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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:32

"Or else, while the other is still far away, he sends a delegation and asks for terms of peace.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Or else - If he is not able. If he is satisfied that he would be defeated.

An ambassage - Persons to treat with an enemy and propose terms of peace. These expressions are not to be improperly pressed in order to obtain from them a spiritual signification. The general scope of the parable is to be learned from the connection, and may be thus expressed:

1. Every man who becomes a follower of Jesus should calmly and deliberately look at all the consequences of such an act and be prepared to meet them.

2. Men in other things act with prudence and forethought. They do not begin to build without a reasonable prospect of being able to finish. They do not go to war when there is every prospect that they will be defeated.

3. Religion is a work of soberness, of thought, of calm and fixed purpose, and no man can properly enter on it who does not resolve by the grace of God to fulfil all its requirements and make it the business of his life.

4. We are to expect difficulties in religion. It will cost us the mortification of our sins, and a life of self-denial, and a conflict with our lusts, and the enmity and ridicule of the world. Perhaps it may cost us our reputation, or possibly our lives and liberties, and all that is dear to us; but we must cheerfully undertake all this, and be prepared for it all.

5. If we do not deliberately resolve to leave all things, to suffer all things that may be laid on us, and to persevere to the end of our days in the service of Christ, we cannot be his disciples. No man can be a Christian who, when he makes a profession, is resolved after a while to turn back to the world; nor can he be a true Christian if he “expects that he will” turn back. If he comes not with a “full” purpose “always” to be a Christian; if he means not to persevere, by the grace of God, through all hazards, and trials, and temptations; if he is not willing to bear his cross, and meet contempt, and poverty, and pain, and death, without turning back, he “cannot” be a disciple of the Lord Jesus.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Or else, while the other is a great way off,.... Upon his march, with resolution to come up and give battle, though as yet at a distance:

he sendeth an ambassage; or men, with an embassy to him:

and desireth conditions of peace; greatly to his disadvantage and reproach: so to give out, and leave off fighting with sin, Satan, and the world, and make peace with them, is shameful and scandalous; but on the other hand, such who have engaged in this war, should pursue it with rigour and courage; considering that God is on their side; that Christ is the captain of their salvation; that the Spirit of God that is in them, is greater than he that is in the world; that angels encamp around them; that it is a good cause they are engaged in; that they have good weapons, the whole armour of God provided for them; are sure of victory, and shall at last enjoy the crown of life, righteousness and glory.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Or else (ει δε μηγεei de mēge). Same idiom in Luke 5:36. Luke is fond of this formula.

An ambassage (πρεσβειανpresbeian). Old and common word for the office of ambassador, composed of old men (πρεσβειςpresbeis) like Japanese Elder Statesmen who are supposed to possess wisdom. In the N.T. only here and Luke 19:14.

Asketh conditions of peace (ερωται προς ειρηνηνerōtāi pros eirēnēn). The use of ερωταωerōtaō in this sense of beg or petition is common in the papyri and Koiné generally. The original use of asking a question survives also. The text is uncertain concerning προς ειρηνηνpros eirēnēn which means with ερωταωerōtaō to ask negotiations for peace. In B we have ειςeis instead of προςpros like Luke 14:28. Most MSS. have ταta before προςpros or ειςeis but not in Aleph and B. It is possible that the ταta was omitted because of preceding ταιtai (ομοεοτελευτονhomoeoteleuton), but the sense is the same. See note on Romans 14:19 τα της ειρηνηςta tēs eirēnēs the things of peace, which concern or look towards peace, the preliminaries of peace.


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Asketh ( ἐρωτᾷ )

On a footing of equality: king treating with king. See on Luke 11:9.

Conditions of peace ( τὰ πρὸς εἰρήνην )

Lit., this looking toward peace: preliminaries. Compare Romans 14:19, things which make for peace ( τὰ τῆς εἰρήνης , the things of peace)i1.


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Or what king, as he goeth to encounter another king in war, will not sit down first and take counsel1 whether he is able with ten thousand to meet him that cometh against him with twenty thousand?
    Luke 14:31,32

  1. Or what king, as he goeth to encounter another king in war, will not sit down first and take counsel, etc. Is the adversary here God or the devil? As warring against God is no part of discipleship, it might seem that the conflict was with Satan. But the case supposed is that of a man who, after counting the cost, is about to decline taking up his cross--about to rebel against the claims of God. But while in this rebellious state he sees a superior force coming against him. This superior force cannot be the devil's, for Jesus could not counsel any to make peace with him, as the parable advises. The superior force, then, is God's, and the lesson here is that however fearful the task of being a disciple may be, it is not so dreadful as to fight against God. As soon as the hesitating man takes in his thought, he will immediately take up the cross which he was about to refuse.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

