Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:25

And a lawyer stood up and put Him to the test, saying, "Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Decalogue;   Deception;   Duty;   Immortality;   Jesus, the Christ;   Lawyer;   Love;   Neighbor;   Readings, Select;   Self-Righteousness;   Works;   Scofield Reference Index - Life;   Thompson Chain Reference - Lawyers;   Tried, Christ;   The Topic Concordance - Commandment;   Eternal Life;   Inheritance;   Law;   Life;   Love;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Self-Righteousness;   Temptation;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Lawyers;   Tempt;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Law;   Levite;   Rabbi;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Clean, Unclean;   Friend, Friendship;   Golden Rule;   Mercy;   Neighbor;   Wealth;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Lawyer;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jericho;   Scribes;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Acceptance;   Brotherly Love;   Life;   Love;   Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Ethics;   Law;   Martha;   Mary;   Pity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Character;   Commandments;   Discourse;   Eternal Life (2);   Ethics (2);   Goodness;   Heir Heritage Inheritance;   Immortality (2);   Lawyer ;   Lots;   Man (2);   Nation (2);   Neighbour (2);   Patience ;   Religious Experience;   Salvation Save Saviour;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Samaritan, the Good ;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Temptation;   Trinity (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Lawyer;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethsaida;   Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Lawyers;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Gospels, the Synoptic;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Law in the New Testament;   Lawyer;   Neighbor;   Righteousness;   Scribes;   Zenas;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Brotherly Love;   Jesus of Nazareth;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for May 19;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

A certain lawyer - See on Matthew 22:35; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A certain lawyer - One who professed to be well skilled in the laws of Moses, and whose business it was to explain them.

Stood up - Rose - came forward to address him.

Tempted him - Feigned a desire to be instructed, but did it to perplex him, or to lead him, if possible, to contradict some of the maxims of the law.

Inherit eternal life - Be saved. This was the common inquiry among the Jews. “They” had said that man must keep the commandments - the written and oral law.

Copyright Statement
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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 10:25

Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?
--

The lawyer’s question

The question of the lawyer is the question of the human heart everywhere. You will find it asked and answered in all the world’s religions. The answers fall into two classes.

1. One set of replies thinks of the better life as a thing external to a man’s own being, procurable by something that a man can do, by bodily self-denial or suffering, or by religious rites or ceremonies.

2. The other class of answers amounts to this--that nothing that is merely outside a man or comes to him from without can ever meet his wants. The true ideal life of humanity is in its very essence a life; it is not doing, it is being. The orthodox doctrine in Christ’s time taught very definitely what was the pathway to eternal life. The religious teachers laid it down that the life God wants men to live was a life of obedience to the law of Moses. The preaching of Jesus Christ did not quite tally with the orthodox teaching of the time. The Pharisee and the penitent, the harlots and publicans, were distinctly conscious that Christ was preaching a new gospel. The gospel of the Pharisees was orthodox; therefore the gospel of Christ was heresy. They were bent upon getting a case against Him, and yet it was not easy. Be Himself fulfilled the law, conformed to all its requirements and statutes, and never spoke disrespectfully of it. How were they to catch Him? One day a crafty lawyer had a very happy thought. He determined to cross-question Christ, to force Him to declare His inner hostility to the creed of the Pharisees, His inner antagonism to the law of God: “What shall I do to inherit eternal life?” A fair, honest question, and yet in the very wording of it the note of discord comes out. Jesus is confronted with a man whose notion of eternal life is utterly different from His. It is impossible to answer that man. Instead of answering, Jesus turns questioner. He must bring out the man’s own notions, and then, when He has got them, it may be possible to show him how threadbare, how poverty-stricken, how wrong they are. “What do you find in the law? How readest thou?” The lawyer, taken aback, gives the regulation reply. He could not repeat the whole law, but there was a summary of it, a standing condensed statement of it, and this he repeats to Jesus: “Thou shalt love … ’” Now, what have we to say to that answer? Is this the pathway to eternal life? What more could a man do to make the music of his life majestic, heavenly, splendid? Loving God utterly, and loving all men as you love yourself--no doubt that is life eternal. The scribe’s answer is the true answer; yet in the scribe’s mouth it was an utter lie, and a damning heresy, that was sending men’s souls to ruin. Christ could accept the definition of the lawyer. “Thou hast answered right.” But then the meaning that He felt in those words was a meaning utterly different from that of the Pharisee; and there you have the explanation of His preaching. He took the very same text that the scribes took, but what a different sermon He preached from it, and what a different application against theirs! He did not say

