Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:4

Or do you suppose that those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them were worse culprits than all the men who live in Jerusalem?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Siloam;   Tower;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Siloam;   Towers;   The Topic Concordance - Perishing;   Repentance;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Pardon;   Towers;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Siloam;   Towers;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Evil;   Jerusalem;   Suffering;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Disease;   Providence of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Siloam, Tower of;   Towers;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Pilate;   Siloam, Tower of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Repentance;   Siloam;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Anger (Wrath) of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Parable;   Siloam;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Death (2);   Discourse;   Evil (2);   Insurrection ;   Loans;   Mental Characteristics;   Palestine;   Political Conditions;   Providence;   Questions and Answers;   Reality;   Reserve;   Siloam;   Tower;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Siloam, Tower in;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Siloah;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Siloam, Tower, in;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Eighteen;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Siloah;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom or Church of Christ, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Repentance;   Sent;   Siloam;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The tower in Siloam - This tower was probably built over one of the porticoes near the pool, which is mentioned John 9:7. See also Nehemiah 3:15.

Debtors, οφειλεται, a Jewish phrase for sinners. Persons professing to be under the law are bound by the law to be obedient to all its precepts; those who obey not are reckoned debtors to the law, or rather to that Divine justice from which the law came. A different word is used when speaking of the Galileans: they are termed ἁμαρτωλοι, as this word is often used to signify heathens; see the notes on Luke 7:37; it is probably used here in nearly a similar sense. "Do ye who live in Jerusalem, and who consider your selves peculiarly attached to the law, and under the strongest obligations to obey it - do ye think that those Galileans were more heathenish than the rest of the Galileans, because they suffered such things? No. It was not on this account that they perished: both these cases exhibit a specimen of the manner in which ye shall all perish, if ye do not speedily repent, and turn to God."

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Or those eighteen - Jesus himself adds another similar case, to warn them - a case which had probably occurred not long before, and which it is likely they judged in the same manner.

Upon whom the tower in Siloam fell - The name Siloah or Siloam is found only three times in the Bible as applied to water - once in Isaiah 8:6, who speaks of it as running water; once as a pool near to the king‘s garden in Nehemiah 3:15; and once as a pool, in the account of the Saviour‘s healing the man born blind, in John 9:7-11. Josephus mentions the fountain of Siloam frequently as situated at the mouth of the Valley of Tyropoeon, or the Valley of Cheesemongers, where the fountain long indicated as that fountain is still found. It is on the south side of Mount Moriah, and between that and the Valley of Jehoshaphat. The water at present flows out of a small artificial basin under the cliff, and is received into a large reservoir 53 feet in length by 18 feet in breadth. The small upper basin or fountain excavated in the rock is merely the entrance, or rather the termination of a long and narrow subterranean passage beyond, by which the water comes from the Fountain of the Virgin. For what purpose the “tower” here referred to was erected is not known; nor is it known at what time the event here referred to occurred. It is probable that it was not far from the time when the Saviour made use of the illustration, for the manner in which he refers to it implies that it was fresh in the recollection of those to whom he spoke.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-13.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and killed them, think ye that they were offenders above all men that dwell in Jerusalem?

The tower of Siloam ... points to some construction with the pool of that name, and having to do with the aqueduct that brought water into it, and perhaps also with the Roman fortifications of the city. Josephus wrote that "Pilate expended the sacred treasure which is called corban upon the aqueducts, whereby he brought water from a distance of four hundred furlongs."[8]

Upon the presumption that the eighteen men were workers on the construction when the tower fell, it is easy to see how the Jews would have accounted them especially sinful; for not only were they working for the hated Romans, but they were being paid with money that Pilate had robbed from the temple treasure. However, Jesus rejected the notion that such conduct was the reason they were killed.

Significantly, this terrible accident was introduced into the conversation, not by his hearers, but by Christ himself; but he used it in exactly the same manner as he used the other incident, demanding of all people (and specifically including Israel) that they should repent or perish.

