Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:24

For I tell you, none of those men who were invited shall taste of my dinner.'"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Feasts;   Gospel;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Kingdom of Heaven;   Opportunity;   Reprobacy;   Reproof;   Salvation;   Unbelief;   Worldliness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Home;   Israel;   Israel-The Jews;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Entertainments;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Food;   Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Church, the;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Gospel;   Grace;   Hospitality;   Kingdom of God;   Lord's Supper, the;   Wealth;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Call, Calling;   Family;   Luke, Gospel of;   Poor, Orphan, Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Discourse;   Doctrines;   Dropsy;   Invitation;   Kindness (2);   Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Marriage;   People ;   Sacraments;   Supper ;   Unity (2);   Wealth (2);   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Prophet, the;   Supper;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Meals;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Taste;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For I say unto you - These may be considered as the words of Jesus, making an application of the parable to the Pharisees before him.

None of those men - This cannot be understood as meaning that no “Jews” would be saved, but that none of those who had “treated him, in that manner” - none who had so decidedly rejected the offer of the gospel - would be saved. We may here see how dangerous it is “once” to reject the gospel; how dangerous to grieve away the Holy Spirit. How often God forsakes forever the sinner who has been once awakened, and who grieves the Holy Spirit. The invitation is full and free; but when it is rejected, and people turn willfully away from it, God leaves them to their chosen way, and they are drowned in destruction and perdition. How important, then, is it to embrace the gospel “at once;” to accept the gracious invitation, and enter without delay the path that conducts to heaven!

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

For I say unto you, that none of those men that were bidden shall taste of my supper.

As Jesus frequently did, he abandoned the metaphor here and stood forth in the majesty of his own right. He no longer addressed a servant (as did the lord in the parable), but said, "I say unto you (plural)," meaning those very men in his presence, that "none of those that were bidden (and refused) shall taste of my supper." Thus Jesus identified himself with the Father in heaven and himself as the one giving the supper, and the supper as the kingdom he came to set up.

Summers pointed out that Jesus did not mean "that no Jews would participate in God's mercy, but that none of those who rejected it would experience it."[35]

The application of this parable is not restricted to the immediate situation of Israel's rejection of Christ, for it is also descriptive of men in all ages who place personal, selfish desires above the kingdom obligations in Christ. In this parable, God's greatest gift, the salvation of the soul, appears in the analogy of an invitation to a great feast, the unspeakable tragedy being man's blind, foolish rejection of it.

Countless thousands of people were following Jesus, but the vast majority of them had no practical understanding of what following Jesus actually entailed. "He desired to check this light-hearted manner of following him, ... so he lays down the absolute demands for everyone who wishes to be his disciples."[36] What Jesus did in the next paragraph strongly suggests what Jesus did to that great throng in Capernaum who had followed him after the miracle of feeding the five thousand; and what was that? He stunned them with that metaphor of eating flesh and drinking his blood (John 6:52f). That cooled their superficial ardor; and the same effect was achieved by Jesus in this multitude through the equally hard sayings of the next paragraph.

[35] Ray Summers, op. cit., p. 179.

[36] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 397.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For I say unto you,.... Most solemnly affirm it, and even swear to it, nothing is more certain, or will be found more true:

that none of those men that were bidden: the impenitent and unbelieving Jews, the Scribes, and Pharisees, and the greater part of the nation; who first had the Gospel published to them, who are the many that were called, though few were chosen, and therefore came not; nor did, nor

shall taste of my supper: nor had they so much as a superficial knowledge of the Gospel, of the truths, blessings, promises, and ordinances of it; being given up to judicial blindness and hardness of heart; and from whom, in a little while, the Gospel was wholly taken; and is not yet afforded to them as a body; nor will till the latter day, when the veil shall be taken away, and they shall turn to the Lord, and all Israel shall be saved; but as for the first disbelievers and rejecters of Christ among the Jews, they died in their sins, and perished eternally.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

I say unto you, That none — Our Lord here appears to throw off the veil of the parable, and proclaim the Supper His own, intimating that when transferred and transformed into its final glorious form, and the refusers themselves would give all for another opportunity, He will not allow one of them to taste it. (Note. This parable must not be confounded with that of Proverbs 1:24-33; The Marriage Supper, Matthew 22:2-14).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

My supper (μου του δειπνουmou tou deipnou). Here it is still the Master of the feast who is summing up his reasons for his conduct. We do not have to say that Jesus shuts the door now in the face of the Jews who may turn to him.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For I say unto you, That none of those men which were bidden shall taste of my supper.

