; whereas it is there, קנאת ביתך, "the zeal of thine house", as here, in the second person: indeed, the word כי, "for", is left out, as he remarks, there being no need of it in the citation; the evangelist only historically relating the accommodation of it to Christ, by the disciples; whereas in the original text, the words contain a reason of the reproach and shame which Christ endured, and was put to by the Jews on account of his zeal for the house, honour, and worship of God; and the latter part of the text is not produced at all, being not for the present purpose, though very applicable to Christ; and is cited, and applied to him by the apostle, in Romans 15:3. Such was Christ's regard to his Father's house, and which was typical of the church of God; and such his concern for his honour, ordinances, and worship, that when he saw the merchandise that was carried on in the temple, his zeal, which was a true and hearty affection for God, and was according to knowledge, was stirred up in him, and to such a degree, that it was like a consuming fire within him, that ate up his spirits; so that he could not forbear giving it vent, and expressing it in the manner he did, by driving those traders out of it. Phinehas and Elias were in their zeal, as well as other things, types of Christ; and in the Spirit and power of the latter he came; and Christ not only expressed a zeal for the house of God, the place of religious worship, but for the church and people of God, whose salvation he most earnestly desired, and most zealously pursued: he showed his strong, and affectionate regard to it, by his suretyship engagements for them, by his assumption of their nature, by his ardent desire to accomplish it, and by his voluntary and cheerful submission to death on account of it. And such was his zeal for it, that it eat him up, it inflamed his Spirit and affections, consumed his time and strength, and, at last, his life: and he also showed a zeal for the discipline of God's house, by his severe reflections on human traditions; by asserting the spirituality of worship; by commanding a strict regard to divine institutions; and by sharply inveighing against the sins of professors of religion: and he discovered a warm zeal for the truths of the Gospel, by a lively and powerful preaching of them; by his constancy and assiduity in it; by the many fatiguing journeys he took for that purpose; by the dangers he exposed himself to by it; and by the care he took to free the Gospel from prejudice and calumnies: and it becomes us, in imitation of our great master, to be zealous for his truths and ordinances, and for the discipline of his house, and not bear with either the erroneous principles, or the bad practices of wicked men.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 2:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And his disciples remembered that it was written, The g zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.

(g) "Zeal" in this place is taken for a wrathful indignation and displeasure of the mind, brought about when someone deals wickedly and evilly towards those whom we love well.
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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 2:17". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-2.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

eaten me up — a glorious feature in the predicted character of the suffering Messiah (Psalm 69:9), and rising high even in some not worthy to loose the latchet of His shoes. (Exodus 32:19, etc.).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-2.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

The zeal of thine house. Quoted from Psalm 69:9.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 2:17". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-2.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Remembered (εμνηστησανemnēsthēsan). First aorist passive indicative of μιμνησκωmimnēskō to remind, “were reminded.” Westcott notes the double effect of this act as is true of Christ‘s words and deeds all through John‘s Gospel. The disciples are helped, the traders are angered.

That it is written (οτι γεγραμμενον εστινhoti gegrammenon estin). Periphrastic perfect passive indicative of γραπωgraphō retained in indirect discourse (assertion).

The zeal of thine house
(ο ζηλος του οικου σουho zēlos tou oikou sou). Objective genitive. “The zeal for thy house.”

Shall eat me up
(καταπαγεται μεkataphagetai me). Future middle indicative of κατεστιωkatesthiō defective verb, to eat down (“up” we say), perfective use of καταkata -. This future παγομαιphagomai is from the second aorist επαγονephagon It is a quotation from Psalm 69:9, frequently quoted in the N.T.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

It was written ( γεγραμμένον ἐστὶν )

Literally, it stands written. This form of the phrase, the participle with the substantive verb, is peculiar to John in place of the more common γέγραπται . For a similar construction see John 3:21.

The zeal of thine house

Jealousy for the honor of God's house. Zeal, ζῆλος , from ζέω , to boil. See on James 3:14.

Hath eaten me up ( κατέφαγέ με )

So the Sept., Psalm href="/desk/?q=ps+69:9&sr=1">Psalm 69:9). But the best texts read καταφάγεται , shall eat up. So Rev., Wyc., “The fervor of love of thine house hath eaten me.”

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The text of this work is public domain.
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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-2.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And his disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.

Psalm 69:9.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 2:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-2.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

His disciples remembered that it was written1, Zeal2 for thy house shall eat me up.

  1. His disciples remembered that it was written. See Psalms 69:9.

  2. Zeal. Loving concern for.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 2:17". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-2.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Hath eaten me up; consumed me; meaning that he was wholly absorbed in zeal for the honor of the house of God.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-2.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Ученики Его вспомнили. Напрасно некоторые создают себе проблемы и вопрошают, как ученики могли вспомнить Писание, которому еще были не научены, и в котором не разбирались. Однако не нужно понимать слова Евангелиста так, что данное место из Писания именно тогда пришло им на память. Оно вспомнилось им после под водительством Духа, когда, наученные Богом, они раздумывали над тем, что означал этот поступок. Действительно, не всегда причина деяний Божиих видна сразу же, часто Бог открывает нам Свой совет по истечении определенного времени. И это – самая подходящая узда для сдерживания нашего любопытства, дабы мы не роптали на Бога, ежели Он сделает что-то для нас непонятное. Одновременно нас учат: когда Бог держит нас в неведении, следует терпеливо ожидать времени более полного откровения, а врожденную нам поспешность – постоянно сдерживать. Ибо Бог потому и медлит с откровением о Своих делах, чтобы воспитывать в нас скромность.