32 Or else, while the other is yet a great way off, he sendeth an ambassage, and desireth conditions of peace.

Ver. 32. He sendeth an embassage] Mittamus preces et lachrymas cordis legatos, Let us send envoys the prays and tears of our heart, saith Cyprian. Currat poenitentia, ne praecurrat sententia, saith Chrysologus. Repent, ere it be too late.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

32. τὰ πρὸς εἰρ.] So τὰ πρὸς πόλεμον, Xen. Anab. iv. 3. 10, but there, ‘the resources of war;’—here, conditions, preliminaries, of peace.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-14.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:32. ἐρωτᾷ, he beggeth) The king finds it an easier matter to prevail on himself to expend [to expose to the risks of war] an army, than to beg a peace. This begging of peace, therefore, expresses the hatred of one’s own soul, wherewith one, having utterly denied self, gives himself up to dependence on pure and unmixed grace. We may also, by changing the figure, understand peace as the avoidance of hatred on the part of his own people, which is a bad kind of peace.(152)


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:28"


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:32". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Ambassage; persons sent from one government to another, to represent the interests of their country. The point of this and the preceding comparison is, that they who undertake Christ’s service should count the cost beforehand.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

32. ἐρωτᾷ τὰ πρὸς εἰρήνην. This is sufficient to overthrow the interpretation which sees Man and Satan in the warring kings. Another view is that it implies the hostility of man to God, and the urgent need of being reconciled to Him (e.g. Bengel says on the words ‘king,’ “Christiana militia regale quiddam”). That however is never a calculated hostility which deliberately sits down and expects to win the victory; otherwise it would be a good inference that “a Christian’s weakness is his strength.” It is a mistake, and one which often leads to serious errors, to press unduly the details of parables; as when for instance some would see in the 10,000 soldiers a reference to the Ten Commandments. The general lesson is—Do not undertake what you have neither the strength nor the will to achieve, nor that in which you are not prepared, if need be, to sacrifice life itself.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-14.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

32. Great way off—The sinner had better make no start at all in the service of Christ than to make a false start. He may as well give up to the devil first as last. For a false start is in itself no start at all; it being only a fit of self-deception, terminating in a self-disgrace, and, what is worse, a disgrace to the cause of religion.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:32. Asketh conditions of peace. This represents our throwing ourselves upon God’s mercy in view of our own insufficiency. ‘A Christian’s weakness is his strength.’ Thus the previous illustration is supplemented.—This making of peace opposes the view that the conflict is with Satan or with sin. We are naturally at peace with these. When we feel that Satan is too powerful an adversary, we do not make peace, or ask for an armistice, but ask God to help us, and until we turn to Him, we never feel that Satan is an adversary. Another reason for preferring the other interpretation is that it alone brings in a gospel thought of mercy, which would scarcely be wanting even in so severe a discourse.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Greek.else = If not.

ambassage = embassy. Only here and Luke 19:14.

desireth = asketh, or seeketh. App-134.

conditions = the [terms].

of = for. Greek. pros. App-104.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Or else, while the other is yet a great way off, he sendeth an ambassage, and desireth conditions of peace.

Or else, while the other is yet a great way off, he sendeth an ambassage, and desireth conditions of peace. If he see that he has no hope of bearing up against such odds, he will feel that nothing remains for him but to make the best terms he can.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(32) Desireth conditions of peace.—Literally, the things that make for peace. The phrase is the same as that in Luke 19:42, “the things that belong unto thy peace.” Are we to see any special significance in this addition to the general teaching of the previous verse, and if so, what is it? The answer seems to be that what our Lord teaches is the necessity of thoroughness in what we do. If we cannot make up our minds to the cost involved in warring against the world and its evil, we had better come to terms with it, and live in such peace as we can thus gain. If we shrink from the thought of fighting against God, we had better accept His conditions of peace. The worst folly of all is to enter into the conflict with a wavering will, not caring to know what “the things belonging to our peace” actually are, or to endeavour to stand apart in an impossible neutrality. Taking the highest application of the parable, He who spoke it had counted the cost, and therefore carried on the war with evil to the last, and would make no terms with it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Or else, while the other is yet a great way off, he sendeth an ambassage, and desireth conditions of peace.
and desireth
12:58; 1 Kings 20:31-34; 2 Kings 10:4,5; Job 40:9; Matthew 5:25; Acts 12:20; James 4:6-10

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:32". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Thursday, November 14th, 2019
the Week of Proper 27 / Ordinary 32
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