For refers to Go out, Luke 14:23.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And the lord said unto the servant, Go out into the highways and hedges, and constrain [them] to come in1, that my house may be filled2.

  1. Go out into the highways and hedges, and constrain [them] to come in. The second and third classes are depicted as needing to be constrained. This would be so, because they would hold themselves unworthy of the invitation. But they were to be constrained by moral and not by physical means (Matthew 14:22; 2 Corinthians 12:11; Galatians 2:14). Physical constraint would have been contrary to all custom, as well as impossible to one servant.

  2. That my house may be filled. Incidentally the parable shows the roominess of heaven and the largeness of divine hospitality, so that Bengel aptly observes,

    "Grace, no less than nature, abhors a vacuum."

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

24 For I say unto you, That none of those men which were bidden shall taste of my supper.

Ver. 24. None of those men] Since they thus judge themselves "unworthy of eternal life," Acts 13:46, and are miserable by their own election, Jonah 2:8.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 14:24

God's Call to the Young.

I. God's call, addressed to the soul of every man, is a call to him to be happy for ever; and this is the same thing as calling upon him to be holy, for holiness and happiness are one in God, and they are one also in the children of God. Holiness in God's creatures consists in their drawing near to God and becoming like unto Him. No man hath seen God, however, at any time; but the brightness of His glory and the express image of His Person man has seen; and although we now see Him no longer with our bodily eyes, yet with the story of His life and character handed down to us from those who did see and hear Him—with His Spirit ever dwelling amongst us, revealing Him to all those who desire Him—we do, for all practical purposes, see and know Him still.

II. As, then, Christ laboured all His life, beginning in His boyhood, to obey God's special call to Him, so we can best imitate Christ by labouring all our lives to obey God's special call to us. Now, this call is made known to us, not by a miracle, nor by a voice from heaven; but partly by the circumstances of our age and outward condition, and partly by the different faculties and dispositions of our minds. Generally, to all young persons God's call is to improve themselves; but what particular sort of improvement He calls you to, that you may learn from the station in life in which He has placed you.

T. Arnold, Sermons, vol. ii., p. 86.


References: Luke 14:25, Luke 14:26.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xix., p. 251; Ibid., vol. xxiv., p. 196; Preacher's Monthly, vol. viii., p. 230. Luke 14:25-30.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxix., p. 90. Luke 14:26.—G. Dawson, The Authentic Gospel, p. 160. Luke 14:26, Luke 14:27.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ii., p. 331. Luke 14:27W. C. E. Newbolt, Counsels of Faith and Practice, p. 200. Luke 14:28-30.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xvii., p. 40; Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xx., No. 1159. Luke 14:31, Luke 14:32.—Ibid. vol. xi., No. 632.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 14:24. I say unto you, that none, &c.— See the interpretation of the parable, Matthew 22 to which nothing need be added, except the explication of a circumstance mentioned here, which is not in the parable as it was then delivered, namely, the two distinct calls; first, to those in the streets and lanes of the city, and then to those in the highways and hedges; the former are supposed to be the Gentile proselytes, to whom the gospel was preached after it was rejected by the Jews; the latter are the idolatrous Gentiles, who had the gospel offered to them last of all. The circumstance too, in the present verse, is wanting in the repetition of the parable, Matthew 22. The thing signified by it is, that because the Jews rejected Jesus and his apostles, they were given over by God to a hardened and reprobate mind: only the reader must remember, that not the condition of individuals, but the general state of the nation is here described; in which view the parabolical representation is perfectly just, notwithstanding many individual Jews believed in Jesus, and obtained eternal

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-14.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

24.] I think with Stier (iii. 202, edn. 2), that our Lord here speaks in his own Person: ὑμῖν will fit no circumstance in the parable; for the householder and his servant are alone: the guests are not present.

