Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:19

Behold, I have given you authority to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing will injure you.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Animals;   Charism;   Jesus, the Christ;   Miracles;   Scorpion;   Serpent;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Battle of Life;   Blessings-Afflictions;   Demons;   Disciples;   Enabling Grace;   Endowments;   Evil;   Gifts;   God's;   Limitations of Satan;   Promises, Divine;   Satan;   Satan-Evil Spirits;   Seven;   Spirits, Evil;   Tempted, Promises to;   Victory;   The Topic Concordance - Name;   Power;   Rejoice;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Scorpion, the;   Serpents;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Scorpion;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Authority;   Demon;   Eve;   Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Suffering;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Exorcist;   Scorpions;   Serpent;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Exorcism;   Satan;   Scorpion;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Devil;   Disciples;   Luke, Gospel of;   Serpent;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Devil;   Jesus Christ;   Martha;   Mary;   Medicine;   Scorpion;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Animals;   Demon, Demoniacal Possession, Demoniacs;   Discourse;   Locust ;   Love (2);   Man (2);   Mental Characteristics;   Miracles;   Organization (2);   Psalms (2);   Sacrifice (2);   Satan (2);   Scorpion ;   Scorpion (2);   Serpent;   Seventy (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Scorpion,;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Scorpion;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Exorcist,;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Scorpion;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Authority in Religion;   Hurt;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Scorpion;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Satan;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for October 28;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

To tread on serpents, etc. - It is possible that by serpents and scorpions our Lord means the scribes and Pharisees, whom he calls serpents and a brood of vipers, Matthew 23:33, (see the note there), because, through the subtilty and venom of the old serpent, the devil, they opposed him and his doctrine; and, by trampling on these, it is likely that he means, they should get a complete victory over such: as it was an ancient custom to trample on the kings and generals who had been taken in battle, to signify the complete conquest which had been gained over them. See Joshua 10:24. See also Romans 16:20. See the notes on Mark 16:17, Mark 16:18.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

To tread on serpents - Preservation from danger. If you tread on a poisonous reptile that would otherwise injure you, I will keep you from danger. If you go among bitter and malignant enemies that would seek your life, I will preserve you. See the notes at Mark 16:18.

Scorpions - The scorpion is an animal with eight feet, eight eyes and a long jointed tail, ending in a pointed weapon or sting. It is found in tropical climates, and seldom exceeds 4 inches in length. Its sting is extremely poisonous, and it is sometimes fatal to life. It is in Scripture the emblem of malicious and crafty men. When rolled up it has some resemblance to an egg, Luke 11:12; Ezekiel 2:6. The annexed cut will give an idea of its usual form and appearance.

The enemy - Satan. The meaning of this verse is, that Jesus would preserve them from the power of Satan and all his emissaries - from all wicked and crafty men; and this shows that he had divine power. He that can control Satan and his hosts that can be present to guard from all their machinations, see all their plans, and destroy all their designs, must be clothed with no less than almighty power.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Behold, I have given you authority to tread upon serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall in any wise hurt you.

Tread upon serpents ... This was not an inducement to snake-handling, either for the seventy or to the Christians of all ages, but rather an affirmation of God's providence as exerted upon behalf of his servants in all generations. The symbolical meaning of "serpents and scorpions" is primarily "the works of the devil." The key to this verse is the last clause, "nothing shall in any wise hurt you." This is equivalent to the promise in the great commission. "Lo, I am with you always" (Matthew 28:20). Any presumption on the part of God's children is not to be grounded in these promises. While it is true that the apostles and prophets of the New Testament did actually take up poisonous serpents and were bitten without harm (Acts 28:5), there is utterly no example where any person ever did such things on purpose and presumptuously.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, I give you power to tread on serpents and scorpions,.... Which may be literally understood, as in Mark 16:18, or figuratively of the devil, and his principalities and powers, and all his emissaries, who, for their craft and cunning, and for their poisonous and hurtful nature and influence, may be compared to serpents and scorpions:

and over all the power of the enemy; of mankind in general, and of the seed of the woman, Christ and his people in particular, Christ has a power over all his power, his whole posse of devils, even the power of the air, of which he is prince; and he communicated this power to his disciples, even to the seventy: adding,

and nothing shall by any means, hurt you; not the most hurtful and poisonous animals, nor the most malicious persecutors on earth, nor all the devils in hell: as the former venomous creatures, when took up in their hands, should not hurt, their bodies; so the other, whatever they might be permitted to do with respect to their lives, and outward estate, should never hurt their souls, and the eternal welfare of them; nor even hinder the work of God prospering in their hands.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means g hurt you.