“Obey”; He said the word that must come before obey: He said “Love.” The least bit of love will do more to make you keep the commandments than any amount of studying them, or any amount of selfish resolve to make a good thing out of the commandments for yourself. The essence of the Pharisee’s gospel was selfishness. Save yourself by keeping on the right side, and not giving God a chance against you. What a God, and what a soul! I think that Jesus, as soon as the scribe had given his reply, looked him straight in the face. The look meant, “Dare you pretend that you do that?” and the man felt it, and therefore, we read, was eager-to justify himself. The man’s conscience was uneasy. He instantly said, “Yes, but who is my neighbour?” It is where the heart is cold that definitions come in. “Who is my neighbour? How many men can claim love from me?” said the scribe. Christ did not answer that, but He made a picture in order to ask the scribe this question, “Who is the man who plays the neighbour’s part?” He told of a man who started from Jerusalem to go to Jericho, and was attacked on the way by thieves, who certainly did not play the part of neighbour by him. There came on the road a priest and a Levite. Christ had not that foolish idea that the clergy should never be held up to rebuke or scorn when they deserve it. Do not misjudge the priest and the Levite. You say they did a heartless thing. They did not; they had not heart to do it. Their sin was not in not doing something, but in being heartless. That is the very point of the story. And if you had met these men after hearing of it, and had asked them how they could do such a thing, they would have assured you that they did not see any man like that. They would have told you that they saw a man who had been fighting, or who had got drunk, or who was an impostor. Or they would have told you they were going to a religious service at Jericho, and had not the time for it. All we can say of them is that they had not heart. And Christ paints the other side of it. There came along a Samaritan, a man of a different religion, a man who had been taught of the Jews that he owed them no kindness. He appeared to be a business man, and probably it would be more to him to lose his market than to the clergy to be late for the religious service. He saw the man, and he saw the first passer-by that had seen him; he saw the wretchedness of it--and he had a heart, and that is all. He did not say,” Is there anything in the Decalogue bearing on this?” And he certainly did not say, “Is that man a neighbour? He is a Jew. Where does he come from?” If he had begun going to the law, he would never have done it. And now, mark how the story has answered the question. As soon as it is finished Christ turns to the scribe, and asks, “Who played the neighbour’s part?” Not the priest, not the scribe, not his own fellow-countrymen. It was that Samaritan.

Nobody could deny it. Even the lawyer acknowledges it. That was a beautiful thing to do, and Christ drove it home with the rejoinder, “Go thou and do likswise”; and He sent that man away saying to himself, “No amount of reading the law would ever make me able to do that; more than that, my reading of the law must be all wrong.” Christ had made that man understand that what he wanted was the real love of the real, living, loving God, and the real, common human love to his fellow-men. Where have you and I to learn that love for God and love for man? I will tell you. At the feet of Christ, and by His side, in fellowship with Him, we shall learn to love God with all our heart, and soul, and mind, and strength, and our neigh-bout as ourself; and that is eternal life. (Professor Elmslie, M. A.)

Inheriting eternal life

1. You will observe that the man who asked this question was a lawyer, a man of education and of good standing; a man, therefore, from whom good behaviour and reverence of spirit might reasonably have been expected. You would think that when such a man spoke he would speak soberly, he would mean, under such circumstances, exactly what he said. You find, however, that the inquiry--the very greatest that can possibly engage human attention--was put in a spirit of temptation. The lawyer was not an earnest man. He asked a right question, but he asked it in a wrong spirit. See, then, the possibility of asking religious questions irreligiously. Learn the possibility of asking great questions in a merely controversial spirit, without any profoundly anxious desire to know the answer that God will return to such inquiries. God understands the irony of our attitude. The Living One knows whether we are hungering and thirsting for Him; He can see through our hypocrisies and concealments, and only into the broken heart and the contrite spirit will He come with redemption and life and helpfulness and grace. So that at the very beginning there is to be no mistake about this. We know the conditions upon which alone we receive the revelations of God--that we be quiet, self.renouncing, reverent, sober, anxious about the business; and wherever these conditions are forthcoming, some light will be flashed upon the life, and some healing word will be dropped into the sorrow of the heart.

2. Jesus Himself answered one question by asking another; and so He not unfrequently disappointed men who had undertaken to ensnare Him in His speech. They thought that if they did but put a case to Him He would instantly commit Himself, and they would entrap Him and take Him captive, and make a fool of Him. Here is a man probably accustomed to put questions, and to put questions again upon the answers that are given, and so to cross-examine those with whom he came in contact. Jesus undertakes to deal with him according to the spirit which he presents; and before He lets him go He will show what the man’s meaning is and his nature, and He will expose him as he never was exposed before. Thus quietly He begins: “What is written in the law? Thou art a lawyer, a man of reading, a man of many letters, and of much understanding probably--how readest thou?” God has never left the greatest questions of the human heart unanswered. The great answer to this question about eternal life was not given first of all by Jesus Christ as He appeared in the flesh. Jesus Himself referred to the oldest record; inferentially He said--That question has been answered from the beginning; go back to the very first revelation and testimony of God, and you Will find the answer there. Yet the question is put very significantly: “How readest thou?” There are two ways of reading. There is a way of reading the letter which never gets at the meaning of the spirit. There is a way of reading which merely looks at the letter for a partial purpose, or that a prejudice may be sustained or defended. And there is a way of reading which means, I want to know the truth; I want to see really how this case stands; I am determined to see it. He who reads so will find no end to his lesson, for truth expands and brightens as we study her revelations and her purposes. He who comes merely to the letter will get but a superficial answer in all probability. It was, therefore, of the highest importance that the lawyer should tell how he had been reading the law.

