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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:2

just as they were handed down to us by those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and servants of the word,

Adam Clarke Commentary

Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eye-witnesses - Probably this alludes to the Gospels of Matthew and Mark, which it is likely were written before St. Luke wrote his, and on the models of which he professes to write his own; and απ 'αρχης, from the beginning, must mean, from the time that Christ first began to proclaim the glad tidings of the kingdom; and αυτοπται, eye-witnesses, must necessarily signify, those who had been with him from the beginning, and consequently had the best opportunities of knowing the truth of every fact.

Ministers of the word - Του λογου . Some suppose that our blessed Lord is meant by this phrase; as ὁ Λογος, the Word or Logos, is his essential character in John 1:1, etc.; but it does not appear that any of the inspired penmen ever use the word in this sense except John himself; for here it certainly means the doctrine of Christ; and in this sense λογος is frequently used both by the evangelists and apostles.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

As they delivered them - As they narrated them. As they gave an account of them.

From the beginning - From the commencement of these things - that is, from the birth of John, or perhaps from the beginning of the ministry of Jesus.

Eye-witnesses - Who had seen those things themselves, and who were therefore proper witnesses.

Ministers of the word - The term “word” here means the “gospel.” Luke never uses it, as John does, to denote the second Person of the Trinity. These eye-witnesses and ministers refer, doubtless, to the seventy disciples, to the apostles, and perhaps to other preachers who had gone forth to proclaim the same things.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Even as they delivered them unto us,.... By whom the evangelist means, as appears from the after description of them, the twelve apostles, and seventy disciples; who handed down to others the accounts of the birth, life, and death of Christ; and according to which the above Christians proposed to write:

which from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word; either of the Gospel, or rather of Christ himself, the eternal Word of God; for from the beginning of Christ's preaching the Gospel, or as soon as he entered upon his public ministry, he called his apostles, as Simon, Andrew, James, John, &c. and afterwards seventy disciples; who were eyewitnesses of him, of the truth of his incarnation, and of his ministry and miracles; saw, and conversed with him after his resurrection from the dead and beheld his ascension to heaven; and were ministers that were called, qualified, and sent out by him and waited on him, and served him. This shows, as is by some rightly observed, that Luke was not one of the seventy disciples, as someF9Epiphan. contra Haeres. l. 2. Haeres. 51. Theophylact. in Argument in Luc. have thought, and as the title of this Gospel, to the Arabic version of it, expresses; for then he would have been an eyewitness himself: nor did he take his account from the Apostle Paul; for he was not a minister of the word from the beginning, but was as one born out of due time,


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

b Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word;

(b) Luke was not any eye witness, and therefore it was not he to whom the Lord appeared when Cleopas saw him: and he was taught not only by Paul, but by others of the apostles also.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

from the beginning — that is, of His public ministry, as is plain from what follows.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

2. Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word;

[Which from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word, &c.] If from the beginning have reference to the time wherein Christ published the gospel upon earth, as no one need to doubt, then there is little distinction to be made between eyewitnesses and ministers: for who from that time had been made a minister of the word, that had not been an eyewitness and seen Christ himself? so that we may easily conjecture who are these eyewitnesses and ministers here, viz., the apostles, the seventy disciples, and others that filled up the number of the hundred and twenty, mentioned Acts 1:15.

It is said of Mnason, that he was an old disciple, Acts 21:16. It may be supposed of him, that he had been a disciple from the beginning; that is, from the very time wherein Christ himself published his glad tidings. Those words a good while ago, Acts 15:7, ought to be understood also in this sense.


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Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-1.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Even as (κατωςkathōs). This particle was condemned by the Atticists though occurring occasionally from Aristotle on. It is in the papyri. Luke asserts that the previous narratives had their sound basis. Delivered unto us (παρεδωσαν ημινparedōsan hēmin). Second aorist active indicative of παραδιδωμιparadidōmi Luke received this tradition along with those who are mentioned above (the many). That is he was not one of the “eyewitnesses.” He was a secondary, not a primary, witness of the events. Tradition has come to have a meaning of unreliability with us, but that is not the idea here. Luke means to say that the handing down was dependable, not mere wives‘ fables. Those who drew up the narratives had as sources of knowledge those who handed down the data. Here we have both written and oral sources. Luke had access to both kinds.

