Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 2:2

and both Jesus and His disciples were invited to the wedding.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Cana;   Jesus, the Christ;   Marriage;   Mary;   Miracles;   Water;   Scofield Reference Index - Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Guest, Christ a;   Hospitality;   Social Life;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Marriage;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Galilee;   Grapes;   John, gospel of;   Marriage;   Miracles;   Palestine;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Joy;   Miracle;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Marriage;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Cana;   Marriage-Feasts;   Wine;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Nazareth;   Wine;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Fulfill;   John, the Gospel of;   Mary;   Sign;   Water;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joy;   Marriage;   Mary;   Propitiation;   World;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Announcements of Death;   Banquet;   Brotherhood (2);   Call, Calling;   Celibacy (2);   Common Life;   Dates (2);   Happiness;   John (the Apostle);   Marriage (I.);   Pleasure;   Poverty (2);   Prophet;   Reality;   Sea of Galilee;   Toleration, Tolerance;   Wealth (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Melchisedec, Melchizedek ;   Miracles;   New Testament;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cana;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Marriage;   Nazareth;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Marriage;   Naz'areth;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Cana;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Andrew;   Banquet;   Bid;   Mary;   Uncleanness;   Woman;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And both Jesus was called, and his disciples - There are several remarkable circumstances here.

  1. This was probably the first Christian wedding that was ever in the world.
  • The great Author of the Christian religion, with his disciples, (probably then only four or five in number, see John 1:37, etc.), were invited to it.
  • The first miracle Jesus Christ wrought was at it, and in honor of it.
  • The mother of Christ, the most pure of all virgins, the most holy of all wives, and the first Christian mother, was also at it.
  • The marriage was according to God, or these holy persons would not have attended it.
  • The bride and bridegroom must have been a holy pair, otherwise they would have had nothing to do with such holy company.
  • Marriage is ever honorable in itself; but it is not at all times used honourably. Where Jesus is not invited to bless the union, no good can be expected; and where the disciples of sin and Satan are preferred to the disciples of Christ, on such occasions, it is a melancholy intimation that so bad a beginning will have a bad ending. I am afraid we may search long, before we find a marriage conducted on such principles as this appears to have been, even among those who make more than a common profession of the religion of Christ.

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    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 2:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-2.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    His disciples - Those that he had made when in Judea. These were Peter, Andrew, Philip, and Nathanael. They were not yet called to be apostles, but they believed that he was the Messiah. The miracle performed here was doubtless to convince them more fully that he was the Christ.

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    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-2.html. 1870.

    Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

    And Jesus also was bidden, and his disciples, to the marriage.

    See under preceding verse for the possible source of the invitation, which, despite all conjecture, cannot be known; all such irrelevancies were omitted by the inspired writer. It is enough to know that Jesus and his disciples were invited and that they attended. Christ came not as an ascetic, fasting and withdrawing from public contact, but as a person of lovable social grace who adorned and blessed any company by his presence. "The Son of man came eating and drinking" (Matthew 11:19).

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    Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
    Bibliographical Information
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    And both Jesus was called,.... Or invited, as being a relation, according to the flesh:

    and his disciples, to the marriage; who were bidden, on his account; and they seem to be these, Andrew, and the other disciple, that followed Jesus, and Simon Peter, and Philip, and Nathanael, who was of this place; and accordingly they all went to it. Christ, and his five disciples, made six of the ten, which were always necessary to be present at, the benediction of bridegrooms: for so runs the canonF13Maimon. Hilch. Ishot, c. 10. sect. 5. Pirke Eliezer, c. 19. Shirhashirim Rabba, fol. 9. 3. ;

    "they do not bless the blessing of bridegrooms, but with ten principal and free men; and the bridegroom may be one of the number.'

    To attend a wedding, was reckoned, with the Jews, an act of beneficence and kindnessF14Maimon in Misn. Peah, c. 1. sect. 1. . Our Lord, being at this wedding, was acting like himself, and his general character, of being free, affable, and courteous; who accepted of every invitation, and refused not to be at any entertainment, made by who it would, or on whatever occasion: and particularly in this instance, it shows his humility in not disdaining his poor relations, but giving them his company at such a time; as also it was bearing a testimony to the institution of marriage, as honourable; and teaches us to rejoice with them that rejoice: and as this was, at the first of Christ's ministry and miracles, it is likely it might give the occasion of that calumny cast on him in Matthew 11:19. The disciples of Christ followed the example of their master. According to the Jewish cationsF15T. Bab. Pesachim, fol. 49. 1. & Maimon. Hilchot Deyot, c. 5. sect. 2. , a disciple of a wise man might not partake of any feast, but what was according to the commandment, as the feast of espousals, and of marriage; and such a feast was this, which Christ and his disciples were at; and so not to be condemned for it, according to their own maxims.