ENDNOTE:

[8] Josephus, Flavius, The Life and Works of Flavius Josephus, translated by William Whiston (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston), p. 677.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Or those eighteen,.... Men; the Persic version reads, "those twelve"; but all copies, and other versions, agree in this number:

upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them; there was a pool near Jerusalem, called the Pool of Siloam, John 9:7 near, or over which, was a tower built, which fell down and killed eighteen men; very likely as they were purifying themselves in the pool, and so was a case very much like the other, and might be a very late one: and this Christ the rather observes, and puts them in mind of, that they might see that not Galileans only, whom they had in great contempt, but even inhabitants of Jerusalem, died violent deaths, and came to untimely ends; and yet, as not in the former case, so neither in this was it to be concluded from hence, that they were sinners of a greater size, or their state worse than that of other men:

think ye that they were sinners; or debtors; for as sins are called debts, Matthew 6:12 so sinners are called debtors:

above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem? there might be, and doubtless there were, as great, or greater sinners, in that holy city, and among such that made great pretensions to religion and holiness, as they were.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in b Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

(b) That is, in the place, or river: for Siloam was a small river from which the conduits of the city came; see (John 9:7) ; (Isaiah 8:6); and therefore it was a tower or a castle, built upon the conduit side, which fell down suddenly and killed some.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-13.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

4. Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

[Upon whom the tower in Siloam fell.] The poor of Bethesda was the pool of Siloam; and from thence all that adjacent part of the city is denominated Siloam. And therefore it is left doubtful, whether this tower were built over the pool, that is, over the porches of the pool, or stood something remote from it in those parts that yet bore the name of Siloam. And if the article in does not determine the matter, we must continue still in doubt. Will grammar permit that that article should be prefixed to that part of the city? It is certain, that the very pool is called the pool of Siloam. So that I conceive this tower might be built over the porticoes of the pool, and might overwhelm those eighteen men, while they were busied about purifying themselves (and so this event falls in the more agreeably with that of the Galileans), or as they were expecting to be healed at the troubling of the waters: for it is very uncertain at what time this tower fell.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-13.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The tower in Siloam (ο πυργος εν Σιλωαμho purgos en Silōam). Few sites have been more clearly located than this. Jesus mentions this accident (only in Luke) of his own accord to illustrate still further the responsibility of his hearers. Jesus makes use of public events in both these incidents to teach spiritual lessons. He gives the “moral” to the massacre of the Galilean pilgrims and the “moral” of the catastrophe at Siloam.

Offenders (οπειλεταιopheiletai). Literally, debtors, not sinners as in Luke 13:2 and as the Authorized Version renders here. See note on Luke 7:41; Luke 11:4; Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:24-34.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Sinners ( ὀφειλέται )

Lit., debtors. Possibly with reference to the figure at the close of the last chapter. Compare Matthew 5:25; Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:24; Luke 11:4.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-13.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and killed them1, think ye that they were offenders above all the men that dwell in Jerusalem2?

  1. Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and killed them. Of this instance, also, there is no other historic mention. It, too was a small incident among the accidents of the day. The pool of Siloam lies near the southeast corner of Jerusalem, at the entrance of the Tyropean village which runs up between Mt. Zion and Moriah. The modern village of Siloam probably did not exist at that time. What tower this was is not known. As the city wall ran through the district of that fountain, it may possibly have been one of the turrets of that wall.

  2. Think ye that they were offenders above all the men that dwell in Jerusalem? This instance presents a striking contrast to the slaughter of which they had told him, for it was, (1) Inflicted upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem; and (2) It came upon them as an act of God.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Siloam; a fountain near the walls of the city of Jerusalem. The tower might have been a part of the wall. (Nehemiah 3:15.)

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-13.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

