Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 3:1

Then Joshua rose early in the morning; and he and all the sons of Israel set out from Shittim and came to the Jordan, and they lodged there before they crossed.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Israel;   Rising;   Scofield Reference Index - Jordan;   Miracles;   Thompson Chain Reference - Early Rising;   Miracles;   Rising, Early;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Early Rising;   Jordan, the River;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ark of the Covenant;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Abel-Shittim;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Joshua, the Book of;   Presence of God;   Rivers and Waterways in the Bible;   Shittim;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abel-Shittim;   Jericho;   Joshua;   Shittim;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Shittim ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ark;   Journeyings of israel from egypt to canaan;   Lachish;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Shit'tim;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Abel-Shittim;   Meadow;   Shittim;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Abel-Shittim;   Shittim;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Joshua rose early - Archbishop Usher supposes that this was upon Wednesday, the 28th of April, A. M. 2553, the fortieth year after the exodus from Egypt. From Shittim, where they had lately been encamped, to Jordan, was about sixty stadia, according to Josephus; that is, about eight English miles.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/joshua-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

“The acacia groves” (Exodus 25:5 note) of Shittim on both sides of Jordan line the upper terraces of the valley (compare 2 Kings 6:4). They would be in this part at some six miles distance from the river itself.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/joshua-3.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Joshua 3:1

Joshua rose early in the morning.

Early rising

Why does Joshua rise early in the morning? He has important and responsible duties to discharge during the day, and this may be one reason. Perhaps this has been his habit during a long succession of years, and now it is as easy and natural to him as breathing. Much has been said by some in favour of early rising, and it has been the practice of many distinguished men. Franklin wrote these words, “The morning has gold in its mouth. Dean Swift declared that he never knew any man come to greatness and eminence who lay in bed of a morning.” Doddridge, Barnes, Wesley, Judge Hale, and others we could name, always rose before five o’clock in the morning. As we look upon these sayings, and consider these examples, should we affirm that early rising is the imperative duty of every man? There are certain persons who live to do evil, only evil, and that continually. The longer they remain in bed the better it will be for themselves and others. There are some Who live a life of sheer indolence. Since their sleeping and waking hours are equal, so far as others are concerned, it is of no importance when they rise. In these times, too, when day is turned into night, there are multitudes, especially in our large cities and towns, who cannot go to rest till a late hour, and to whom early rising is therefore a physical impossibility. Besides, no hard and fast line can be drawn regarding measures of sleep, because some require more than others. We believe it would be highly beneficial to the bodies, the minds, and the souls of all, if the old custom--“early to bed and early to rise”--were constantly observed. Let every individual, however, endeavour to discharge every duty which is legitimately imposed upon him; and whether this is done by day or by night, he will fill up the outline of work which God gives to him, and find acceptance in His sight. (A. McAuslane.)

They removed from Shittim, and came to Jordan.

“Advance”

is the strong word that gathers up the teaching of the chapter.

1. The advance was from a notable past. “Finis” had been written to the first volume of the history of Israel; bondage its preface, vengeance its introduction, mercy its continual illumination. Sin had made their forty years a wilderness, in which they wandered from one oasis to another of heavenly grace set as with palm-trees and wells of water. And the present was rich and satisfying. Eastern Palestine was overflowing with honey and oil and milk. The stately oaks of Bashan, its sheep and goats and mighty bulls waiting to be herded among their riches, its abundant pasturage and countless watercourses, quite outrivaled the land beyond the river. Here they were already in possession; while beyond, fenced cities and disciplined troops forewarned of hardship and blood. This new volume opened to-day will show no such lavishness of miraculous helps. Still the word is “Advance.” If the leader is less, the people are more. If miracles and interventions are fewer, courage and skill and power are greater. God’s helps are transferred from without to within the hearts of men. He works best for them by working through them.

2. The advance was a long step toward their destiny. God’s purposes never turn back. His plan demanded the transfer of the people across the Jordan. Just because Eastern Palestine was broader and richer, they must go over. Their national growth and mission demanded a new type of life. Israel must set his feet by the shore of the great sea, and dwell upon the roads traversed by caravans and armies. Then Alexandria can supply its spiritual philosophy, Greece its culture and language, Rome its law and wide sway, to aid in recording and extending the gospel. Physical geography is potent in civilisation.