Итак, смысл следующий: ученики в конце концов поняли, что Христос, изгоняя из храма мирскую скверну, был подвигнут на это обуревавшей Его ревностью к дому Божию. Под именем храма Давид без сомнения имел в виду все богопочитание. Ибо так звучит библейский стих: Ревность по доме Твоем снедает меня, и поношения поносящих Тебя пали на меня. Вторая часть здесь соответствует первой, более того, она представляет собой толкующее ее повторение. Смысл обеих частей таков: Давид столь усердно заботился об утверждении славы Божией, что с готовностью подставил свою голову под все поношения, коими злые люди поносили Бога. Он пылал таким рвением, что одно это чувство поглощало в нем все остальные. Давид сказал все это о себе, но не подлежит сомнению, что в своем лице он изобразил то, что в собственном смысле относилось к Мессии. Посему Евангелист говорит: это было одним из знамений, по которому ученики признали Иисуса защитником и восстановителем царствия Божия. Заметь, что они руководствовались Писанием, дабы научиться тому, как подобает думать о Христе.

Действительно, без водительства и учительства Писания никто не может узнать, кто такой Христос, и на что направлено все, что Он сделал и выстрадал. Посему, ежели каждый из нас желает возрастать в познании Христовом, ему необходимо тщательно и постоянно исследовать Писания. Давид не напрасно сказал о том, что доме Божием Богу воздается всяческая слава. Ибо Бог, хотя и достаточен для Самого Себя и довольствуется Собой одним, хочет, однако, явить Свою славу в Церкви. В этом Он являет свидетельство особой к нам любви, соединяя неразрывно Свою славу с нашим спасением. Теперь каждому из нас остается только подражать Христу, поскольку на примере Главы учение адресуется всему Его телу. Как и апостол Павел учит в Рим.15:3. Не будем же терпеть, насколько зависит от нас, чтобы священный храм Божий подвергался осквернению. Но будем также следить за тем, чтобы никто не вышел за рамки своего призвания. Нам всем подобает пылать одной ревностью с Сыном Божиим, но далеко не всем позволительно брать в руки бич и силой исправлять пороки. Ибо нам дана не одинаковая со Христом власть и не одинаковое служение.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-2.html. 1840-57.

Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

Ver. 17. "His disciples remembered that it was written: The zeal of thy house shall eat me up."

This recollection took place immediately; comp. John 2:22, where the opposite fact is expressly pointed out. Psalms 69, the ninth verse of which presents itself at this moment to the remembrance of the disciples, is only indirectly Messianic—that is to say, the subject contemplated by the Psalmist is not the person of the Messiah (comp. John 2:6 : "Thou knowest my foolishness, and my sins are not hid from thee"), but the theocratic righteous person, suffering for the cause of God. The highest realization of this ideal is the Messiah. Weiss claims that this quotation finds an explanation only so far as this Psalm was, at that time, exclusively, and through an error, referred to the Messiah. But in order to this, the reading of John 2:6 must have been forgotten. The unanimity of the Mjj. decides in favor of the reading καταφάγεται . This verb is a future; the evangelist substitutes it for the past κατέφαγε, hath eaten up, of the LXX. which is in conformity with the Hebrew text. The disciples are thinking, not of Jesus" last sufferings, which were at that time beyond the thoughts which occupied their minds, but on the consuming force of His zeal, on that living holocaust, the first act of which they beheld at this moment. This also is the meaning of the word hath eaten up, in the Psalm.

While the disciples compare the Scriptures, and this remembrance strengthens their faith, the Jews reason and object, just as the inhabitants of Nazareth do, Luke 4:22. Instead of letting the act of Jesus speak, as every manifestation of holiness should, to their conscience, they demand the external sign which should legitimate this act, as if it did not contain in itself its own legitimation!

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Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-2.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

17 And his disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.

Ver. 17. The zeal of thine house] Apostates, on the other side, eat up their zeal of God’s house. But as in falling forward is nothing so much danger as backward; so the zealot, though not so discreet, is better than the apostate: howbeit, zeal should eat us up (saith Mr Vines), but not eat up our wisdom, nor should pride eat up our zeal. Mr Greenham had this saying of David often in his mouth, and well he might. He also usually prayed that he might keep up his young zeal with his old discretion.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 2:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-2.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 2:17

I. Zeal is one of the elementary religious qualifications—that is, one of those which are essential to the very notion of a religious man. A man cannot be said to be in earnest in religion till he magnifies his God and Saviour; till he so far consecrates and exalts the thought of Him in his heart, as an object of praise and adoration and rejoicing, as to be pained and grieved at dishonour shown to Him, and eager to avenge Him. In a word, a religious temper is one of loyalty towards God; and we all know what is meant by being loyal from the experience of civil matters. To be loyal is not merely to obey, but to obey with promptitude, energy, dutiful ness, disinterested devotion, disregard of consequences. And such is zeal, except that it is ever attended with that reverential feeling which is due from a creature and a sinner towards his Maker, and towards Him alone.

