Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 24:14

"Now, therefore, fear the Lord and serve Him in sincerity and truth; and put away the gods which your fathers served beyond the River and in Egypt, and serve the Lord .
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Fear of God;   Haran;   Obedience;   Shechem;   Sincerity;   Truth;   Zeal, Religious;   Thompson Chain Reference - Awakenings and Religious Reforms;   Fear;   Fear of God;   Idols;   Reforms, Religious;   Religion;   Religion, True-False;   Religious;   Reverence-Irreverence;   Serve God;   Service;   Sincerity;   True Religion;   Work, Religious;   Work-Workers, Religious;   The Topic Concordance - Fear;   Idolatry;   Service;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Decision;   Idolatry;   Sincerity;   Truth;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Idol, Idolatry;   Terah;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua the son of nun;   Shechem;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Life;   Will;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Flood;   Idol;   Idolatry;   Shechem;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Abraham;   Calf Worship;   Egypt;   Hosea;   Idol;   Joshua;   Pillars;   Rachel;   Remphan;   Ruth;   Satyrs;   Shechem (1);   Teraphim;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Beyond the River;   Confessions and Credos;   Covenant;   Ebal;   Flood;   God of the Fathers;   Idol;   Joshua;   Joshua, the Book of;   Mission(s);   Shechem;   Temple of Jerusalem;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Flood;   Shechem;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Abraham ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Abram;   Terah;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Idolatry,;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Conquest of Canaan;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abraham;   Beyond;   Gods;   Israel, History of the People;   Sincere;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Shechem;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for October 6;   Every Day Light - Devotion for February 29;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Fear the Lord - Reverence him as the sole object of your religious worship.

Serve him - Perform his will by obeying his commands.

In sincerity - Having your whole heart engaged in his worship.

And in truth - According to the directions he has given you in his infallible word.

Put away the gods, etc. - From this exhortation of Joshua we learn of what sort the gods were, to the worship of whom these Israelites were still attached.

  1. Those which their fathers worshipped on the other side of the flood: i.e., the gods of the Chaldeans, fire, light, the sun.
  • Those of the Egyptians, Apis, Anubis, the ape, serpents, vegetables, etc.
  • Those of the Canaanites, Moabites, etc., Baal-peor or Priapus, Astarte or Venus, etc., etc.
  • All these he refers to in this and the following verse. See at the conclusion of Joshua 24:33; (note). How astonishing is this, that, after all God had done for them, and all the miracles they had seen, there should still be found among them both idols and idolaters! That it was so we have the fullest evidence, both here and in Joshua 24:23; Amos 5:26; and in Acts 7:41. But what excuse can be made for such stupid, not to say brutish, blindness? Probably they thought they could the better represent the Divine nature by using symbols and images, and perhaps they professed to worship God through the medium of these. At least this is what has been alleged in behalf of a gross class of Christians who are notorious for image worship. But on such conduct God will never look with any allowance, where he has given his word and testimony.

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    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/joshua-24.html. 1832.

    Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

    "Now therefore fear Jehovah, and serve him in sincerity and in truth; and put away the gods which your fathers served beyond the River, and in Egypt; and serve ye Jehovah. And if it seem evil unto you to serve Jehovah, choose ye this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served beyond the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell: but as for me and my house, we will serve Jehovah."

    These two verses place the decision squarely up to Israel. They must choose between serving the pagan gods of their early ancestors which the patriarchs (some of them) worshipped beyond the Euphrates River, or the gods of the Amorites whom Jehovah had driven out of their land to provide an inheritance for Israel, or they must choose Jehovah.

    "The gods of the Amorites in whose land ye dwell ..." (Joshua 24:15). What a "reductio ad absurdum" this is! He seems to say, "If you had served those gods, you would not be here, nor would the Amorites have been driven out before you."[29] We also offer in this connection the inspiring words of Plummer:

    "Joshua invites the people as Elijah did on an even more memorable occasion, to make their choice between the false worship and the true, between the present and the future, between the indulgence of their lusts and the approval of their conscience ... No desire to stand well in the eyes Israel, no temptation of this lower world to pervert his sense of truth deters him. The experience of a life of service to Jehovah have convinced him that Jehovah is the true and only God, and from that conviction, the venerable warrior does not intend to swerve"[30]

    What is taught in these two verses is absolute loyalty to the sovereign Lord, involving, of course, the putting away of all false gods. Morton pointed out that this corresponds exactly to the ancient form of the old suzerainty treaties, in that, "The historical prologue is followed by a statement of covenant obligations."[31]