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    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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    Bibliographical Information
    Gill, John. "Commentary on John 2:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-2.html. 1999.

    People's New Testament

    Both Jesus and disciples were called. He now had disciples, those called in the few days before; John, Andrew, Peter, Philip and Nathanael.

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    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
    Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
    Bibliographical Information
    Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 2:2". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-2.html. 1891.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    Jesus also was bidden (εκλητη και ο Ιησουςeklēthē kai ho Iēsous). First aorist passive indicative of καλεωkaleō “was also invited” as well as his mother and because of her presence, possibly at her suggestion.

    And his disciples (και οι ματηταιkai hoi mathētai). Included in the invitation and probably all of them acquaintances of the family. See note on John 1:35 for this word applied to John‘s followers. This group of six already won form the nucleus of the great host of “learners” through the ages who will follow Jesus as Teacher and Lord and Saviour. The term is sometimes restricted to the twelve apostles, but more often has a wider circle in view as in John 6:61, John 6:66; John 20:30.

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    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-2.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    Was called

    Rev., bidden. After His return from the Baptist.

    His disciples

    In honor of Jesus.

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    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-2.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage.

    Jesus and his disciples were invited to the marriage — Christ does not take away human society, but sanctifies it. Water might have quenched thirst; yet our Lord allows wine; especially at a festival solemnity. Such was his facility in drawing his disciples at first, who were afterward to go through rougher ways.

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    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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    Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 2:2". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-2.html. 1765.

    The Fourfold Gospel

    and Jesus also was bidden, and his disciples2, to the marriage.

    1. And Jesus also was bidden . . . to the marriage. Being the Creator of woman, and the author of matrimony, it was fitting that the Son of God should grace a marriage feast with his presence.

    2. And his disciples. This is the earliest use of the term "disciples" in the ministry of Jesus. His disciples were Andrew, Peter, Philip, Nathanael, and probably John and James.

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    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
    Bibliographical Information
    J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 2:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-2.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

    Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

    Called; invited.

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    Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-2.html. 1878.

    Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books

    Ver. 2. "Now Jesus also was bidden to the marriage, as well as His disciples."

    There is a contrast between the imperfect, was there, which is used in speaking of Mary, and the aorist was bidden, applied to Jesus and His disciples. Jesus was bidden only on His arrival, while Mary, at that time, was already there. It appears from all these points that the family in question was quite closely related to that of the Lord; this is likewise proved by the authoritative attitude which Mary assumes in the following scene.

    The singular, was bidden, is owing to the fact that the disciples were not bidden except in honor, and, as it were, in the person, of their Master. Rilliet, with some commentators, translates: had been bidden. But when? Before going to His baptism (Schleiermacher), or later, through a messenger? Two very improbable suppositions. Moreover, the added words: as well as His disciples, are incompatible with this meaning. For they could not have been invited before it was known that Jesus had disciples.

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    Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/john-2.html.

    James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

    THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE CHRISTIAN

    ‘And both Jesus was called, and His disciples, to the marriage.’

    John 2:2

    The Christian must necessarily at times be sorely perplexed in regard to what is right and what is wrong for him in the matter of social engagements.

    The narrative of the marriage at Cana in Galilee shows us clearly that our Lord did not disdain the festive board. He went to the wedding-feast and took His disciples with Him. There is no reason why His disciples of to-day should abstain from social entertainments, but we must be quite sure that we can take Him with us. It is a matter of common experience that there are social engagements to which we are invited where, our own instinct tells us, He would not, if I may so express it, feel at home. Where the Master cannot go is no place for the disciple.

    I. Some cautions.—But when we go into society let us beware lest, by our own act, or by assenting to the actions of others, we may do harm.

    (a) Pride may come there (Matthew 23:6).

    (b) Vanity may come there—vanity of dress, vanity of face, vanity of manners, vanity of conversation. Souls have been lost in society, having acquired there the habit of turning everything to account for one end—self-display.

    (c) Charity may not come there. It comes not, or it stays not, where scandal is—discussion of other men’s affairs, conduct, character.

    (d) Even reverence may be wanting. How often has a jest, pointed and winged by Scripture—a ludicrous quotation, or a humorous allusion—planted in some memory an association not to be lost, ruinous to the future use of a whole text or context of inspiration!