II. On the other hand, zeal is an imperfect virtue; that is, in our fallen state, it will ever be attended by unchristian feelings if it is cherished by itself. (1) Love perfects zeal, purifying and regulating it. (2) Faith is another grace which is necessary to the perfection of zeal. We have need of faith, not only that we may direct our actions to a right object, but that we may. perform them rightly; it guides us in choosing the means as well as the end. Now, zeal is very apt to be self-willed; it takes upon itself to serve God in its own way. Patience, then, and resignation to God's will, are tempers of mind of which zeal stands especially in need—that dutiful faith which will take nothing for granted on the mere suggestion of nature, looks up to God with the eyes of a servant towards his master, and, as far as may be, ascertains His will before he acts. If this heavenly corrective be wanting, zeal becomes what is called political. Christian zeal plans no intrigues; it recognises no parties; it relies on no arm of flesh. It looks for no essential improvements or permanent reformations in the dispensation of those precious gifts which are ever pure in their origin, ever corrupted in man's use of them. It acts according to God's will, this time or that, as it comes, boldly and promptly; yet letting each act stand by itself, as a sufficient service to Him, not connecting them in one, or working them into system, further than He commands. In a word, Christian zeal is not political.

J. H. Newman, Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. ii., p. 379.


References: John 2:17.—A. Barry, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxi., p. 17; Preacher's Monthly, vol. ii., p. 95. John 2:18.—R. D. B. Rawnsley, Village Sermons, 4th series, p. 120.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-2.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 2:17. And his disciples remembered, &c.— In the apprehension of the disciples, their Lord exposed himself to great danger by turning out a body of factious and interested men, whom the priests and rulers supported. On this occasion, therefore, they called to mind that text in the Psalms, where it is said, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up; imputing their Master's actions to such a concern for the purity of God's worship, as that by which David, his great type, was animated. See on Psalms 69:9.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 2:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-2.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The disciples upon this occasion called to remembrance the words of David, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up: Psalms 69:9 which was verified in Christ as well as in David.

Where observe, 1. The grace described, zeal, which is the ardour of the affections, carrying forth a man to the utmost for God's glory, and his church's good. Zeal is not so much one affection, as the intense degree of all the affections.

Observe, 2. The object about which our Saviour's zeal was conversant, God's house, that is, all things relating to the worship of God, temple, tabernacle, ark, &c. which were the pledges of God's presence.

Observe, 3. The effect of this, it hath eaten me up, like fire that eats up and devours that whereon it lights. What was said of St. Peter, That he was a man made up all of fire; and of St. Paul in respect of his sufferings, that he was a spark of fire burning in the midst of the sea, may much more truly be said of Christ, when he was engaged in the work of church-reformation.

Learn, That as Christ was, so Christians ought to be, very zealous for the glory of God, the honour of his house, and the purity of his worship. The zeal of thine house, that is, for the honour of thine house, hath eaten me up, &c.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 2:17". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-2.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

17.] ἐμνήσθησαν, at the time, not afterwards, which would have been expressed, as in John 2:22. But the very remembrance itself was prophetic. The καταφαγεῖν spoken of in that passion-Psalm, was the marring and wasting of the Saviour’s frame by His zeal for God and God’s Church, which resulted in the buffeting, the scourging, the Cross.

καταφάγεται is a well-known future, contracted from καταφαγήσεται: see reff. and cf. the prophecy, 4 Kings John 9:36, καταφάγονται οἱ κύνες τὰς σάρκας ἱεζάβελ.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 2:17". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-2.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1606

BUYERS AND SELLERS DRIVEN OUT

John 2:17. And his Disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.

WE are apt to think that we receive no benefit from what we read or hear, unless it produce an immediate effect upon us: but the word, like seed, often springs up long after it has been sown. God often brings it to our minds by some great and singular occurrence: and then we see a beauty and importance in it which we never saw before. The Apostles themselves forgat many things which were spoken to them by our Lord, till the Holy Spirit brought them to their remembrance. They had often heard the Psalms read in their synagogues; but probably never reflected on the passage before us, till our Lord’s conduct suggested it to their minds, and cast the true light upon it.

We shall consider,

I. The circumstances which brought these words to their remembrance—

Our Lord, for the first time after his entrance on his public character, went up to Jerusalem at the Passover. There he found that the temple of God was scandalously profaned; and he immediately set himself to rectify the abuses that were there tolerated—

[The outer court of the temple was appropriated to the use of the Gentiles: but many of the Jews had rendered it a place of merchandize. There they exposed for sale the cattle that were proper to be offered in sacrifice, and stationed themselves with tables of money for the accommodation of the strangers who might want to exchange their foreign coin [Note: Every one had occasion for a half shekel for the service of the temple, Exodus 3:13-16.]. Thus they insulted the Gentiles and greatly dishonoured God. To correct this evil, our Lord exerted his divine authority. He drove out the cattle, and ordered the doves to be removed. He overturned the tables of money, and commanded all the traders to depart; nor did any of the people dare to oppose his sovereign command.]

This act of his could not fail of attracting universal notice:

It discovered,

1. His holy indignation against sin—

[Such a profanation of the temple was indeed a grievous sin: nor could his righteous soul behold it without the utmost abhorrence. His anger was justly excited by the indignity offered to his Father. To have felt it less, would have been a crime; and to have refrained from manifesting it, a mark of cowardice. We indeed are not called to manifest our displeasure in the same authoritative way; but we should never behold sin but with pain and grief; nor can our indignation be ever sinful, provided it be directed against sin as its object, and be felt only in proportion to the malignity of the offence committed. We can never err, if we follow the example of those eminent saints [Note: Psalms 119:53; Psalms 119:136; Psalms 119:158. Jeremiah 9:1.]—.]