Which from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word (οι απ αρχης αυτοπται και υπηρεται γενομενοι του λογουhoi ap' archēs autoptai kai hupēretai genomenoi tou logou). “Who” is better than “which” for the article here. The word for eyewitnesses (αυτοπταιautoptai) is an old Greek word and appears in the papyri also. It means seeing with one‘s own eyes. It occurs here only in the N.T. We have the very word in the medical term autopsy. Greek medical writers often had the word. It is a different word from εποπταιepoptai (eyewitness) in 2 Peter 1:16, a word used of those who beheld heavenly mysteries. The word for “ministers” (υπηρεταιhupēretai), under rowers or servants we have had already in Matthew 5:25, Matthew 26:58 and Mark 14:54, Mark 14:65. We shall see it again in Luke 4:20 of the attendant in the synagogue. In the sense of a preacher of the gospel as here, it occurs also in Acts 26:16. Here “the word” means the gospel message, as in Acts 6:4; Acts 8:4, etc.

From the beginning apparently refers to the beginning of the ministry of Jesus as was true of the apostles (Acts 1:22) and of the early apostolic preaching (Acts 10:37-43). The Gospel of Mark follows this plan. The Gospel of Luke goes behind this in chapters 1 and 2 as does Matthew in chapters 1 and 2. But Luke is not here referring to himself. The matters about the childhood of Jesus Christ would not form part of the traditional preaching for obvious reasons.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Even as

Referring to the composition of the narrative.

Delivered ( παρέδοσαν )

Not necessarily excluding written traditions, but referring mainly to oral tradition. Note the distinction between the many who attempted to draw up a narrative and the eye-witnesses and ministers who handed down the facts.

From the beginning ( ἀπ ' ἀρχῆς )

The official beginning, the commencement of Jesus' ministry. Compare Acts 1:1, Acts 1:21, Acts 1:22; John 15:27.

Eye-witnesses and ministers

Personal knowledge and practical experience were necessary elements of an apostle. Eye-witnesses ( εὐτόπται )Only here in New Testament. Peter uses another word, ἐπόπται (2 Peter 1:16). Frequent in medical writers, of a personal examination of disease or of the parts of the body. Compare the modern medical term autopsy. Ministers ( ὑπηρέται )See on Matthew 5:25. In medical language denoting the attendants or assistants of the principal physician.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

even as they delivered them unto us, who from the beginning were eyewitnesses1 and ministers of the word2,

  1. Who from the beginning were eyewitnesses. The apostles were necessarily such and there were some few others.

  2. And ministers of the word. The apostles were ministers and not ecclesiastical dignitaries.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The word which, refers back to they, and not to us; the meaning being, as they who were eye-witnesses &c., delivered them to us.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-1.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word;

Ver. 2. Which from the beginning were eyewitnesses] Therefore it may seem his Gospel was not dictated to him by Paul (who was no eyewitness), as some ancients have affirmed. But if we can believe Tacitus or Suetonius in things that happened long before they were born, because we are confident of their diligence in inquiring, how much more should we believe St Luke upon such doubted assurance? &c.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:2. Ministers of the word; Some have supposed, that by the word, St. Luke meant Christ himself. See John 1:1. Others however underhand by the word, the transactions of our Lord's public life or the gospel; called the word, as being the great subject of the preaching of the apostles, who were eye and ear witnesses of these things. It seems as plain as possible, from this verse, that they could not be false or heretical gospels to which St. Luke alludes.

See commentary on Luke 1:1


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

2. καθὼς παρ.] The Apostles, &c., delivered these matters orally to the Churches in their teaching (see below on κατηχ.) and others drew up accounts from that catechetical instruction. It appears from this, that Luke was not aware of any διήγησις drawn up by an eye-witness or ὑπ. τ. λ. Their account of these matters was a παράδοσις, from which the διηγήσεις were drawn up. He cannot therefore have seen (or, having seen, not recognized as such, which is highly improbable) the Gospel of Matthew. Compare 1 John 1:1-3.

ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς—not, ‘from the very beginning,’ i.e. the birth of the Lord, &c., but from the official beginning: see Acts 1:21 f. It differs from ἄνωθεν below.