4 Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

Ver. 4. The tower of Siloam] A tower, belike, upon the wall of Jerusalem, which stood by the fish pool of Siloam, mentioned John 9:17.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 13:4. The tower in Siloam This tower, by its name, appears to have been built beside the bason, or pool of Siloam, (see John 9:7.) whose waters running into a lower bason, formed what was called the pool of fleeces, probably from the sheep which were washed in it. The upper bason, or pool of Siloam, seems to have been used as a bathing-place for men; and if it had porticos round it for them to undress in, will answer to the description of the pool of Bethesda, John 5:2. Besides, the situation of Bethesda, just by the sheep-gate, agrees with this supposition; for that gate had its name from the sheep-market which was kept at it, and to which the sheep were driven, after having been washed in the pool of fleeces. The tower of Siloam, therefore, which fell, and slew the eighteen persons here mentioned, may have been one of the porticos of Bethesda. This last instance might seem in some respects more to the purpose than the former, as there was no human interposition attending the death of these men; so that it seemed more immediately providential, than that of the Galileans whom Pilate had massacred.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-13.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Another instance our Saviour gives of persons that fell by a sudden death, even eighteen that were slain by the fall of a tower in Jerusalem. He takes occasion from thence to caution the Jews, that they did not rigidly censure the sufferers, or conclude that those have wrought the most sin, who are brought to most shame. Oh, how ready are we to judge of men's eternal condition, by their present visitation; and to conclude them the greatest offenders, upon whom God inflicts the most visible punishments! Our Saviour forbids this, and advises every one to look at home, telling the whole body of the Jews, that if they did not repent, they should all likewise perish, and that two ways:

1. By as certain a punishment as these did.

2. Ye shall likewise perish, by the same kind of punishment; you shall perish by the ruin of your whole city, as they did by the downfall of that tower, if a timely and sincere repentance does not intervene.

Learn hence, that we must judge of persons by their conversation towards God, and not by God's dispensation towards them; all things here fall alike to all. A sudden death, yea, a violent death, as it comes upon many men, so it may come upon the best of men, as well as others: think not, says Christ, that those eighteen were sinners above all that dwelt in Jerusalem, because they sufferd such things, I tell you, Nay; but except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.

Teaching us, that repentance is the only way and means to prevent punishment here, and perishing hereafter: Except ye repent, ye shall perish.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-13.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:4. , or) From the Galileans He passes in His discourse, inasmuch as His departure from Galilee was close at hand, to the people of Jerusalem; comp. Luke 13:33. He passes from slaughter inflicted by men to a casualty, which might seem to have happened by chance.— οἱ δέκα καὶ ὀκτὼ, those eighteen) A profound and mysterious judgment in the case of the deaths of so many joined together.— ὀφειλέται, debtors(129)) Comp. Luke 13:34.— κατοικοῦντας ἐν ἰερουσαλὴ΄) So the LXX. In Jerusalem, a city in other respects esteemed “the holy city.”

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 13:1"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Силоамская Район Иерусалима на южном конце нижнего города, где была хорошо известная купальня (ср. Ин. 9:7, 11). Очевидно, одна из башен, защищающих водопровод, обрушилась (вероятно, в процессе строительства), убив несколько человек. И снова вопрос людей относился к связи между бедствием и беззаконием («виновнее»). Иисус ответил, что такое бедствие не было для Бога способом умертвить особенно греховную группу людей, но было средством предупреждения всех грешников. В конечном счете губительный суд происходил над всеми, если они не раскаивались.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-13.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Tower in Siloam; probably in the wall of Jerusalem, near the south-east corner, where was the pool of Siloam. See comment on John 9:7.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-13.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4.Or those eighteen—A more striking instance, as being more purely providential. Of course history makes no mention of so ordinary an accident as the fall of a tower.

The tower of Siloam—Siloam is a fountain south-east of Jerusalem, for a full account of which see John 9:7. This tower seems to have stood near the fountain, or perhaps in the locality which received its name from the fountain.

Dwelt in Jerusalem—And this brings it home to those informants themselves. Not the poor Galileans alone, but the proud inhabitants of the mountain-girt capital even, must repent or perish.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-13.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Or those eighteen, on whom the tower in Siloam fell, and killed them, do you think that they were offenders above all the men who dwell in Jerusalem?”

He then takes another example, this time of an ‘accident’ that had happened in the vicinity of Jerusalem. Siloam was the reservoir from which Jerusalem’s water supply came. The tower may have been a watch tower, or it may have been connected with the aqueduct that Pilate built. Whatever tower it was it had clearly simply collapsed. So here the deaths had been purely connected with what could be called ‘an act of God’, that is, something not resulting from men’s actions. Was this then any different?

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:4. Those eighteen. An allusion to an occurrence then well known, but about which we have no further information.

The tower in Siloam. Probably a tower of the city wall near the pool of Siloam, or in that district, which may have been called by the name of the pool (see on John 9:7). The village named ‘Silwan’ occupies the site of the ancient suburb where the valley of Tyropoeon opens into that of the Kidron.

