Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:21

And the slave came back and reported this to his master. Then the head of the household became angry and said to his slave, ‘Go out at once into the streets and lanes of the city and bring in here the poor and crippled and blind and lame.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Feasts;   Gospel;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Kingdom of Heaven;   Opportunity;   Reproof;   Salvation;   Unbelief;   Worldliness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Haste;   Haste-Delay;   Home;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   Streets;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Cities;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Streets;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Food;   Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Gospel;   Grace;   Hospitality;   Kingdom of God;   Lord's Supper, the;   Poor and Poverty, Theology of;   Wealth;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Street;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Call, Calling;   Family;   Halt;   Lane;   Luke, Gospel of;   Master;   Poor, Orphan, Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Courtesy;   Discourse;   Dropsy;   Halting;   Householder;   Invitation;   Kindness (2);   Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Maimed;   Marriage;   Owner ;   Sacraments;   Street (2);   Unity (2);   Wealth (2);   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophet, the;   Supper;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Grapes;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Lanes;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Halt;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Lane;   Maimed;   Poor;   Poverty;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Showed his lord - Told his master of the excuses of those who had been invited. Their conduct was remarkable, and it was his duty to acquaint him with the manner in which his invitation had been received.

Being angry - Being angry at the people who had slighted his invitation; who had so insulted him by neglecting his feast, and preferring “for such reasons” their own gratification to his friendship and hospitality. So it is no wonder that God is angry with the wicked every day. So foolish as well as wicked is the conduct of the sinner, so trifling is his excuse for not repenting and turning to God, that it is no wonder if God cannot look upon their conduct but with abhorrence.

Go out quickly - The feast is ready. There is no time to lose. They who partake of it must do it soon. So the gospel is ready; time flies; and they who partake of the gospel must do it soon, and they who preach it must give diligence to proclaim it to their fellow-men.

The streets and lanes of the city - The places where the poor, etc., would be found. Those first invited were the rich, who dwelt at ease in their own houses. By these the Jews were intended; by those who were in the streets, the Gentiles. Our Lord delivered this parable to show the Jews that the Gentiles would be called into the kingdom of God. They despised the Gentiles, and considered them cast out and worthless, as they did those who were in the lanes of the city.

The maimed … - See the notes at Luke 14:13.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the servant came and told his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor and maimed and blind and lame.

The man giving the feast here moved to a wider circle than before; and this corresponds to the call of the publicans, harlots, and others of those classes despised by the leaders of Israel. The anger of the master of the house is the same as the anger of the king (Matthew 22:7), and in both parables it is the anger of God for their rejection of the Son of God which is indicated.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

So that servant came and showed his Lord these things,.... The several excuses which those that were bidden to the supper made. So the ministers of the Gospel come to God and Christ, and give an account of the success of their ministry, which is often with grief, and not with joy:

then the master of the house being angry; as well he might, at their ingratitude to him, their slighting of his kindness, and the contempt they poured upon his entertainment. Christ resented the impenitence and unbelief of the Jews, who were favoured with his ministry and miracles; and looked upon them with anger, and was grieved because or the hardness of their hearts; and threatened them with a sorer punishment, more aggravated condemnation, and more intolerable torments, than other men.

And said to his servants; the apostle, when their commission was enlarged to preach to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem:

go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city; to the Jews, who lived under a civil government, under the law of Moses; though the meaner sort of them, the poor, and such as knew not the law in such sort as the Scribes and Pharisees did, who rejected the counsel of God against themselves; and so are comparable to persons that lie about the streets, and live in lanes and alleys: and, it may also regard the Jews that were scattered abroad in other places, and the proselytes to their religion among the Gentiles; to whom the Gospel was first preached, after it was rejected by the Jews at Jerusalem and in Judea:

and bring in hither the poor; not in a literal, but in a mystical and spiritual sense; such as have no spiritual food to eat, but ashes, gravel, wind, and husks of carnal lusts and sins; nor any spiritual clothing, no righteousness, but what may be justly called filthy rags; nor money to buy either, but are in debt, owe ten thousand talents, and have nothing to pay; of which spiritual poverty some are sensible, and others are not.