αὐτ. κ. ὑπηρ. τοῦ λ.] αὐτ. most probably stands alone: but it may well be taken with τ. λ. (see below.)

ὑπηρ.,—see reff.,—ministering servants—but in connexion with ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς. The fanciful idea of “remiges in navi, sc. ecclesia,” cited by Wordsw. from Valckn., is out of the question. ὑπηρέτης had long lost trace of its original derivation, in its more common meaning; and it would be abhorrent from good taste to suppose St. Luke to have used it with so pedantic an allusion.

τ. λόγου—not, ‘the λόγος’ (i.e. Christ: so Orig(3), Athanasius, Cyril, Euthym(4)), which would be altogether alien from Luke’s usage (see on Hebrews 4:12. Bleek, in his posthumous “Erklärung der drei ersten Evv.,” Leipz. 1862, also objects to the personal sense as too precise and definite for the rhetorical generalities of St. Luke in this passage)—nor ‘the matter,’ so that ὑπ. τ. λ. would signify those who by their labours contributed to bring the matter about, ‘qui ipsi interfuerunt rebus, tanquam pars aliqua’—for this is alien from Luke’s usage of ὑπηρ.—see Acts 26:16; but, the word,—‘the word preached:’—so that ὑπηρέτης τ. λόγ. = διάκονος τ. λόγ. Acts 6:4.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:2. καθώς] neither quatenus, nor belonging to πεπληροφ. (in opposition, as respects both, to Kuinoel, as respects the latter also to Olshausen), but introducing the How, the modal definition of ἀνατάξ. διήγησιν.

παρέδοσαν] have delivered. It is equally erroneous to refer this merely to written (Königsm. de fontibus, etc., in Pott’s Sylloge, III. p. 231; Hug), or merely to oral communication, although in the historical circumstances the latter was by far the preponderating.(16) Holtzmann appropriately remarks: “The subjects of παρέδοσαν and the πολλοί are not distinguished from one another as respects the categories of the oral and written, but as respects those of primary and secondary authority.” For the πολλοί, as for Luke himself, who associates himself with them by κἀ΄οί, the παράδοσις of the αὐτόπται was the proper source, in accordance with which therefore he must have critically sifted the attempts of those πολλοί, so far as he knew them (Luke 1:3).

ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς] namely, of those πραγ΄άτων. But it is not the time of the birth of Jesus that is meant (so most commentators, including Kuinoel and Olshausen), but that of the entrance of Jesus on His ministry (Euthymius Zigabenus, de Wette); comp. John 15:27; Acts 1:21 f., which explanation is not “audacious” (Olshausen), but necessary, because the αὐτόπται καὶ ὑπηρέται τοῦ λόγου are the same persons, and therefore under the αὐτόπται there are not to be understood, in addition to the first disciples, Mary also and other members of the family. ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς therefore is not to be taken absolutely, but relatively.

ὑπηρέται τοῦ λόγου] ministri evangelii (the doctrine κατʼ ἐξοχήν, comp. Acts 8:7; Acts 14:25; Acts 16:6; Acts 17:11). These were the Twelve and other ΄αθηταί of Christ (as according to Luke also the Seventy), who were in the service of the gospel for the purpose of announcing it. Comp. Luke 3:7; Acts 6:4; Colossians 1:23; Acts 26:16; 1 Corinthians 4:1. Others (Erasmus, Castalio, Beza, Grotius, Maldonatus, al., including Kuinoel) take τοῦ λόγου in the sense of the matter concerned, of the contents of the history spoken of (see on Acts 8:21); but it would be just as inappropriate to ὑπηρέται as it would be quite superfluous, since τοῦ λόγου must by no means be attached to αὐτόπται also. Finally, it is a mistake to refer it to Christ in accordance with John 1:1. So Origen, Athanasius, Euthymius Zigabenus, Valla, Calovius, and others, including Stein (Kommentar, Halle 1830). It is only John that names Christ λόγος.