3. Advance requires spiritual preparation. It is not first for the sake of earthly reward. An eternal purpose, a holy destiny rules the progress. Before each Jordan is crossed, the people must be sanctified, the leader empowered. The past was no dead past to bury its dead, but was to live in remembrance of deliverance granted and mercies showered, of disastrous and destructive sins. (C. M. Southgate.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Joshua 3:1". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/joshua-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

ISRAEL CROSSES THE JORDAN RIVER

Joshua 3 and Joshua 4 must certainly stand on a very high plateau of importance, due not merely to the astounding miracle that took place, but also to the typical nature of the historic movement of Israel across the Jordan River into the Promised Land. The narrative here weaves together a number of very important elements:

(1) the elevation of Joshua in the estimation of the people;

(2) the function of the ark of the covenant and the priests who carried it;

(3) the beginning of the crossing, its continuation, and its conclusion;

(4) the erection of two memorials - one in the middle of Jordan, the other at Gilgal;

(5) the cessation of the manna; and

(6) the timing of the event with reference to the 10th of Abib and the approach of the First Passover in Canaan.

As recorded here, the narrative is very complex. As Blair pointed out, this complexity is the very thing overlooked by, "Those who have attempted to solve this narrative by appealing to `different accounts' woven together."[1] We might be able to forgive such explanations if there were any different accounts, but, of course, this is the only account that has come down through history. Those ephemeral, imaginary "accounts" prior to this one are known to be non-existent except in the imaginations of men who are already committed to a denial of the sacred record found in the Bible.

If one wonders why famous and honored "scholars" blunder so disastrously in the interpretation of miracles, Woudstra accurately explained it thus:

"In the Biblical view, MIRACULOUS events have one unambiguous and clear meaning. Those who do not accept them as such fly in the face of evidence which all can see. Only blindness of mind caused by sin makes people misinterpret miracles."[2]

The peculiarities of the narrative of these two chapters are marked by the piecemeal manner of its relation. There is a free use of provisional endings, which do not signal the final conclusion of a given factor at all, but the interruption of the record in order for the historian to insert a parenthesis, a prolepsis, or to take up another phase of the overall history. This episodic treatment of the grand event related here is nothing new to the histories of the times of Joshua and earlier. We shall meet with it again in Joshua 10. It is an undeniable earmark of the near mid-second millennium writings that have come down through history. Keil has favored us with a step-by-step analysis of these two chapters as follows:

The final preparations for the crossing (Joshua 3:1-6).

The commencement of the crossing (Joshua 3:7-17).

The further progress of the crossing (Joshua 4:1-14).

The crossing concluded (Joshua 4:15-24)[3]

Furthermore, in each of the final three sections outlined by Keil, the account is arranged according to the following plan:

In each of them, God's command to Joshua comes first (Joshua 3:7,8; 4:2,3; and Joshua 4:15,16).

Then there is the communication of this command to the people of Israel.

This is followed by the execution of God's command through Joshua (Joshua 3:9-17; 4:4-13; 4:17-20).[4]

The above are some of the considerations that lie behind the decision to treat these two chapters as a single unit in this commentary.

"And Joshua rose up early in the morning; and they removed from Shittim, and came to the Jordan; and they lodged there before they passed over."

Why was this preliminary approach made? Shittim was at most only five or six miles from the river, but here Joshua brought Israel to the very brink of the Jordan. Many have thought that God wanted the people to get a good look at that river in flood stage before they passed over it, and this is probably the correct explanation. Pink saw this three-day pause by the terrible Jordan as God's impressing upon the Israelites, "that they had no means of crossing it, that they were utterly helpless, and that they were thus completely shut unto God as their only hope."[5]

THE JORDAN RIVER

This terrible river, lying at the bottom of the most spectacular gash upon the surface of the planet earth, most of its course lying even below the level of the sea, is an astoundingly appropriate symbol of death.

The very name "Jordan" means "descender."[6] The Encyclopaedia Brittanica gives the meaning as "the down-comer."[7] Such names reflect the amazing steepness of the river throughout its course. From its source to its entry into the Dead Sea the distance is only about 65 miles, but the river meanders for a length of about 200 miles, with "an average loss of altitude of about 9 feet per mile."[8] The rank vegetation on each side of the river abounds with large quantities of castor oil plants, oleanders (poisonous), tamarisks, and acacias.[9]

The landscape on each side of the Jordan was in most places covered with the rank growth due to the annual flooding, and it was a cluttered mass of deposits of mud, gravel, dead weeds, driftwood, and exposed roots of trees. The swiftness of the river was rendered even more dangerous by its zig-zag current and muddy bed. It could easily sweep a man from the side into midstream. In the April flood, the Jordan just about doubled in size, from its usual 90 to 100 feet in width to almost twice that.[10]

In a very real sense, Jordan was the river of death. It terminated in the Dead Sea, where life is impossible. The salinity of the Dead Sea surpasses that of any other body of water on earth. Its waters have been called "a syrup of sodium chloride"!