(g) Will do you wrong.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-10.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Behold, I give you, etc. — not for any renewal of their mission, though probably many of them afterwards became ministers of Christ; but simply as disciples.

serpents and scorpions — the latter more venomous than the former: literally, in the first instance (Mark 16:17, Mark 16:18; Acts 28:5); but the next words, “and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall by any means hurt you,” show that the glorious power of faith to “overcome the world” and “quench all the fiery darts of the wicked one,” by the communication and maintenance of which to His people He makes them innocuous, is what is meant (1 John 5:4; Ephesians 6:16).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

And over all the power of the enemy (και επι πασαν την δυναμιν του εχτρουkai epi pāsan tēn dunamin tou echthrou). This is the heart of “the authority” (την εχουσιανtēn exousian) here given by Jesus which is far beyond their expectations. The victory over demons was one phase of it. The power to tread upon serpents is repeated in Mark 16:18 (the Appendix) and exemplified in Paul‘s case in Malta (Acts 28:3-5). But protection from physical harm is not the main point in this struggle with Satan “the enemy” (Matthew 13:25; Romans 16:20; 1 Peter 5:8).

Nothing shall in any wise hurt you (ουδεν υμας ου μη αδικησειouden humās ou mē adikēsei). Text has future active indicative, while some MSS. read αδικησηιadikēsēi aorist active subjunctive of αδικεωadikeō common verb from αδικοςadikos (αa privative and δικοςdikos), to suffer wrong, to do wrong. The triple negative here is very strong. Certainly Jesus does not mean this promise to create presumption or foolhardiness for he repelled the enemy‘s suggestion on the pinnacle of the temple.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.

I give you power — That is, I continue it to you: and nothing shall hurt you - Neither the power, nor the subtilty of Satan.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Behold, I have given you authority to tread upon serpents and scorpions1, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall in any wise hurt you.

  1. I have given you authority to tread upon serpents and scorpions. While the messengers of Christ were, no doubt, literally protected from the poisons of reptiles, etc. (Acts 28:3-6), serpent and scorpions are here to be taken an emblematic of the powers of evil.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

19 Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.

Ver. 19. To tread on serpents] {See Trapp on "Mark 16:18"} Good ministers tread so hard on the old serpent’s head, that it is no wonder he turns again, and nibbleth at their heels.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 10:19. Behold, I give unto you power, &c.— To tread on serpents is a proverbial expression, which signifies victory over enemies; accordingly, it is added, and over all the power of the enemy. Though these words, in the primary sense, imply, that the apostles should be preserved from these noxious creatures, as one of them literally was, (compare Acts 28:5 and Mark 16:18.) yet they seem to have likewise a secondary sense, and to be a prediction that the disciples should obtain a completevictory over the infernal spirits in general; the devil himself being frequently mentioned in scripture, in allusion to the fall, under the appellation of the old serpent. If we consider how great an instrument of idolatry the serpent has been in all ages, it will add some weight to this opinion. There is no need to prove the fact; it is well known what the case was in Egypt, in the eastern countries, in Greece and Rome, and elsewhere. This species of idolatry, however it came there, was found in America, upon the first discovery of that country. Garcilasco del' Viga, who wrote the History of the Incas of Peru, tells what the Spaniards forcing into the recess of one of their temples, found there the image of a great dragon, placed as the deity of the temple, and the object ofreligious worship. Other instances in abundance might be produced, from ancient as well as modern history. When we reflect how extensive this kind of idolatry has been, how it has spread over the whole world, we may judge, perhaps, that the first prophesy has been more literally accomplished than has been generally supposed; and that the old serpent, in his old form with his seed, and the Son of man, the seed of the woman, have been in perfect enmity, and will be, till the time appointed comes for destroying the power of the evil one; when the dragon, that old serpent, which is the devil and Satan, shall be cast into, and confined for ever in the lake of fire and brimstone. See the notes on Genesis 3.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-10.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our Lord, finding that his seventy ambassadors had managed their former commission so well, he here enlarged it, adding there unto a promise of divine protection: Behold I give you power to tread on serpents, and nothing shall hurt you; as if Christ had said, "Go forth again in this armor of power, with which I have girt you, and I warrant you sword-free and shot-free; nothing shall by any means hurt you, neither strength nor stratagem shall overcome you. Neither the power, the presence, nor protection, of God, shall be wanting to any of Christ's ministers, or members, who go forth in his strength against the spiritual enemies of their salvation."

