Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:25

Once the head of the house gets up and shuts the door, and you begin to stand outside and knock on the door, saying, ‘Lord, open up to us!' then He will answer and say to you, ‘I do not know where you are from.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Door;   Formalism;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Judgment;   Opportunity;   Reprobacy;   Self-Delusion;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Delay, Causes of;   Haste-Delay;   Too Late;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Entertainments;   Procrastination;   Self-Delusion;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Kingdom of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Knock;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Master;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Goodman;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Authority of Christ;   Discourse;   Doctrines;   Eternal Punishment;   Holy Spirit (2);   Householder;   Impotence;   Incarnation (2);   Lazarus;   Reserve;   Trinity (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Christ;   Door;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - New Testament;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

And hath shut to the door - See the notes on Matthew 7:22-23; (note), and 25:10-41.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

When once the master … - The figure here used is taken from the conduct of a housekeeper, who is willing to see his friends, and who at the proper time keeps his doors open. But there is a proper time for closing them, when he will not see his guests. At night it would be improper and vain to seek an entrance - the house would be shut. So there is a proper time to seek an entrance into heaven; but there will be a time when it will be too late. At death the time will have passed by, and God will be no longer gracious to the sinner‘s soul.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-13.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

When once the master of the house is risen up,.... From table, or off of his couch, the entertainment being over: and so here, the Gospel feast, or dispensation, being at an end, and all the guests come in, who were effectually called, and long patience and forbearance being used towards others; or has entered in, as the Vulgate Latin version reads, and so Beza's ancient copy, and one of Stephens's; is come from the wedding; see Luke 12:36 Christ having espoused all his elect to himself, by the ministry of the word: for by "the master of the house" is meant, the bridegroom of the church, the head of the body, the King of saints, who is Son over his own house, and high priest there; of whom the whole family in heaven and earth, is named:

and hath shut to the door; the door of mercy and of hope; the door of faith; the preaching of the word, and the administration of ordinances, when these shall be no more:

and ye begin to stand without; or "do stand without"; without the holy city, where dogs are; having no admittance to the nuptial chamber, to the marriage supper of the Lamb, and the joys of heaven:

and to knock at the door; which shows how near some persons may come to heaven, and yet not enter there, even to the very door; and what an expectation, yea, an assurance they may have, of admission into it, not at all doubting of it; and therefore knock as if they were some of the family, and had a right to enter; but not finding the door opened to them, so soon as they imagined, they begin to call as well as knock:

saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; they acknowledge Christ to be Lord, as all will at the last day, to the glory of God the Father, even professors and profane; they repeat the word, to show the vehemency and earnestness of their entreaty; and according to the Syriac and, Persic versions, they claim an interest in Christ, which read, "our Lord, our Lord"; and on account of which they doubted not, but the door would be opened: but alas! he was only their Lord in a professional way; they had only called him Lord, Lord, but had never truly and heartily yielded obedience to him; their hearts had never been opened to him, and he had never had a place there, nor his Gospel; wherefore though they knock, he will not open;

and he shall answer and say unto you. The Persic version adds, "nay, but be ye gone hence", for the following reason,

I know you not, whence you are: not but that Christ being the omniscient God, will know who they are, from whence they come, of what country and place they be, and to whom they belong; but the sense is, that he will not own them, and express any approbation of them, as his; but will treat them as strangers, that come, it is not known, from whence; he will reject them, as not being born from above, as not being the sheep of his fold, or members of his true church: they did not come from heaven, they were not heaven born souls, or partakers of the heavenly calling, and therefore shall not be received there; they belonged to the men of the world, and were of their father the devil, and shall be sent to him: so the foolish virgins, or formal professors of religion, and such as have been preachers of the Gospel, will entreat Christ at the last day, and shall have such an answer as this returned to them, which will be very awful and startling; See Gill on Matthew 7:23, Matthew 25:12.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

master of the house is risen up and hath shut to the door — awfully sublime and vivid picture! At present he is represented as in a sitting posture, as if calmly looking on to see who will “strive,” while entrance is practicable, and who will merely “seek” to enter in. But this is to have an end, by the great Master of the house Himself rising and shutting the door, after which there will be no admittance.