Offenders, literally ‘debtors’ (not the same word as in Luke 13:2) as in the Lord’s prayer (Matthew 6:12); there is no reason for supposing that they were actual debtors imprisoned in the tower. This accident (as it is supposed to have been) is classed by our Lord with the slaughter by Pilate. All such events are under God’s control. He is just in permitting them, but we are unjust in drawing uncharitable inferences from them.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-13.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 13:4. Jesus refers to another tragic occurrence, suggesting that He was acquainted with both. His ears were open to all current news, and His mind prompt to point the moral. The fact stated, otherwise unknown to us.— , word changed, in meaning the same as , moral debtors paying their debt in that dismal way.

The utterances of Jesus on this occasion do not bear on the general question: how far may lot be viewed as an index of character? which was not then before His mind. He assumed that the sufferers in the two catastrophes were sinners and even great sinners, so acquiescing in the popular view, because He wanted to point a lesson for the whole nation which He regarded as fast ripening for judgment. From the saying in the Teaching on the Hill concerning the Father in Heaven giving sunshine and rain to evil and good alike, it is evident that He had risen not only above popular current opinion, but even above the O.T. view as to the connection between physical and moral good and evil. That saying implies that there is a large sphere of Divine action within which moral distinctions among men are overlooked, that good may come to had men and evil to good men. To our Lord it would not have appeared impossible that some of the best men in Israel might be involved in the two calamities here mentioned.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-13.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Luke 13:4. Or those eighteen, &c. — The case here referred to seems to have occurred lately, and may seem, in some respects, more to the purpose than the former, as there was no human interposition attending the death of these men; so that their destruction appeared to be more immediately from Providence than that of the Galileans, whom Pilate had massacred: on whom the tower in Siloam fell — From the fountain of Siloam, which was without the walls of Jerusalem, a little stream flowed into the city, (Isaiah 8:6,) which was received in a kind of basin, thought by some to be the same with the pool of Bethesda. Being near the temple, it is no wonder that many frequented it for purification. And the calamity here spoken of, occasioned by the fall of a neighbouring tower, had probably happened at some late feast; and some of Christ’s hearers might then have been at Jerusalem.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/luke-13.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Or those eighteen, &c. The Almighty permitted these people to be thus chastised, that the others might be filled with fear and apprehension at the sight of another's dangers, and thus become the heirs of the kingdom of heaven. But then you will say, is another punished that I may become better? No; he is punished for his own crimes; but his punishment becomes to those that witness it the means of salvation. (St. John Chrysostom, Concio. 3. de Lazaro.)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-13.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

upon. Greek. epi. App-104.

in. Greek en. App-104. Not the same word as in Luke 13:21.

Siloam. See App-68. Compare Nehemiah 3:16. Isaiah 8:6. John 19:7.

slew = killed.

men. Greek. anthropos. App-123.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell - probably one of the towers of the city-wall, near the pool of Siloam. Of its fall nothing is known.

And slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) Upon whom the tower in Siloam fell.—Here, again, we have a reference to an incident not recorded elsewhere. It was clearly one that had impressed the minds of men with horror, as a special judgment. At or near to Siloam, the modern Birket-Silwan, is a swimming-pool, or tank (John 9:7), where the valley of Tyropœon opens into that of the Kedron. It was supplied through artificial conduits, and appears to have been one of a series of pools so fed. It is not unlikely, connected as Siloam thus was with the water-system of the city, that the tower in question was part of the works which Pilate had planned, and partly executed, for the construction of an aqueduct, and for which he appropriated part of the Corban or sacred treasure of the Temple, and if so, the popular excitement which this measure caused (see Note on Matthew 27:2) might well lead men to look on its fall as an instance of a divine judgment on what they regarded as an act of sacrilege.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Or those eighteen, upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them, think ye that they were sinners above all men that dwelt in Jerusalem?
in Siloam
Nehemiah 3:15; John 9:7,11
fell
1 Kings 20:30; Job 1:19
sinners
or, debtors.
7:41,42; 11:4; Matthew 6:12; 18:24
Reciprocal: Job 5:4 - they are crushed;  Matthew 21:28 - what;  Luke 13:2 - Suppose;  Acts 28:4 - No doubt

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.