3. The lawyer, please to remember, knew the answer when he asked the question. He said, “What shall I do to inherit eternal life?” and all the time the answer was in his own recollection had he but known it. Alas I we do not always turn our knowledge into wisdom. We know the fact, and we hardly ever sublimate the fact into truth. We know the law, and we fail to see that under the law there is the beauty and there is the grace of the gospel.

4. “This do,” said Jesus, “and thou shalt live.” What had the lawyer to do? To love the Lord his God with all his heart and with all his soul and with all his strength and with all his mind. Love is life. Only he who loves lives. Only love can get out of a man the deepest secrets of his being and develop the latent energies of his nature and call him up to the highest possibility of his manhood. Criticism never can do it; theology never can do it; power of controversy never can do it. We are ourselves, in all the volume of our capacity, and in all the relations of our original creation, only when life becomes love and our whole nature burns with affection towards the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Let us look less at our knowledge and our intellectual capability and our training and our circumstances, and more at the degree of our religious love. The end of the commandment is charity; the summing up of all true law is love. Do we, then, know this mystery of religious love? or is ours a religion that hangs itself upon the outward letter and the ceremonial form? Then observe that the law goes still further than love to God, it includes love to one’s neighbour. Hear the exact expression of the text--“And thy neighbour as thyself.” Love of God means love of man. Religion is the Divine side of philanthropy; philanthropy is the practical side of religion. We must first be right with God or we never can be right with man.

5. Was the lawyer satisfied? Read: “But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neigbbour?” It was the question of a sharp man, but not the inquiry of an honest one. Such a question as this does not need to be answered in words. Every man knows in his own heart who his neighbour is; and only he who wishes to play a trick in words, to show how clever he is in verbal legerdemain, will stoop to ask such a question as this. Why did he ask the question? Because he was willing to justify himself. It is precisely there that every man has a great battle to fight, namely--at the point of self-justification. So long as there is any disposition in us to justify ourselves are we unprepared to receive the gospel. One of the first conditions required of us at the Cross is self-renunciation. Am I to suppose that any one is asking now, What shall I do to inherit eternal life? Do not misunderstand that word do. It may be so employed as to convey a wrong sense. The obtaining of eternal life does not come through any action or merit of our own. There is not a certain journey that is to taken, a labour which is to be performed, a specific duty that is to be discharged. What, then, is there to be? Consciousness of sin, conviction of guilt in the sight of God, self-despair, self-torment, such a knowledge of the nature and reality of sin as will pain the heart to agony; and then a turning of the eyes of faith to the bleeding Lamb of God, the one sacrifice, the complete atonement; a casting of the heart, the life, the hope, upon the broken body of Jesus, Son of God! Dost thou so believe? Thou hast eternal life! This eternal life is not a possession into which we come by and by. We have hold of it now; for to love the Son of God is to begin eternity, is to enter upon immortality I How is this life to be exhibited? In other words, how is it to prove its own existence and defend its own claim? By love. God is love. And if we be in God we shall be filled with love. Let us then retire, knowing that there is in our hearts and minds information enough upon these great questions, if so be we are minded to turn that information to account. Let no man say he will begin a better life when he knows more. Begin with the amount of your present knowledge. Let no man delude himself by saying that if he had a good opportunity of showing charity to a stranger he would show it. Show charity, show piety at home. Let no man say that if he was going down a thief-haunted road, and saw a poor man bleeding and dying there, he would certainly bind up his wounds. Do the thing that is next thee; bear the Cross that is lying at thy feet; start even upon the very smallest scale to love, and thou shalt grow in grace. (J. Parker, D. D.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 10:25". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-10.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And behold, a certain lawyer stood up and made trial of him, saying Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

THE GOOD SAMARITAN

Trench held that "We may not ascribe to this lawyer any malicious intentions,"[22] basing his argument upon the revelation that another lawyer, also described as TEMPTING Christ, nevertheless received encouraging words, "Thou art not far from the kingdom of God" (Mark 12:34).

What shall I do to inherit eternal life ... It is erroneous to deny that Jesus answered this question; because the ensuing conversation shows that, when requested to answer his own question, the lawyer accurately did so, Jesus receiving his answer as true, thus confirming it.

ENDNOTE:

[22] Richard C. Trench, Notes on the Parables of Our Lord (Westwood, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1953), p. 311.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And behold a certain lawyer stood up,.... From his seat, having been hearing Christ preach, very likely, in some synagogue; when and where this was, is not certain. The Syriac, Persic, and Ethiopic versions call this man a Scribe; and a lawyer and a Scribe were the same, as appears from Matthew 22:35 compared with Mark 12:28

and tempted him; or tried him whether he understood the law, or whether he would say any thing contrary to it, and see if he could gain any advantage against him, and expose him, and get credit and applause to himself:

saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? the same question as was put by the young ruler in Mark 10:17 for they were both of the same complexion, and upon the same foundation, seeking eternal life by their own works: See Gill on Matthew 19:16.

he said unto him; that is, Jesus, as all the Oriental versions express it.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

8 And, behold, i a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

(8) Faith does not take away but establishes the doctrine of the law.

(i) One of those who proclaimed himself to be learned in the rites and laws of Moses.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-10.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 10:25-37. Question of a lawyer and parable of the good Samaritan.

tempted him — “tested him”; in no hostile spirit, yet with no tender anxiety for light on that question of questions, but just to see what insight this great Galilean teacher had.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

25. And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

[Behold, a certain lawyer stood up.]