But over and beyond these characteristics which certainly entitle the river to stand as a symbol of death, it is in the Grand Analogy of the Two Israels that its unique place in this function is sealed and certified. (See the details of the Grand Analogy in Vol. 7 of my N.T. series of commentaries, pp. 149,150.) Just as Joshua led Israel over Jordan into the Promised Land, just so our Lord Jesus Christ leads Christians (the New Israel) over the Jordan of death into "the eternal habitations!"

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/joshua-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Joshua rose early in the morning,.... The morning after the spies had returned and made their report; which, as Kimchi rightly observes, was the ninth of Nisan; for on the morrow, which was the tenth, the people passed over Jordan, see Joshua 3:5. Moses, according to the Jewish writers, died on the seventh of Adar or February; the thirty days of his mourning ended the seventh of Nisan or March; two days before they were ended the spies were sent, who returned on the eighth day of the month; and the morning following Joshua rose early, which shows his readiness and alacrity to proceed in the expedition he was directed and encouraged to:

and they removed from Shittim, and came to Jordan; from Shittim in the plains of Moab, to the river Jordan:

he and all the children of Israel; he as their general, and they an army of six hundred thousand fighting men under him, besides women and children, and others that came along with them:

and lodged there before they passed over; lay there encamped a night before they passed over the river Jordan.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And Joshua rose early in the morning; and they removed from Shittim, and came to a Jordan, he and all the children of Israel, and lodged there before they passed over.

(a) Which according to the Hebrews was in March, about 40 days after Moses' death.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/joshua-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Joshua 3:1-6. Joshua comes to Jordan.

Joshua rose early in the morning — On the day following that on which the spies had returned with their encouraging report. The camp was broken up in “Shittim” (the acacia groves), and removed to the eastern bank of the Jordan. The duration of their stay is indicated (Joshua 3:2), being, according to Hebrew reckoning, only one entire day, including the evening of arrival and the morning of the passage; and such a time would be absolutely necessary for so motley an assemblage of men, women, and children, with all their gear and cattle to make ready for going into an enemy‘s country.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/joshua-3.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This is as memorable a Chapter of the Lord's dealings with his people, as perhaps any in the Old Testament. And as there can be no doubt but that it is typical of yet greater mercies to be manifested in the New, it demands the attention of every believer more particularly. We have contained in this Chapter, the miraculous passage of Israel under their commander Joshua, over Jordan: the assurance given to the people of this event before it came to pass: the preparation for it; the sanctifying the people against it: and the event fully accomplished.

Joshua 3:1

We are called upon to pay the more regard to this interesting account, because we find, that the Lord himself in after ages appealed to it, as a token to his people, that he was and ever had been their gracious covenant God. And depend upon it, Reader, you and I cannot take a better method, of proving the righteous dealings of God with our souls, than when remembering all the path our God hath led us from our Shittim to Gilgal: from our first entrance through all the eventful periods of our spiritual and temporal stages to the present moment. Reader! I do not know what your view of those things are. But I do know in my own experience, that faith finds great sweetness when the Holy Ghost, acting as the Remembrancer of Jesus, brings to my memory afresh some of the many blessed tokens of past goodness the Lord hath shown me. When I can look back, and see how many apparently impassable Jordan were before me, and yet through how many of them the Lord hath brought me, setting up the stone of remembrance and saying, Hitherto the Lord hath helped me; I find cause through grace to add, And will he not bring me through all that remain? Reader! I beg you to read the resolution of the Psalmist upon this point. Psalms 77:10-12.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/joshua-3.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Joshua rose early in the morning; and they removed from Shittim, and came to Jordan, he and all the children of Israel, and lodged there before they passed over.

In the morning — Not after the return of the spies, but after the three days, Joshua 1:11, as it follows, verse3:2.

Lodge there — That night, that they might go over in the day time, that the miracle might be more evident and unquestionable, and strike the greater terror into their enemies.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/joshua-3.html. 1765.

