Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:24

for I say to you, that many prophets and kings wished to see the things which you see, and did not see them, and to hear the things which you hear, and did not hear them."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Gospel;   Jesus, the Christ;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Salutations;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Mystery;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Kingdom of God;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Disciples;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Martha;   Mary;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Consciousness;   Desire;   Discourse;   Foresight;   Hearing;   Mental Characteristics;   Mission;   Nunc Dimittis ;   Religion (2);   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Teaching of Jesus;   Trinity (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Many prophets - See on Matthew 13:11, Matthew 13:17; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For I tell you that many prophets and kings,.... As Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, who were prophets, as well as patriarchs, and David, Solomon, and others:

have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them, and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them, meaning himself, doctrines, and miracles; See Gill on Matthew 13:17.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Which ye see (α υμεις βλεπετεha humeis blepete). The expression of υμειςhumeis makes “ye” very emphatic in contrast with the prophets and kings of former days.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

for I say unto you, that many prophets and kings desired to see the things which ye see1, and saw them not; and to hear the things which ye hear, and heard them not.

  1. Many prophets and kings desired to see the things which ye see, etc. See .

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

24 For I tell you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them.

Ver. 24. Many prophets and kings] Many righteous, saith Matthew, Matthew 13:17. Righteous persons are kings.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

24. προφ. κ. βασ.] David united both these, also Solomon. There may be an especial reference to the affecting last words of David, 2 Samuel 23:1-5, which certainly are a prophecy of the Redeemer, and in which he says, Luke 10:5, “This is all my salvation, and all my desire, though he make it not to grow:”—see also Genesis 49:18.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-10.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:24. προφῆται καὶ βασιλεῖς, prophets and kings) who were otherwise highly blessed. An example of both is furnished in Abraham, who was at once a prophet and prince: Genesis 23:6; Genesis 20:7 : so also David, who was both a prophet and a king, and the father of so many kings.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 10:23"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24.Prophets—As Moses, Isaiah, and Daniel.

Kings—As David, Josiah, and Hezekiah.

The SEVENTY, as being a temporary symbol, now recede forever from view. Their collective name has not been recorded in later apostolic history; but their individual names were written in heaven, and the fulfilment of the predictions they symbolized is now taking place on earth. By consulting the Harmony, at page 101, it will be seen that after “the return of the Seventy,” which followed the Feast of Tabernacles, Jesus “prosecutes a ministry in Judea” until the Feast of Dedication. In what section of Judea this ministry was prosecuted we are not informed, as Luke gives no notice of place. But as we know from other evangelists that the residence of the sisters of Lazarus was in Bethany, so we may infer that Eastern Judea, lying between Jerusalem and the Jordan, was the region of the whole period.

This entire period, extending from the Feast of Tabernacles to the Feast of Dedication, terminates at Luke 13:21. Though the contents are not equally striking with the lessons of the Peraean ministry, (Luke 13:23 to Luke 17:10,) this period contains some brilliant gems of divine wisdom. Beginning with the memorable parable of the Good Samaritan, (25-37,) we have next the home in Bethany, (38-42,) the establishment of the Lord’s Prayer as a permanent heritage, (Luke 11:1-13,) the sermon to the myriads, with its appendix, (Luke 12:1 to Luke 13:9.)

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“For I say to you, that many prophets and kings desired to see the things which you see, and did not see them, and to hear the things which you hear, and did not hear them.”

This was something that many wise men of understanding, many prophets and kings, have desired to see, and have not seen it, have desired to hear and have not heard it (compare 1 Peter 1:10-12; Isaiah 52:15). They saw it in part but they could not know. But they, the disciples, have heard it and seen it and are therefore truly blessed. This is therefore what they should primarily rejoice in. Note the introduction of the idea of ‘hearing’. Hearing His words is constantly central in Jesus thinking. Having ‘seen’ Him as the beloved Son they must hear Him in His role as the introducer of the last days, of the acceptable year of the Lord (Luke 4:19), as the revealer of the mind of God.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The prophets typically looked forward to the fulfillment of the things that they predicted ( 1 Peter 1:10-12). Kings probably represent the most important people of their day. Even they, with all their advantages, could not see and hear what Jesus" humble disciples could. What they saw was the signs of the advent of Messiah, and what they heard was the good news that the kingdom was at hand.

Jesus" teaching in this pericope glorified the privilege of being a disciple of His. Too often the responsibilities of discipleship make following Jesus appear very threatening and unattractive, but the rewards of discipleship far outweigh its costs (cf. Romans 8:18). In view of this Revelation, disciples of Jesus should feel encouraged to participate wholeheartedly and fully in God"s mission for them. For us that means participation in the execution of the Great Commission ( Luke 24:44-49).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

tell you = say to you.

prophets. Abraham (Genesis 20:7; Genesis 23:6), Jacob (Genesis 49:18; App-36), &c.

kings. David (2 Samuel 23:1-5).

desired. Greek. thelo. App-102.

see. Greek. eidon. App-133.

not. Greek. ou. App-105.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) Many prophets and kings. . . .—There is a slight verbal difference here as compared with St. Matthew’s report, which gives “prophets and righteous men.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For I tell you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them.
many
John 8:56; Hebrews 11:13,39; 1 Peter 1:10,11
Reciprocal: Song of Solomon 8:1 - that thou;  Isaiah 29:14 - for the wisdom;  Jeremiah 33:14 - GeneralMalachi 1:5 - your;  Matthew 13:16 - GeneralMatthew 13:17 - That many;  Matthew 16:17 - Blessed;  Luke 4:21 - This day;  Luke 7:28 - but;  Romans 16:25 - which;  Galatians 3:23 - the faith;  Ephesians 3:5 - in other

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 10:24.Many Prophets and Kings have desired to see. The condition of the Church, at the present day, is justly pronounced to be preferable to that of the holy fathers, who lived under the Law; because to them was exhibited, under shadows and figures only, what is now openly manifested in the shining face of Christ. The vail of the temple being rent, (Matthew 27:51,) we enter by faith into the heavenly sanctuary, and are freely permitted to approach to God. Although the fathers were satisfied with their lot, and enjoyed a blessed peace in their own minds, yet this did not prevent their desires from extending farther. Thus, Abraham saw the day of Christ afar off, and rejoice, (John 8:56,) and yet longed to enjoy a nearer view, but did not obtain his wish. Simeon spoke the sentiments of all, (191) when he said, Now thou sendest thy servant away in peace, (Luke 2:29.) And indeed it was impossible that, under the burden of that curse by which the human race is crushed, they should be otherwise than altogether inflamed with the desire of a promised deliverance. (192) Let us therefore learn, that they breathed after Christ, like hungry persons, and yet possessed a serene faith; so that they did not murmur against God, but kept their minds in patient expectation till the full time of revelation.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-10.html. 1840-57.