And the maimed; who are debilitated and enfeebled by sin; and so weak and strengthless, that they are not able to keep the law of God; to atone for sin; to redeem themselves, or others, from the bondage of sin, Satan, and the law; to begin and carry on a work of grace and holiness in them; or to do any thing that is spiritually good:

and the halt; which is sometimes a character of persons that are in suspense about matters in religion, and know not which side to take; or who halt in religion, and falter and fail in the exercise of it: but here, of such who are in an incapacity of going or walking in a spiritual sense; as unto Christ, for life and salvation, without the drawings and influences of the Father's grace:

the blind: who are so, as to any saving knowledge of God in Christ; of Christ, and the way of righteousness, life, and salvation by him; of the plague of their own hearts, the exceeding sinfulness of sin, and the need of a Saviour; of the work of the Spirit of God upon their souls, and the necessity of it; and of the truths of the Gospel, in a spiritual and experimental way. In short, under these characters are represented natural and unconverted men, and the most vile, profligate, and abandoned of them; which are sometimes under the power of divine grace accompanying the ministration of the Gospel brought to Christ, and into his church. So the "blind and the lame", in 2 Samuel 5:6 are by the Targum on the place, explained of, חטאייא וחיבייא, "sinners and wicked persons".

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the c streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

(c) Wide and broad areas.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

came, and showed, etc. — saying as in Isaiah 53:1. “It is the part of ministers to report to the Lord in their prayers the compliance or refusal of their hearers” [Bengel].

angry — in one sense a gracious word, showing how sincere he was in issuing his invitations (Ezekiel 33:11). But it is the slight put upon him, the sense of which is intended to be marked by this word.

streets and laneshistorically, those within the same pale of “the city” of God as the former class, but the despised and outcasts of the nation, the “publicans and sinners” [Trench]; generally, all similar classes, usually overlooked in the first provision for supplying the means of grace to a community, half heathen in the midst of revealed light, and in every sense miserable.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Being angry (οργιστειςorgistheis). First aorist (ingressive) passive, becoming angry.

Quickly (ταχεωςtacheōs). The dinner is ready and no time is to be lost. The invitation goes still to those in the city.

Streets and lanes (τας πλατειας και ρυμαςtas plateias kai rhumas). Broadways and runways (broad streets and narrow lanes).

Maimed (αναπειρουςanapeirous). So Westcott and Hort for the old word αναπηρουςanapērous due to itacism (ειηei

=ανα in pronunciation). The word is compounded of πηροςana and pēros lame all the way up.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Streets ( πλατείας ) - lanes ( ῥύμας )

The former word from πλατύς , broad; the broad streets contrasted with the narrow lanes. Wyc., great streets and small streets.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

The servant came and showed his lord these things — So ministers ought to lay before the Lord in prayer the obedience or disobedience of their hearers.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

21 So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

Ver. 21. Then the master of the house being angry] And good reason he had: for, Non modo pluris putare quod utile videatur, quam quod honestum, sed haec etiam inter se comparare et in his addubitare, turpissimum est, saith the honest heathen (Cicero de Officiis). Surely as Pharaoh said of the Israelites, "They are entangled in the land, the wilderness hath shut them in," Exodus 14:3, so may we say of many, They are entangled in the creature, the world hath shut them in, they cannot come to Christ: they are shut up in a cave, as those five kings, Joshua 10:16-18; and have hardness of heart, as a great stone, rolled to the mouth, and honours, riches, and pleasures as so many keepers, &c.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

21.] τῆς πόλεως, still, in the city (Matthew 22:7); still, among the Jews.

πλατ. κ. ῥύμ., the broad and narrow streets: perhaps the πόλεις κ. κῶμαι through which the Lord and his Apostles journeyed preaching.