(3:1 - 4:24)Переход через Иордан. Переход через Иордан знаменует тот момент, когда Израиль преодолел последнее препятствие на своем пути к обетованной земле и наконец вышел из пустыни. Божественный Воитель, символом Которого был Его ковчег, привел народ к Иордану, раздвинул его воды, предоставил людям защиту и провел в обетованную землю.

В течение всего года Иордан можно перейти вброд (ср.: Суд. 3:28; 8:4), но Бог ждал ранней весны (наступления полноводья, что по большей части происходит из–за тающих снегов на горе Ермон), чтобы повести израильтян через реку и таким образом возвысить Иисуса Навина в глазах людей (6) и дать понять народу Израиля, что среди них пребывает живой Бог (8, 13).

(3:1–17)Иордан расступается. Под верным водительством Иисуса священная война велась организованно и беспрерывно, без промедлений и излишней торопливости.

(3:1) Израиль понял, что Бог начал действовать чудесным образом, что особенно явно проявилось при переходе через Иордан, но началось еще в Ситтиме (ср.: Мих. 6:5). Израильтяне отправились от Иордана 10 нисана (4:19) (первый месяц лунного года, соответствует нашему апрелю), а прибыли на берег неприступного Иордана на три дня раньше (3:2,5). Свободное время между их прибытием к Иордану и переходом его посуху было необходимо для духовной подготовки народа (5).

Здесь приводятся четыре речи, подготовившие народ к переходу. В первой к народу обратились надзиратели (2-4), затем Иисус говорил к народу и священникам (5–6), в третьей - Господь обратился к Иисусу (7–8), и в последней - Иисус ко всему народу (9- 13). В каждой следующей речи говорится немного больше о чуде, которое должно произойти, и это ожидание достигает своего апогея в последнем обращении Иисуса.

 

 

Scofield's Reference Notes

Jordan

The passage of Jordan, type of our death with Christ Romans 6:6-11; Ephesians 2:5; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 3:1-3.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Joshua 3:1". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/joshua-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Joshua 3:1 And Joshua rose early in the morning; and they removed from Shittim, and came to Jordan, he and all the children of Israel, and lodged there before they passed over.

Ver. 1. And Joshua rose early in the morning,] viz., Of the ninth day of the first month, called Abib; as on the tenth day [Joshua 4:19] - which was the day wherein the paschal lamb was set apart - the Israelites entered the land of Canaan under the command and conduct of Joshua, who was a type of Jesus Christ, by whom we have "the purchased possession, unto the praise of his glory." [Ephesians 1:14]

Removed from Shittim.] In the plains of Moab. See Joshua 2:1.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 1. And Joshua rose early in the morning, &c.— Early the next morning, after he had ordered the army to make all necessary provision for speedily entering the enemy's country, (chap. Joshua 1:10-11.) he raised the camp; and the Israelites, who were at Shittim from the fifth day of the eleventh month of the fortieth year after their departure out of Egypt, advanced to the banks of the Jordan.

And lodged there before they passed over The French version renders this, and lodged there that night; and the Vulgate, they came to Jordan, where they tarried three days. The truth is, that the Hebrew word jalinu, signifies not only to pass the night, but also to tarry some time; to stop. Every one agrees, that God chose that the miraculous passage of the Jordan should be performed in the day-time, either that the prodigy might be more incontestable, or that it might spread more terror among the Canaanites.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/joshua-3.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

JOSHUA CHAPTER 3

Joshua comes with the Israelites to Jordan, Joshua 3:1. The officers instruct the people and priests for the passage, Joshua 3:2-6. God encourages Joshua, and he encourageth the people, giving therefore a sign the dividing the waters of Jordan till the ark and people should pass over, Joshua 3:7-13. The people pass over, the priests standing all the time in the midst of Jordan, Joshua 3:14-17.

In the morning; not after the return of the spies, as may seem at first view; but after the three days, as it follows, Joshua 3:2.

Lodged there that night, that they might go over in the day time; partly that the miracle might be more evident and unquestionable; and partly to strike the greater terror into their enemies.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/joshua-3.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

Chapter 3. The Momentous Crossing of the Jordan.