Lord, Lord — emphatic reduplication, expressive of the earnestness now felt, but too late. (See on Matthew 7:21, Matthew 7:22).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

Hath shut the door. Even that narrow door shall be shut. The time of opportunity will pass by. Even here on earth, the heart hardens so that it will be impossible to stir it to repentance.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-13.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

When once (απ ου ανaph' hou an). Possibly to be connected without break with the preceding verse (so Westcott and Hort), though Bruce argues for two parables here, the former (Luke 13:24) about being in earnest, while this one (Luke 13:25-30) about not being too late. The two points are here undoubtedly. It is an awkward construction, απ ου απο τουτου οτεaph' hou = ανapo toutou hote with εγερτηιan and the aorist subjunctive (αποκλεισηιegerthēi and αποκλεισηιapokleisēi). See Robertson, Grammar, p. 978.

Hath shut to (αποκλειωapokleisēi), first aorist active subjunctive of αποapokleiō old verb, but only here in the N.T. Note effective aorist tense and perfective use of και αρχηστεapo slammed the door fast.

And ye begin (αρχομαιkai arxēsthe). First aorist middle subjunctive of απ ου ανarchomai with εγερτηιaph' hou an like αποκλεισηιegerthēi and εσταναιapokleisēi stand (ιστημιhestanai). Second perfect active infinitive of και κρουεινhistēmi intransitive tense and to knock (ανοιχον ημινkai krouein). Present active infinitive, to keep on knocking.

Open to us (ερειanoixon hēmin). First aorist active imperative, at once and urgent.

He shall say (ειπονerei). Future active of απ ουeipon (defective verb). This is probably the apodosis of the aph' hou clause.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

When once ( ἀφ ' ou)

Lit.,from the time that. Compare Luke 13:7. Some editors connect this with the previous sentence: “Shall not be able when once, etc.

Whence ( πόθεν )

Of what family. Ye do not belong to my household. See John 7:27: “We know whence he (Jesus) is;” i.e., we know his birthplace and family.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-13.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are:

And even agonizing will not avail, after the door is shut. Agonize, therefore, now by faith, prayer, holiness, patience.

And ye begin to stand without — Till then they had not thought of it! O how new will that sense of their misery be? How late? How lasting? I know not whence ye are - I know not, that is, I approve not of your ways.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door1, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying2, Lord, open to us; and he shall answer and say to you, I know you not whence ye are3;

  1. When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door. This verse gives the reason why one should strive to enter in. The "time" for entrance is limited, and he must get in before it expires.

  2. And ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying,
  3. Lord, open to us. For when the limited time has passed, he cannot enter, no matter how earnestly he may seek or strive.

  4. And he shall answer and say to you, I know you not whence ye are. Our Lord pictures a householder who refuses to receive any guest that has shown contempt for his feast by coming late. The strict spirit of the Lord in giving his invitation is indicated by the phrase "narrow door", but the phrase includes more than this for those who would strive must not only be prompt to act, but must be painstaking so as to act intelligently, and of obedient spirit so as to act acceptably.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

25 When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are:

Ver. 25. And hath shut to] God is not always with men in the opportunities of grace. He hath his season, his harvest for judgment, Matthew 13:30, when troops of those that forget God are turned into hell, Psalms 9:17.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our Saviour having exhorted all his followers, in the foregoing verses, to make sure of heaven and salvation to themselves, while the door of hope and salvation is open to them, by this parable of a master of a family inviting guests to his table, waiting for their coming, and at last shutting the door against them, because they either denied or delayed coming, Christ hereby represented to the Jews the great danger they were in, if they neglected the present season of grace and salvation, which now they did enjoy; telling them farther how little it would profit them at the day of judgment, to allege that they had eaten and drank in his presence, and that they had heard him preach in their streets, if they did not forsake their sins, and obey his gospel.