Here appear again the very persons of Luke 14:13; the representatives of the wretched and despised; = ὁ πολὺς ὄχλος, Mark 12:37; not perhaps without a hint, that only those who knew themselves to be spiritually poor and maimed and halt and blind would come to the gospel feast.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:21. ἀπήγγειλε, reported) It is the part of ministers to lay before the Lord in prayer an account of the obedience and disobedience of their hearers.— ὀργισθεὶς, being angry) Therefore He had invited them with entire sincerity.— ἔξελθε, go out) So Luke 14:23.— ταχέως, quickly) Because all the viands were already prepared, and, as it were, still hot; and the excellence of these viands is to be vindicated from contempt [such as had been thrown on them by the self-excusers] by means of other guests.— πλατείας, streets) which are larger.— ῥύμας, lanes) which are smaller.— τῆς πόλεως, of the city) We may suppose, that by these are meant those nations, among which the Jews were dispersed.—V. g. (Comp. however the following note, E. B.)]— τοὺς πτωχοὺς, the poor) Those already called [ κεκλημένοι, Luke 14:24] were those, who were accounted among the Jews to be the best men, Luke 14:1; Luke 14:3 [“the chief Pharisees and lawyers”]; the poor in the streets are the “Publicans and sinners” [who welcome the invitation in], ch. Luke 15:1 : see Matthew 21:31.— πτωχοὺς, the poor) whom otherwise no one feels disposed to invite.— ἀναπήρους, the maimed) whom no wife (woman) would take, Luke 14:20.— χωλοὺς, the lame) who cannot go ( πορεύομαι), Luke 14:19.— τυφλοὺς, the blind) who cannot see ( ἰδεῖν, Luke 14:18.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:16"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:21". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

нищих, увечных, хромых и слепых Т.е. людей, которых фарисеи склонны были рассматривать как нечистых или недостойных. Религиозные вожди осуждали Иисуса за то, что Он общался с блудницами и мытарями (ср. 5:29, 30; 15:1; Мф. 9:10, 11; 11:19; 21:31, 32; Мк. 2:15, 16).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Angry; because those who were bidden slighted his invitation by neglecting his feast for totally inadequate reasons.

Streets and lanes of the city; the dwelling-places of the poor and disabled, who here represent the publicans and sinners.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And the servant came, and told his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, ‘Go out quickly into the main streets and side roads of the city, and bring in here the poor and maimed and blind and lame.’ ”

So the servant returns to his lord and informs him of what all the invitees have said, and the excuses that they have made. Then the master of the house was furious, and he commanded the servant to go throughout the city, and bring in ‘the poor and maimed and blind and lame’. He will hold his feast, which is already prepared, and he will make sure that he has guests. For these will be pleased to come to his supper.

‘The poor and maimed and blind and lame.’ These are the very ones for whom God’s salvation is promised and were the ones who had been flocking to Jesus (Luke 4:18; Luke 7:22; Isaiah 35:5-6). They are as described in Luke 14:13.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

21.The master—Who is Christ himself.

Being angry—His judicial wrath and condemnation at the rejecters of his Gospel, the very men who were listening to his parable.

Streets and lanes of the city—Of Jerusalem, the representative of the theocracy.

The maimed—Who have lost a limb.

The halt—Who cannot walk from some disorder. These represent the publicans and the sinners, who go into heaven before the proud Pharisee.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:21. Being angry. God has ‘wrath’ in such circumstances.

Go out quickly. This substitution of guests took place at once, both in the parable and in fact

Into the broad ways and streets of the city. Still in the city, i.e., among the Jews.

The poor, etc. The very same classes as in Luke 14:13. From these no excuses were to be feared: ‘the blind had no field to view, the lame could not go behind his oxen, the maimed had no wife who could have hindered him from coming; only the feeling of poverty could have held them back; but this feeling also vanishes, since they must be in a friendly way led in by the servant’ (Van Oosterzee.) They represent the wretched and despised, ‘publicans and sinners,’ whom the ‘servant’ quickly brought in; since already they listened eagerly to the Saviour. But the absence of hindrance did not imply fitness for the feast.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:21. The servant has done his duty and returns to make his strange report.— , enraged; no wonder.— , go out quickly; no time to be lost, as all things are ready, but the thing chiefly to be noted is how the word answers to the master’s mood— , broad streets and narrow lanes (Matthew 6:2, q.v.); all sorts of people to be met with there and many of them: invitation to be broadcast, no one to be shunned however poor or unsightly; the poor, maimed, blind, and halt rather to be preferred, therefore expressly named—such is the master’s mood in his disgust at the behaviour of the well-to-do, propertied, happy classes—a violent but natural reaction.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

shewed = reported to.