Some few Notes concerning the Jewish Doctors.

The word lawyer we meet with in Matthew 22:35, where the Syriac hath it a scribe. So Luke 7:30; as also in this place, and chapter 11:45. Nor without reason, when he in St. Matthew, one of them which was a lawyer, is said to be, Mark 12:28, one of the scribes.

However there seems some difficulty from a passage in our evangelist, where woe unto you scribes, and Then answered one of the lawyers, seems to make some distinction betwixt them. As to this, we shall make some remarks in its proper place. In the mean time let it not seem tedious to the reader, if we discourse some things concerning the doctors of the law, with the various classes and orders of them, that we may the better judge of that sort of men of which we have so frequent mention in the holy Scriptures. And,

I. It is not unknown how the name scribe was a general title given to all the learned part of that nation, as it is opposed to the rude and illiterate person. "If two persons eat together, and are both scribes, they each of them say grace singly for themselves: but if one of them be a scribe, and the other an illiterate person, the scribe saith grace, and it sufficeth for the other that is unlearned."

Indeed, the first original of the word scribes did more peculiarly signify the numberers. "The ancients were called numberers, because they numbered all the letters of the law..." The Gloss gives another reason out of the Jerusalem Talmud; namely, "because they numbered all the points and contents of the law, as the forty principal servile works save one," &c.

Should we indeed grant that the first original of the word had such narrow bounds as this, yet does not this hinder but that it afterward enlarged itself so far as to denote any person learned in the law, and every doctor of it; nay, that it extended itself even to the schoolmasters that taught children: if not to the very libellarii, those whose business it was to write out bills of divorce and forms of contracts, &c. Of which two there is mention made amongst the ten sorts, whereof if none should happen to be in a city, it was not fit for any disciple of the wise to abide in it.

II. That the fathers of the Sanhedrim were more emphatically called the scribes is so well known that it needs no confirmation. That passage in the evangelist sufficiently shews it; "The scribes and Pharisees sit in Moses' seat": that is, on the legislative bench, or in the Sanhedrim: where also the Sadducees that were of that council are called scribes: and the scribes are distinguished there from the Pharisees, not that they were not scribes, but because all the scribes there were not Pharisees.

III. There was a certain degree of doctors or scribes that were in the Sanhedrim, but were not members of it: these are commonly called those who gave judgment in the presence of the wise men, fit for the office of legislators, but not yet admitted. Such were Simeon Ben Azzai, and Simeon Ben Zumah. Such also was Simeon the Temanite, of whom we have made mention elsewhere, (out of Sanhedrin, fol. 17. 2) He judged in the presence of the Sanhderim, sitting upon the ground. He did not sit on the bench with the fathers, as not being one of their number, but on the seats below, nearer the ground: him the fathers consulted in difficult matters. A shadow of which we have in England of the judges, men learned in the laws, who have their seats in our house of lords.

Whether he that was particularly called the wise man was of the number of the fathers, or only of this kind of judges, I shall not at present dispute, but leave the reader to judge from this story: "Rabban Simeon Ben Gamliel was the president of the Sanhedrim: R. Meir was chacam, or the wise man; and R. Nathan, the vice-governor." Now when Rabban Simeon had decreed something that disparaged R. Meir and R. Nathan, "Saith R. Meir to R. Nathan, I am the chacam [or the wise man], and thou art the vice-president. Let us remove Rabban Simeon from the presidency, then thou wilt be the president, and I the vice-president."

There is nothing more common, and yet nothing more difficult than that saying, "The school of Hillel saith so and so, and the school of Shammai so: but the wise men say otherwise." It is very obscure who these wise men should be. If we should say the Sanhedrim, it is plain that one part of it consisted of the Shammaeans, and another part of the Hillelites. If so, then it should seem that these wise men are those judges of whom we have spoken: unless you will assign a third part to the Sadducees, to whom you will hardly attribute the determination of the thing, and much less the emphatical title of the wise men. But this we leave undecided.

IV. Let us a little inquire out of the Sanhedrim; we shall find variety of scribes and doctors of the law, according to the variety of the law itself, and the variety of teaching it. Hence those various treatises amongst the Rabbins; the Micra, Misna, Midras, Talmud, Agadah, &c.

1. Micra, is the text of the Bible itself: its reading and literal explication.

2. Misna, the doctrine of traditions and their explication.

3. Midras, the mystic and allegorical doctrine and exposition of the Scriptures: "For Moses of old time hath in every city them that preach him, being read in the synagogues every sabbath day." Now these were the ways and methods of preaching him:

I. As to the written law (for every one knows they had a twofold law, written and oral, as they call it), they had a twofold way of declaring it, viz., explaining and applying it according to the literal sense of it, for edification, exhortation, and comfort, as the apostle hath it; or else by drawing allegories, mysteries, and far-fetched notions out of it. As to the former way, the rulers of the synagogue seem to have respect to it in what they said to Paul and Barnabas: If ye have any word of exhortation for the people, say on. As to the latter, the instances are endless in the Jewish writings every where; so far, that they have even melted down the whole volume of the Scriptures into tradition and allegory.

