Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 9:7

and said to him, "Go, wash in the pool of Siloam" (which is translated, Sent). So he went away and washed, and came back seeing.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Blindness;   Pool;   Sabbath;   Siloam;   Thompson Chain Reference - Effort Demanded;   Faith;   Faith-Unbelief;   Preparation;   Readiness-Unreadiness;   Siloam;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Blindness, Spiritual;   Miracles of Christ, the;   Pools and Ponds;   Water;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Siloam;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jerusalem;   John, gospel of;   Work;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heal, Health;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Holy Ghost;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Baths;   Pool;   Siloam, Pool of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Shilhim;   Siloam, the Pool of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ablutions;   Bathing;   Blindness;   Diseases;   Healing, Divine;   John, the Gospel of;   Pool;   Sign;   Siloam;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - John, Gospel of;   Miracles;   Pool, Pond;   Siloam;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Attributes of Christ;   Bason;   Bath, Bathing;   Beggar;   Cures;   Error;   Fig-Tree ;   Impotence;   Interpretation;   Mission;   Sabbath ;   Seeing;   Spitting, Spittle ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Siloah, Siloam ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Silence;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Siloah;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Bath, Bathing;   Sabbath;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cistern;   Pool;   Sent;   Siloam;   Water;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Siloam - Called also Shiloah, Silos, or Siloa, was a fountain under the walls of Jerusalem, towards the east, between the city and the brook Kidron. Calmet thinks that this was the same with En-rogel, or the fuller's fountain, which is mentioned in Joshua 15:7; Joshua 18:16; in 2 Samuel 17:17; and in 1 Kings 1:9. Its waters were collected in a great reservoir for the use of the city; and a stream from it supplied the pool of Bethesda.

By interpretation, Sent - From the Hebrew שלח shalach, he sent: either because it was looked upon as a gift sent from God, for the use of the city; or because its waters were directed or sent by canals or pipes, into different quarters, for the same purpose. Some think there is an allusion here to Genesis 49:10; that this fountain was a type of Shiloh, the Christ, the Sent of God; and that it was to direct the man's mind to the accomplishment of the above prophecy that our Lord sent him to this fountain. This supposition does not appear very solid. The Turks have this fountain still in great veneration, and think the waters of it are good for diseases of the eyes. Lightfoot says that the spring of Siloam discharged itself by a double stream into a twofold pool - the upper was called שילוח shiloach - the lower שלח shelach ; the one signifying απεϚαλμενος, sent, the latter, κωδιων fleeces; and that our Lord marked this point so particularly, to inform the blind man that it was not to Shelach, but to Shiloach, that he must go to wash his eyes. These two pools seem to be referred to in Isaiah 7:23; Isaiah 22:9.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 9:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-9.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Wash in the pool - In the fountains.

Of Siloam - See the notes at Luke 13:4.

By interpretation, Sent - From the Hebrew verb to send perhaps because it was regarded as a blessing sent or given by God. Why Jesus sent him to wash there is not known. It is clear that the waters had no efficacy themselves to open the eyes of a blind man, but it is probable that he directed him to go there to test his obedience, and to see whether he was disposed to obey him in a case where he could not see the reason of it. An instance somewhat similar occurs in the case of Naaman, the Syrian leper, 2 Kings 5:10. The proud Syrian despised the direction; the tremble blind man obeyed and was healed. This case shows us that we should obey the commands of God, however unmeaning or mysterious they may appear. God has always a reason for all that he directs us to do, and our faith and willingness to obey him are often tried when we can see little of the reason of his requirements. In the first edition of these notes it was remarked that the word Siloam is from the same verb as Shiloh in Genesis 49:10. “The sceptre shall not depart from Judah - until Shiloh (that is, the Sent of God: the Messiah) come,” and that John in this remark probably had reference to this prophecy. This was incorrect: and there is no evidence that John in this passage had reference to that prophecy, or that this fountain was emblematic of the Messiah. The original words Siloam and Shiloh are from different roots and mean different things. The former, Siloam שׁלח Shiloachis derived from שׁלה shaalach(to send); the latter, Shiloh שׁילה Shiylohmeans rest or quiet, and was given to the Messiah, probably, because he would bring rest that is, he would be the “prince of peace.” Compare Isaiah 9:6.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-9.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 9:7

Go wash in the pool of Siloam.
--Rounding the southern end of Ophel, the southeast span of Moriah, you reach this famous pool. It is fifty-two feet long and eighteen feet wide, some piers, like flying buttresses, standing on its north side, while part of a column rises in the middle of it. These are the remains of an old church, built over it 1,300 years ago, or a monastery of the twelfth century. The miracle invested the pool with such peculiar sacredness that baths were erected under the ancient church, to let the sick have the benefit of the wondrous stream. You go down eight ancient stone steps to reach the water, which is used by the people for drinking, washing their not over clean linen, and for bathing. Everything around is dilapidated. At the north end a small tunnel opens in the rock, bringing the water from the spring of the Virgin, which lies 1,700 feet higher up the valley. This ancient engineering work is about two feet wide, and from two to sixteen feet in height, with a branch cut due west from it to a shallow basin within the line of the ancient walls, where a round shaft more than forty feet deep has been sunk to reach it. On the top of this a great chamber hewn in the rock, with a flight of steps leading down to it, made it possible for the citizens, by covering and hiding the spring outside, to cut off the supply of water from an enemy, while themselves, by means of this striking arrangement, enjoying it in safety without leaving their defences. A notable discovery connected with the cutting of the main tunnel was made in 1880 by a youth while wading up its mouth. Losing his footing, he noticed, as he was picking himself up, some letters cut in the rocky side, which proved to be an inscription left by the workmen when they had finished their great undertaking. From this it appears that they began at both ends, but as engineering was hardly at its best 3,000 years ago their course was very far from being exactly straight, windings of more than two hundred yards, like the course of a river, marking their work. There are several short branches showing where the excavators found themselves going in a wrong direction, and abruptly stopped, to resume work in a truer line, when at last they met they proved to be a little on one side of each other and had to connect their excavations by a short side cutting. Prof. Sayce thinks that this undertaking dates from about the eight century B.C., and Prof. Muhlan refers it to the time of Hezekiah, while others think it in part, at least, a relic of the early inhabitants of Jerusalem before David. The depth of the tunnel below the surface, at its lowest, is one hundred and fifty feet. The slope is very small, so that the water must always have flowed with a gentle leisure from the spring to the pool
Isaiah 8:6). The remains of four other basins have been discovered, which were apparently once connected with the pool, and a little way from it down the valley, is an ancient “Lower Pool,” but now has its bottom overgrown with trees, the overflow from the higher pool having for centuries trickled past it instead of filling it. This is known as the Red Pool--from the colour of its soil--and is famous for an old mulberry tree saidto mark the spot where Isaiah was sawn asunder by Manasseh. The Virgin’s Well, from which the whole supply comes, lies at the bottom of two flights of broken stone steps--thirty in all--and has the glory of being the only spring rising in the Temple Mount. The taste of the water is very unpleasant, from its having filtered through the vast mass of foul rubbish on which the city stands, and which has been soaked by the sewage of many centuries. The sides of the tunnel are covered to a height of about three feet with thin red cement, very hard and full of pounded potsherds. The bed is covered with a black slimy deposit two or three inches thick, which makes the water still worse at Siloam than at the Virgin’s Well. Still from time to time water carriers come to fill their skins, and women with their great jars on their shoulders. Yet Siloam must have been far livelier than now in olden times, when a fine church rose over the spring and pilgrims bathed in the great tank beneath it. Already in the days of Christ, perhaps from the thought of the healing powers of the pool as issuing from Moriah, it must have been the custom to wash in it, else the blind man would hardly have been directed in so few words to do so. (C. Geikie, D. D.)