Adding farther, that it would be an heart piercing sorrow, a soul rendering grief to them at the great day, to see not only the patriarchs and prophets, and other Jews, but even the despised Gentiles from all quarters and nations, whom they thought accursed, admitted into the kingdom of heaven, and themselves eternally shut out: For the last shall be first, and the first last: that is, the Gentiles who were afar off shall receive the gospel, when you for rejecting it shall be cast off.

From the whole note,

1. That there is a determined time when souls must (if ever) accept of the offers of grace and salvation, which are made unto them; now is the door open, and persons invited in.

2. That however long Jesus Christ, who now stands at every one of our doors waiting for our compliance with his gospel terms, will wait no longer upon us, nor strive any further by the motions of his Spirit with us: When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door.

3. That doleful is the condition of such miserable souls against whom the door is shut; the door of repentance, the door of hope, the door of salvation; all shut, eternally shut; and that by him who shuts, and none can open.

4. That all would be saved at last; all will cry for mercy when it is too late, even such as now sinfully undervalue, and scornfully despise it: Ye shall stand without and knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us.

5. That is no good plea for admittance into heaven, because we have been church members here on earth: no outward privileges, though Christ has taught in our streets; no external acts of communion, though we have eaten and drunk in his presence, and at his holy table; will justify our hopes of entering into heaven when we die, if we be workers of iniquity while we live: Lord, we have eaten and drunk in thy presence; but he shall say, I know ye not, ye workers of iniquity.

6. That as hell will be a second heaven to the glorified, so heaven will be a second hell to the damned. Hell will be second heaven to the glorified, that is, it will add exceedingly to the happiness of the saints in heaven, to see and be sensible of that misery which they escaped, and the damned endure; and on the other hand, heaven will be a second hell to the damned, that is, it will increase their torments, and add to the vexation of their spirits, to see some in heaven whom they little expected to see there; some that never saw nor heard, nor enjoyed what they have done; strangers, yea, heathens taken in, when the children of the kingdom, that is, the members of the visible church, are shut out: They shall come from the east, from the west, from the north, and from the south, and sit down in the kingdom of God, but the children of the kingdom shall be cast into outer darkness.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-13.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

25.] A reason why this ἀγωνίζεσθαι is so important:—because there will be a day when the gate will be shut. The figure is the usual one,—of a feast, at which the householder entertains (in this case) the members of his family. These being assembled, he rises and shuts the door, and none are afterwards admitted.

The ἀφʼ οὗ extends to ἐστέ, end of Luke 13:25—and the second member of the sentence begins with τότε.

ἔξω ἑστάναι and κρούειν both depend on ἄρξησθε:Hearing that the door is shut, ye begin to stand without and knock. On the spiritual import, see note on Matthew 25:11.

οὐκ οἶδ. π. ἐστέ,ye are none of my family—have no relationship with me.’