2. His courageous zeal for God—

[The priests themselves were accessary to the dishonour done to God: if they did not encourage it for gain, they at least promoted it by connivance. Thus they, no less than the traders, were interested in maintaining the abuse, and, no doubt, would be forward to uphold it with all their power; but Jesus feared not the face of men, though all should combine against him. He resolutely determined to suppress these gross abominations, and, without any regard to consequences, set himself to perform his duty. Thus should we move undaunted in the way of duty; nor ever be deterred from it by the dictates of carnal policy [Note: Jeremiah 1:17.].]

3. A miraculous power over the minds of men—

[What but this could prevent their rising against him? He detected their hypocrisy, reproved their impiety, mortified their pride, opposed their interests, and loaded them with disgrace. He did this singly, unarmed, unsupported, and in opposition to the existing authorities: yet, behold, they were all constrained to yield submission to his will. We cannot doubt but that he miraculously overawed their minds: nor was this a less exertion of omnipotence than any other of the miracles which he wrought.]

The sight of these things particularly affected his immediate followers, and brought to their recollection a portion of Scripture which they had never before noticed,

II. The words themselves—

The words were justly quoted in reference to Christ—

[In their primary sense indeed they had their accomplishment in David. David elsewhere expresses in very strong terms his zeal for God [Note: Psalms 101:3-8.]: nor can we forget how he manifested it when he danced before the ark [Note: 2 Samuel 6:14.]. But David confessedly personates the Messiah: some parts are applicable to himself, and some to Christ, alone [Note: Psalms 69:5. cannot well be applied to any but David; nor can ver. 21. to any but Christ. It is thus that the literal and prophetical parts of scripture are continually intermixed.]. The words before us may very properly be applied to both; indeed the strength of the terms would almost lead us to confine them to Christ. His holy soul was inflamed with incessant zeal for God’s honour; nor did he ever suffer one opportunity of promoting his glory to pass unimproved. The occasion now before us called forth the strongest exertions of his zeal, and manifested the full accomplishment of this prophecy in his person.]

They are also replete with useful instruction to us—

They reprove the shameful want of zeal amongst his followers

[God is greatly dishonoured by men on every side: his name is blasphemed, his word despised, his authority rejected. Does it become his people to behold these things with indifference? Should they not resemble Paul when he beheld the idolaters at Athens [Note: Acts 17:16.]? Should they not imitate John [Note: Mark 6:18.], and adopt the words of Jeremiah [Note: Jeremiah 13:17.]? Should they not reprove sin in others as well as abstain from it themselves [Note: Ephesians 5:11.]? But how miserably defective are even good people in this particular! How often do fear or shame restrain them from bearing their testimony for God! Alas! what a sad contrast does our conduct form with that of our Lord! Have we not reason then to be ashamed, and mourn for our neglect? But many, so far from rebuking sin in others, indulge it in themselves: even in the very house of God they harbour worldly and carnal thoughts; nor are at all concerned to have their hearts purified from vile affections. Surely this cannot but be most offensive to the heart-searching God. Let us remember the solemn caution given us by the Apostle [Note: 1 Corinthians 3:17.]—. With respect to others, let us never presume to use the petulant language of Cain [Note: Genesis 4:9.]—, but rather endeavour to obey the injunction which God has given us [Note: Leviticus 19:17.]—; and, with respect to ourselves, let us seek in all things that conformity to Christ which is required of us [Note: 1 John 2:6.]—.]

They afford us a proper example for our imitation

[Phinehas of old was called to execute the judgment he inflicted on Zimri [Note: He was a ruler himself, and acted by the command of the chief magistrate. Compare 1 Chronicles 9:20. Numbers 25:5; Numbers 25:7-8.]. Thus Jesus, as the Prophet of the Most High, was called to vindicate God’s honour. In the same manner we should do whatever our place and station require: we must not all take on ourselves the office of magistrates, or assume the authority which does not belong to our situation and circumstances. Our zeal must be regulated by the word of God. It must be in a good cause; and in support of truth and virtue [Note: Romans 10:2.]: it must be pure; and free from bigotry, ostentation, or wrath [Note: 2 Kings 10:16.]: it must be discreet, not precipitating us into unbecoming conduct [Note: Jude, ver. 22, 23.]: it must be proportioned, in a measure, to the occasion that excites it; and it must be uniform, opposing sin in ourselves, as much as in others [Note: Revelation 3:19.]. Such a zeal as this cannot be too vigorously maintained [Note: Romans 12:11.]. An intemperate zeal will injure the cause it attempts to serve; but that which is duly tempered with meekness and wisdom, will be productive of much good [Note: Galatians 4:18.]. Let us then check the unhallowed zeal that would call fire from heaven [Note: Luke 9:54.], and cherish that which is meek, humble, pious and benevolent [Note: James 3:17.]. Thus shall we approve ourselves to be God’s peculiar people [Note: Titus 2:14.]; and, while we please our God, shall be a blessing to all around us.]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on John 2:17". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/john-2.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 2:17. ἐμνήσθησαν] At the very time of the occurrence, and not (as Olshausen asserts) after the resurrection, a circumstance which has to be stated in John 2:22 (comp. John 12:16).