Which is by interpretation, Sent.--By a solemn and daily libation, the fount of Siloam had figured during the recent feast as the emblem of theocratic favours and the pledge of all Messianic blessings. This rite harmonized with the Old Testament, which had already contrasted this humble fountain with the brute force of the foes of the theocracy Isaiah 8:7). We have seen that Jesus applied to Himself the theocratic symbols of the feast; why should He not in the present instance also express by an act what He had hitherto declared in words. By adding to the real blindness, which He alone could cure, that artificial and symbolic blindness which the waters of Siloam were to remove, He declared in fact: What Siloam effects typically I accomplish in reality. Perhaps it is by the symbolic part given to Siloam that the explanation “Sent” of the Evangelist must be explained. In a philologic point of view, the correctness of John’s translation is not disputed, and the origin of the name has been explained by the circumstance that the water of the pool was “sent” from the distant spring of the Virgin, or because springs are regarded in the East as gifts of God. In any case, Israelite consciousness was struck by the fact that the spring flowed from the Temple hill, the residence of Jehovah, and had from the prophetic era attached to this water, a Messianic signification. It was undoubtedly this relation, with which the mind of the whole nation was penetrated, that John meant to bring forward in the parenthesis. Go to Siloam (the typically sent), to cleanse thyself from what causes thine artificial blindness; come by faith to He (the really Sent), who alone can cure thy blindness, both physical and moral. (F. Godet, D. D.)

The way of faith is simple

“Go wash in the pool.” Go to the pool, and wash the clay into it. Any boy can wash his eyes. The task was simplicity itself. So is the gospel as plain as a pikestaff. You have not to perform twenty genuflections or posturings, each one peculiar, nor have you to go to school to learn a dozen languages, each one more difficult than the other. No, the saving deed is one and simple. “Believe and live.” Trust, trust Christ; rely upon Him, rest in Him. Accept His work upon the cross as the atonement for your sin, His righteousness as your acceptance before God, His person as the delight of your soul. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Faith and obedience

He obeyed Christ blindly. He looked not upon Siloam with Syrian eyes as Naaman did upon Jordan, but, passing by the unlikelihood of a cure by such means, he believeth and doth as he was bidden. His blind obedience made him see. Let God be obeyed readily without reasoning or wrangling, and success shall not be wanting. (J. Tramp.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 9:7". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-9.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And said unto him, Go wash in the pool of Siloam (which is by interpretation, Sent). He went away therefore, and washed, and came seeing.

The big thing in this verse, aside from the loving mercy of the Saviour's awesome power, is the blind man's obedience. Let it be supposed, for a moment, that this blind man exhibited the same attitude prevalent in our own times. Suppose he had said, "Now look, Jesus, this pool of Siloam business is not really necessary, you know. I believe in you and will just take my eyesight right here where I stand; and, after I am able to see clearly, then I will go and wash, like you said, just to show I trust you. Certainly, water cannot cure eyesight; so I'll just take it here and now by faith only! Of course, I'll go and wash later to show I trust you."

What would have resulted from such an attitude? Can anyone doubt that he would have died as blind as he was born, if he had responded with any such proposal? To his honor and exceedingly great reward, he did not claim a blessing while denying the condition upon which it was promised. "He went away, therefore, and washed, and came seeing."

The analogy in the foregoing will not be lost on a student of the word of God. Blindness, from the most ancient times, has been held as a type of sin. This does not mean that a blind man is a sinner but that the terrible handicap is a forceful illustration of sinful condition. Jesus said, "If the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch" (Luke 6:39). See also 2 Peter 1:9 and Revelation 3:18. Thus, blindness is a Scriptural type of sin; and the detail of this sixth sign's deployment upon the sacred page compels the conclusion that this blind man's healing must be construed as typical of the far greater wonder of healing men of sin. Most of John's signs are thus to be understood in their dual significance in both the physical and spiritual sectors. Therefore, we shall note the bearing of this sign upon the forgiveness of sin.

Salvation from sin is specifically promised by Christ, thus: "He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved" (Mark 16:16). This is as simple and easily understood as "Go wash in the pool of Siloam." Why then should Mark's record of Jesus' promise be hard to understand, and why all the quibble about whether water can wash away sins? Of course, it cannot; and, since the Dark Ages, no one has ever believed that it could, But, if a man can understand why the blind man received his sight after washing in the pool of Siloam, and wholly apart from any power of those waters, and without in the least supposing that the waters of the pool had anything to do with his healing, then such a person should have no difficulty with the analogy of the way one is saved in the washing of the waters of baptism, when he is baptized into Christ, and yet without supposing the water had any efficacy.

The blind man was healed in the act of washing in Siloam. He did not go seeing and then wash; but he went and washed and came seeing.

THE POOL OF SILOAM

Go wash in the pool of Siloam ... Peloubet identified the name Siloam with its earlier name Shiloah (Isaiah 8:6).[5] John's interpretation of the name as "one sent" makes it a reference to the Messiah who was the "one sent" from God. Therefore, the word Shiloh (Genesis 49:10), which was the name Jacob gave the Messiah, appears to be the original form of the name Siloam. Thus, in Scripture, this name had three forms, Shiloh, Shiloah, and Siloam, all of them laden with an immense weight of symbolism pointing to the Saviour of the world.

"Shiloh" was the poetic name of the Messiah; and Isaiah had made the soft waters of this humble water hole a metaphor of the peaceful government of the Lord as contrasted with the rapacious government of Assyria, the latter being compared to the rampage of Euphrates at flood stage. It was from this pool that the golden pitcher of water was brought to pour out in the temple court during the feast of tabernacles (John 7:37); and, in the presence of those waters from Siloam, Jesus invited all to "come unto me and drink!"

The filling of Siloam came through an underground conduit that entered at the bottom, causing the waters to rise silently, hence Isaiah's reference to "the waters that go softly." Jesus' choice of this pool as the scene of one of his mightiest deeds more than justified the Messianic expectations so long associated with the sacred word Shiloh and its derivatives.