    II. Positive duties.—But in all watchings against evil there should be a positive striving after good. Let a high aim and a Christian motive go with us into society, and we shall not be there like men armed for self-defence or chained against offending, but rather as free and large-hearted friends, fearing no evil, because God is with us. We must go as Christians.

    (a) Earnest prayer for a special blessing will be the preliminary and safeguard of all.

    (b) There are many other ways in which he may speak and use influence for his Master. He can win others by the charm of a thoroughly Christian, and therefore powerfully attractive, spirit. Sometimes a word, or scarcely a word of his, will not only check the running down of some maligned character, but even rectify the misapprehension from which slander had started. Sometimes in a crowded reception-room, that which could not, without obtrusiveness, have been said at the table, has been uttered with saving power to an individual guest.

    The effect of a Christian man’s presence in common society should be to make others feel that they were in a good atmosphere.

    Illustration

    ‘Christ and His religion are meant for every day. If Christ began by going to a wedding, it is plain that Christ’s religion must have something to do with weddings; if Christ went to what we call a wedding-party, it is plain that Christ’s religion has something to do with our wedding-parties. If Christ took the trouble to find them more wine it is plain that religion has something to do with such things as eating and drinking. Christ began his work by going among people when they were merry and by helping them to be merry too, and so He teaches us that we must have our religion with us when we are merry, and that if we do, He will help us to be merry much better than we can do it ourselves. For you will see that the wine Christ gave them was better than what they had of their own.’

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    Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 2:2". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-2.html. 1876.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    2 And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage.

    Ver. 2. Jesus was called] That was the way to have all sanctified, 1 Timothy 4:3, and disorders prevented. Cave, spectat Cato, Beware, Cato is wating, was the old watchword.

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    Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 2:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-2.html. 1865-1868.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    John 2:2. Jesus was called, and his disciples, Was invited, &c. The persons called his disciples, who were with him at this marriage, as also at Jerusalem, and who accompanied him to the distant parts of Judea, and baptized those who offered themselves to his baptism, (see Ch. John 3:22, John 4:1-2.) seem to have been Philip, Simon, Andrew, and Nathanael, the four mentioned in the preceding chapter; for as these transactions happened before the Baptist's imprisonment, (Ch. John 3:24.) we cannot think that the disciples present at them had followed Jesus in consequence of the call given near the sea of Galilee, Matthew 4:18 or the call spoken of Luke 5:1; Luke 5:39 because it is certain that neither the one nor the other was given till after the Baptist was put in prison.

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    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 2:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-2.html. 1801-1803.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    2.] ἐκλήθη, not for a pluperfect:—was invited: the historical past.

    κ. οἱ μαθ. αὐτ.] It does not appear who these were, unless we assume that they were those called in ch. 1., which seems most probable. John himself was most likely present. He does not relate so circumstantially any thing which he had not witnessed.

    In this case, there must have been some other reason for the invitation, besides mere previous acquaintance. This would be the probable reason for Jesus Himself being invited; but the disciples, being from various places in the district, can hardly all have been (De Wette) friends of the family. The fact of Jesus having attached disciples to Himself must have been known, and they were doubtless invited from consideration to Him.

    Our Lord at once opens His ministry with the character which He gives of himself Matthew 11:18-19, as distinguished from the asceticism of John. He also, as Trench admirably remarks (Miracles, edn. 2, p. 98, note), gives us his own testimony against the tendency which our indolence ever favours, of giving up those things and occasions to the world and the devil, which we have not Christian boldness to mingle in and purify. Even Cyprian, for instance, proscribes such festivals,—“nuptiarum festa improba et convivia lasciva vitentur, quorum periculosa contagio est.” De Habitu Virginum, ch. 21. p. 460. And such is the general verdict of modern religionism, which would keep the leaven distinct from the lump, for fear it should become unleavened. The especial honour conferred upon marriage by the Lord should also be noticed. “He here adorned and beautified it with his presence, and first miracle that He wrought.”

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    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 2:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-2.html. 1863-1878.

    Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

    John 2:2. Jesus also and His disciples (those won in chap. 1) were invited, i.e. when, in the meanwhile, He had come to Cana.(133) To take ἐκλήθη as pluperfect is objectionable both in itself (see on John 18:24), and also because the disciples had been first won by Jesus on the way. But there is nothing against the supposition that Jesus had journeyed not to Nazareth, but to Cana, on account of the wedding; for He may have known (through Nathanael, Godet thinks) that His mother was there, and because, considering the friendly relations with the family, He did not need a previous invitation. This is at the same time in answer to Weisse, II. 203, who finds an invitation inconceivable; to Lange, who holds that Jesus found the invitation awaiting Him at Nazareth (?); also to Schleiermacher, who makes the invitation to have preceded even His baptism. Of the disciples, Nathanael, moreover, was himself a native of Cana (John 21:2). But even apart from this, the friendly invitation of the disciples along with Jesus by no means implies a previous extended ministry of Jesus in Galilee (Schenkel), or even such a ministry at all before His baptism (Schleiermacher).

    As to the sing. ἐκλήθη, see Kühner, § 433, 1; Buttmann, N. T. Gk. 110 [E. T. p. 126 ff.].

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    Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 2:2". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-2.html. 1832.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    John 2:2. οἱ μαθηταί, the disciples) There were by this time more disciples than those who had invited Jesus and His disciples seem to have thought: on that account the wine was the more speedily all spent; but Jesus most liberally compensates them, by giving as many vessels of wine as were about the number of companions whom He had brought with Him.— αὐτοῦ, His) Hence maybe inferred the piety of those who invited Him.

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    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 2:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-2.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    Whether only the five disciples mentioned in the former chapter, or some others also, the Scripture doth not say. Christ and his disciples being at this marriage feast, both lets us know that feasting at such a time is proper, and that the most severe religious persons may lawfully be present at such meetings; only they are obliged to keep to rules of frugality, modesty, and sobriety, to a breach of which possibly such meetings may give more temptations.

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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 2:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-2.html. 1685.

    Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

    Был также зван Иисус и ученики Его Поскольку все: Иисус, Его мать и Его ученики – присутствовали на свадьбе, то она, вероятно, состоялась у родственника или близкого друга семьи. С Иисусом были пять учеников, упомянутых в первой главе: Андрей, Симон Петр, Филипп, Нафанаил и неназванный ученик (1:35), которым, несомненно, был Иоанн, также ставший свидетелем чуда.

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    MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 2:2". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-2.html.

    Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

    Marriage is an ordinance of divine appointment, and a means of great usefulness and happiness. At weddings, the presence and blessing of Jesus Christ should always be sought, and every thing conducted in such a manner as will honor him, and promote the benefit of all concerned.

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    Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-2.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

    Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

    The facts that Jesus received an invitation to a wedding and accepted it show that He was not a recluse. He participated in the normal affairs of human life. This included occasions of rejoicing. The Gospels consistently present this picture of Him. Godliness does not require separation from human society, though John the Baptist did not mix with people as much as Jesus did. A Christ-like person can be a socially active person.

    In a small village such as Cana-probably modern Khirbet Kana-a wedding would have been a community celebration. [Note: For a description of how a typical Galilean wedding was conducted, see Edersheim, 1:354-55.] Perhaps the hosts included Jesus because Nathanael was from Cana ( John 21:2), and Nathanael had recently become a follower of Jesus. Yet probably they knew Jesus and invited Him as a friend since His mother was also there and took some responsibility for the catering. This event evidently transpired very early in Jesus" ministry, before He called the Twelve. Consequently the only disciples present may have been the five to which John referred in chapter1.

    "Wise is that couple who invite Jesus to their wedding!" [Note: Wiersbe, 1:290.]

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    Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-2.html. 2012.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    John 2:2. And Jesus also was called, and his disciples, to the marriage. The form of the sentence shows that our chief attention is to be fixed on Jesus, not on the disciples. They were invited as His disciples. Those who came were probably the five or six mentioned in chap. 1, viz. Andrew, Simon Peter, Philip, Nathanael, and John himself (and probably James).

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    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-2.html. 1879-90.

    The Expositor's Greek Testament

    John 2:2. . “And both Jesus was invited and His disciples to the marriage.” To translate as a pluperfect “had been invited” is grammatically possible, but it is impossible that the disciples should have been previously invited, because their existence as disciples was not known. They were invited when they appeared. The collective title is anticipatory: as yet it could not be in use. The singular verb ( ) with a plural nominative is too common to justify Holtzmann’s inference that it indicates, what of course was the fact, that the disciples were asked only in consequence of Jesus being asked. Cf.Luke 2:33. In this instance Jesus “came unto His own” and His own received Him, at any rate as a friend.

     

     

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    Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 2:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-2.html. 1897-1910.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    called = invited.

    disciples. Probably six in number: viz. Andrew, Simon, Philip, Nathanael (John 1:40-51), with James and John (Mark 1:16-20). See App-141.

    to. Greek. eis. App-104.

