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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:22

But when he came out, he was unable to speak to them; and they realized that he had seen a vision in the temple; and he kept making signs to them, and remained mute.

Adam Clarke Commentary

They perceived that he had seen a vision - As the sanctuary was separated from the court by a great veil, the people could not see what passed, but they understood this from Zacharias himself, who, ην διανευων, made signs, or nodded unto them to that purpose. Signs are the only means by which a dumb man can convey his ideas to others.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Had seen a vision - The word “vision” means “sight, appearance,” or “spectre,” and is commonly applied to spirits, or to beings from another world. When he came out of the temple, it is probable that they “suspected” that something of this nature had detained him there, and that, on inquiry of him, he signified by a nod that this was the case. He was unable to speak, and they had no way of “perceiving” it but by such a sign. On the word “vision,” see the notes at Isaiah 1:1.

For he beckoned unto them - That is, by beckoning unto them, or by a sign, he informed them of what he had seen.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And when he came out, he could not speak unto them, and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: and he continued making signs unto them, and remained dumb.

The last clauses in this verse explain the first two. As to the manner of how the people "perceived that he had seen a vision," it is clear that Zacharias communicated with them through the making of signs, an activity that was continued at length by him. Yet he remained a deaf-mute until his son was born.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when he came out, he could not speak unto them,.... Or deliver the benediction they were waiting for:

and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: which he made them to understand, by the gestures he used: for he beckoned unto them; nodding his head, or by some motions of his hands the Ethiopic version adds, "with his hand": or of his lips; for the signs of a dumb man are distinguished into רמיזה, and קפיצה F17Bartenora in Misa. Gittin, c. 5. sect. 7. ; the one is a sign which is expressed by the head and hands; and the other is a sign expressed by the lips: hence that rule,F18Misn. ib. .

"a dumb man beckons, and is beckoned to; and Ben Bethira says, he moves his lips, and lips are moved to him:

and remained speechless; to the time the angel fixed,


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

speechless — dumb, and deaf also (see Luke 1:62).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

22. And when he came out, he could not speak unto them: and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: for he beckoned unto them, and remained speechless.

[He beckoned unto them.] There is also, verse 62, they made signs. The deaf and dumb man, he nods to them, and they nod to him.

The Talmudists distinguish the judgments given by a dumb man into the nodding of the head, and the dumb man's making signs.

"If any person be dumb, and yet hath his understanding, should they say to him, May we write a bill of divorce to thy wife, and he nod with his head, they make the experiment upon him three times," &c. And a little after they do not much rely upon the signs of the deaf and dumb man. For as it is in the same place, the dumb person, and the deaf and dumb, differ. Gloss: "The one can hear and not speak; the other can neither hear nor speak."

Amongst the doctors, the deaf and dumb person is commonly looked upon as one made so by some fit of palsy or apoplexy, by which the intellectuals are generally affected: whence the deaf and dumb are, according to the traditional canons, deprived of several offices and privileges of which others are capable.

This case therefore of Zacharias might have occasioned a considerable question, whether he ought not to have been sequestered from his ministry, and deprived of all the privileges of his priesthood, because he had been struck deaf and dumb, but that it happened to him in so signal and extraordinary a way.


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Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-1.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Perceived (επεγνωσανepegnōsan). Second aorist indicative. Clearly knew because he was not able to pronounce the benediction from the steps (Numbers 6:24-26).

Continued making signs (ην διανευωνēn dianeuōn). Periphrastic imperfect again. He nodded and beckoned back and forth (διαdia between). Further proof of a vision that caused his dumbness.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

They perceived ( ἐπέγνωσαν )

Clearly perceived. See on Matthew 7:16, and Luke 1:4.

He beckoned ( ἦν διανεύων )

Better Rev., continued making signs. Again the participle with the finite verb, denoting frequent repetition of the same signs. Wyc., was beckoning.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

And when he came out, he could not speak unto them1: and they perceived2 that he had seen a vision in the temple3: and he continued making signs unto them, and remained dumb.

  1. And when he came out, he could not speak unto them. Could not dismiss them with the usual blessing (Numbers 6:23-26). Disbelief is always powerless to bless.

  2. And they perceived. Probably by his excited manner.

  3. That he had seen a vision in the temple. The most vivid and objective of all spiritual phenomena (Luke 24:23; Acts 26:19; 2 Corinthians 12:1 Daniel 9:23).


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Beckoned; made signs, indicating that he had seen an extraordinary vision.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-1.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

22 And when he came out, he could not speak unto them: and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: for he beckoned unto them, and remained speechless.