As we have a promise of power in this text to enable us to resist the devil, so we have a promise of success elsewhere upon our resisting him: Resist the devil and he will flee from you, James 4:7

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-10.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

19.] Our Lord here,—including all the evil and poison in nature in the δύναμις τοῦ ἐχθ.,—from the power given Him over that enemy, asserts the gift to them, extended afterwards to all believers (Mark 16:18), of authority to ‘bruise the head of the serpent’ (Genesis 3:15). There is an evident allusion to Psalms 91:13.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-10.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:19. δίδωμι) As I have given, so in continuation I give.— ὄφεων, serpents) Mark 16:18. An appellation appropriate to an earthly enemy: He no longer alludes to the enemy descending “from heaven,” as in the image, as lightning. The passage, Acts 28:3, et seqq., is parallel to Mark 16:18; but between Mark and Luke (the Gospel) there is a verbal parallelism, yet one not of the things themselves, but of the names.(97) Believers were secured against serpents, called so both in the literal and metaphorical sense.— σκορπίων, scorpions) which are more subtle (keen, or else more minute) than serpents.— δὐναμιν) power, or, צבא, forces. Serpents and scorpions are the species: All the power is the genus.— τοῦ ἐχθροῦ, of the enemy) The singular number, applying to the chief enemy [Matthew 13:39; Psalms 8:3].— οὐ ΄ὴ ἀδικήσῃ, shall not hurt) Greater danger was lying hidden beneath, than the inexperienced had been sensible of.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Christ doth here:

1. Confirm the power before given to these seventy for working miracles, that they might not think that it ceased upon the determination of their first mission.

2. He confirmeth his promise to them for his presence with them, and protection of them.

Interpreters think here is a manifest allusion to Psalms 91:13, Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under thy feet: which must be understood figuratively, the sense being, that nothing should hurt them. This promise was more specially verified for some years in God’s protection of time first ministers of the gospel, until they had done their work; and shall be fulfilled in a sense to the end of the world, according to the promise in Psalms 91:13. Nothing shall hurt their souls, as to the favour of God and their eternal happiness, nor their bodies, so far forth as, or so long as, God in his wisdom shall judge fit. They have a further power also given them more common to all the ministers of the gospel sent by Christ, yea, and to all Christians. They have a power over all the power of the enemy; God will not be wanting to them in a power to resist the devil, and they have a promise that, being resisted, he shall flee from them.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

на змей и скорпионов Ср. Пс. 90:13; Иез. 2:6. По-видимому, это метафорические названия для бесовских сил (ср. Рим. 16:20).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-10.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

To tread on serpents and scorpions; to tread on literal serpents and scorpions without harm, and to overcome wicked men, who are like serpents and scorpions in character.

Nothing shall by any means hurt you; the chief reference of these words is to the spiritual victory which Christ gives his servants over all evil, of which the outward deliverances sometimes vouchsafed to them in this world are symbols and pledges. Compare Romans 8:28; Romans 8:37. Christ is able to give his ministers all the aid which they need for the discharge of their duties. In his name and strength they may commence their work, and go on from conquering to conquer, till every knee shall bow, and every tongue confess that he is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19.Behold I give—The perfect tense, I have given. The Greek perfect signifies a past act whose effect remains. I have given and the gift still remains. The gift was imparted in the first bestowment of their symbolical office, as one of its significant points. It was probably to cease with their office, though this may not be so certain. The same promise was made even to private believers in Mark 16:18, on which see our note.