Joshua removed from Shittim to the River Jordan, where they stayed a short while, after which the people were directed to move once they saw the Ark being borne by the priests, and the distance that they should keep from it because it was holy. They were ordered to sanctify themselves against the next day, when wonders would be wrought, and then the priests would be ordered to take up the Ark and go in front of the people. Joshua was encouraged by YHWH, and instructed to command the priests, when they came to the Jordan, to stand still in it. So he declared to all the people that, as a token that God would drive the Canaanites from before them, as soon as the feet of the priests bearing the ark should tread in the waters of Jordan, the waters would be parted, and make way for them to pass through. And this was what actually happened so that all the Israelites passed over on dry ground.

Joshua 3:1

And Joshua rose up early in the morning, and they removed from Shittim and came to Jordan, he and all the children of Israel, and stayed there temporarily before they passed over.’

The following morning Joshua gave orders and they struck camp and moved to the edge of the Jordan, where they set up a temporary encampment. The excitement must have been intense. The big moment for which they had waited so long had arrived.

“Joshua rose up early in the morning.” Compare Joshua 6:12; Joshua 7:16; Joshua 8:10. He wanted to make full use of the day. While the people did have lampstands which gave off dim light, daytime was the time for doing things, and people therefore tended to rise at dawn and go to bed ‘early’, especially when something important was going on.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/joshua-3.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.Rose early in the morning — According to a necessary custom in hot countries to work by night or early dawn and rest at noonday. Compare Genesis 19:2; Genesis 19:27; Genesis 20:3; Genesis 28:18.

Came to Jordan — Not close up to the brink of the river, but within some two thousand cubits of it. Joshua 3:4.

Lodged there — Not merely spent one night there, as some understand, but abode there (for לון often has this sense) three days, as the next verse most naturally explains.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-3.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Joshua 3:1. Joshua rose early in the morning — Not after the return of the spies, as may seem at first view, but after the three days mentioned Joshua 1:11, when orders were given to the army to make all necessary provision for invading the enemies’ country. They came to Jordan — and lodged there — That night, that they might go over in the day-time, that the miracle might be more evident and unquestionable, and might strike the greater terror into their enemies.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/joshua-3.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

early in the morning: i.e. after the command in Joshua 1:2.

children = sons.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/joshua-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Joshua rose early in the morning; and they removed from Shittim, and came to Jordan, he and all the children of Israel, and lodged there before they passed over.

Joshua rose early in the morning - i:e., on the day following that on which the spies had returned with their encouraging report, the camp was broken up in "Shittim" (the acacia groves), and removed from the terraced heights of the valley to the eastern bank of the Jordan. The duration of their stay is indicated (Joshua 3:2), being, according to Hebrew reckoning, only one entire day, including the evening of arrival and the morning of the passage; and such a time would be absolutely necessary for so motley an assemblage of men, women, and children, with all their gear and cattle, to make ready for going into an enemy's country.

Lodged there before they passed over - literally 'they had not yet passed over' (see the note at Joshua 2:8; Lodged there before they passed over - literally, 'they had not yet passed over' (see the note at Joshua 2:8; Genesis 2:5).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/joshua-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

III.

THE PASSAGE OF JORDAN (Joshua 3:1 to Joshua 4:18, inclusive).

Joshua 3:1-6, preliminaries; 3:7- 4:14, the passage of the people and Joshua 4:15-18, the passage of the ark itself.

(1) They removed from Shittim.—See Note on Joshua 2:1. Shittim may be called the last stage of the Exodus of Israel, “their journeyings according to their goings out” (Numbers 33:2). The march from Shittim to Jordan is their first march under Joshua—the first stage of their Eisodus or coming in.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/joshua-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Joshua rose early in the morning; and they removed from Shittim, and came to Jordan, he and all the children of Israel, and lodged there before they passed over.
rose early
Archbishop Usher supposes, that this was upon Wednesday, the 28th of April, A.M. 2553, the fortieth year of the Exodus from Egypt. From Shittim, where the israelites had been encamped for about two months (De 1:3), to the Jordan, was, according to Josephus, about sixty stadia; that is, between seven and eight English miles.
Genesis 22:3; Psalms 119:60; Jeremiah 7:13; 25:3; 26:5; Mark 1:35
Shittim
2:1; Numbers 25:1; Micah 6:5
Jordan
Jordan, called by the Arabs El Sharia, takes its rise in Anti-Libanus, about twelve miles north of Cæsarea Philippi, now Banias; and, having run about twelve miles southward, it receives a considerable stream, which is now called the Moiet Hasbeia. About 15 miles farther, it forms the waters of Merom or Semechon, now Houle; and, after running about 28 miles more, it passes through the lake of Gennesareth, and thence runs southward till it loses itself in the Dead Sea; its whole course being about 160 miles.
Reciprocal: Joshua 6:12 - Joshua rose;  Joshua 7:16 - rose up;  Joshua 8:10 - rose up;  Judges 7:1 - rose up;  Judges 20:19 - rose up;  Proverbs 31:15 - riseth