Ver. 22. He could not speak unto them] Hereupon a divine thus descants: Tacuit pater vocis, et cessit in miraculum: Vox si sileat, cedit in contradictionem. Numquid aeque obmutescit pater et filius? Iohannes et Zacharias? Numquid et praeco mutus est? Let us leave to the Papists (saith another) ministrorum muta officia, populi caeca obsequia, their ministers’ dumb offices; their people’s blind obedience.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:22. For he beckoned unto them, He made signs to them. The word Κωφος, rendered speechless, signifies deaf, as well as dumb, the latter being generallythe consequence of the former; and accordingly it is concluded from Luke 1:62 that Zacharias lost his hearing with his speech during that interval.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

22.] They knew, by some excitement, visible in his manner. It was not his office to pronounce the benediction, but that of the other incensing priest; so that his ‘not being able to speak,’ must mean, in answer to the enquiries which his unusual appearance prompted. This answer he gave by a sign: and the question was also by signs; for (see Luke 1:62) he was deaf, as well as dumb, which indeed is the strict meaning of κωφόςοὔτε λαλῶν, οὔτʼ ἀκούων, Hesych(8)


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-1.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 1:22. λαλῆσαι, to speak) for instance, to give the blessing. Zacharias, as being dumb, was in the meantime excluded from the exercise of all the functions of a priest. This constitutes the prelude to the termination of the ceremonial law, now that Christ is coming.— ἐπέγνωσαν, they perceived) A benefit thus accompanied the very punishment of Zacharias. Thereby all were stirred up to attention.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 1:21"


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Beckoned unto them; he showed them by signs that he had seen a vision.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

22. ἐξελθὼν δέ. The moment of the priest’s reappearance from before the ever-burning golden candlestick, and the veil which hid the Holiest Place, was one which powerfully affected the Jewish imagination. See Sirach 50:5-21.

οὐκ ἐδύνατο λαλῆσαι αὐτοῖς. They were waiting in the Court to be dismissed with the usual blessing, which is said to have been generally pronounced by the other priest. Numbers 6:23-26. “Then he” (the High Priest Simon) “went down and lifted up his hands over the whole congregation of the children of Israel, to give the blessing of the Lord with his lips, and to rejoice in His name. And they bowed themselves down to worship the second time, that they might receive a blessing from the Most High.” Sirach 50:20.

ὀπτασίαν. The classical term is ὄψιν. The word is used especially of the most vivid and ‘objective’ appearances, Luke 24:23; Acts 26:19; 2 Corinthians 12:1; Daniel 9:23.

αὐτὸς ἦν διανεύων αὐτοῖς. ‘He himself continued making signs to them.’

διέμενεν κωφός. The word κωφὸς means actual ‘dumbness.’ In Luke 1:20 the angel uses σιωπῶν, because, though Zachariah appeared to the people to be ‘dumb,’ his power of speech was only temporarily arrested. “Credat Judaeus ut loqui possit” (let the Jew believe that he may be able to speak) says St Augustine. Origen, Ambrose, and Isidore, see in the speechless priest vainly endeavouring to bless the people, a fine image of the Law reduced to silence before the first announcement of the Gospel. The scene might stand for an allegorical representation of the thesis so powerfully worked out in the Epistle to the Hebrews (see Hebrews 8:13). Zacharias became dumb, and Saul of Tarsus blind, for a time. “Praeludium legis ceremonialis finiendae Christo veniente.” Bengel.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22. When he came out—From the Holy Place. Zacharias now comes forth, near the Great Altar, and presents himself to the people, viewing him from below in the courts of Israel, and of the women.

They perceived that he had seen a vision—It was customary for a priest to return forthwith from the holy place, so that the people might be sure that no judgment had befallen him for malperformance of office, or for any defect of the service. Zacharias, being speechless, indicated by signs that a divine manifestation had been made to him.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-1.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And when he came out, he could not speak to them, and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple. And he continued making signs to them, and remained dumb.’

And when he did come out they waited expectantly for the priestly blessing (Numbers 6:24-26) which would normally follow the offering of the incense. But it soon became apparent to them that the blessing was not coming. They realised that Zacharias was unable to speak to them, and they gathered that he must have seen a vision in the Temple, for the only way in which he could communicate with them was with signs.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-1.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:22. They perceived. They probably asked why he had remained so long, and at once found that he was both deaf (Luke 1:62) and dumb, as the word ‘speechless’ implies. From this they inferred that he had seen a vision in the temple, which was confirmed by Zacharias himself; for he (on his part, in response) was making signs to them, doubtless trying to hint what had happened. ‘When the voice of the preacher (Isaiah 40) is announced, the priesthood of the Old Testament becomes silent’ (Chemnitz), or can, at best, only make signs.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 1:22. ὀπτασίαν: from his dazed look they inferred that the priest had seen a vision (chap. Luke 24:23, 2 Corinthians 12:1).— διανεύων: making signs all he could do; he could not bless them, e.g., if that was part of his duty for the day, or explain his absence (here only).


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-1.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

speak: i.e. pronounce the usual blessing (Numbers 6:24).

perceived = clearly perceived, or recognised. Greek. epiginosko. App-132.

had seen. Greek. horao. App-133.

beckoned = kept making signs.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when he came out, he could not speak unto them: and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: for he beckoned unto them, and remained speechless.

And when he came out, he could not speak unto them: and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: for he beckoned unto them - by some motion of his hands and eyes, signifying what had happened,

And remained speechless - `mute' [ koofos (Greek #2974)], and deaf also, as appears from Luke 1:62.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

He could not speak to them. This was the sign. They knew he had seen a vision. But Gabriel was not a vision, he had been there in person.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) A vision.—The word is used as distinguished from “dream,” to imply that what had been witnessed had been seen with the waking sense. The look of awe, the strange gestures, the unwonted silence, all showed that he had come under the influence of some supernatural power.

He beckoned unto them.—The tense implies continued and repeated action.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when he came out, he could not speak unto them: and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: for he beckoned unto them, and remained speechless.
for
John 13:24; Acts 12:17; 19:33; 21:40

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

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