Our Lord speaks, with His usual λέγω γὰρ ὑμῖν, to the company present: and half continuing the parable, half expounding it, substitutes Himself for the master of the feast, leaving it hardly doubtful who ἄνδρες ἐκεῖνοι οἱ κεκλημένοι are.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:24. γὰρ, for) This is to be referred to ἐξελθε, Go out in Luke 14:23. The Lord now seeks any persons whatever, rather than those who had been bidden, and yet rejected the invitation. [Nor is there any longer any room left open for the despisers of the Lord’s goodness.—V. g.]— ὑμῖν, unto you) The plural appertains to the ‘poor,’ the ‘maimed,’ etc., who had been brought in.— τῶν ἀνδρῶν, of the men) men of distinction and wealth though they were.— ἐκείνων, of those men) The pronoun has the force of putting them to a distance [the Lord putting them away from Him]. Here too that common saying holds good, “The absent must go without” [must want. He who absents himself must have no share in the good things of the supper].— γεύσεται, shall even taste) much less be allowed to enjoy. The contumacious Jews fall short of even the kingdom of grace [not to say the kingdom of glory] and any taste of it.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:16"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

никто из тех званых Т.е. тех, кто отказался. С презрением отвергнув приглашение, Израиль не мог войти на пир. Приговор Господа против них только утверждал их собственное решение. Большинство из них погибло от рук римлян в 70 г. по Р.Х. в результате исполнения Божьей кары. См. пояснения к Мф. 22:7; 23:36; 24:2.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

None of those men-taste of my supper; a solemn announcement of the coming rejection of the Jews as a nation for their unbelief. But the words apply in all their force to the multitudes now in Christian lands who despise and neglect the gospel, while converts from among the heathen nations are multiplied. God is angry with men who will not accept of his salvation, and be for ever happy; and when for ever miserable, they will see that no part of the blame attaches to him, but that it all belongs to them.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“ ‘For I say to you, that none of those men who were invited shall taste of my supper.’ ”

And His parable ends on the sombre note that none of those first invited will taste of his supper. These words are addressed by Jesus to His hearers, as the plural ‘you’ makes clear. He is enforcing the application of the parable so that they will not overlook it, and letting them know that it is His Supper that is in mind, that is, the Kingly Rule of God, where they may feast with Him. The finality in mind here parallels Luke 13:24-25. The parable was spoken in the first place to the Scribes and Pharisees. It was a warning to them that if they refused His invitation to enter under the Kingly Rule of God present in Him, they would find that rather than being blessed in the Kingly Rule of God (Luke 14:15), they would be rejected from it once and for all.

There may be in mind here the custom of sending food from banquets to guests who had been unable to attend (compare Nehemiah 8:10-12), so that Jesus is stressing that this does not apply here because their reasons for not attending were invalid. Let them take note. Once the door is closed. There will no longer be hope.

But it also contained a wider message for a wider audience, a message for some of His disciples who were probably with Him, and for those who would hear it from their lips. For Jesus was a master strategist. (And He may well have told the parable a number of times in different ways in different contexts. A good story is always worth repeating). It informed them that while the Scribes and Pharisees would on the whole not enter under the Kingly Rule of God, many ordinary people, and even outcasts, would be delighted to do so. They would come in their lameness and their blindness and their relative poverty, humbly and gratefully, to receive His salvation and His blessing. Blessed are the poor who seek Him, for the Kingly Rule of God is theirs (Luke 6:20). Like the crooked woman they would come to be made straight.