It is not easily determined whether those preachers were so of a different order, that one should wholly addict himself to the plain and literal exposition and application of the Scriptures, the other only to the mystical and more abstruse way of teaching. There is no question but both these did frequently meet both in one preacher, and that in one and the same sermon: and indeed I cannot tell but that the word Agadah may sometimes denote both these ways of expounding and interpreting the law. When a certain person, being interrogated about certain traditions, could give no answer, the standers by said, Perhaps he is not skilled in the [traditional] doctrine: but he may be able to expound. And so they propound to him Daniel 10:21 to explain. To which that also agrees well enough, "The masters of the Agada or expositions, because they are 'Darshanin' [or profound searchers of the Scriptures], are honoured of all men, for they draw away the hearts of their auditors." Nor does that sound very differently as to the thing itself: On the sabbath day they discussed discussions [i.e. in the Scriptures, searching the Scriptures] "to the masters of families, who had been employed in their occasions all the week; and while they were expounding, they taught them the articles about things forbidden and things permitted them," &c.

To these kind of mystic and allegorical expositions of Scripture (if at least it be proper to call them expositions) they were so strangely bewitched, that they valued nothing more than a skill in tickling or rubbing the itching ears of their auditors with such trifles. Hence that passage, "R. Joshua said to R. Jochanan Ben Bruchah, and to R. Eleazar the blind, What new thing have you met with today in 'Beth Midras'? They answered and said, 'We are all thy disciples, and drink wholly at thy waters.' To whom he; 'It is impossible but you should meet with something novel every day in Beth Midras.'"

II. As to the oral law, there was also a twofold way of explaining it, as they had for the written law:

1. The former way we have intimated to us in these words: "The book of the Law, when it grows old, they lay up with one of the disciples of the wise men, even although he teach the traditions." The passage seems very obscure, but it is thus explained by the Gloss: "Albeit it doth not any way help the disciples of the wise men in Talmud and Gemara, but in Misnaioth and Beriathoth," that is, he that would only read the body of the traditional law, and render the literal sense of it,--and not he that would dispute scholastically, and comment upon it. For,

2. There were doctors that would inquire more deeply into the traditions, would give some accounts (such as they were), of them, would discuss difficulties, solve doubts, &c.; a specimen of which is the Talmudic Gemara throughout.

Lastly, amongst the learned, and doctors of that nation, there were the Agadici, who would expound the written law in a more profound way than ordinary, even to what was cabalistical. These were more rare, and (as it should seem) not so acceptable amongst the people. Whether these are concerned in what follows, let the reader judge: "R. Joshua Ben Levi saith, So and so let it happen to me, if in all my life I ever saw the book Agada above once; and then I found a hundred seventy-and-five sections of the law, where it is written, 'The Lord hath said, hath spoken, hath commanded.' They are according to the number of the years of our father Abraham, as it is said, To receive gifts for men, &c. A hundred forty-and-seven Psalms, which are in the Book of Psalms [mark the number] are according to the number of the years of our father Jacob; as it is written, 'Thou art holy, and inhabitest the praises of Israel.' A hundred twenty-and-three turns, wherein Israel answereth Hallelujah [to him that repeats the Hallel], are according to the number of the years of Aaron," &c. And as a coronis, let me add that passage in Sanhedrim, "If they be masters of the textual reading, they shall be conversant in the Law, the Prophets, and the Hagiographa. If they be masters of the Misna, they shall be conversant in Misna Halacoth and Haggadoth. And if they be masters of the Talmud, they shall be conversant in the traditions of the Passover, in the Passover: in the traditions of Pentecost, in Pentecost: in the traditions of the feast of Tabernacles, in the feast of Tabernacles."

These all, whom we have mentioned, were scribes and doctors and expounders of the law; but which of these may properly and peculiarly challenge to themselves the title of lawyers, whether all, or any particular class of them? The latter is most probable: but then, what class will you choose? or will you distinguish betwixt the lawyer and the teacher of the law? I had rather the reader would frame his own judgment here. And yet, that I might not dismiss this question wholly untouched, and at the same time not weary the reader with too long a digression, I have referred what is to be alleged in this matter to my notes upon chapter 11:45.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-10.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

And tempted him (εκπειραζων αυτονekpeirazōn auton). Present active participle, conative idea, trying to tempt him. There is no “and” in the Greek. He “stood up (ανεστηanestē ingressive second aorist active) trying to tempt him.” ΠειραζωPeirazō is a late form of πειραωpeiraō and εκπειραζωekpeirazō apparently only in the lxx, and N.T. (quoted by Jesus from Deuteronomy 6:16 in Matthew 4:7; Luke 4:12 against Satan). Here and 1 Corinthians 10:9. The spirit of this lawyer was evil. He wanted to entrap Jesus if possible.

What shall I do to inherit eternal life? (Τι ποιησας ζωην αιωνιου κληρονομησωTi poiēsas zōēn aiōniou klēronomēsō̱). Literally, “By doing what shall I inherit eternal life?” Note the emphasis on “doing” (ποιησαςpoiēsas). The form of his question shows a wrong idea as to how to get it.