ENDNOTE:

[5] F. N. Peloubet, Peloubet's Bible Dictionary (Chicago: The John C. Winston Co., 1925), p. 620.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-9.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And said unto him, go wash in the Pool of Siloam,.... A fountain of this name is called Siloah, Isaiah 8:6, and according to the Jewish writers, sometimes GihonF5Targum, Jarchi, Kimchi, & Solomon ben Melech in 1 Kings i. 39. ; and this, they sayF6Jarchi & Bartenora in Misn. Succa, c. 4. sect. 9. , was without Jerusalem, though near unto it: hither the Jews went at the feast of tabernaclesF7Misn. Succa, c. 4. sect. 9. , and drew water with great rejoicing, and brought it, and poured it on the altar; the waters thereof also the priests drank for digestion, when they had eaten too much fleshF8Abot R. Nathan, c. 35. fol. 8. 3. ; and this was likewise made use of to wash in, in case of uncleanness. It is saidF9Targum in 1 Chron. xi. 22. of Benaiah, one of David's worthies, that

"one day he set his foot upon a dead toad, and he went down to Siloah, and broke the pieces of hail, (or ice congealed together,) and dipped himself.'

This fountain was to the south west of Jerusalem; and was, as Josephus says, sweet and largeF11De Bello Jud. l. 5. c. 4. sect. 1. ; and from it were two watercourses, upper and lower, 2 Chronicles 32:30, which ran into two pools; the one was called the Pool of Siloam, which may be the same that JosephusF12Ib. l. 6. c. 6. vel. l. 5. c. 4. sect. 1. calls the Pool of Solomon, and is here meant, and which was situated on the south of the wall of Sion, towards the east; and the other was called the Pool of Shelah, and which, in Nehemiah 3:15, is called in our translation, and in some others, the Pool of Siloah. Now both the fountain, and the pool, were without the city; and yet we read of a Siloah in the midst of the cityF13T. Hieros. Chagigah, fol. 76. 1. . This blind man was sent, not to wash himself all over, but only his face or eyes; and so the Arabic and Persic versions read, "wash thy face"; the clay from it: this may be emblematical of the grace of the Spirit, sometimes signified by water and washing, which accompanying the word, makes it effectual to the salvation of souls:

which is by interpretation sent. This interpretation of the word Siloam does not determine which of the pools is meant, the upper or lower, "Siloah" or "Shelah", since they both come from the word שלח, which signifies to "send"; but by the flexion of the word, the upper pool "Siloah" seems plainly intended, which was not so forenamed, as Nonus suggests, from the sending this man thither, but rather from the sending forth its waters, which flowed softly and gently for the supply of the city of Jerusalem, Some think Christ gave this interpretation of it with a view to himself, as the sent of God, the true Messiah: but the words seem not to be the words of Christ, but of the evangelist, who interprets this word; wherefore they are left out in the Syriac and Persic versions, where such an interpretation was needless.

He went his way therefore and washed, and came seeing: he did as he was commanded; he was obedient to the directions and orders of Christ, though they seemed so unlikely to answer the end; and yet that was brought about through the divine power of Christ, which appeared the more in making use of such unlikely means.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 9:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Sent, etc. — (See 2 Kings 5:10, 2 Kings 5:14). As the prescribed action was purely symbolical in its design, so in connection with it the Evangelist notices the symbolical name of the pool as in this case bearing testimony to him who was sent to do what it only symbolized. (See Isaiah 8:6, where this same pool is used figuratively to denote “the streams that make glad the city of God,” and which, humble though they be, betoken a present God of Israel.)

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-9.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

7. And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is by interpretation, Sent). He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing.

[ Which is by interpretation, Sent.] We have already shewn that the spring of Siloam discharged itself by a double stream into a twofold pool; the Upper pool, which was called the pool of Siloah; and the Lower, which was called the pool of Shelah; Nehemiah 3:15. Now the pool of Siloah, plainly and properly signifies Sent; but Shelah not so, as we have already noted. Probably the evangelist added this parenthesis on purpose to distinguish which of the pools the blind man was sent to wash in; viz. not in the pool Shelah, which signifies fleeces, but in the pool of Siloah, which signifies Sent.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 9:7". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-9.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Wash (νιπσαιnipsai). First aorist middle imperative second person singular of νιπτωniptō later form of νιζωnizō to wash, especially parts of the body. Certainly bathing the eyes is good for eye trouble, and yet we are not to infer that the cure was due to the use of the clay or to the washing.

In the pool of Siloam (εις την κολυμβητραν του Σιλωαμeis tēn kolumbēthran tou Silōam). The word κολυμβητραkolumbēthra (from κολυμβαωkolumbaō to swim) is a common word for swimming-pool, in N.T. only here and John 5:2, John 5:7. The name απεσταλμενοςSiloam is Hebrew (Isaiah 8:6) and means “sent” (αποστελλωapestalmenos perfect passive participle of ενιπσατοapostellō). It was situated south of the temple area and was apparently connected by a subterranean tunnel with the Virgin‘s Well (John 5:2) according to Bernard. The water was conducted artificially to the pool of Siloam.

Washed
(νιπσαιenipsato). First aorist direct middle (cf. ηλτεν βλεπωνnipsai), apparently bathing and not merely washing his eyes.

Came seeing
(ēlthen blepōn). Jesus had healed him. He was tested by the demand to bathe his eyes.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-9.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Wash ( νίψαι )

Wash the eyes. See on Acts 16:33.

Siloam

By Rabbinical writers, Shiloach: Septuagint, Σιλωάμ : Vulgate and Latin fathers, Siloe. Josephus, generally, Siloa. In scripture always called a pool or tank, built, and not natural. The site is clearly identified in a recess at the southeastern termination of Zion, near the junction of the valley of Tyropoeon with that of the Kidron. According to Dr. Thomson, it is a parallelogram about fifty-three feet long and eighteen wide, and in its perfect condition must have been nearly twenty feet deep. It is thus the smallest of all the Jerusalem pools. The water flows into it through a subterraneous conduit from the Fountain of the Virgin, and the waters are marked by an ebb and flow. Dr. Robinson witnessed a rise and fall of one foot in ten minutes. The conduit has been traversed by two explorers, Dr. Robinson and Captain Warren. See the account of Warren's exploration in Thomson, “Southern Palestine and Jerusalem,” p. 460. On the word pool, see on John 5:2.

Sent

The Hebrew word means outflow (of waters); missio, probably with reference to the fact that the temple-mount sends forth its spring-waters. Many expositors find a typical significance in the fact of Christ's working through the pool of this name. Thus Milligan and Moulton, after noting the fact that the water was drawn from this pool for pouring upon the altar during the Feast of Tabernacles; that it was associated with the “wells of salvation” (Isaiah 12:3); and that the pouring out of the water symbolized the effusion of spiritual blessing in the days of the Messiah, go on to say: “With the most natural interest, therefore, the Evangelist observes that its very name corresponds to the Messiah; and by pointing out this fact indicates to us what was the object of Jesus in sending the man to these waters. In this, even more distinctly than in the other particulars that we have noted, Jesus, in sending the man away from Him, is keeping Himself before him in everything connected with his cure. Thus, throughout the whole narrative, all attention is concentrated on Jesus Himself, who is the Light of the world, who was 'sent of God' to open blind eyes.” See also Westcott and Godet.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-9.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is by interpretation, Sent.) He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing.