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-13.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:25. ἀφʼ οὗ, from the time that once [when once]) This being abruptly subjoined, has great force. The Apodosis is in τότε, then, in Luke 13:26 : nor is the employment of the Indicative ἐρεῖ, shall say, an objection to this view of the construction. Comp. note on Mark 3:27.— ἐγέρθῃ, shall have risen up) from the banquet (supper) in order to shut the door. For He is not speaking concerning His advent: for at the Advent it is not the Lord that opens to the servants, but it is the servants who open unto their Lord: ch. Luke 12:36.— ἀποκλείσῃ) shall have shut, against strangers alien to Him. Now, now is the time for striving in the [good] contest.— τὴν θύραν, the door) What seems to those standing outside to be a gate, is a door to those who are within, as in a house (home).(131) καὶ ἄρξησθε, and ye shall have begun) This too depends on ἀφʼ οὗ, from the time that once; for the ζητήσουσιν, shall seek, is handled (treated of) in Luke 13:26; and the οὐκ ἰσχύσουσιν, shall not be able, is handled (treated of) in Luke 13:27. Such persons had never thought so before. O how new [implied in τότε ἄρξεσθε] shall be their sense of misery then first realized, and how late, and how long-continuing! It is when his opportunity has passed by, that man begins to wish: Numbers 14:40. [The Israelites began thus to feel only when doomed to forty years wandering, whereas, had they believed in time, they would have entered the promised land at once: Too late “they rose up early, etc., and said, Lo we be here and will go up,” etc.]— κρούειν τὴν θύραν, to knock at the door) which was now not merely στενὴ, as before, Luke 13:24, but by this time closed and shut to ( ἀποκλείσῃ, Luke 13:25).— πόθεν, whence) Herein is implied the point of view in which He refuses to know them. They are recognised by Him, in their character as workers of iniquity.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 25-27. Our Saviour in these verses doth represent himself by a man, who, having invited guests to his supper, stays till all those who were invited, and accepted the invitation, were Come in; then rising up, shuts the door; and after that is shut, turns a deaf ear to any that shall come knocking, let them plead for admittance what they can plead. By this parabolical expressing of himself, he both openeth in part what he meant by the foregoing words,

many will seek to enter in, and shall not be able, and also lets us know, that there is a determinate time, wherein souls must (if ever) accept of the offers of grace and salvation, when they are made to them, which if they slip, they will not be able to obtain of God an entrance into the kingdom of heaven. Seek the Lord while he may be found, saith the prophet, Isaiah 55:6. In an acceptable time have I heard thee, saith the prophet, Isaiah 49:8; which the apostle applies, 2 Corinthians 6:2, to persuade men that they should not receive the grace of God (in the gospel) in vain. What this determinate time is God hath hidden from us, and it is probable that it is not the same as to all persons; we know nothing to the contrary, but while there is life there is hope, which warrants us to preach truth and repentance to all. We are also further instructed, that no outward privileges though Christ hath taught in our streets; no external acts of communion with Christ, though we can say we have ate and drunk with him; will justify our hopes of entrance into heaven, if in the mean time we be workers of iniquity. We had much the same; See Poole on "Matthew 7:21", and following verses to Matthew 7:23.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

не знаю вас Ср. Мф. 7:23; 25:12. Ясно, что никаких взаимоотношений никогда не существовало, хотя они обманули сами себя, воображая, что знают Хозяина дома (ст. 26). Несмотря на их протесты, Он категорически повторил свой отказ в ст. 27.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-13.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The master-shut to the door; the reference is to the shutting of the door at a feast, after which none can be admitted. Compare Matthew 25:10-12. The meaning is, that the day of grace is limited, and after it is closed, none who have continued to neglect it can obtain salvation.

I know you not; he did not know them as his friends, because they had never been such.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-13.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25.When once—Once for all and forever. The master of the house—The hospitable entertainer of his friends for the night.

Is risen up—From his evening divan to close the house for the night.

Hath shut to the door— Locked for the night’s safety and repose. Ye—Our Lord gives his reply to the question in the most admonitory form of the second person plural.

Lord, Lord, open—These are not members of his family. They only claim acquaintance Nor is there any intimation of its being a feast. On the contrary, all they ask is an open door and a refuge.