Eternal life (ζωην αιωνιονzōēn aiōnion) is endless life as in John‘s Gospel (John 16:9; John 18:18, John 18:30) and in Matthew 25:46, which see note.

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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Lawyer

See on Luke 7:30.

Tempted

See on temptation, Matthew 6:13.

To inherit

See on inheritance, 1 Peter 1:4.

Eternal ( εἰώνιον )

The word will be fully discussed in the second volume.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

Matthew 22:35; Mark 12:28.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And behold, a certain lawyer stood up and made trial of him1, saying, Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life2?
    PARABLE OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN. (Probably Judea.) Luke 10:25-37

  1. And behold, a certain lawyer stood up and made trial of him. For the term "lawyer", see Luke 10:25-37 and see Luke 10:25-37. The lawyer stood up to attract attention to himself, and thus give emphasis to his question and its answer.

  2. Saying, Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? The lawyer wished to make trial of the skill of Jesus in solving the intricate and difficult question as to how to obtain salvation. Jesus was probably teaching in some house or courtyard, and his habit of giving local color to his parables suggests that he was probably in or near Bethany, through which the road from Jerusalem to Jericho passes.

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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

25 And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

Ver. 25. See Matthew 22:35.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 10:25

I. The lawyer knew the answer at the time when he asked the question. He said, "What shall I do to inherit eternal life?" and all the time the answer was in his own recollection, had he but known it. Alas! we do not always turn our knowledge into wisdom. We know the fact and we hardly ever sublimate the fact into truth. We know the law, and we fail to see that under the law there is the beauty and there is the grace of the Gospel.

II. "This do," said Jesus, "and thou shalt live." What had the lawyer to do? To love the Lord his God with all his heart and soul and strength and mind. Love is life. Only he who loves lives. Only love can get out of a man the deepest secrets of his being, and develop the latent energies of his nature, and call him up to the highest possibility of his manhood. The end of the commandment is charity; the summing-up of all true law is love.

III. "But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?" It is precisely there that every man has a great battle to fight—namely, at the point of self-justification. So long as there is any disposition in us to justify ourselves we are unprepared to receive the Gospel. One of the first conditions required of us at the Cross is self-renunciation.

IV. Jesus asked the man certain questions which he answered rightly, and those answers were returned to him as a response to his own enquiries. This ought to have a very serious application to ourselves, because we are to be no longer self-deluded by the impression that if more was said to us we should do more; if we had a better minister we should soon have higher knowledge of truth and keener perception of moral beauty. Jesus Christ showed in this case that all the while there was in the man's heart the very answer which he professed himself eager to ascertain. So it is with ourselves. We know the right; yet oftentimes the wrong pursue. There is in our hearts and minds information enough upon these great questions, if so be we are minded to turn that information to account.

Parker, City Temple, vol. iii., p. 85.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-10.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here we have a lawyer, that is, an interpreter and expounder of the law of Moses, tempting our Saviour; that is, making a trial of him, whether he would deliver any doctrine contrary to the law of Moses; he propounds therefore a question, What he should do to inherit eternal life?

Where note, he believed the certainty of a future state.

1. He professes his desire of an eternal happiness in that state.

2. He declares his readiness to do something in order to the obtaining of that happiness.

Hence learn, that all religion, both natural and revealed, teaches men that good works are necessary to salvation, or that something must be done by them who desire to enter into life: What shall I do to inherit eternal life? It is not talking well, and professing well, but doing well, that entitles us to heaven and eternal salvation; and this the very light of nature teaches.

Observe, 2. Our Saviour's answer: What is written in the law? How readest thou? Intimating to us, that the word and law of God is the rule and measure of our duty; our guide to direct us in the way to eternal life.

The man replies, that the law of God requires that we love God with all our heart, soul, and strength, and our neighbor as ourselves.

Where note, 1. That the fervor of all our affections, and particularly the supremacey of our love, is required by God as his right and due. Love must pass through and possess all the powers and faculties of our souls. The mind must meditate upon God, the will must choose and embrace him, the affections must take complacency and delight in him, the measure of loving God is to love him without measure.

Note, 2. That the best evidence of our sincere love to God is, the unfeigned love of our neighbor: love to man is both a fruit and testimony of our love to God. For he that loves not his brother whom he has seen, how can he love God whom he has not seen?

Note, 3. That as it is every man's duty to love himself, so is he to love his neighbor as himself; not as he does love himself, but as he ought to love himself; not with the same measure and degree of love, but in the same manner and kind of love that we love ourselves.

Do we love ourselves freely and readily, sincerely and unfeignedly, tenderly and compassionately, constantly and perseveringly? So should we love our neighbor also. Though we are not required to love our neighbor as much as we love ourselves, yet are we commanded to love him like we love ourselves.

Observe lastly, Our Lord's reply: Thou hast answered right. This do, and thou shalt live.

Where note, that Christ intimates to him, that the law considered in itself could give life, but then a person must keep it perfectly and exactly, without the least deficiency; which is impossible to man in his fallen state; for the law is not weak to us, but we are weak to that. Romans 13:3 The law becomes weak through the weakness of our flesh. Such as seek salvation by the works of the law, must keep the law perfectly and exactly; which being impossible in our fallen estate, Christ has obtained of his Father, that for his sake our sincere, though imperfect obedience, shall find acceptance with God and be available to our salvation.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-10.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

25.] No immediate sequence from Luke 10:24 is implied.