Go, wash at the pool of Siloam — Perhaps our Lord intended to make the miracle more taken notice of. For a crowd of people would naturally gather round him to observe the event of so strange a prescription, and it is exceeding probable, the guide who must have led him in traversing a great part of the city, would mention the errand he was going upon, and so call all those who saw him to a greater attention. From the fountain of Siloam, which was without the walls of Jerusalem, a little stream flowed into the city, and was received in a kind of basin, near the temple, and called the pool of Siloam.

Which is, by interpretation, Sent — And so was a type of the Messiah, who was sent of God.

He went and washed, and came seeing — He believed, and obeyed, and found a blessing. Had he been wise in his own eyes, and reasoned, like Naaman, on the impropriety of the means, he had justly been left in darkness. Lord, may our proud hearts be subdued to the methods of thy recovering grace! May we leave thee to choose how thou wilt bestow favours, which it is our highest interest to receive on any terms.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 9:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-9.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

and said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam1 (which is by interpretation, Sent). He went away therefore, and washed, and came seeing3.

  1. Go, wash in the pool of Siloam. As to Siloam, see .

  2. (Which is by interpretation, Sent.) It was probably called Sent because its waters are sent to it from the Virgin's Fountain through a tunnel cut through the hill Ophel. For the Virgin's Fountain, see .

  3. He went away therefore, and washed, and came seeing. He did not come back to Jesus, but came to his own house.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 9:7". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-9.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

 Умойся в купальне Силоам. Несомненно, что сила для исцеления глаз не пребывала ни в брении, ни в Силоамской воде. Но Христос охотно и не один лишь раз украшал Свои чудеса внешними символами, либо для того, чтобы приучить верующих к употреблению знаков, либо чтобы засвидетельствовать: Его творения обладают только такой силой, какую Он хочет им дать. Однако некоторые спрашивают: что означает брение, смешанное из земли и слюны, и толкуют его как означающее собой Самого Христа. Ибо земная пыль означает природу плоти, а слюна, исшедшая из уст, указывает на Слово Божие. Я же опускаю эту аллегорию, поелику в ней содержится больше изощренности, чем надежности, и довольствуюсь следующей простой мыслью: как первый человек был сотворен из глины, так и Христос употребил глину для исцеления глаз, являя ту же силу в части человеческого тела, какую Отец выказал в сотворении всего тела. Или, возможно, этим знаком Христос хотел засвидетельствовать, что Ему не труднее, устранив препятствие, открыть очи слепому, чем кому-либо из людей смыть с себя глину. Опять же, Он показывает, что в Его власти дать зрение человеку, как во власти любого помазать глиной свои очи. И это последнее толкование мне нравится больше. Умыться в купальне Силоам Он возможно повелел для попрека иудеев. Ведь только из-за самих себя они не ощущали присутствующую там силу Божию. Так и Исаия (8:6) попрекал людей своего века за то, что, презрев спокойно текущие воды Силоама, они возжелали стремительные и яростные потоки. Мне кажется этим же объясняется и то, что Елисей приказал Нееману Сириянину омыться в Иордане. Купальню же сию, если верить Иерониму, образовывали воды, в определенные часы вытекающие из недр Сиона. Толкование слова «Силоам» Евангелист приводит с определенной целью. Ведь этот источник, близкий к храму, каждый день напоминал иудеям о грядущем приходе Христа, Которого они презрели после Его явления. Итак, Евангелист хвалит здесь благодать Христову, говоря, что один Христос просвещает нашу тьму и восстанавливает зрение слепым. Ибо в лице этого слепого изображается вся наша природа, тот факт, что все с утробы матери лишены света и разумения. Кроме того, Евангелист говорит, что исцеление от этого зла следует просить у одного лишь Христа. Заметь, что Христос, присутствуя там лично, тем не менее, не пренебрег символами для преодоления тупости народа, удерживавшего только тень этих символов и забывшего их суть. Впрочем, в том проявляет себя чудесная благость Христова, что врач пришел здесь к больному, не дожидаясь его молитв. Действительно, поскольку по природе мы отвращены от Христа, у нас не было бы надежды, если бы прежде Его призывания Он сам не предварял милосердием тех, кто забыл о всяком свете и всякой жизни.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-9.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

7 And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is by interpretation, Sent.) He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing.

Ver. 7. He went his way and washed] He obeyed Christ blindling, he looked not upon Siloam with Syrian eyes, as Naaman did upon Jordan; but, passing by the unlikelihood of a cure by such means, he believeth, and doth as he was bidden, without questioning.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 9:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-9.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 9:7. Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, Concerning these waters, the evangelist observes, that their name Siloam, or according to the Hebrew orthography, Shiloah, signifies a thing that is sent. This remark, Grotius, Dr. Clarke, and others, think was designed to insinuate that Christ's command to the blind man was symbolical, teaching him, that he owed his cure to the Messiah, one of whose names was Shiloh, the sent of God.—The waters here mentioned, came from a spring that was in the rocks of mount Zion, and were gathered into two great basons: the lower called the pool of fleeces, and the upper Shiloah, Nehemiah 3:15 because the waters which filled it were sent to them by the goodness of God, from the bowels of the earth; for in Judea, springs of water, being very rare, were esteemed peculiar blessings. Hence the waters of Shiloah were made by the prophet a type of David's descendants, and, among the rest, of Messiah; Isaiah 8:6. Christ's benefits are fitly represented by the image of water; for his blood purifies the soul from the foulest stains of sin, just as water cleanses the body from its defilements. Moreover, his doctrine imparts wisdom, and affords refreshment to the spirit, like that which cool draughts of water impart to one who is ready to faint away with thirst and heat. But, beside the emblematical reason mentioned by the evangelist, Jesus might order the blind man to go and wash in the pool of Siloam, because there were generally great numbers of people there, who, seeing the man led thither blind, having his eyes bedawbed with clay, must have gathered round him to inquire into the cause of so strange an appearance. These having examined the man, and found that he was stone-blind, they could not but be prodigiously struck by his relation, when, after washing in the pool, they saw the new facultyinstantly imparted to him: especially if his relation was confirmed by the person who led him, as in all probability it would be. For it is reasonable to suppose, that his conductor was one of those who stood by when Jesus anointed his eyes, and ordered him to wash them in Siloam. Accordingly, when he went away, and washed, and came seeing, that is, walked by the assistance of his own eyes, without being led, the miracle was earnestly and accurately inquired into by all his acquaintance, and so universally known, that it became the general topic of conversation at Jerusalem, as the evangelist informs us, John 9:8-9. Nay, it was accurately examined by the literati or doctors there; for the man was brought before them; they looked at his eyes; they inquired what had been done to them; they sent for his parents, to know from them whether he had been really born blind; and they excommunicated the man, because he would not join them in saying that Jesus, who had cured him, was an impostor. The expression at the end of this verse, He came seeing, with eyes so remarkably strengthened that they could immediately bear the light, is a great heightening of the miracle. Perhaps this man had been taught by the example of Naaman, not to despise the most improbable means, when prescribed in the view of a miracle: but the miracle implied a divine energy and interference in every respect.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 9:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-9.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

7.] The reason of his being sent to Siloam is uncertain. It may have been as part of the cure,—or merely to wash off the clay. The former is most probable, especially as the εἰς must be taken with νίψαι, not with ὕπαγε, and thus would imply immersion in the pool. So Athen(145) x. p. 438 F (in Meyer), λούεσθαι εἰς λουτρῶνας.