Power to tread on serpents and scorpions—And as the casting out of demons by the Seventy, and the fall of Satan, which Christ saw, were both actual and physical realities, so was this treading on serpents and scorpions an actual and physical reality. The Seventy during their mission should find a superiority to reptile venom one of their miraculous gifts, as did Paul at Melita. Acts 28:5. But all three of these realities were symbols of the spiritual. They were the type of the final

bruising of the serpent’s head. All the power of the enemy—It is not sin which has produced physical evil in the world; for evil, accident, and death existed on earth, as geology shows, before Adam sinned. But sin excluded man from access to the tree of life, from which he had been immortal, and thus sin established that relation of the body and mind of man towards external nature, as that disease and death ensue. Sin, therefore, constitutes to man the power of the serpent’s venom and the scorpion’s sting. Christ here promises to these his followers some faint restoration of the Adamic superiority to the power of the enemy.

The enemy—The chief and first old Serpent; the Satan of Luke 10:18, by whose first hostility all other venomous things are poisonous to man.

Hurt you—This promise of miraculous power should doubtless be limited by the laws of miracle and faith, as defined in our note on Matthew 17:20.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Behold, I have given you authority to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing will in any way hurt you.”

The result of Satan’s fall, whether seen as actually having happened or as potential, is that those who are in the Kingly Rule of God have authority over all his minions who can be trodden underfoot, for Jesus has given His ambassadors authority over them. And this is what they have been engaged in. There is here a glance towards Genesis 3:15 where the curse on the Serpent was to result in the bruising of his head by man as he himself struck at man’s heel. This bruising was now in process (and would continue - Romans 16:20) . The evil spirits which are symbolised as serpents and scorpions can do no harm to those sheltered under the authority of Jesus who can tread on them with impunity. Even their heels are not vulnerable. They will find this guaranteed by the fact that physical serpents and scorpions will be unable to hurt them as well (compare Mark 16:18), but this last is secondary, it is but a symbol of the real thing. For the idea of treading on serpents compare Psalms 91:13. Because they are within God’s Kingly Rule serpents have become their plaything (Isaiah 11:8).

‘The power (dunamis) of the Enemy.’ That is, the power of Satan and all the forces of evil. Though they may have to battle with him (Ephesians 6:12) those who are truly in Christ need fear nothing of him, for Christ is with them. While Satan has may have a certain ‘power’ (dunamis) Jesus has total authority over him (exousia), and He has given it to His own.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The power that Jesus had given the Seventy to escape injury symbolized their ability to overcome Satan and His demons spiritually (cf. Revelation 12:13-17). Thus the connection with the previous verse is clear. Jesus probably referred to snakes and scorpions because they represented these spiritual foes (cf. Genesis 3:15). In other words, we should probably take His words figuratively rather than literally. This was evidently a special protection that Jesus gave His disciples during this mission. Jesus may have given it again to His disciples following His resurrection (cf. Mark 16:18). This verse is in the debated long ending of Mark"s Gospel. However, that protection apparently lasted only a short time (cf. Acts 28:1-6). Jesus" disciples since then have experienced injury, so it was evidently a limited provision in view of the unique ministry of Jesus" original disciples and apostles. Even during the apostolic age many disciples did not escape injury or death ( Acts 7:60; Acts 12:2; 2 Timothy 4:20).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:19. I have given. The correct reading expresses an abiding fact. The Lord augments by a new promise the joy He has just confirmed.

Authority, delegated power here.

To tread on serpents and scorpions. The promise is doubtless literal, so far as necessary to manifest higher spiritual power. In view of the connection we must accept an allusion to Genesis 3:15 : ‘bruise the head of the serpent,’ and perhaps to Psalms 91:13 also.

Over all the power of the enemy, i.e., Satan. What precedes also, as the original indicates, belongs to ‘the power of the enemy.’

In any wise injure you, though apparent hurt may come.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:19 reminds one of Mark 16:18.— , the enemy, Satan.— , may be either nominative or accusative = either, “nothing shall in any wise hurt you,” R. V[101], or “in no respect shall he (the enemy) hurt you”.

