Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 14:9

So Moses swore on that day, saying, ‘Surely the land on which your foot has trodden will be an inheritance to you and to your children forever, because you have followed the Lord my God fully.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Caleb;   Hebron;   Oath;   Obedience;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Anakim, the;   Holy Land;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Anak;   Caleb;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Debir;   Judah, Tribe of;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Caleb;   Joshua, the Book of;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Hebron;   Joshua, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joshua;   Moses;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Caleb;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Conquest of Canaan;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Caleb;   Joshua (2);   Joshua, Book of;   Judah, Territory of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Judah, Tribe of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The land whereon thy feet have trodden - This probably refers to Hebron, which was no doubt mentioned on this occasion.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/joshua-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Moses sware - i. e. God swore; and His promise, confirmed by an oath, was communicated, of course, through Moses.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/joshua-14.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Moses sware on that day, saying,.... Or declared the oath of the Lord, for it was the Lord that sware to what follows; see Deuteronomy 1:34,

surely the land whereon thy feet have trodden shall be thine inheritance, and thy children's for ever: not the whole land of Canaan, nor all the parts of it Caleb travelled through, but particularly Hebron; which though not expressly mentioned in the aforesaid oath, yet was understood and known to be the meaning of it, and which Joshua by the following grant owned, and it is elsewhere expressly affirmed, Judges 1:20; and it is remarked, that it is not said "they", but "he" came to Hebron, Numbers 13:22; that is Caleb, so that it was literally true that his feet had trodden there: now the reason of this oath, and the inheritance assured by it to Caleb, was:

because thou hast wholly followed the Lord thy God; in all his ways, and with full purpose of heart, and particularly had acted the upright and faithful part in the report he made of the good land; See Gill on Numbers 14:24.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-14.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Joshua 14:9 And Moses sware on that day, saying, Surely the land whereon thy feet have trodden shall be thine inheritance, and thy children’s for ever, because thou hast wholly followed the LORD my God.

Ver. 9. Whereon thy feet have trodden.] And whereon thy faith hath triumphed.

Because thou hast wholly followed.] See Joshua 14:8, and take notice that God’s retributions are more than bountiful.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 9. And Moses sware on that day, saying See Numbers 14:21-24 and Deuteronomy 1:34-35. It was God who sware, and not Moses; but as he sware by the mouth of the latter, the expression used by the sacred writer is just. Ver. 11. As yet I am as strong, &c.] Caleb adds this consideration only the better to shew the high sense he has of the divine goodness, which had so preserved his vigour in this advanced age, as to enable him either to take from the enemies, which still retained them, the possessions to which he was entitled, or to defend what should belong to him against their attempts. For the expression, to go out, and to come in, see Numbers 27:17.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/joshua-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Numbers 14:24 Deuteronomy 1:36.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/joshua-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.Moses sware — The oath was God’s own oath, (Numbers 14:24; Deuteronomy 1:13,) but declared and accepted by Moses.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Joshua 14:9. Moses sware on that day — See Deuteronomy 1:35-36. What is here mentioned was first pronounced by God himself, and that with an oath, Numbers 14:21-24. It was also, however, repeated by Moses, so that the expression of the sacred writer is just.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/joshua-14.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Moses sware. Compare Deuteronomy 1:34, Deuteronomy 1:36 (compare Judges 1:20).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/joshua-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) And Moses sware on that day . . . the land whereon thy feet have trodden shall be thine.—Whether Moses referred to Hebron specifically in this promise, it is impossible to say.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/joshua-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Moses sware on that day, saying, Surely the land whereon thy feet have trodden shall be thine inheritance, and thy children's for ever, because thou hast wholly followed the LORD my God.
1:3; Numbers 13:22; 14:22-24
Reciprocal: Numbers 14:24 - followed me;  Numbers 32:11 - because;  Numbers 32:12 - for;  Deuteronomy 11:24 - GeneralJoshua 14:14 - because;  Judges 1:20 - they gave;  Psalm 78:8 - whose

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-14.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.And Moses swear on that day, etc Here, then, is one fruit of the embassy honestly and faithfully performed — to gain possession of an inheritance of which the whole people is deprived. For although long life is justly accounted one of the mercies of God, the end proposed by it is here added, viz., that Caleb may obtain the inheritance which is denied to others. This was no ordinary privilege. He next extols the faithfulness of God in having prolonged his life, and not only so, but supplied vigor and strength, so that though he was now above eighty years of age, he was not a whit feebler than when in the flower of his youth. Others, too, had a green old age, but they were few in number, and then in their case there was not added to the even tenor of their days a manly vigor, remaining wholly unimpaired up to their eighty-fifth year. For he lays claim not only to the skill and valor of a leader, but also to the physical strength of a soldier.

He next adds the other offices and actions of his life. For to go out and in is equivalent in Hebrew to the observance and execution of all parts of our duty. And this Caleb confirms by fact, when he demands it as his task to assail and expel the giants. He is not, however, elated by stolid pride to a confident assurance of victory, but hopes for a prosperous event from the assistance of God. There seems, indeed, to be an incongruous expression of doubt in the word Perhaps, as if he were begirding himself fortuitously for the fight. (141) Those expositors who think that he is distrusting himself from a feeling of modesty and considering his own weakness, say something to the point, but do not say the whole. They certainly omit what is of principal import, viz., that this Perhaps refers to the common feelings which men would entertain on taking a view of the actual state of matters.

The first thing necessary is duly to consider what his design is. Had he asked the gift of a mountain, which he could have seized without any great exertion, it would have been more difficult to obtain it. But now when the difficulty of the task is plainly set forth, he gains the favor of Joshua and the princes, because in assenting to his prayer, they grant him nothing but the certainty of an arduous, doubtful, and perilous contest. Knowing, then, that the children of Israel trembled and were in terror at the very name of the giants, he speaks according to their opinion as of a matter attended with doubt and uncertainty. As regards himself, the words clearly demonstrate how far he was from viewing that which had been said to him with a dubious or vacillating mind. I shall drive them out, he says, as the Lord has declared. Shall we say that when he utters the declaration of God, he is in doubt whether or not God will do what he promised? It is quite plain that he only reminded them how dangerous the business was, in order that he might the more easily obtain their assent. Although it is not uncommon in Hebrew to employ this term to denote difficulty merely, without meaning to imply that the mind is agitated by distrust or disquietude. How very difficult it was to drive out the giants from that fastness, (142) may be inferred from the fact that the death of Joshua took place before Caleb ventured to attack them.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Joshua 14:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/joshua-14.html. 1840-57.