A beggar blind from his birth would know the localities sufficiently to be able to find his way; so that there is no necessity to suppose a partial restoration of sight before his going.

The situation of the fountain and pool of Siloam is very doubtful. Robinson makes both at the mouth of the ancient Tyropœon, S.E. of the city. He himself explored a subterranean passage from this spot to the Fountain of the Virgin higher up on the banks of the Kedron. Josephus, B. J. ver. 4. 1, says, ἡ δὲ τῶν τυροποιῶν προσαγορευομένη φάραγξκαθήκει μέχρι σιλωάμ· οὕτω γὰρ τὴν πηγήν, γλυκεῖάν τε καὶ πολλὴν οὖσαν, ἐκαλοῦμεν. Jerome sets it “ad radices montis Zion” (on Isaiah 8:6), and mentions its intermittent character: but he also says (on Matthew 10:28), “ad radices montis Moria, in quibus Siloo fluit:” so that his testimony exactly agrees with Josephus and Robinson (see Robins. i. 493 ff., and The Land and the Book, pp. 659 ff.). It is mentioned Nehemiah 3:15; Isaiah 8:6. On the subject of a recent suggestion respecting the identity of Siloam and Bethesda, see supplementary note at the end of this volume.

ὃ ἑρμ. ἀπεστ.] The reason of this derivation ( σιλωάμ = שִׁלֹחַ) being stated has been much doubted. Some (e.g. Lücke) consider the words to have been inserted as an early gloss of some allegorical interpreter. But there is no external authority for this; every MS. and version containing them, except the Syr(146). and Pers. Euthym(147) says, οἶμαι διὰ τὸν ἀπεσταλμένον ἐκεῖ τότε τυφλόν. So also Nonnus: ὕδωρ στελλομένοιο προώνυμον ἐκ σέο πομπῆς: and Meyer takes this view. But it would be a violent transfer,—of the name of the fountain, to the man who was sent thither. I should rather regard the healing virtue imparted to the water to be denoted, as symbolical of Him who was sent, and whose mission it was to give the healing water of life. Aug(148), Chrys., Thl., Erasm., Beza, Calvin, &c., and Ebrard and Luthardt, similarly refer ἀπεσταλ. to the Lord Jesus: Stier, to the Holy Spirit,—but as one with, and proceeding from Christ.

ἦλθεν, came back;—apparently to his own house, by the next verse.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 9:7". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-9.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 9:7. νίψαι, wash thyself) thy face.— τοῦ σιλωάμ, Siloam) A name given to this place formerly, because Jesus Christ was about to send thither the blind man. And from this time the name of the place was a memorial of the miracle wrought at it. The derivation is implied in Go, wash thyself.— ἐρμηνεύεται ἀπεσταλμένος, which is rendered in translation Sent) The Evangelist adds this. Comp. John 9:11, “Go to the pool of Siloam, and wash.”— καὶ ἦλθε, and he went) before going to his parents.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 9:7". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-9.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

He doth not only anoint his eyes, but sendeth him also to wash in the pool of Siloam. We read of this pool, Nehemiah 3:15; and we are told, that it was a fountain which sprang out from Mount Zion. It should seem, that there was a brook of that name, which supplied part of the city with water, Isaiah 8:6. Some think they have also found a mystery in this name, because it signifieth

sent; and think that it hath an allusion to Shiloh, which was the Messias, mentioned Genesis 49:10. The name is plainly an old name, as appears from the place I noted out of Nehemiah; probably given to it anciently, in acknowledgment of the mercy of God given them, in sending them such a brook, or rivulet, from those mountains, so commodious for that great city: or, because (as some think) the water did not run always, but at certain times, as it were sent of God. We read of nothing medicinal in this water, only, as a probation of the blind man’s faith and obedience, it pleased our Lord to send the blind man to wash himself there; as of old Naaman the Syrian was sent to wash in Jordan. He went, and the evangelist, to let us see that true faith joined with sincere obedience never faileth the expectation of them that exercise it, lets us know that he returned seeing.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 9:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-9.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

умойся в купальне Силоам Слово «Силоам» на еврейском языке означает «посланный». Купальня Силоам находилась на юго-востоке Иерусалима. В нее вода поступала по водопроводу Езекии из источника Геон, находившегося в долине Кедрон. Ее можно отождествить с «нижним прудом» или «старым прудом», упомянутым в Ис. 22:9, 11. Из этой купальни черпали воды для обряда излияния воды на празднике кущей (см. пояснения к 7:37-39).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 9:7". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-9.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Pool of Siloam; this pool or reservoir was in the south-east part of Jerusalem, at the mouth of the narrow valley separating mount Zion from the hill Ophel. Its water comes from a subterranean channel, from a fountain higher up on the east side of Ophel. Luke 13:4.

Sent; the meaning of the Hebrew word Siloam. Some think it was so called because its water was sent, that is, conducted to its place by the subterranean channel just named.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-9.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7.Go, wash—An act of faith is the condition to his salvation. Had he refused, he might have been doomed to perpetual darkness.

Pool of Siloam—This is a pool or a small pond, in an oblong form, at the lower end of the Valley of Jehoshaphat, overlooked by the wall of Mount Zion. Its sides are built up with stones, and a column stands in its middle, indicating that a chapel was once built over it. It is in length fifty-four feet, by eighteen in breadth. It is fed, probably, by water from the temple mount.

By interpretation, Sent—By this explanation of the meaning of the word, we understand the Evangelist to indicate that Jesus selected this pool because its name was significant. As Christ himself is the fountain, sent from God, by which our nature is purified, so Siloam is the fountain, sent from the mount of God’s temple, by which the man is washed from both his blindness and his clay. The man was sent by the Sent to the Sent.

[image]

The word Siloam here is in the Hebrew Shiloah, ; the h being changed to m for Greek euphony. But Kuinoel, like many other critics, affirms that Shiloah is not truly the Hebrew for Sent, but Shaluah; and so claims that this parenthesis is not John’s, but an interpolation. Tholuck, however, maintains “that the yod in Shiloah is to be regarded as daghesh forte resolved, and that the word is, consequently, to be regarded either as abstract, or equivalent to effusion, that is, aqueduct; or may even be like the form passively equivalent to ‘the one sent.’“

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-9.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘So he went and washed, and came back seeing.’