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    Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
    Bibliographical Information
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/joshua-24.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    Now therefore fear the Lord,.... Since he has done such great and good things, fear the Lord and his goodness, fear him for his goodness sake; nothing so influences fear, or a reverential affection for God, as a sense of his goodness; this engages men sensible of it to fear the Lord, that is, to worship him both internally and externally in the exercise of every grace, and in the performance of every duty:

    and serve him in sincerity and in truth: in the uprightness of their souls, without hypocrisy and deceit, and according to the truth of his word, and of his mind and will revealed in it, without any mixture of superstition and will worship, or of the commands and inventions of men:

    and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; that is, express an abhorrence of them, and keep at a distance from them, and show that you are far from giving in to such idolatries your ancestors were guilty of, when they lived on the other side Euphrates, in Chaldea, or when they were sojourners in Egypt; for it cannot be thought that the Israelites were at this time guilty of such gross idolatry, at least openly, since Joshua had bore such a testimony of them, that they had cleaved to the Lord unto that day, Joshua 23:8; and their zeal against the two tribes and a half, on suspicion of idolatry, or of going into it, is a proof of it also:

    and serve ye the Lord: and him only.

    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
    A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
    Bibliographical Information
    Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-24.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    Now therefore f fear the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD.

    (f) This is the true use of God's benefits, to learn by it to fear and serve him with an upright conscience.
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    Bibliographical Information
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/joshua-24.html. 1599-1645.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    Now therefore fear the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD.

    The gods β€” Whereby it appears, that although Joshua had doubtless prevented and purged out all public idolatry, yet there were some of them who practised it in their private houses and retirements.

    Your fathers β€” Terah, and Nahor, and Abraham, as verse2, and other of your ancestors.

    In Egypt β€” See Ezekiel 23:3,8,19,21,27. Under these particulars, no doubt he comprehends all other false gods, which were served by the nations amongst whom they were, but only mentions these, as the idols which they were in more danger of worshipping than those in Canaan; partly because those of Canaan had been now lately and palpably disgraced by their inability to preserve their worshippers from total ruin; and partly, because the other idols came recommended to them by the venerable name of antiquity, and the custom of their forefathers.

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    Bibliographical Information
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/joshua-24.html. 1765.

    Scofield's Reference Notes

    fear

    (See Scofield "Psalms 19:9").

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    These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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    Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Joshua 24:14". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/joshua-24.html. 1917.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    Joshua 24:14 Now therefore fear the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD.

    Ver. 14. And put away the gods.] Deastros illos, which some of them secretly worshipped, as they did likewise in the wilderness. [Amos 5:25-26 Acts 7:42-43] So in Josiah’s days, Baal had privily his "Chemarims," or chimney chaplains, yea, those that "worshipped the host of heaven upon the housetops," &c. [Zephaniah 1:4-5]

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    Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-24.html. 1865-1868.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    Ver. 14. Now, therefore, fear the Lord, &c.— Here it is no longer Jehovah that speaks; Joshua himself addresses the Israelites, and, after all that he had just represented to them in the name of God, concludes with exhorting them to fear Jehovah; i.e. to open their whole heart to his religion, and to render him, in sincerity and in truth, with right and pure intentions, free from all hypocrisy, the worship due to him; and that without any mixture of idolatry, and according to his law, which is truth itself. "Put away from among you," says he, "those idols, the worship of which your ancestors, Terah, Nahor, Abraham, and others, formerly joined with the worship of the true God, while they remained on the other side of the Euphrates. Remove from you that unhappy propensity to idolatry which you acquired in Egypt: in a word, resolve to serve God, and Him alone." To the idols of the Chaldees and Egyptians, Joshua in the following verse adds the idols of the Amorites; and from the manner of his speaking, both here and in ver. 23 it is easy to discern, that the Israelites, notwithstanding all that the Lord had done for them, were by no means clear from the capital crime of idolatry. St. Augustin could not agree in this opinion; for, struck with the fine testimonies which Joshua himself bears to the faith of the Hebrews; and seeing it nowhere mentioned, that on account of the last exhortations of that holy sage, the people removed from them any idols; and being moreover unable to believe that God, who took vengeance of the Israelites for many lesser crimes, would have left their idolatry unpunished; this learned man has thought proper to interpret the words of Joshua conditionally, as if he had said; "If any one of you hath still the least inclination to idolatry, let him pluck it from his heart, and unreservedly devote himself to the worship of the only true God." See Quaest. 29: in Josh. But it is certainly doing violence to Joshua's discourse: to give it so soft a sense. Besides, what greater difficulty is there in conceiving the Israelites to have given way to idolatry under the government of this general, than under that of Moses their legislator? And how, after all, can we controvert a fact so positively attested by the Holy Spirit in divers other passages of Scripture? Ezekiel, Amos, and St. Stephen warrant the truth of the offence here imputed to the Hebrews. See Ezekiel 3:8; Ezekiel 3:27; Ezekiel 20:6; Ezekiel 20:49. Amos 5:16. Acts 7:41. Without doubt, the whole nation was not tainted with it, nor was the scandal of it yet public; but it appears evident, that among the multitude of the Israelites, there were many superstitious persons who privately joined the idolatrous worship of the people of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the land of Canaan, with the worship of Jehovah.