The text quoted is Psalms 69:10; the theocratic sufferer in this psalm, a psalm written during the exile, is a type of the Messiah; see John 15:25, John 19:28 ff. Comp. Romans 15:3; Romans 11:9; Acts 1:20

καταφάγεταί με] will devour or consume me, is to be understood of a power which wears one out internally, Psalms 119:139, not to be referred to the death of Jesus (Bengel, Olshausen, Hofmann, Weissag. u. Erf. p. 111; Luthardt, comp. Brückner), for the disciples could at that time have thought of anything but His death; comp. John 2:22. In this wrathful zeal, which they saw had taken hold of Jesus, they thought they saw the Messianic fulfilment of that word in the psalm, wherein the speaker declares his great zeal for God’s house, which was yet to wear him out. The fulfilment relates to the ζῆλος τοῦ οἴκου σου, whereof the καταφάγεται indicates only the violence and permanence; and there is therefore no ground for imagining already any gloomy forebodings on the part of the disciples (Lange). For ἐσθίειν and ἔδειν, used of consuming emotions (as in Aristophanes, Vesp. 287), see Jacobs, ad Anthol. VI. 280; Del. epigr. p. 257. As to the future φάγομαι, which belongs to the LXX. and Apocrypha, see Lobeck, ad Phryn. p. 327; like the classical ἔδομαι, it never stands as present (against Tholuck, Hengstenberg, Godet, and others).

Note.

If there was but one cleansing of the temple, then either John or the Synoptics have given an erroneous narrative. But if it happened twice,(140) first at the beginning, and then at the end of the Messianic ministry of Jesus,—a supposition which in itself corresponds too well to the significance of the act (in so far as its repetition was occasioned by the state of disorder remaining unchanged after so long an interval had elapsed) to be inconceivable (as has been asserted by some), or even merely to pass the limits of probability,—it is then, on the one hand, conceivable that the Synoptics do not contain the first cleansing, because Christ’s early labours in Jerusalem do not belong to the range of events which they generally narrate; and, on the other hand, that John passes over the second cleansing, because he had already recorded the Messianic ση΄εῖον of the same kind. We are not therefore to suppose that the one account is true, and the other false, but to assume that the act was repeated. See on Matthew 21:12-13. So the Fathers and most subsequent writers; also Schleiermacher, Tholuck, Olshausen, B. Crusius, Maier, Ebrard, Luthardt, Riggenbach, Lange, Baumgarten, Hengstenberg, Godet, etc. Others, on the contrary, admitting only one temple-cleansing, decide in favour, some of the synoptical account (Strauss, Weisse, Baur, Hilgenfeld, Scholten, Schenkel(141)), and some in favour of John’s (Lücke, De Wette, Ammon, Krabbe, Brückner, Ewald, Weizsäcker, and many others; Bäumlein hesitatingly). The latter would be the correct view, because John was an eye-witness; although we are not to suppose, as Baur, in keeping with his view of the fourth Gospel, thinks, that John derived the facts from the Synoptics, but fixed the time of the transaction independently, in consistency with the idea of reformatory procedure. See also Hilgenfeld, who traces here the “idiosyncrasy of John,” who, with reference at least to the knowledge of the disciples and the relations of Jesus to the Jews, begins where the Synoptics leave off; and thus his narrative is merely a peculiar development of synoptical materials. Besides, upon the supposition of two distinct cleansings of the temple, any essential difference between the two acts themselves is not to be discovered. Luthardt, indeed, following Hofmann (comp. Lichtenstein, p. 156), thinks that, in the synoptical account, Jesus as prophet protects the place of divine worship, but that in John’s He as Son exercises His authority over the house; but the οἶκός μου of the Synoptics, as the declaration of God, exactly corresponds with τὸν οἶκον τοῦ πατρός ΄ου in John as the word of Christ. The distinction, moreover, that the first cleansing was the announcement of reformation, and the second that of judgment (Hengstenberg), cannot be made good, separates what is clearly connected, and attaches too much importance to collateral minutiae. This remark in answer to Godet, who regards the first cleansing as “un appel,” the second as “une protestation.” The essential element of difference in John’s account lies in the very striking declaration of Jesus about the temple of His body, John 2:19, of which the Synoptics have not a word, and which possesses great prophetic significance as uttered at the very outset of His Messianic ministry, but has no special fitness at the end of it. Jesus accordingly did not utter it again at the second cleansing, but only at the first, though upon that second cleansing also, occasion was given for so doing (Matthew 21:23). It is this very declaration, however, which marks unmistakeably the Messianic character of the appearance of Jesus in Jerusalem from the very first (against Weizsäcker, Evang. Gesch. p. 260). Chap. John 7:3 is not the first place which treats of that Messianic appearance.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 2:17". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-2.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 2:17. ἐμνήσθησαν, they remembered) Comp. John 2:22, ch. John 12:16 [His triumphant entry into Jerusalem], “These things understood not His disciples at the first; but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they that these things were written of Him.” Concerning the time of remembrance, also ch. John 14:26, “The Holy Ghost shall bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.”— ζῆλοςκαταφάγεταί με, Zeal—shall eat Me up(46)) So Septuagint, Psalms 69:10. In truth, His enemies afterwards killed Jesus on account of His zeal for His Father’s house.— οἴκου, house) See John 2:16.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 2:17". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-2.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The disciples, as well as the rest of the people there present, could not but be astonished at this so strange a thing, to see a single person, and he in no repute but as a private person, to make a whip, and with authority drive the buyers and sellers out of the temple, and nobody to oppose him; but they remembered the words of David, Psalms 69:9. Some think that John here reports what they did after Christ’s resurrection; and, indeed, whoso considereth the following part of the gospel history, would think that it were so; for they did not seem so early to have had a persuasion of Christ’s Divine nature, nor that he was the Messiah; or if they at this time remembered it, and apprehended that Christ was the Son of David, the impression seems to have worn off. It is a greater question whether Psalms 69:1-36 (from whence this quotation is) is to be understood of Christ, properly and literally, or merely as the Antitype to David, of whom that Psalm is literally to be understood? Some of the Lutherans think that Psalm primarily concerned Christ. Mr. Calvin and others think it only concerned Christ as David’s Antitype. The former, for their opinion, take notice of the frequent quotation of it in the New Testament, Matthew 27:48 John 19:28 Acts 1:20 Romans 15:3. The other urge that there are some things in that Psalm which cannot agree to Christ. The matter is not much. Zeal is nothing but a warmth of love and anger. It is good to be zealous, yea, swallowed up with zeal, in a good cause; but men must take heed of the Pharisaical zeal, not according to knowledge. Christ was zealous, but the cause was good.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 2:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-2.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Цитата из Пс. 68:10 свидетельствует, что Иисус не потерпит непочтительности по отношению к Богу. Давид писал этот псалом в то время, когда его преследовали за его ревность к дому Божьему и за его защиту почитания Бога. Ученики боялись, что действия Иисуса вызовут подобное преследование. Позже Павел в Рим. 15:3 цитировал Пс. 68:10 («злословия злословящих Тебя пали на Меня»), ясно указывая на то, что для ранней церкви псалом имел мессианский характер.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 2:17". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-2.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