The blind man was obedient to Jesus’ words. It was no simple matter for a blind man go to the pool but he did what Jesus told him to do without question. After a life of hopelessness he had met Jesus and hope had arisen in his heart, a hope accompanied by faith. How simple the words are. He responded obediently to Jesus and stumbled on his way to the pool of Siloam and washed his eyes, and at once the miracle happened, he could see. The world’s blindness must be dealt with in the same way. The water of the word of God can wash away the blindness and darkness, and open the eyes of the blind and of those who sit in darkness (Ephesians 5:26). But just as the blind man had to go and wash so those who would have their eyes open must go to the word of God and partake of it in responsive faith. Then they too will come back seeing.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/john-9.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus then instructed the blind man to go to the pool of Siloam in southeast Jerusalem and wash the mud off his eyes. [Note: See the diagram "Jerusalem in New Testament Times" at the end of these notes.] He obeyed Jesus, received his sight, and departed from the pool seeing. His obedience evidenced faith that something good would come of obeying Jesus.

It is probably significant that Jesus sent the man to that particular source of water. John interpreted the meaning of "Siloam" as "sent" for his readers. Jesus had sent the Prayer of Manasseh, he obeyed, and he received sight. Likewise all who obeyed Jesus" command to believe on Him received spiritual sight.

"Sight was restored by clay, made out of the ground with the spittle of Him, Whose breath had at first breathed life into clay; and this was then washed away in the Pool of Siloam, from whose waters had been drawn on the Feast of Tabernacles that which symbolized the forthpouring of the new life by the Spirit." [Note: Edersheim, 2:181.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-9.html. 2012.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 9:7. The application of the clay was not enough. Jesus further said: . Elsner shows that “wash into,” , is not an uncommon construction. But John 9:11, which gives the same command in a different form, shows that the man understood that followed and not , The pool of Siloam, supplied from the Virgin’s fountain (Isaiah 8:6), lay at the south-east corner of Jerusalem in the Kidron Valley. On the opposite side of the valley lies a village Silwan representing the old name. The name is here interpreted as meaning “Sent” [ , missus; not , missio sc. aquarum, Meyer]. The word is so frequently used by Jesus of Himself that, notwithstanding what Meyer says, we naturally apply it here also to Himself, as if the noiseless Stream which their fathers had despised (Isaiah 7:6) and which they could trace to its source, was a fit type of Him whom the Jews rejected because they knew His origin and because he had no external force. His influence consisted in this, that He was . The blind man obeyed and received his sight. Cf. Elisha and Naaman. From the succeeding several interpreters conclude that means “came” home. Needlessly.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 9:7". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-9.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

fountain of Siloe was at the foot of the walls of Jerusalem, to the east, where its waters were collected in a reservoir for the benefit of the city. Thither our Saviour sent the blind man. The word Siloe signifies sent, and was a figure of Christ, who was sent by his eternal Father into the world to enlighten all men, of whom this blind man was the emblem. The pool of Siloe represents the sacrament of baptism, by which we are sanctified and made Christians. It is still to this day held in great veneration by the Turks, who think its waters very beneficial in diseases of the eyes. (Calmet) --- Its waters signify those of divine grace and light, communicated to the faithful soul through Jesus Christ, who was sent of God. (Bible de Vence) --- Thus Sedulius: ----------------------------------------Cognoscite cuncti,

Mystica quid doceant animos miracula nostros.

Cœca sumus proles miseræ de fœtibus Hevæ,

Portantes longo natas errore tenebras.

Sed dignante Deo mortalem sumere formam

Tegminis humani, facta est de Virgine nobis

Terra salutaris, quæ fontibus oblita sacris

Clara renascentis referat spiracula lucis.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 9:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

wash. Greek. nipto. App-136. See on John 13:10.

in = into. Greek. eis. App-104.

pool. Compare John 5:2. Greek. kolumbethra, a pool for swimming or bathing. Occurs only here, John 9:11, and John 5:2, John 5:4, John 5:7.

Siloam. See App-68. which, &c. See note on "and we "(John 1:14).

Sent. So called from the sending forth of the waters, which were intermittent. See App-174. Not the same word as in John 9:4.

seeing. Greek. blepo. App-133.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 9:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is by interpretation, Sent.) He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing.

And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is, by interpretation, Sent.) These operations were not so incongruous in their nature as might appear, though it were absurd to imagine that they contributed in the least degree to the effect which followed. (See the note at Mark 6:13; Mark 7:33-34.) As the prescribed action was purely symbolical in its design, so in connection with it the Evangelist notices the symbolical name of the pool, as in this case bearing testimony to Him who was sent to do what it only symbolized. See Isaiah 8:6, where this same pool is used figuratively to denote "the streams that made glad the city of God," and which, humble though they be, betoken a present God of Israel.

He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing. See 2 Kings 5:10; 2 Kings 5:14. But though he "came seeing," it does not appear that he came to Jesus. On the contrary, when no "came seeing," Jesus was not to be seen; nor did they meet at all, it would seem, until, after his expulsion from the synagogue, Jesus "found him" (John 9:35).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) Go, wash in the pool of Siloam.—Comp. Notes on John 5:2 (“Bethesda”), and on Luke 13:4 (“the tower in Siloam”). The locality is almost without doubt that now known by the Arabic form of the same name, the Birket Silwân, which is in the lower Tyropæon valley, between the Temple mountain and Mount Zion. It is about a quarter of a mile from the present city wall, but in the time of our Lord the wall extended up to it (Jos. Wars, v. 4, § 1; so the Antonine Itinerary in the fourth century). The place is frequently mentioned by Josephus, and there is every reason to believe that in the present pool we have the Siloah of Nehemiah 3:15, the Shiloah of Isaiah 8:6, and the Siloam of the present passage. The form of the word here used by St. John is that found in the Greek translation of both the Old Testament passages.

The words “wash in” mean literally, wash into, that is, “wash so that the clay from the eyes will pass into the tank.”

The attempt to show that in the waters of Siloam, too, we have an ordinary remedial agent, must be abandoned, at least as far as regards blindness. The command recalls that to Naaman the Syrian (2 Kings 5:10), and not improbably recalled it to the mind of the blind man. In any case, it is a further stage in his spiritual education. It is a demand on the faith which realises the presence of the Power to heal. The place is chosen, perhaps, as a well-known spot, or as one at some little distance, so as to afford time for reflection and a test for obedience. It may be, however, that there is another reason for the choice. The pool of Siloam was bound up with all the religious feelings of the Feast of Tabernacles. A solemn procession went each morning to it, and carried water from it to the Temple. That water had already led to the teaching of the gift of the Spirit to every man who should receive the Messiah (see Notes on John 7:37 et seq.), uttered, perhaps, on this very day (comp. John 9:1). There would be attached, then, to the pool of Siloam a sacred significance that would be in itself a help to faith.