    REFLECTIONS.—Joshua seems, at his last meeting of the congregation, to have expected his dissolution at hand; but, God having spared him a little longer, he is glad to make use of the last moments of his life in one more solemn assembly of the heads of Israel. Note; (1.) Whilst God continues our lives, it is a sign that he has something for us yet to do. (2.) They whose hearts are faithful to God will be pleased with the returning solemnities, when they come to appear before the Lord. (3.) God is still in the midst of his people, whenever or wherever they assemble in his name.

    The congregation being collected, Joshua opens his farewel sermon, commissioned from God to speak, and therefore deserving the most profound attention: he begins with a recapitulation of the signal mercies that, from the beginning until that time, God had shewn to their ancestors, and to them. Their ancestors, who dwelt beyond the Euphrates, were sunk, as other Gentiles, into gross idolatry; when God, in his infinite mercy, separated Abraham from them, and brought him out from thence into the land of Canaan, where they now were, multiplied his posterity in Ishmael, and gave him the promised seed in Isaac. When Rebekah's barrenness seemed to restrain the fulfilment of the promise, Jacob and Esau were born. Jacob, their great progenitor, with his increasing household, were driven into Egypt by famine; but when his seed were there multiplied and oppressed, with a mighty arm did God rescue them from thence, protecting them with his pillar of a cloud, and overwhelming their pursuers in the sea. Through the dreary wilderness he led them safely, defeated the plots of their enemies, and turned wicked Balaam's intended curse into a blessing. After this also, he wrought his wonders in the land of Gilead, at Jordan and Jericho, casting out their foes before them, not by their sword or bow, but by his army of hornets, which he sent before them; and now at last he brought them into possession of Canaan, where peace and plenty reigned. In return for which mercies, it was not more their bounden duty, than the dictate of gratitude, 1. That they should fear that God whose wonders they had seen, and with a reverential sense of his majesty and mercy walk before him. 2. That they should serve him in sincerity and truth; for he is a heart-searching God, who cannot be imposed upon, who hateth hypocrisy, and expects the soul in simplicity to be devoted to his service. 3. That they should put far from them strange gods. Note; (1.) God requires the heart in his worship; without this, we can do him no acceptable service. (2.) Neglect of God is not only foul disobedience, but base ingratitude. (3.) That is still our idol, to which our affections cleave more than to the blessed God.

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    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/joshua-24.html. 1801-1803.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    In sincerity and in truth; either these two expressions note the same thing; or sincerity is opposed to the mixture of false gods with the true, as it here follows, or of a false and corrupt worship of God with that which God appointeth; and truth is opposed to dissimulation and falseness, and instability of heart.

    Put away the gods; whereby it appears, that although Joshua had doubtless prevented and purged out all public and manifest idolatry, yet there were some of them who practised it in their private houses and retirements. See Joshua 24:23 Amos 5:25,26 Ac 7:42,43. Your fathers, Terah, and Nahor, and Abraham, as Joshua 24:2, and others of your ancestors.

    On the other side of the flood, and in Egypt: see Ezekiel 23:3,8,19,21,27. Under these particulars no doubt he comprehends all other false gods, which were served by the nations amongst whom they were, as appears from Joshua 24:15, but only mentions these, as the idols which they were in more danger of worshipping than those in Canaan; partly because those of Canaan had been now lately and palpably disgraced by their inability to preserve their worshippers from total ruin; and partly because the other idols came recommended unto them by the venerable name of antiquity, and the custom of their forefathers. See Jeremiah 44:17 Ezekiel 20:18.