It was written; Psalms 69:9.

Hath eaten me up; I am full of consuming desire for the honor of thy house, and the purity of thy worship. The transactions recorded in the New Testament are in many cases a fulfilment of the declarations of the Old; and the more we become acquainted with each, and with the connection of one with the other, the more clear to our minds will be the evidence of the divine inspiration and value of both-that they have one Author, tend to form one character, and promote one great and benevolent end.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-2.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17.His disciples—Only, as yet, the five from Bethsaida. See notes on John 2:2, and John 1:40-51. Among these was John himself, and therefore a witness of this cleansing.

Remembered—As at John 2:22, afterward. But it called to mind the psalm at the time.

Written—In Psalms 69:9. This Psalm, though written in the person of David, was applied even by the ancient Jews to the Messiah. Aben Ezra has on the last verse of that psalm this note: “The sense is, they and their children shall inherit, not in the days of David, but in the days of the Messiah.”

Zeal of thine house—Rather, zeal for thy house.

Eaten me up—A figure in all ages to express the consuming, emaciating effects of care and passion.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-2.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘His disciples remembered that it was written, ‘Zeal for your House will eat into me’.’

The words cited here by John come from Psalms 69:9 and there it is also in a context where insults are being offered to God, just as they were here. We are not told when the disciples remembered the words, probably it was at the time, but it confirms to them and the readers that here is One Who fulfils the Scriptures and takes worship seriously, and is willing to be unpopular in order to purify it.

John possibly also sees in the incident a picture of rejection of the sacrificial system which Jesus has come to replace, but that is not apparent from Jesus’ words, although hinted at in what follows. But certainly it was a sign that the old waters of Judaism needed transforming and changing into something better.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-2.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The outstanding impression that Jesus" acts presented to His disciples was one of zeal for the proper use of the temple and ultimately for God"s glory. They may have recalled Psalm 69:9 then, or they may have thought of it later. John"s description does not make this clear. This is the third most frequently quoted Psalm in the New Testament (cf. John 7:3-5; John 15:25; Matthew 27:34; Matthew 27:48; Romans 11:9-10; Romans 15:3). [Note: Cf. Bernard, 1:91.] In Psalm 69:9 David meant that zeal for the building of the temple had dominated his thoughts and actions, and he implied that others had criticized him for it. John changed the quotation from the past to the future tense implying that it was a prophecy concerning David"s great Son. He undoubtedly saw it as such. However, was he not misquoting the verse?

The Hebrew language does not have past, present, and future tenses as English does. It has a perfect tense indicating complete action and an imperfect tense indicating incomplete action. In Psalm 69:9 the tense of the Hebrew verb is perfect. One can translate a Hebrew perfect tense with an English past, present, or future tense depending on the context. Here an English past tense was appropriate for David"s statement about himself, but the Hebrew also permits an English future tense that is appropriate for Messiah, the Song of Solomon -called prophetic perfect tense.

"We should not miss the way this incident fits in with John"s aim of showing Jesus to be the Messiah. All his actions imply a special relationship with God. They proceed from his messianic vocation. The citation from Scripture is important from another point of view, for it accords with another habit of this Evangelist. While John does not quote the Old Testament as frequently as do some other New Testament writers, it is still the case, as Richard Morgan says, that "the Old Testament is present at every crucial moment in the Gospel." It is one of John"s great themes that in Jesus God is working his purposes out. Every critical moment sees the fulfillment of Scripture in which those purposes are set forth." [Note: Morris, p172.]