Which is by interpretation, Sent.—St. John sees a significance even in the name. The sending of the waters of this intermittent spring had given it the -name Siloam. Popular belief connected the moving of the waters with the presence of an angel who gave them their healing virtue. There was One then present who was the source of all life and power to heal, and He was Himself the sent of God. So He had taught men in words which had fixed themselves on St. John’s mind (John 3:17; John 3:34; John 5:36; John 5:38; John 7:29; John 8:42). So the prophet Isaiah had spoken of His work (Isaiah 61:1), and He had quoted that prophecy of His own work with the remarkable addition from the LXX., “and recovering of sight to the blind.” (Comp. Notes on Matthew 11:5, Luke 4:18; and Isaiah 42:7.) So He was later called “the Apostle (the One sent) of our profession (Hebrews 3:1).

And came seeing.—These words need no Note for the reader who will pause to think of them, but we often pass over them without remembering that a whole world of visual objects now first burst upon the mind of him who was healed. We can only know in part what a revelation this was, but we may by thought realise it in some degree. There is no reference to his coming again to our Lord. He returned apparently to his usual dwelling, and this agrees with the mention of “neighbours” in the following verse.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And said unto him, Go, wash in the pool of Siloam, (which is by interpretation, Sent.) He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing.
Go
2 Kings 5:10-14
the pool
11; Nehemiah 3:15
Siloah
Isaiah 8:6
Shiloah
Sent
10:36; Romans 8:3; Galatians 4:4
and came
39; 11:37; Exodus 4:11; Psalms 146:8; Isaiah 29:18,19; 32:3; 35:5; 42:7,16-18; Isaiah 43:8; Luke 2:32; Acts 26:18
Reciprocal: Genesis 49:10 - until;  Joshua 6:12 - the priests;  2 Samuel 5:23 - fetch;  2 Kings 6:6 - he cut down;  1 Chronicles 14:14 - turn away;  Song of Solomon 6:13 - Shulamite;  Matthew 9:29 - touched;  Matthew 9:30 - their;  Matthew 20:34 - touched;  Mark 3:5 - Stretch;  Mark 7:33 - he took;  Mark 8:23 - spit;  Luke 13:4 - in Siloam;  Luke 17:14 - as

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 9:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-9.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 7. "And said unto him. Go wash in the pool of Siloam (which is, by interpretation. Sent). He went his way therefore, and washed, and came seeing."

The blind man did not obtain his sight until he had first washed in the pool of Siloam. There would doubtless be many friendly people among the bystanders who would be glad to guide him thither. But as the pool was in the immediate neighbourhood—the beggar sat probably near the Temple, comp. Acts 3:2—and in the way which he had daily to take, he might indeed have gone thither alone. Strictly translated, it runs, "Go, wash into the pool of Siloam;" and the reason is plain enough, as whatever was washed away entered the pool. And it is not without purpose that the expression is "pool of Siloam." The name Siloam properly belonged only to the spring, the present Fountain of Mary, "whose waters flowed through a subterranean canal, circuitous, and 1750 feet long, into the brook of Siloam "(von Raumer). We read in Nehemiah 3:15 of the pool of Siloah, שלח; and חשלח in that passage corresponds to the preceding חעין. That the name Siloam was originally appropriated only to the spring, is made abundantly plain by many passages of Josephus. In Book i. 4, 1, of the work on the Jewish War, he says: καθήκει μέχρι σιλωάμ· οὕτω γὰρ τὴν πηγὴν γλυκεῖαν τε καὶ πολλήν οὖσαν ἐκαλοῦμεν; and in ch. ii, καὶ ἔπειτα πρὸς νότον ὑπὲρ τὴν σιλωὰμ ἐπιστρέφον πηγήν. The fountain of Siloam is referred to alone twice in the Old Testament, in Isaiah 8:6 and Nehemiah 3:15. It is of great importance to the understanding of our present passage, that the signification of the name should be held fast. It may be, so far as its form is concerned, either a passive formation from Piel, the reduplication of the second letter of the root being omitted (Ewald, § 156, h), or, which is better (Ewald, § 155, d), an adjectival form like יִלּוֹד, born, שִׁכּוֹר, drunken, "not as a simple participle, but as an independent adjective further modified." They are "words which give the idea of an internally fixed and abiding characteristic or property; and thus they are primarily a strengthened form of the simple participles and adjectives." The participle Pahul שָׁלווּחַ denotes one who is on an occasion sent; שִׁלווֹחַ, on the other hand, a missionary, one whose mission is permanent. Accordingly, the spring did not derive its name from its sending out water; but the passive signification decides the form. And שלח, too, which is used in Nehemiah 3:15 instead of שלוח, has a passive signification—that generally of a projectile weapon, missile. The notion of Rodiger, that the word signified emissio aquae, aquaeductus, rests upon the theory, already shown to be wrong, that the name properly belonged to the canal or the pool. The sent required a sender. If the stream of water was called Sent, the fountain must have been the Sender; as we read in Ezekiel 31:4 of the Nile, "and sent out her little rivers (conduits) unto all the trees of the field." But if, as we have shown, the name originally was appropriated to the spring, then there must be in the background a sender independent of the water. To understand this Sender, with Ewald, as an indefinite Christ, "sent forth, flowing freely, streaming abundantly," would be appropriate enough if we found ourselves in the domain of idolatry, which makes God's of all things, and not in the domain of living faith in a personal God. To us the Sender can be no other than He who generally "sendeth the springs into the valleys, which run among the hills," Psalms 104:10, where we have simply a commentary on the name Siloam, just as we also have in Psalms 18:17, "He sent from above." And thus viewed, the name Silchim, which we find in Joshua 15:32 with Ajin (comp. on ch. John 11:23), stands in connection with Siloam. In the dry and parched south country, the springs were pre-eminently regarded as messengers of God. This one was, according to Josephus, sweet, and flowed abundantly; he further seems to intimate that this last property gave it its name. Isaiah, ch. John 8:6, recognises in it, and in the power of blessing which was concealed under its insignificance, a figure of the kingdom of God in Israel; whilst, in opposition to its soft flow, the "waters of the river, strong and many," were a figure of the kingdom of this world. The very remarkable fluctuations which befell the fountain must ever have turned attention towards its supernatural origin and design. Ritter, in the Erdkunde, xvi. 447, says, "The Itinerarium Burdig. in the year 333 mentions this spring, which flowed through six days and six nights, but on the Sabbath neither by day nor night. (Hence Pliny, H. N. xxxi. 18: In Judaea rivus Sabbatis omnibus siccatur.) Jerome is more definite on Isaiah 8:6. The fountain Siloam lies at the foot of Mount Zion; and its waters do not flow regularly, but only on certain days and hours: then, however. with great tumult, rushing out of hidden caves and holes in the most hidden rocks." The sudden rise and fall of water in the Mary Fountain, of which William of Tyre says, "interpolatum habens fluctum" (comp. on these fluctuations the remarks upon ch. John 5:2; Ritter, p. 456), is even to the present day a mystery; Robinson, 11:158. Josephus alludes to the abundant flow of the fountain Siloam, at the time of the siege of Titus, as a miracle, τέρας; de Bell. Jud. v. 9, 4. "On the ground of these phenomena the Mohammedans attached great value to the brook Siloam: they joined it with Zemzem, and made these two the fountains of paradise:" Ritter, p. 450. It has been also observed upon ch. John 5:2, that many attributed the perturbations of the waters to a dragon concealed within. What is there said concerning the angel who moved the water, is in harmony with the name of Sent.