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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/joshua-24.html. 1685.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    [14. Put away the gods which your fathers served — Many expositors hold that these words do not necessarily imply the actual possession of idols by the people, but rather a tendency to idolatry, which was ever too painfully prominent in Israel until after the Babylonish exile. The spirit of the exhortation is, according to this view, well conveyed by Bush: “Keep away, renounce, repudiate, have nothing to do with, idolatry of any sort; being equivalent to a charge to preserve themselves pure from a contagion to which they were peculiarly liable.” Subsequent history shows how they failed. But it is scarcely supposable, that if Joshua meant to warn them merely against tendencies to idolatry he would have used the words here employed, and those still stronger ones, in Joshua 24:23, Put away the strange gods which are among you — the very words used by Jacob when his household gave up their strange gods, and he buried them at Shechem. Genesis 35:2. Better, then, to understand that many of the Hebrews had still in their houses teraphim — the gods which the ancient fathers worshipped beyond the Euphrates. Laban had them in his family, (Genesis 30:19,) and Rachel carried them off, and they were probably the strange gods buried at Shechem. Genesis 35:2-4. We again meet with them in the days of the Judges, (Judges 17:5, Judges 17:18, Judges 17:20,) and in the time of David, and even in his house, (1 Samuel 19:13;) and also in the time of Josiah, who tried to put them away. 2 Kings 23:24. It is therefore by no means improbable that among many families in Israel these teraphim were zealously kept, and Joshua, knowing the fact and the danger of it, called this assembly and especially urged this matter, in order to abolish, if possible, this evil.

    Though the fathers beyond the Euphrates seem to have worshipped or served these teraphim as gods, there is no sure evidence that they were ever worshipped as gods in Israel. But they were images more or less associated with a false worship, and therefore dangerous to the religion of the Hebrews.

    In Egypt — The fathers had carried these teraphim in their families to Egypt, and during all their captivity they had not lost sight of them. Comp. Ezekiel 20:7-8.]

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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-24.html. 1874-1909.

    Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

    Now therefore, fear YHWH, and serve him in sincerity and in truth, and put away the gods which your fathers served beyond the River and in Egypt, and you serve YHWH.”

    The requirements were simple and yet demanding. They were firstly that they should ‘fear YHWH’, recognise His greatness, His sovereignty and His power, and serve Him without pretence, but truly and honestly. This meant, of course, in accordance with the Law already given to them.

    And secondly that they should reject all rivals. It has already been mentioned that their fathers had worshipped other gods beyond the River, and now is added the fact of gods they had worshipped in Egypt. These were probably not the native gods of Egypt, for there is never any hint that they worshipped them, but gods commonly worshipped in Egypt by sojourners (also taken up by many Egyptians), on which for example had possibly been based the golden calves and the teraphim so often mentioned. We must remember that a good proportion of ‘the children of Israel’ were from a mixture of nations and would have worshipped a number of gods (Exodus 12:38), and it is clear that traces of that worship were still among them (compare Genesis 35:2).

    So Joshua was now calling on them to renounce these ‘gods’ and serve YHWH only. Syncretism was always a huge danger, but it is noteworthy that at this stage there is no suggestion of their pandering to Canaanite gods, although Joshua was aware of the danger (Joshua 24:15). They had not yet begun to mix with the Canaanites and learn their ways, a remarkable indication of the authenticity of the speech (a later writer would not have been able to resist incorporating such an idea here).

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    Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/joshua-24.html. 2013.

    Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

    Joshua 24:14. Put away the gods — By this it appears, that although Joshua had doubtless prevented and purged out all public idolatry, yet there were some of them who practised it in their private houses and retirements. Your fathers — Terah, and Nahor, and Abraham, as Joshua 24:2, and others of your ancestors. In Egypt — See Ezekiel 23:3; Ezekiel 23:8; Ezekiel 23:19; Ezekiel 23:21; Ezekiel 23:27. Under these particulars, no doubt, he comprehends all other false gods which were served by the nations among whom they were, but only mentions these, as the idols which they were in more danger of worshipping than those in Canaan; partly because those of Canaan had been now lately and palpably disgraced by their inability to preserve their worshippers from total ruin; and partly because the other idols came recommended to them by the venerable name of antiquity, and the custom of their forefathers.