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-3.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

1.And Joshua rose early, etc We must remember, as I formerly explained, that Joshua did not move his camp till the day after the spies had returned, but that after hearing their report, he gave orders by the prefects that they should collect their vessels, as three days after they were to cross the Jordan. (43) His rising in the morning, therefore, does not refer simply to their return, but rather to the issuing of his proclamation. When the three days were completed, the prefects were again sent through the camp to acquaint the people with the mode of passage. Although these things are mentioned separately, it is easy to take up the thread of the narrative. But before it was publicly intimated, by what means he was to open a way for the people, the multitude spread out on the bank of the river were exposed to some degree of confusion.

It is true, there were fords by which the Jordan could be passed. But the waters were then swollen, and had overflowed, so that they might easily prevent even men altogether without baggage from passing. There was therefore no hope, that women and children, with the animals, and the rest of the baggage, could be transported to the further bank. That, in such apparently desperate circumstances, they calmly wait the issue, though doubtful, and to them incomprehensible, is an example of faithful obedience, proving how unlike they were to their fathers, who, on the slightest occasions, gave way to turbulence, and inveighed against the Lord and against Moses. This change was not produced without the special agency of the Holy Spirit.

The Jordan, then, by far the most important river of Palestine, is formed, near its northern frontiers, by several streams which descend from the mountains of Lebanon, and after flowing nearly due south, for a direct distance of about 175 miles, discharges its waters into the north side of the Dead Sea. In the upper part of its course, before it reaches the late of Tiberius, more familiarly known by its usual scriptural name of the Sea of Galilee, it has much of the character of an impetuous torrent, and is hemmed closely in on both sides by loftly mountains, but on issuing from the south side of the lake, it begins to flow in a valley, the most remarkable circumstance connected with which, is its great depth beneath the level of the ocean. Even the Sea of Galilee is 84 feet, and the Dead Sea, where the Jordan falls into it is 1337 feet beneath this level. The intervening space between the two seas, forms what is properly called the valley of the Jordan, and consists of a plain, about six miles across in its northern, but much wider in its southern half, where it spreads out, on its east or left bank, into the plains of Moab, and on its west or right bank, into the plains of Jericho. This valley, throughout its whole length, is terminated on either side by a mountain chain, which in many parts rises so rapidly as soon to attain a height exceeding 2500. Within the valley thus terminated, a minor valley is enclosed. It is about three quarters of a mile in breadth, and consists, for the most part, of a low flat, bounded by sandy slopes, and covered by trees or brushwood. Nearly in the center of this flat the river, almost concealed beneath its overhanging banks, pursues its course, with few large windings, but with such a multiplicity of minute tortuosities, that though the direct distance is not more than sixty-five, the indirect distance or total length of the stream is estimated at not less than two hundred miles. The river, in its ordinary state, within its banks, has a width of from twenty to thirty yards, and a depth, varying from nine to fifteen feet. The banks are there from twelve to fourteen feet high, and immediately beyond them, the flat bears evident marks of being frequently inundated. These inundation’s take place in spring, and are caused by the melted snow brought down, partly by the three principal tributaries of the Jordan, the Jarmuch, or Shurat-el-Mandour, the Jabbok, or Zerka, and the Arnon, or Wady Modjet, which all join it from the east, but chiefly by the main stream, which is then copiously supplied from the snowy heights of Lebanon. This rising of the waters, of course, begins as soon as the thawing influence of the returning heat begins to be felt, but does not attain its maximum till the impression has been fully made, or, in the first weeks of April. Such was the state of the stream as the Israelites now safely assumed to have been from seven to Twelve miles north of the Dead Sea, and not far from the Bethabarah, where our Savior, after condescending to receive baptism at the hands of his forerunner, went up from the banks, while the heavens opened, and the Spirit of God descended like a dove, and lighted upon him. — Ed.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Joshua 3:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/joshua-3.html. 1840-57.