This explanation of the name of the fountain of Siloam furnishes us the key to the fact of our Lord's having sent the blind man to the pool which was formed out of that fountain. That humble messenger, with its beneficent power spreading around, in Isaiah a symbol of the kingdom of God, was a type of the supreme Divine Messenger; and it is to be observed in relation to this, that it is in John that Christ is described continually as the Sent of God. (Grotius: Christus ubique se vocat missum a patre, c. John 3:17; John 3:34; John 5:36; John 5:38, et alibi passim, unde et ἀπόστολος dicitur, Hebrews 3:1.) As in ch. 5 Jesus represents Himself and His Church as the real pool of Bethesda, so He declares Himself here to be the real Sent one, or Siloam; without much demonstration, but infinitely rich in blessing and invigoration for the people of God. And that the symbolical meaning of the act might not be missed, John adds the Greek explanation of the name Siloam. Everywhere, when he appends such an interpretation, he has a deep reason for it; he never does so merely for the sake of etymology: comp. John 1:39; John 1:42-43. Calvin excellently expresses the idea which is stamped upon the whole transaction: "In the person of one man the condition of our nature is delineated; we are all of us from our mothers womb deprived of light and vision, and the cure of this evil is to be sought for only in Christ." Siloam is all the more appropriate as a type of Christ, because our Lord dispenses His benefit through the water of baptism, to which Augustin referred the waters of Siloam: Lavit ergo oculos in ea piscina, quae interpretatur missus, baptizatus est in Christo. Water appears in ch. John 3:5 as one of the indispensable factors of participation in Christ and His kingdom. And we may regard as applicable to the pool of Siloam what Peter says in 1 Peter 3:21 : ὦ καὶ ὑμᾶς ἀντίτυπον νῦν σῴζει βάπτισμα.

We shall now make some general remarks touching our Lord's miracles of healing on the blind. In harmony with what Isaiah, in ch. Isaiah 35:5, prophesied of the time of the Messiah, "Then shall the eyes of the blind be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped," these specific miracles assume a pre-eminent place among the wonderful works of Christ. As His individual restorations of the dead to life were types and pledges of the universal bodily resurrection of believers at the end of the world; so the restorations of sight to the blind were primarily signs and pledges that blindness, and generally all the physical misery which sin has introduced, are to be removed by Christ. Then these healings give consolation and hope to that state of abandonment and helplessness which in the Old Testament is so often represented by blindness,—the point of similarity being the inability to find the way: Deuteronomy 28:29; Isaiah 59:10; Job 12:25; Zephaniah 1:17. Whenever we find ourselves without counsel and help, we should look up to Christ as the Saviour of the blind. But the main point is, that the healing of the bodily blind was the pledge of the healing of spiritual blindness. This was included by the prophet Isaiah, as is plain from the fact, that this prophet so often speaks of spiritual blindness and deafness, e.g. in ch. Isaiah 29:18, where it is said of the time of the Messiah, "And in that day shall the deaf hear the words of the book, and the eyes of the blind shall see out of obscurity, and out of darkness;" ch. Isaiah 42:18, Isaiah 43:8. Christ speaks often of spiritual blindness: in John 9:39; John 9:41 of this chapter, and in Matthew 15:14; Matthew 23:16, etc. He thereby gives us a hint as to the point of view from which we are to regard the healings of the physically blind; that we are to derive from them inexhaustible assurance that He can and He will cure all our spiritual maladies. The connection between physical and spiritual blindness appears in this narrative more definitely than anywhere else. Jesus, in vers. 35 seq., heals also the spiritual blindness of the man born blind; and we mark that the bodily healing was the means to that higher end, the instrument for the accomplishment of the spiritual cure: comp. especially ver. 39. The final result was, that the man born blind received "the enlightened eyes of the heart," Ephesians 1:18. Augustin, therefore, was quite right: Si quod significat hoc quod factum est cogitemus, genus humanum est iste caecus: haec enim caecitas contigit in primo homine per peccatum, de quo omnes originem duximus non solum mortis sed etiam iniquitatis.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 9:7". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-9.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

7.Go, wash in the pool of Siloam. Unquestionably, there was not, either in the clay, or in the water of Siloam, any power or fitness for curing the eyes; but Christ freely made use of those outward symbols, on various occasions, for adorning his miracles, either to accustom believers to the use of signs, or to show that all things were at his disposal, or to testify that every one of the creatures has as much power as he chooses to give them. But some inquire what is meant bythe clay composed of dust and spittle, and they explain it to have been a figure of Christ, because the dust denotes the earthly nature of the flesh, andthe spittle, which came from his mouth, denotes the Divine essence of the Word. For my part, I lay aside this allegory as being more ingenious than solid, and am satisfied with this simple view, that as man was at first made of clay, so in restoring the eyes Christ made use of clay, showing that he had the same power over a part of the body which the Father had displayed in forming the whole man. Or, perhaps, he intended to declare, by this sign, that it was not more difficult for him to remove the obstruction, and to open the eyes of the blind man, than to wash away clay from any man whatever; and, on the other hand, that it was as much in his power to restore sight to the man as it was to anoint his eyes with clay I prefer the latter interpretation.

As to the pool of Siloam, he perhaps orderedthe blind man to wash in it, in order to reprove the Jews for not being able to discern the power of God when present; as Isaiah reproaches the men of his time, that they

despise the waters of Siloam, which flow softly,
(
Isaiah 8:6,)

and prefer rapid and impetuous streams. This was also the reason, I think, why Elisha ordered Naaman the Syrian to go and wash in Jordan, (2 Kings 5:10.) This pool, if we may believe Jerome, was formed by waters which flowed at certain hours from Mount Zion.

Which, if you interpret it, means Sent. The Evangelist purposely adds the interpretation of the word Siloam; because that fountain, which was near the temple, daily reminded the Jews of Christ who was to come, but whom they despised when he was exhibited before them. The Evangelist, therefore, magnifies the grace of Christ, because he alone enlightens our darkness, and restores sight to the blind. For the condition of our nature is delineated in the person of one man, that we are all destitute of light and understanding from the womb, and that we ought to seek the cure of this evil from Christ alone.

Let it be observed that, though Christ was present then, yet he did not wish to neglect signs; and that for the sake of reproving the stupidity of the nation, which laid aside the substance, and retained only an empty shadow of signs. Besides, the astonishing goodness of God is displayed in this respect, that he comes of his own accord to cure the blind man, and does not wait for his prayers to bestow help. And, indeed, since we are by nature averse to him, if he do not meet us before we call on him, and anticipate by his mercy us who are plunged in the forgetfulness of light and life, we are ruined.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 9:7". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-9.html. 1840-57.