νομικός, a kind of scribe, = νομοδιδάσκαλος, ch. Luke 5:17—whose especial office it was to teach the law, see Titus 3:13; = εἷς τῶν γραμματέων, Mark 12:28.

There is no reason to suppose that the lawyer had any hostile intention towards Jesus,—rather perhaps a self-righteous spirit (see Luke 10:29), which wanted to see what this Teacher could inform him, who knew so much already. Thus it was a tempting or trying of Jesus, though not to entangle Him: for whatever had been the answer, this could hardly have followed.

τί ποιήσας] He doubtless expects to hear of some great deed; but our Lord refers him back to the Law of which he was a teacher.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:25 ff. This transaction is different from the later narrative of Matthew 22:35 ff. (comp. Mark 12:28 ff.). The fact that the same passages of the law are quoted cannot outweigh the difference of time and place, of the point of the question, of the person quoting the passages, and of the further course of the conference. Comp. Strauss, I. p. 650 f., who, however, also holds Matthew and Mark as distinct, and thus maintains three variations of the tradition upon the one subject, viz. that Jesus laid stress on the two commandments as the foremost of the law; while Köstlin, p. 275, supposes that Luke arbitrarily took the question, Luke 10:25, out of its original place in Matthew and Mark, and himself made it the entire introduction to the parable (Luke 10:30 ff.). Comp. Holtzmann: “two independent sections brought by Luke within one frame.”

ἐκπειράζων αὐτόν] προσεδόκησεν παγιδεῦσαι τὸν χριστὸν εἰς τὸ πάντως ἐπιτάξαι τι ἐναντίον τῷ νόμῳ, Euthymius Zigabenus. As to ἐκπειράζ., to try thoroughly, see on 1 Corinthians 10:9.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:25. ἀνέστη, stood up) on purpose that he might question Him.— τί ποιήσας, by doing what) It is just the same as if he were to say: By doing what shall I see the Sun of Righteousness? Nay, it is not by doing but by seeing that He is to be seen: see Luke 10:23. It is to this ποιήσας, doing, that the verb, ποίει, do, in Luke 10:28; Luke 10:37, has reference; just as ζήσῃ, thou shall live, Luke 10:28, refers to ζωὴν, in this verse.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 25-28. These four verses would incline one to think that Luke here records the same piece of history which we met with in Matthew 22:35-40, and Mark 12:28-34; See Poole on "Matthew 22:35" and following verses to Matthew 22:40, See Poole on "Mark 12:28" and following verses to Mark 12:34; but neither of those evangelists have the following part of this discourse, which makes me doubtful whether Luke speaks of the same person coming to Christ which the others mention. A lawyer he was, who came to our Saviour upon a design to tempt, that is, to make a trial of him, whether he would deliver any doctrine contrary to the law of Moses. It is plain that he fancied that the eternal life which Christ preached was to be obtained by wing what the law required. Our Saviour agreeth it, that if he did what the law required, according as he himself had given an account of it, he should live. I apprehend no absurdity, to affirm that our Saviour speaks here of living eternally. It is rather absurd to fancy that our Saviour did not answer ad idem, to the thing about which the question was propounded. Neither is salvation impossible because the law in itself could not give life, but because of the weakness of our flesh, so as we cannot fulfil it. So that considering our infirmity, the law serveth to us only as a schoolmaster, to bring us to Christ; and as a mark which we ought to shoot at, though we cannot shoot home; a rule to direct us in our duty, though we cannot perform or fulfil it.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

законник Т.е. книжник, который, по общему мнению, был знатоком закона Божьего. За исключением единичного употребления этого слова в Мф. 22:35 (см. пояснение там) Лука – единственный евангелист, использующий его (11:45, 46).

что мне делать, чтобы наследовать жизнь вечную? Такой вопрос ставится несколькими спрашивающими (18:18-23; Мф. 19:16-22; Ин. 3:1-15).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-10.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

A certain lawyer; one whose business it was to study, explain, and teach the divine law.

Tempted him; put his wisdom to the test.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25.A certain lawyer—The law embraced in this man’s profession consisted of two parts, the oral and the written. The written was contained in the Pentateuch of Moses; the oral was professedly derived by unwritten tradition from the seventy elders appointed by Moses to aid in the government of Israel. Numbers 11:16. Both these formed a mass of rules and regulations, civil, moral, and religious, boundless in extent, complicated in character, exercising a controlling influence over the whole of Jewish life, and forming a subject for an infinite variety of subtle distinctions, disputes, and questionings. The distinction between lawyer and scribe is not very clearly drawn. In fact the same person receives from different evangelists each of these titles. Matthew 22:35; Mark 12:28. The title of the scribe would seem to indicate a more special relation to the text of the law and its transcription; that of lawyer more to the study of its principles.

Stood up—Rose to indicate his purpose of a discussion.