lord. App-98.

the master of the house. App-98. Note these different titles, appropriate to each case, and see App-140.

the city. Jerusalem. See App-140.

the poor. Note the Figure of speech Polysyndeton (App-6) in this verse, emphasizing each class (with no climax at the end). The opposite of the Figure of speech in verses: Luke 14:13, Luke 14:14.

and. This is the Figure.

halt = lame. The same word as "lame" in Luke 14:13.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

So that servant came, and showed his lord these things. It is the part of ministers, says Bengel, to report to the Lord in their prayers the compliance or refusal of their hearers; and certainly, of those first bidden, it could only be said, "Lord, who hath believed our report, and to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?" (Isaiah 53:1.)

Then the master of the house, being angry - at the slight put upon him. At the same time there is grace in this anger, showing how sincere he was in issuing his invitation (Ezekiel 33:11).

Said to his servant, Go out quickly (all, now being ready, and waiting), into the streets and lanes of the city. Historically, this must mean those within the limits of the city of God (Psalms 87:3), but the despised and outcast classes of it-the "publicans and sinners," as Trench rightly conceives it; but generally it comprehends all similar classes, usually overlooked in the first provision for supplying the means of grace to a community-half pagan in the midst of revealed light, and in every sense miserable.

And bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(21) The master of the house being angry . . .—The element of righteous indignation is more strongly emphasised in the analogous parable of Matthew 22:6-7, where the mere apathy of those who were invited passes into scornful outrage.

The streets and lanes . . .—See Note on Matthew 6:2. The former word includes the “piazza” or “place” of an Eastern town; the latter is the long, narrow “street” or “lane” hardly wide enough for a man to ride through. It is the word used for the “street called straight” in Damascus (Acts 9:11). In the application of the parable these represent the by-ways of Jewish life—the suburbs, and the wretched courts and alleys, which no scribe deigned to enter, and which lay entirely outside the notice and the functions of the priesthood. “The poor, the maimed, the halt, and the blind” are the publicans and sinners and harlots and men of violence, who obeyed the summons and pressed eagerly into the kingdom. The repetition of the same four adjectives as had been used in Luke 14:13 is singularly suggestive. Our Lord was following, in the spiritual feast of His kingdom, the very rule which He had given for those who made great feasts on earth. Each class may possibly represent some spiritual fact which would seem to men a disqualification, but which was, for the pitying love of Christ, the very ground of invitation and acceptance.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

So that servant came, and shewed his lord these things. Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.
and shewed
9:10; 1 Samuel 25:12; Matthew 15:12; 18:31; Hebrews 13:17
being
24; Psalms 2:12; Matthew 22:7,8; Hebrews 2:3; 12:25,26; Revelation 15:1-8; 19:15
Go
24:47; Proverbs 1:20-25; 8:2-4; 9:3-4; Jeremiah 5:1; Zechariah 11:7,11; Matthew 21:28-31; John 4:39-42; 7:47-49; 9:39; Acts 8:4-7; James 2:5; Revelation 22:17
the poor
13; 7:22,23; 1 Samuel 2:8; Psalms 113:7,8; Matthew 11:5,28
the halt
Psalms 38:7; Isaiah 33:23; 35:6
Reciprocal: Proverbs 8:3 - GeneralSong of Solomon 3:2 - the streets;  Ezekiel 17:23 - under;  Matthew 13:47 - and gathered;  Matthew 15:31 - the maimed;  Matthew 20:7 - Go;  Matthew 22:9 - GeneralMark 9:43 - maimed;  Mark 16:15 - Go;  Hebrews 4:6 - some

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:21". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.