But the distinction between those in the city (Jerusalem) and those outside would certainly suggest to Luke and his readers that the invitation was also intended to go out to the Gentiles. For Jerusalem symbolised the Jews in Gentile eyes, and outside it would indicate the Gentiles. It is quite probable also that Jesus had this in mind, for He had a number of times made clear His interest in the Gentiles (Luke 4:25-27; Luke 7:9; Luke 11:31-32), and He knew that the Servant was to be a light to the Gentiles (Isaiah 42:6; Isaiah 49:6). But as always it was open to His hearers to apply it for themselves in their own thinking.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:24. For I say to you. It is a question whether this is the language of the giver of the feast or of Christ in His own person. Our Lord is represented as ‘servant’ throughout the parable, and ‘my supper’ seems more appropriate in the mouth of the lord of the servant; but ‘you’ is plural, and we have no mention of any one else than the servant as present during the conversation. The whole discourse gains greater vividness and point, if we regard the parable as closed in Luke 14:23, and our Lord as directly applying it here. And this is the more likely, since the whole lesson of the parable is summed up in the words: None of those men.... shall taste of my supper. As if He would say: This is the eating Dread in the kingdom of God, to which you look forward; though it is God’s feast, to which God has invited, it is ‘my supper,’ given in my honor, though I have come ‘in the form of a servant’ to invite you; and none of you will enter, because in refusing me, you refuse to obey the second summons of God who has before invited you through His word.—This discourse probably increased the already pronounced hostility.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:24. , etc.: to keep out the first invited in case they should change their minds. Of course this is spoken by the master, and is no comment of Jesus, though we read where we expect , the application to the hearers of the parable intruding itself at this one point. The reason of the master for wishing his house filled is not a high one. But the ethics of parables belong to this world. They must not be transferred into the spiritual sphere.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

none = not (Greek. ou. App-105) one.

men. App-123. Not the same word as in verses: Luke 14:2, Luke 14:16, Luke 14:30.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For I say unto you, That none of those men which were bidden shall taste of my supper.

For I say unto you, That none of those men which wore bidden shall taste of my supper. Our Lord here appears to throw off the veil of the parable, and proclaim the Supper His Own, intimating that when transferred and transformed into its final glorious form, and the refusers themselves would give all for another opportunity, He will not allow one of them to taste of it.

Remarks:

(1) Some of the richest of our Lord's teachings were quite incidental-drawn forth by casual circumstances occurring in His daily course, Thus, having accepted the invitation of this Pharisee to dine on the Sabbath day, the presence of a dropsical person, whom He resolves to cure, gives occasion to some important teaching on the right observance of that holy day. Then, observing the eagerness of the guests to occupy the places of honour at the table, He instructs them on the subject of Humility. Further, from the quality of the guests-apparently "brethren, kinsmen, rich neighbours" - He takes occasion to inculcate hospitality of a diviner sort, compassionate provision for the wants of those who could make no return, looking to the time when a return of another kind would be made them-when "the merciful should obtain mercy." 'Blessed lot that will be'-exclaims one of the guests, fired for the moment, at the thought of a Feast in the kingdom above-`Happy they who shall have the honour of sitting down to it!' Happy indeed, replies the Great Teacher and loving Redeemer; but the present despisers of it shall not be the future partakers of it.

Thus did His heavenly wisdom stream forth at every opening, however incidental. "Grace was poured into His lips," and was ready to pour out again whenever it would not be as pearls cast before swine. And should not His disciples strive to copy Him in this? "The lips of the righteous feed many" (Proverbs 10:21). There is a certain advantage in set discourses, to which the hearers set themselves to listen, expecting something lengthened, formal, solid. But the wisdom that comes out unexpectedly and casually has a freshness and charm special to itself. And it impresses the hearer, far more than all set discoursing, with the conviction that it is the genuine and spontaneous expression of the speakers present judgment and feeling. And when it comes as "line upon line, line upon line; precept upon precept, precept upon precept; here a little, and there a little" (Isaiah 28:10), its weight is all the greater. (Compare Deuteronomy 6:7.)

(2) The punishment attached to pride, and the reward promised to humility, make themselves good even in the ordinary workings of human society. When a man insists on thrusting himself, as Lord Bacon somewhere expresses it, into the center of things, there is a kind of social instinct that leads others to resist and take him down; but when one gives place to others, he not only disarms every disposition to take advantage of it, but is usually made to go before his neighbours. Thus, in the ordinary working of the social system, the great principles of the divine administration are revealed; on a small scale, indeed, and often without the smallest reference, on the part of men, to the divine will, but just on that account all the more strikingly manifesting and illustrating a moral government.