Tempted him—That is, proposed to try his depth of intellect and knowledge of the law. There was no malicious purpose in the case. It was simply a challenge to a keen encounter of wits and professional knowledge. Among the Jews there was the disciple and the doctor; the former was one able to answer questions which he bad specially read up; the latter was ready to answer questions on any part of the law. Similarly the Sophists among the Greeks would take a seat in public, and offer to discourse on any topic that any one would please to propose.

What shall I do?—Though the lawyer proposes this question in the first person singular, he means it rather for a theoretical than a practical question. He is no convicted sinner asking the way to eternal life.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And behold, a certain lawyer stood up and made trial of him, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” ’

A Scribe approaches Jesus to ‘test Him out’. This may signify an attempt to make Him make a false move, or it may be a sign of genuine interest and a desire to discover His calibre. His question goes right to the heart of Pharisaic thinking. One of their main aims was to discover how they could receive eternal life. They believed that if only they could fully fulfil the covenant then they would receive it. That was what all their regulations and rule were aimed at. Seeking to ensure full compliance with the covenant of Moses so as to seal their place as the people of God. Possibly he expected Jesus to repudiate Moses, or possibly he had a genuine problem that he hoped would be resolved.

‘Inherit eternal life.’ Canaan had been Israel’s inheritance. But now that inheritance is replaced by ‘eternal life’, the life of the age to come, life under the Kingly Rule of God. That now was what all Israel sought for.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Lawyers (scribes) were experts in the Mosaic Law. The Greek word translated "test" (ekpeirazon) does not necessarily imply hostility (cf. Luke 4:12). The man simply could have been wanting Jesus" opinion. He addressed Jesus as a teacher or rabbi. This title tells us nothing about his motivation, only that He viewed Jesus as less than a prophet, the Messiah, or God. He assumed that people had to do something to obtain eternal life (cf. Luke 18:18). The term "inherit" had a particular significance for Jewish readers distinguishing a special way of receiving eternal life (cf. Matthew 5:5; Matthew 19:29; Matthew 25:34). However, Gentiles readers for whom Luke wrote would have regarded it as synonymous with obtaining eternal life (cf. Mark 10:17). Eternal life is the equivalent of spiritual salvation and included entrance into the messianic kingdom.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:25. A certain lawyer. A kind of scribe whose business it was to teach the law.

And tempted, or, ‘trying,’ him. This implies a cold, self-righteous spirit, rather than a hostile one. He probably wished to see whether our Lord would teach anything in conflict with the law of Moses, or simply whether He could teach him anything new. The two states of mind are not very far removed from each other: Pharisaism, in its self-righteousness, may present either a conceit of orthodoxy or self-conceit.

Matter, what shall I do? He doubtless expected in reply the mention of some new thing, or at least some great thing.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:25. , stood up; from this expression and the present tense of , how readest thou now? it has been conjectured that the scene may have been a synagogue.— : the , like the of Luke 18:18, is professedly in quest of eternal life.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Eternal life? The law of Moses does not expressly promise eternal life to the observers of it, but confines its promises to temporal blessings during this life. Still we always find that the Jews hoped in another life after this. This opinion is clearly observable in the books of Scripture, written both before and after the captivity, and in Josephus and Philo. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

lawyer = doctor or teacher of the Law.

and tempted Him = putting Him to the test.

Master = Teacher. App-98.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him - `tried,' or 'tested Him' [ ekpeirazoon (Greek #1598)]; in no hostile spirit, yet with no tender anxiety for light on that question of questions, but just to see what insight this great Galilean teacher had.

Saying, Master [`Teacher' Didaskale (G1320)], what shall I do to inherit eternal life?

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up.—On the word “lawyer” and its difference from the more generic “scribe,” see Note on Matthew 22:35. Here, as there, the “tempting” does not necessarily imply hostile purpose. It was simply a test-question to see if the new Teacher was sound in His view of the ethical obligations of the Law.

The question, though the same as that of the young man in Matthew 19:16, is not asked in the same tone. There it was asked by one anxiously seeking to inherit eternal life. Here there is a certain tone of self-conscious superiority, which required a different treatment. As the method of Socrates was to make men conscious of their ignorance of the true meaning of words which they repeated glibly, so here our Lord parries the question by another, makes him repeat his own formulated answer—an answer true and divine itself, identical with that which our Lord gave Himself (Matthew 22:37)—and then teaches him how little he had realised its depth and fulness. The commandment was “exceeding broad” above all that the teacher of Israel had imagined.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? 26 He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou?
a certain
7:30; 11:45,46; Matthew 22:35
Master
18:18; Matthew 19:16; Acts 16:30,31
to
Galatians 3:18
Reciprocal: Micah 6:6 - Wherewith;  Malachi 4:4 - the law;  Matthew 16:1 - tempting;  Matthew 22:18 - Why;  Mark 8:11 - tempting;  Mark 10:3 - What;  Luke 12:17 - What;  John 5:39 - ye think;  John 6:28 - What;  John 8:6 - tempting;  Acts 13:39 - from which;  Romans 2:13 - but the;  Romans 7:9 - For I;  Galatians 2:16 - that;  Galatians 3:12 - The man;  Philippians 3:9 - which is of the;  Titus 3:13 - the lawyer;  1 Peter 3:9 - that

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.