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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 2:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-2.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage.

    And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage - by special invitation, probably, at the instance of Jesus' mother.

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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-2.html. 1871-8.

    The Bible Study New Testament

    2. Jesus and his disciples had also been invited. Jesus now had disciples with him: John, Andrew, Peter, Philip, Nathanael.

     

     

     

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    Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 2:2". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-2.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (2) Was called, or invited, after His arrival in Cana; but we may still think of Him, in whom purpose and result were one, as coming to Cana for the marriage. Nathanael would have known of it, and was perhaps also connected with one of the families. It is quite in accord with Eastern hospitality that the disciples, who are now spoken of under this collective title, and formed with their Rabbi a band of seven, should be bidden with Him.

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    Bibliographical Information
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 2:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-2.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage.
    both
    Matthew 12:19; Luke 7:34-38; 1 Corinthians 7:39; 10:31; Colossians 3:17; Revelation 3:20
    his
    Matthew 10:40-42; 25:40,45
    the marriage
    Hebrews 13:4
    Reciprocal: Numbers 6:10 - GeneralPsalm 116:4 - called;  Matthew 7:8 - GeneralMatthew 11:19 - came;  Luke 8:24 - Master

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    Bibliographical Information
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 2:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-2.html.

    Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

    Ver. 2. "And both Jesus was called and His disciples to the marriage."

    The mother of Jesus was already there when this invitation was made. It seems that Jesus and His disciples came to seek her there, and were then invited. The deficiency may have arisen, in part, from the unexpected increase in the number of the guests. The love had surpassed the ability. It is not unimportant for our judgment of the remedy, that the need had been produced in part by Jesus Himself.

    The bridal pair was doubtless a God-fearing one. Otherwise, the mother of Jesus would not have interested herself so much in them, and Jesus also would have declined the invitation. The invitation to Jesus and His disciples, at least those five whose conversion is described in the previous chapter (Lampe: "qui magnifacit Jesum, illi etiam discipuli ejus grati sunt"), proceeded, as it seems, from a germinant faith, and had the same source as the invitation of Abraham to his three heavenly guests. They would rather expose themselves to be put to shame, than let Jesus and His disciples go.

    The ready willingness with which Jesus accepts the invitation to the marriage, for Himself and His disciples, forms a contrast to the severe mode of life of John the Baptist: cf. Matthew 11:19. Olshausen: "The first disciples of Christ were all originally disciples of the Baptist. His manner of life—rigid, penitential austerity, and solitary abode in the desert—naturally appeared to them the only one that was right. What a contrast for them, when the Messiah, to whom the Baptist himself had pointed them, takes them first of all to a marriage!" Jesus brings with Him new supernatural powers, in possession of which His disciples need not anxiously avoid contact with worldly affairs, but by which they are to overcome and sanctify them. The renunciation of the world is indicated and commanded only, so long as such powers do not yet exist. But it was of importance to indicate that marriage and married life are capable of such sanctification; it was of value for all times of the Church to make a protest against those who regard the conjugal state as a profane one,—a mode of consideration of which we find germs even in the apostolic age, 1 Timothy 4:3. Moreover. we must regard the time at which Jesus accepts the invitation to the marriage. Bengel has aheady, with perfect correctness, remarked: "magna facilitas Domini: nuptiis interest primo tempore, dum discipulos allicit, per severiores inde vias progressurus ad crucem, in gloriam." Jesus would hardly have taken His disciples to a marriage shortly before His passion. When, in Matthew 9:15, He says, with respect to His disciples, "But the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken from them, and then shall they fast," we may assume, that even when this time was immediately before them, Jesus would not have taken His disciples to such occasions as those at which life is presented from the more cheerful side. In that first time, however, the acceptance of the invitation to the marriage appears the more suitable, since this, together with its independent significance, has also a high value as a symbol and adumbration. Christ was not here the bridegroom; but the marriage, according to a conception naturalized by the Song of Songs, and widely extended in the New Testament, appears to be a representation of the relation of Christ to His Church, a type of the marriage of the Lamb. Cf. John 3:29; Matthew 9:15; Matthew 22:1-14; Matthew 25:10; Ephesians 5:32; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 22:17; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9. This symbolic dignity of marriage and married life presupposes its independent dignity. Only a sacred condition, only a venerable ordinance of God, can be an adumbration of the highest and holiest of all relations.

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    These files are public domain.
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    Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 2:2". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-2.html.