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    Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/joshua-24.html. 1857.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    The gods. Some still retained in their hearts an affection for these idols, though privately; (Calmet) so that Josue could not convict them, or bring them to condign punishment; as no doubt he, and Moses before him, would have done, if they had been apprized of any overt act of idolatry. Amos (v. 26,) says, You carried a tabernacle of your Moloch and the image of your idols, &c., which is confirmed by Ezechiel xxiii. 3, 8., and Acts vii. 42. For these acts many of the people were punished, (Numbers xxv. 3, 9,) and the rest were either sincerely converted, or took care to hide their impiety till after the death of Josue. Yet the secret inclination of many was still corrupt; and these no sooner found a proper opportunity than they relapsed repeatedly into the worship of idols, for which reason the prophets represent their disposition as criminal from their youth. (Haydock) --- St. Augustine (q. 29,) cannot think that the people, who are so often praised for their fidelity during the administration of Josue and of the ancients, (chap. xxii. 2., and xxiii. 3, 8., and xxiv. 31,) and who had testified such zeal against every appearance of idolatry in Ruben, (chap. xxii.) should be themselves infected with this deadly poison. He therefore supposes that Josue exhorts them to repent, if any of them should have retained a predilection for the worship of their ancestors in Mesopotamia, and in Egypt, (Calmet) which, by the prophetic light he say, was secretly the case. (Worthington) --- Yet, though the great majority was clear of this crime, it seems many concealed from their leaders their secret attachment to it, ver. 23; (Calmet) or if they were sincere, for a time, their former bad habits soon gained the ascendancy, and involved them in perdition. (Haydock) --- Fathers. He does not exempt Abraham, and the Jews acknowledge that he was once an idolater, which is the opinion of St. Ephrem, of the author of the Recognitions, B. i., and of many moderns; some of whom think that St. Paul gives him the epithet of impious, or ungodly, on that account, Romans iv. 5. The idolatry of the Hebrews in Egypt, is no less certain than that of their ancestors in Mesopotamia, Ezechiel xxiii. 2, 8, 27. (Calmet)

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    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/joshua-24.html. 1859.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    and in Egypt. So that they were idolaters there. Compare Ezekiel 23:8. Three systems of idolatry referred to in verses: Joshua 24:14, Joshua 24:15, Chaldean, Egyptian, and Canaanite.

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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/joshua-24.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    Now therefore fear the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD.

    Now therefore fear the Lord, and serve him in sincerity and in truth. After having enumerated so many grounds for national gratitude, Joshua calls on them to declare, in a public and solemn manner whether they will be faithful and obedient to the God of Israel. He avowed this to be his own unalterable resolution, and urges them, if they were sincere in making a similar avowal, 'to put away the strange gods that were among them'-a requirement which seems to imply that some were suspected of a strong hankering for, or concealed practice of, idolatry, whether in the form of Zabaism, the fire-worship of their Chaldean ancestors, the scarabaei of Egypt, or the grosser superstitions of the Canaanites.

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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/joshua-24.html. 1871-8.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (14) Fear the Lord.β€”It should be remembered throughout the whole of this passage that Lord stands for JEHOVAH, the covenant God of Israel.

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    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/joshua-24.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    Now therefore fear the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD.
    fear
    Deuteronomy 10:12; 1 Samuel 12:24; Job 1:1; 28:28; Psalms 111:10; 130:4; Hosea 3:5; Acts 9:31
    serve
    23; Genesis 17:1; 20:5,6; Deuteronomy 18:13; 2 Kings 20:3; Psalms 119:1,80; Luke 8:15; John 4:23,24; 2 Corinthians 1:12; Ephesians 6:24; Philippians 1:10
    put
    From this exhortation of Joshua, we not only learn that the Israelites still retained some relics of idolatry, but to what gods they were attached. 1. Those whom their fathers worshipped on the other side of the food, or the river Euphrates, i.e., the gods of the Chaldeans, fire, light, the sun, etc. 2. Those of the Egyptians, Apis, Anubis, serpents, vegetables, etc. 3. Those of the Amorites, Moabites, Canaanites, etc., Baal-peor, Astarte, etc. How astonishing is it, that after all that God had done for them, and all the miracles they had seen, there should still be found among them both idols and idolaters!
    2,23; Genesis 35:2; Exodus 20:3,4; Leviticus 17:7; Ezra 9:11; Ezekiel 20:18; Amos 5:25,26
    in Egypt
    Ezekiel 20:7,8; 23:3
    Reciprocal: Exodus 20:20 - his fear;  Exodus 23:25 - And ye;  Joshua 5:9 - I rolled away;  Joshua 22:5 - serve;  Joshua 24:15 - whether the gods;  1 Samuel 7:3 - put away;  1 Samuel 12:14 - If ye will;  2 Kings 17:41 - these nations;  Jeremiah 4:1 - put away;  Ezekiel 16:3 - Thy birth;  Ezekiel 16:26 - with the;  Matthew 4:10 - Thou shalt;  1 Corinthians 5:8 - but;  2 Corinthians 6:16 - what;  2 Corinthians 8:8 - prove;  Ephesians 6:5 - in

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    Bibliographical Information
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 24:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-24.html.