"When Jesus cleansed the temple, He "declared war" on the hypocritical religious leaders ( Matthew 23), and this ultimately led to His death. Indeed, His zeal for God"s house did eat Him up!" [Note: Wiersbe, 1:292-93.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-2.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 2:17. His disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of thine house shall eat me up. Clearly (from the contrast with John 2:22) they remembered this scripture at that time. The quotation is from Psalms 69, a psalm which is several times referred to in the New Testament. See Romans 15:3; Romans 11:9-10; Acts 1:20 (perhaps John 15:25); and comp. Psalms 69:21 with the accounts of the crucifixion. We have no record of the interpretation of this psalm by Jewish writers in a Messianic sense, but New Testament usage can leave no doubt that such an application of many verses is both allowable and necessary. What was true of the devout and afflicted Israelite who wrote the words was true in the fullest sense of the Servant of Jehovah, of whom all such faithful servants were imperfect types. The exact meaning of the words here quoted will best appear if we take the whole verse: ‘The zeal of Thine house consumed me: and the reproaches of them that reproached Thee fell on me. The parallelism of the lines shows that the chief antithesis lies in the pronouns. Dishonour shown to God has been felt by the psalmist as a cruel wrong to himself.’ Zealous indignation for Thine house, inspired by the sight or news of unworthy treatment of Thine house, consumed me,—so to say, destroyed my very life.’ The quotation is not exact; what in the psalm is past is here future: ‘shall eat me up.’ An examination of other passages will show that, where John uses the words ‘it is written,’ he does not necessarily imply that the quotation is made with literal exactness. Had we the past, ‘consumed,’ we might be led to think of the inward consuming of holy zeal from which resulted this act of indignation; the future, ‘will eat me up,’ brings us nearer to what we have seen to be the meaning of the passage in the psalm. His zeal for His Father’s house will devour His very life-will bring destruction in its train.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-2.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

it was written = it is (or standeth) written. Compare John 6:31, John 6:45; John 8:17; John 10:34; John 12:14. The zeal, &c. Quoted from Psalms 69:9. See the rest of the verse in Romans 15:3, and other parts of the Psa. in John 15:25 (John 2:4); John 19:28 (John 2:21). Romans 11:9, Romans 11:10 (John 2:22). Acts 1:20 (John 2:25). See App-107. of. Genitive of" Relation. App-17. Compare John 3:3.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 2:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-2.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And his disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.

And his disciples remembered that it was written (Psalms 69:9), The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up - a glorious feature in the predicted character of the suffering Messiah, and rising high even in some not worthy to loose the latchet of His shoes. (See, for example, Exodus 32:19, etc.)

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-2.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

17. My devotion to your house, God. Quoted from Psalms 69:9.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 2:17". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) Was written . . . hath eaten me up .—More literally, is written . . . shall eat me up. The verse is full of interest in many ways. It gives us the thought of the disciples at the time (comp. John 2:22) which could be known only to one of their number. It shows us what we too seldom realise in reading the New Testament, that the Jewish mind was filled to overflowing with thoughts of the Old Testament. The child was taught to say by heart large portions of the Law and Psalms and Prophets, and they formed the very texture of the mind, ready to pass into conscious thought whenever occasion suggested. With the exception of the 22nd Psalm, no part of the Old Testament is so frequently referred to in the New as the psalm from which these words are taken (Psalms 69:9), and yet that psalm could not have been in its historic meaning Messianic (see, e.g., John 2:5; John 2:22-25). This reference to it gives us, then, their method of interpretation. Every human life is typical. The persecution without reason, the wrong heaped upon the innocent, the appeal to and trust in Jehovah, the song of thanksgiving from him whose parched throat was weary of calling—all this was true of some representative sufferer of earlier days, and we may hear in it almost certainly the voice of Jeremiah; but it was true of him in that he was a forerunner of the representative sufferer. The darker features of the psalm belong to the individual; the Life which sustains in all, and the Light which illumines in all, was even then in the world, though men knew Him not. The words of Jeremiah are Messianic, because his life—like every noble, self-forgetting, others’ sorrow bearing, man and God loving life—was itself Messianic.

The change of tense, from the past of the Psalmist to the future here, is itself significant. The words were true of the inner burning which consumed the prophet-priest. They come to the heart as true, with a fuller truth, of Christ’s spirit burning with righteous indignation, and cast down by deepest sorrow; but shrinking not from the painful task, which leaves its mark falling on that face as the shadow of a deeper darkness. They are to be, in a deeper sense, truer still.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And his disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up.
The zeal
Psalms 69:9; 119:139
Reciprocal: Numbers 25:13 - zealous;  1 Samuel 4:22 - The glory;  2 Samuel 7:2 - the ark;  1 Kings 19:10 - very jealous;  2 Kings 19:31 - the zeal;  Psalm 122:9 - the house;  Isaiah 59:17 - with zeal;  Luke 2:49 - my;  John 2:22 - his;  2 Corinthians 7:11 - zeal;  2 Corinthians 11:29 - and I burn;  Galatians 4:18 - it is;  Revelation 3:19 - be

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 2:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-2.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 17. "And His disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of Thine house consumeth me."