Theophylact, moreover, aptly observes: ἐκ τούτου (namely, from καθὼς παρέδοσαν ἡ΄ῖν κ. τ. λ.) δῆλον, ὅτι οὐκ ἦν λουκᾶς ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς ΄αθητὴς, ἀλλʼ ὑστερόχρονος· ἄλλοι γὰρ ἦσαν οἱ ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς ΄αθητευθεντες οἳ καὶ παρέδοσαν αὐτῷ κ. τ. λ. By ἡ΄ῖν the writer places himself in the second generation; the first were the immediate disciples of Christ, οἱ ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς αὐτόπται καὶ ὑπηρέται. This ὑπηρέται, however, is not chosen for the sake of placing the Twelve on an equality with Paul (Acts 26:16). As though the word were so characteristic for Paul in particular! Comp. John 18:36; 1 Corinthians 4:1.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 1:2. παρέδοσαυ ἡυῖν, they have delivered to us) to me, and to the other companions of the apostles.— ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς, from the beginning) It was not from Paul alone, who was converted after the beginning, that Luke received his information.— αὐτόπται καὶ ὑπηρέται) They themselves saw [ αὐτὸς ὄπτεσθαι being the components of αὐτόπτης], and, what is more, ministered. So also Paul was a minister and witness: Acts 26:16; so also the mother of our Lord herself, Mary: Acts 1:14. There were many such witnesses, advanced in years, and so of the highest authority [for instance, the twelve apostles, the seventy disciples, Mary Magdalene, and several more.—V. g.]: 1 Corinthians 15:6; Romans 16:7. It was such as these themselves, and the companions of such, who wrote the books of the New Testament. No room was left for doubting.— τοῦ λόγου, of the word) Acts 10:36. This one ‘word’ embraces many ‘words,’ Luke 1:4 [ ὧν κατηχήθης λόγων: subjects of instruction].


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 1:1"


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:2". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

They; the persons who were eye-witnesses.

From the beginning; the beginning of the things which they described.

Ministers of the word; preachers of the gospel.


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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

2. That to any one who believes in God there can therefore be no stumblingblock in the Angelic appearances and other marvellous incidents. They are thrown into the shade by the awfulness of the central fact that “The WORD became Flesh.”


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"Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

2. Delivered them unto us—This delivery being previous to writing must have been oral. The us to whom they were delivered must be the Church and people contemporaneous with the apostles, and to whom they preached. The phrase “handed down,” therefore, is not a proper translation of the Greek term; for that would imply that the receiver belonged to a later generation. Luke, though after the apostles in rank, was probably their coeval in time.

From the beginning—The beginning of the public ministry of Jesus.

Eyewitnesses—To be “witnesses chosen before of God” of the doings and sayings of Jesus was the very essence and object of the apostolic office. Acts 10:41; Acts 1:8; Acts 1:22; Acts 26:16. In accordance with this is the bold declaration of Peter at a later day: “We have not followed cunningly devised fables… but were eye-witnesses.” On equally strong grounds does John, near the close of the first century, later, in fact, than the publication of this gospel, place his own testimony: “That which was from the beginning, which we have HEARD, which we have SEEN with our EYES, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled… declare we unto you.” 1 John 1:1. Such declarations afford no room, no interval of time, no chance for the intervention of fabricators for forming traditions, legends, or myths. Our gospels are the plain records of the statements of actual spectators.

Ministers of the word—The terms eyewitnesses and ministers are epithets for the same persons. The apostles were to be eye-witnesses of the facts, in order to be official rehearsers of the history.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-1.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The writer wanted to assure Theophilus ( Luke 1:3) that the information that he and other writers had included in their accounts was valid. It had come from eyewitness testimony of people who accompanied Jesus from the beginning of His public ministry and who were servants of the word, namely, the gospel message. These people were the apostles and other eyewitnesses, such as Jesus" mother (cf. Acts 10:39-42). Luke used the Greek word logos, "word," often in his Gospel, especially in the sections that are unique to it. [Note: See Lloyd Gaston, Horae Synopticae Electonicae; Word Statistics of the Synoptic Gospels, pp64 , 76; and John C. Hawkins, Horae Synopticae; Contributions to the Study of the Synoptic Problem, pp20 , 43.] Paul also claimed to communicate faithfully what others had "handed down" to him ( 1 Corinthians 11:23; 1 Corinthians 15:3). [Note: See Oscar Cullmann, The Early Church: Studies in Early Christian History and Theology, pp59-75.] This verse is a claim to careful research using reliable sources of information.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-1.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:2. They delivered them, or, ‘handed them down.’ The oral instruction of the Apostles is here referred to. From this (see Luke 1:4) the writ-ten accounts of the ‘many ‘were drawn up. Oral tradition came first, but this preface plainly implies its insufficiency.