[101] Revised Version.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Given you power, &c. By these words our Saviour seems to insinuate, that the venom of serpents, and the other noxious qualities of some animals, proceed from the malice of the devil. These are the arms and the instruments he makes us of to kill us, being the prince of death and a murderer from the beginning, as the Scripture styles him. The Jews attributed sickness, poisons, and every thing of the same kind to evil spirits.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

I give = I have given. So L m T Tr. A WH R.

power = authority. Greek. exousia. App-172.

on. Greek. epano, upon (from above). Not the sameword as in verses: Luke 34:35, Luke 34:37.

over = upon. Greek. epi. App-104.

power = might. Greek. dunamis. App-172.

nothing . . . by any means. Greek. ouden. ., ou me. App-105.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.

Behold, I give unto you - not with a view to the renewal of their mission, though probably many of them afterward became ministers of Christ, but simply as disciples.

Power to tread on serpents and scorpions - the latter more venomous than the former. This was to be literally fulfilled at the first starting of the Gospel ministry (Mark 16:17-18; Acts 28:5). But the following words,

And over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you - show that what is meant is the glorious power of faith to "overcome the world" and "quench all the fiery darts of the wicked one," by the communication and maintenance of which to His people He makes them innocuous (1 John 5:4; Ephesians 6:16).

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) Behold, I give unto you . . .—The better MSS. have, “I have given,” as of something already bestowed in its completeness. In the power to “tread on serpents and scorpions,” we have a manifest reference to the words of Psalms 91:13. Those words stand in closest sequence with the promise which had been wrested from its true meaning by the Tempter in the great struggle in the wilderness; and it is not over-bold to think that they were connected with our Lord’s memories of that time, and especially of the fact indicated by St. Mark’s statement (Mark 1:13) that He “was with the wild beasts.” Now, through resistance to the Temptation, there had come the victory which if He had then yielded, never would have been won. Of a literal fulfilment of the words, St. Paul’s escape from the viper at Melita (Acts 28:3) is the only recorded instance; but the parallelism between this promise and that of Psalms 91:13 shows that the literal meaning falls into the background, that the serpent and the scorpion are symbols of spiritual powers of evil. A merely literal interpretation lands us in two serious difficulties: (1) that it represents the treading on serpents as a greater work than casting out demons; and (2) that it implies that serpents and scorpions, as such, are not part of God’s creation, but belong to the power of the Evil One. So far as we think of a literal fulfilment at all, it can only be as the symbol and earnest of the spiritual. The real kernel of the promise lies in the last words, “Nothing shall by any means hurt you,” and these find their interpretation in the thought that “nothing shall separate us from the love of God,” and that “all things work together for good to those that love Him” (Romans 8:39; Romans 8:28).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.
I give
Psalms 91:13; Isaiah 11:8; Ezekiel 2:6; Mark 16:18; Acts 28:5; Romans 16:20
and nothing
21:17,18; Romans 8:31-39; Hebrews 13:5,6; Revelation 11:5
Reciprocal: Genesis 3:15 - enmity;  Exodus 4:4 - put forth;  Exodus 7:10 - it became;  Numbers 23:23 - no enchantment;  2 Chronicles 10:11 - scorpions;  Isaiah 26:6 - GeneralMatthew 10:1 - he gave;  Luke 9:1 - gave;  Luke 11:12 - a scorpion;  Luke 15:24 - they;  Acts 1:8 - ye shall;  2 Timothy 1:7 - but;  Hebrews 6:4 - and have;  Revelation 9:3 - as

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19.Lo, I give you power. This is said by way of admission. Christ does not affirm that the gift of which they now boast is not illustrious, but reminds them, that they ought to keep their eye chiefly on something loftier still, and not remain satisfied with outward miracles. He does not altogether condemn their joy, as if it were groundless, but shows it to be faulty in this respect, that they were immoderately delighted with a temporal favor, and did not elevate their minds higher. To this disease even the godly are almost all liable. Though the goodness of God is received by them with gratitude, yet the acts of the Divine kindness do not assist them, as they ought to do, by becoming ladders for ascending to heaven. This makes it necessary that the Lord should, as it were, stretch out his hand to raise them up, that they may not rest satisfied with the earth, but may aspire to heavenly renovation. The power of the enemy is the name given by him to every kind of annoyance; for all that is hostile to us is wielded against us by Satan. I do not mean that every thing which tends to injure men is placed at his disposal; but that, being armed with the curse of God, he endeavors to turn to our destruction all his chastisements, and seizes them as weapons for the purpose of wounding us.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-10.html. 1840-57.