In Psalms 69:9 it is said, "For the zeal of Thine house hath eaten me up, and the reproaches of them that reproached Thee are fallen upon me." The two clauses of the verse are not in synonymous parallelism, but the second designates the consequences of the first: The zeal of Thine house hath eaten me up; therefore the reproaches are fallen on me. For that the expression, "consumeth me," does not designate the outward consequences of the zeal, but rather its inward intensity—equivalent to, it wears me away (Luther: I am zealous even unto death; with the remark: It is a mournful mood, so that the heart pines away, disappears, and is as it were consumed, as the moths consume a garment)—is shown by the parallel passage, Psalms 119:139, "My zeal hath consumed me, because mine enemies have forgotten Thy words." In the former passage, the temple is regarded as the centre of the whole Israelitish religion. The zeal here is the zeal of love. Luther says: "He is not moved to the anger which He here manifests by hatred, but by a deep love to God, who has founded this temple for His glory, for commerce in the Divine Word, that in the Church men might learn how they could be saved, and could serve God.

This made Him sad, to behold in His Father's house such a horror and calamity that souls should be miserably ruined: with this He is angry, for He loved God." The quotation of this passage from the Psalms is characteristic of the first cleansing of the temple in distinction from the second. It shows that the first transaction cannot be one absolutely peculiar to Christ; that it was typified by previous acts of righteous persons; and that in it a pattern is given for all believers and especially for all the servants of the Church. The passage could not have been quoted with reference to the second purification of the temple. For this did not form the summit of the activity common to all the servants of God (cf. Elijah's declaration: I have been zealous for the Lord); but it belongs entirely and solely to Christ, the Angel of the covenant.

The expositors of the Church call attention, with much earnestness, to the doctrine which is contained in these words for the ministers of the Church. Quesnel says, "Jesus teaches us that zeal for God's house is, as it were, the peculiar virtue of pastors." Luther: "All apostles and bishops have also attempted this, and still do. They very well know what it is, when they see that their faithful care, their toil and trouble, are all in vain, and some evil-disposed person comes and makes a noise, and breaks down in one day more than one could build or set up again in some years. He also will say, The zeal of Thy house hath eaten me up. For the more pious a pastor or preacher is, the more he feels this zeal, and the more he should feel it." Calvin points out that, although the zeal must be common to all with the Son of God, it is not, however, permitted to all immediately to take up the scourge, and thus to attack abuses. For we have not the same authority, nor the same office.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 2:17". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-2.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

17.And his disciples remembered. It is to no purpose that some people tease themselves with the inquiry how the disciples remembered a passage of Scripture, with the meaning of which they were hitherto unacquainted. For we must not understand that this passage of Scripture came to their remembrance at that time; but afterwards, when, having been taught by God, they considered with themselves what was the meaning of this action of Christ, by the direction of the Holy Spirit this passage of Scripture occurred to them. And, indeed, it does not always happen that the reason of God’s works is immediately perceived by us, but afterwards, in process of time, He makes known to us his purpose. And this is a bridle exceedingly well adapted to restrain our presumption, that we may not murmur against God, if at any time our judgment does not entirely approve of what he does. We are at the same time reminded, that when God holds us as it were in suspense, it is our duty to wait for the time of more abundant knowledge, and to restrain the excessive haste which is natural to us; for the reason why God delays the full manifestation of his works is, that he may keep us humble.

The zeal of thine house hath eaten me up. The meaning is, that the disciples at length came to know, that the zeal for the house of God, with which Christ burned, excited him to drive out of it those profanations. By a figure of speech, in which a part is taken for the whole, David employs the name of the temple to denote the whole worship of God; for the entire verse runs thus:

the zeal of thy house hath eaten me up, and the reproaches of them who reproached thee have fallen on me, (Psalms 69:9.)

The second clause corresponds to the first, or rather it is nothing else than a repetition explaining what had been said. The amount of both clauses is, that David’s anxiety about maintaining the worship of God was so intense, that he cheerfully laid down his head to receive all the reproaches which wicked men threw against God; and that he burned with suchzeal, that this single feeling swallowed up every other. He tells us that he himself had such feelings; but there can be no doubt that he described in his own person what strictly belonged to the Messiah.

Accordingly, the Evangelist says, that this was one of the marks by which the disciples knew that it was Jesus who protected and restored the kingdom of God. Now observe that they followed the guidance of Scripture, in order to form such an opinion concerning Christ as they ought to entertain; and, indeed, no man will ever learn what Christ is, or the object of what he did and suffered, unless he has been taught and guided by Scripture. So far, then, as each of us shall desire to make progress in the knowledge of Christ, it will be necessary that Scripture shall be the subject of our diligent and constant meditation. Igor is it without a good reason that David mentions the house of God, when the divine glory is concerned; for though God is sufficient for himself, and needs not the services of any, yet he wishes that his glory should be displayed in the Church. In this way he gives a remarkable proof of his love towards us, because he unites his glory — as it were, by an indissoluble link — with our salvation.

Now as Paul informs us that, in the example of the head, a general doctrine is presented to the whole body, (Romans 15:3,) let each of us apply to the invitation of Christ, that — so far as lies in our power — we may not permit the temple of God to be in any way polluted. But, at the same time, we must beware lest any man transgress the bounds of his calling. All of us ought to have zeal in common with the Son of God; but all are not at liberty to seize a whip, that we may correct vices with our hands; for we have not received the same power, nor have we been entrusted with the same commission.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 2:17". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-2.html. 1840-57.