From the beginning, i.e., from the baptism of John (see Mark 1:1; Acts 1:21; John 15:27).

Eye-witnesses. The Apostles, perhaps the Seventy also. This implies that Luke was not a disciple during the lifetime of our Lord.

Became ministers. The same persons who had been ‘eye-witnesses.’

The word, i.e., the word of the gospel, the preached word. Certainly not ‘the Word,’ the Logos, for John only uses this term. Hence ‘of the word’ is scarcely to be joined with ‘eye-witnesses.’


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 1:2. καθὼς implies that the basis of these many written narratives was the παράδοσις of the Apostles, which, by contrast, and by the usual meaning of the word, would be mainly though not necessarily exclusively oral (might include, e.g., the Logia of Mt.).— οἱτοῦ λόγου describes the Apostles, the ultimate source of information, as men “who had become, or been made, eye-witnesses and ministers of the word”. Both αὐτόπτ. and ὑπηρ. may be connected with τοῦ λόγου, understood to mean the burden of apostolic preaching = the facts of Christ’s earthly history. Eye-witnesses of the facts from the beginning ( ἀπʼ- ἀρχῆς), therefore competent to state them with authority; servants of the word including the facts (= “all that Jesus began both to do and to teach”), whose very business it was to relate words and facts, and who therefore did it with some measure of fulness. Note that the ἡμῖν after παρέδοσαν implies that Lk. belonged to the second generation (Meyer, Schanz). Hahn infers from the ἡμῖν in Luke 1:1 that Lk. was himself an eye-witness of Christ’s public ministry, at least in its later stage.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-1.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

from. Greek apo. App-104.

from the beginning. Greek. ap" arches; i.e. from the birth or ministry of the Lord. Compare John 15:27. Acts 1:1, Acts 1:21, Acts 1:22.

were = became.

eyewitnesses. Greek autoptai. Occurs only here. Not the same word as in 2 Peter 1:16. A medical word (Colossians 4:14). Compare our autopsy.

ministers = attendants. A technical word, often translated "officer".


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word;

Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning [ ap' (Greek #575) archees (Greek #746) - that is, of Christ's ministry], were eye-witnesses, and ministers of the word}, [ autoptai (Greek #845) kai (Greek #2532) hupeeretai (Greek #5257) tou (Greek #3588) logou (Greek #3056)]. Though it would not be strictly proper to understand "the word" here of Christ Himself-since only John applies to Him this exalted title, and He seems never to have been actually so denominated-yet since the term rendered "ministers" [ hupeeretai (Greek #5257)] denotes the servants of a person, it must refer to those apostles of the Lord Jesus, who, in proclaiming everywhere that word which they had heard from His own lips, acted as His servants.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(2) Even as they delivered them unto us.—There is something noticeable in the candour with which the writer disclaims the character of an eyewitness. The word “delivered” is the same as that used by St. Paul when he speaks of the history of the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 11:23-25) and of the Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:3-7), and, with its cognate noun “tradition” (2 Thessalonians 2:15), would seem to have been almost a technical term for the oral teaching which at least included an outline of our Lord’s life and teaching.

Ministers of the word.—The word used is that which describes the work of an attendant, something between a “slave” and a “minister,” in the later ecclesiastical use of the term as equivalent to “deacon” or “preacher.” It is used of St. Mark in Acts 13:5. On the opportunities St. Luke enjoyed for converse with such as these, see Introduction. The “word” is used in its more general Pauline sense (as e.g., 1 Corinthians 1:18; 1 Corinthians 2:4), as equivalent to the “gospel,” not in the higher personal meaning which it acquired afterwards in St. John (1 John 2:14).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word;
which
24:48; Mark 1:1; John 15:27; Acts 1:3,8,21,22; 4:20; 10:39-41; Hebrews 2:3; 1 Peter 5:1; 1 John 1:1-3
and
Acts 26:16; Romans 15:16; Ephesians 3:7,8; 4:11,12; Colossians 1:23-25

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:2". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

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