Know you not whence—Ye are straggling night-walkers, from I know not what quarter. I cannot recognize you as part of my family or as guests.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-13.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“When once the master of the house is risen up, and has shut to the door, and you begin to stand outside, and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us’, and he will answer and say to you, “I do not know you, from where you are,’ ”

Many interpret this of a banquet to which later arrivals are refused entry, but that is not really the impression given here. In such cases the master does not rise up and shut the door, he simply tell his servants to refuse entry to any more. Nor have guests in stories ever striven to enter a banquet through a narrow door, nor is there any hint of a banquet (Luke 13:29 is not part of the parable). More possible is it that night time has come and the doors are shut because no further visitors are expected. Such a situation had previously resulted in the lord having to knock at his own door (Luke 12:36). The picture may therefore be similar to Luke 11:5-7. But that then leaves open the question as to why men come knocking at the door at such an hour. Of course, we can simply say that it was because, like the friend at midnight, they had awoken to their own need. After all, while Jesus was on earth, had he not said that the door would be opened, because ‘to him who knocked it would be opened’. The idea would then be that now that the master of the house has arrived back and is calling His servants to account He has shut the door, and the promise has been rescinded. But it still does not explain why they want to come in. And it also assumes too much by incorporating ideas from other parables.

The impression given here is rather of an emergency situation. It is a picture where the master has taken personal charge and ensured that the door is shut. Thus the thought may well be that danger threatened. He arose and did it himself because it was necessary for him to check the safety of the premises. This would explain why people came clamouring at the door. And it would explain why he would not let them in. You do not let outsiders in at dangerous times.

But what kind of situation would fit in with such a picture? The answer in fact lies in Isaiah 26:20-21. There we have exactly this situation. It is set in the context of the last days and of the Lord coming in judgment, and the command is to ‘enter your chambers and shut your doors behind you’ because of the tribulation that is coming on the world. This would exactly explain why the master rises and shuts the door, and does not leave it to servants. It is because danger threatens (Isaiah 26:20-21; compare Genesis 19:10). It is because end time tribulation has come on the world. Isaiah 26:20 fits the situation exactly for it has in mind the final judgment, as the parable also does here where the last chance is seen to have gone. Others see it as the doors being shut because the guests have arrived, but that is less likely. Quite apart from how unusual that would be, we must not read in other parables.

But the point is that while it was day, and all was going well, they did not want entry. However, now danger loomed and they desperately wanted entry because they recognised that His house would provide their only place of safety. Judgment is coming on the world and they have suddenly awoken to the fact that they have nowhere else where they can find shelter. All they have trusted in is now in vain, and the only one who can possibly help them is this particular householder. But it is too late, the master has shut the door until the danger is past. There is no place of escape. If only they had striven to enter while they were able.

Thus those outside panic. Awful danger is threatening and they have no place of salvation. They are in the same position as the people in Isaiah 2:17-21. But they do not want to flee to caves which cannot protect them. And so they knock desperately at the door and cry, ‘Lord, open to us.’ All too late they recognise the master’s status. But He replies that He does not recognise or acknowledge them. They have never been in His employ, and He has no responsibility for them. They are as good as strangers.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The revelation that God would soon shut the narrow door of opportunity to enter heaven and the kingdom should have moved Jesus" hearers not to delay believing in Him. In one sense anyone can believe as long as he or she is alive. In another sense it becomes more difficult to believe as one procrastinates and as one grows older. However in view of Jesus" illustration of the banquet that follows, it is more likely that He was thinking of the beginning of the kingdom. When the kingdom began, it would be impossible for unbelievers to change their minds and be saved. Therefore in view of the kingdom"s imminency when Jesus uttered this warning, His hearers needed to believe without delay.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-13.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:25. When once. The motive urged is, a time will come when it will be altogether impossible to enter.

The master of the house. The figure is that of an entertainment made by a householder for his family.

Shut the door. The feast is to begin, and the expected guests, the members of the family, are all there. Comp. Matthew 25:10, where a similar thought occurs with the figure of a marriage feast.

Ye begin to stand without, and knock, etc. Knowing that the door is shut, they still cling to the false hope that they have a right within. Even in this hour the earnestness is not such as it ought to be; still there is a climax in the description of their conduct: standing, knocking, calling, and finally arguing (Luke 13:26).