(3) It is a mistake in religion, alike common and fatal, to regard heaven as a state of simple happiness-mere bliss; higher and more refined than anything conceivable now, but not essentially dependent upon present character. If one thing is clearer than another in the Scripture view of the future state, it is that, in point of moral and religious character, it will be but the perfection and development of the present state, both in the righteous and the wicked; and all the conclusions, even of Natural Theology, confirm that view of it. In vain, therefore, do worldlings, living without God and minding only earthly things, exclaim, Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God! Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his! The best of heaven's bliss is but getting face to face with Him whom not having seen we love, in whom, though now we see him not, yet believing, we rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory.

But if we have never felt any of this love to Him and joy in Him, are we capable of heaven? To be "forever with the Lord," is transport, even in prospect, to such as have tasted that He is gracious, experienced the blessedness of reconciliation, learned to cry, Abba, Father, walk daily in the light of His countenance, and live to please Him. In such as these, it is but a change of sphere, and the new life perfected; it is but the bursting of the flower, the ripening of the fruit. Amidst all its novelties, the children of God will find themselves at home in heaven-its company congenial, its services familiar, its bliss not strange. But if so, how is it possible that those who disrelished its language, its exercises, its fellowship here, should have any capacity for it, and, wanting this, be admitted to it? No, "none of those men who were bidden" - but only insulted Him who prepared the feast by slighting His invitation - "shall taste of His Supper." "Be not deceived: God is not mocked; for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap."

(4) How often is it found that while the Gospel is slighted by the classes who enjoy the greatest advantages, who might be expected the most to appreciate it, and whom one would most gladly see brought under its power, it is embraced by those to whom it has last of all been presented, and-judging as we are apt to do-the least likely to value it. Thus it ever is, that there are last which come to be first, and first last.

(5) The call addressed to those in the highways and hedges is a glorious directory to the preachers of the Gospel. If such are invited and expected to come straight to the feast, all preparation is out of the question; and all misgivings on their own part, or obstructions on the part of others, on the ground of want of preparation, must be met with one answer-`The invitation found us in that condition, and required immediate compliance.' If this great Gospel truth is not clearly apprehended, and by the preacher himself felt as the sole ground of his own standing in Christ, he cannot urge it upon others, and still less so deal with them as to "compel them to come in." But having gotten over all his own scruples on that one principle, that the invitations of the Gospel are to sinners as such-to sinners just as they are-he can and will then effectually meet all difficulties and scruples of earnest, anxious souls; and as he cries to them --

`Come, ye sinners, poor and needy, Weak and wounded, sick and sore, Jesus ready stands to save you,

Full of pity, love, and power: He is able, He is willing, ask no more' -

He shall hear of one and another falling down before the cross, and saying:

`Just as I am-without one plea, But that Thy blood was shed for me,' And that Thou bidd'st me come to Thee - O Lamb of God! I come. `Just as I am-and waiting not To rid my soul of one dark blot, To Thee, whose blood can cleanse each spot

- O Lamb of God! I come.'

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) None of those men which were bidden . . .—Here again we may not press a literal interpretation of the parable. The absolute exclusion of the whole company of the first-invited guests has its anti-type in the general rejection of Israel from fellowship with the Church of Christ. It lies in the very nature of a parable that it deals roughly with general facts, and so it passes over in this instance what would have answered to the admission of a chosen few, “the remnant according to the election of grace” (Romans 11:5.)

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For I say unto you, That none of those men which were bidden shall taste of my supper.
Proverbs 1:24-32; Matthew 21:43; 22:8; 23:38,39; John 3:19,36; 8:21,24; Acts 13:46; Hebrews 12:25,26
Reciprocal: Proverbs 1:26 - GeneralIsaiah 65:13 - my servants shall eat;  Matthew 8:11 - That;  Matthew 20:16 - for;  Matthew 21:41 - and will let out;  Luke 14:21 - being

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.