I know you not whence ye are, i.e., ye are strangers to me, not members of my family, not expected at my feast.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-13.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

the Almighty casts any off, he is said not to know them: in the same manner as a lover of truth may be said not to know how to tell a falsehood, being withheld powerfully from it by his love of truth. (St. Gregory, mor. chap. 8.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

When once = From (Greek. apo. App-104. iv) whatsoever time. master of the house. App-98.

is risen up = may have risen up (Greek. an).

shut to. Occurs only here.

Lord, Lord. Note the Figure of speech Epizeuxis (App-6), for emphasis. See note on Genesis 22:11.

I know. Greek. oida. App-132.

whence: i, e. of what family or household.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are:

When once the Master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door. Awfully sublime and vivid picture! At present He is represented as in a sitting posture, as if calmly looking on to see who will "strive," while entrance is practicable. But this is to have an end, by the great Master of the house Himself rising and shutting the door, after which there will be no admittance.

And ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord - emphatic reduplication, expressive of the earnestness holy felt, but too late. See the notes at Matthew 7:21-22. Open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are:

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

25. And close the door. The time of opportunity will expire. If we continue to say “no” to God, we may find the door shut when we decide to enter.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-13.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) When once the master of the house . . .—The passage contains elements that are common at once to Matthew 7:22-23; Matthew 25:10-12, where see Notes.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When once the master of the house is risen up, and hath shut to the door, and ye begin to stand without, and to knock at the door, saying, Lord, Lord, open unto us; and he shall answer and say unto you, I know you not whence ye are:
once
Psalms 32:6; Isaiah 55:6; 2 Corinthians 6:2; Hebrews 3:7,8; 12:17
shut
Genesis 7:16; Matthew 25:10
Lord
6:46; Matthew 7:21,22; 25:11,12
I know
27; Matthew 7:23; 25:41
Reciprocal: Genesis 6:16 - the door;  Genesis 19:15 - hastened;  Numbers 14:40 - rose up;  1 Samuel 8:18 - will not hear;  2 Samuel 22:42 - unto the Lord;  Job 27:9 - his cry;  Psalm 18:41 - GeneralPsalm 77:9 - shut up;  Proverbs 1:28 - shall they;  Proverbs 21:13 - cry himself;  Proverbs 28:9 - even;  Ecclesiastes 8:6 - therefore;  Isaiah 1:15 - when;  Jeremiah 8:20 - GeneralEzekiel 8:18 - and though;  Hosea 5:15 - in their;  Hosea 8:2 - GeneralHosea 8:4 - set;  Micah 3:4 - cry;  Zechariah 7:13 - so;  Matthew 5:25 - whiles;  Matthew 7:7 - knock;  Matthew 7:13 - at;  Luke 9:26 - of him;  Luke 11:7 - the door;  Luke 11:9 - knock;  John 7:34 - GeneralActs 12:13 - knocked;  Acts 24:25 - when;  Hebrews 4:1 - any;  1 Peter 3:20 - wherein

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 13:25.And when the master of the house shall have arisen Though these words, as I hinted a little before, were spoken on a different and later occasion, I have chosen to pay more regard to the doctrine than to the time: for it is no slight assistance to the understanding to read, in immediate connection, those passages which are closely related in meaning. As Christ had declared that to many, who shall desire to enter into heaven, the door will not be open, he now asserts, that they gain nothing by occupying a place in the church because God will at length arise in judgment, and shut out from his kingdom those who now lay claim to a place in his family. He employs the comparison of the master of a house, who, having learned that some wicked and dissolute persons among his own domestics steal out unperceived during the night, and expose the house to thieves, rises and shuts the door, and does not allow those night-prowlers to enter, who have been wandering through the public streets at unseasonable hours. By these words he warns us, that we must avail ourselves of the opportunity, while it is offered: for so long as the Lord invites us to himself, the door is, as it were, open, that we may enter into the kingdom of heaven: but the greater part do not deign to move a step. Christ therefore threatens, that the door will at length be shut, and that those who are looking for companions are in danger of being refused admission.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:25". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-13.html. 1840-57.