Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:34

"Therefore, salt is good; but if even salt has become tasteless, with what will it be seasoned?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Hypocrisy;   Jesus, the Christ;   Manure;   Proverbs;   Salt;   Thompson Chain Reference - Association-Separation;   Contact;   Personal Contact;   Salt, the;   Salt, Christians as, the;   The Topic Concordance - Salt;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Agriculture or Husbandry;   Parables;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jesus Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Minerals and Metals;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ambassage;   Anger (2);   Discourse;   Fellowship (2);   Good ;   Ideas (Leading);   Poet;   Power;   Questions and Answers;   Salt (2);   Sermon on the Mount;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Salt;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Savor;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Agriculture;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Salt is good - See on Matthew 5:13; (note), and Mark 9:50; (note).

On the subject referred to this place from Luke 14:23, Compel them to come in, which has been adduced to favor religious persecution, I find the following sensible and just observations in Dr. Dodd's notes.

    "1st. Persecution for conscience' sake, that is, inflicting penalty upon men merely for their religious principles or worship, is plainly founded on a supposition that one man has a right to judge for another in matters of religion, which is manifestly absurd, and has been fully proved to be so by many excellent writers of our Church.

"2nd. Persecution is most evidently inconsistent with that fundamental principle of morality, that we should do to others as we could reasonably wish they should do to us; a rule which carries its own demonstration with it, and was intended to take off that bias of self-love which would divert us from the straight line of equity, and render us partial judges betwixt our neighbors and ourselves. I would ask the advocate of wholesome severities, how he would relish his own arguments if turned upon himself? What if he were to go abroad into the world among Papists, if he be a Protestant; among Mohammedans if he be a Christian? Supposing he were to behave like an honest man, a good neighbor, a peaceable subject, avoiding every injury, and taking all opportunities to serve and oblige those about him; would he think that, merely because he refused to follow his neighbors to their altars or their mosques, he should be seized and imprisoned, his goods confiscated, his person condemned to tortures or death? Undoubtedly he would complain of this as a very great hardship, and soon see the absurdity and injustice of such a treatment when it fell upon him, and when such measure as he would mete to others was measured to him again.

"3rd. Persecution is absurd, as being by no means calculated to answer the end which its patrons profess to intend by it; namely, the glory of God, and the salvation of men. Now, if it does any good to men at all, it must be by making them truly religious; but religion is not a mere name or a ceremony. True religion imports an entire change of the heart, and it must be founded in the inward conviction of the mind, or it is impossible it should be, what yet it must be, a reasonable service. Let it only be considered what violence and persecution can do towards producing such an inward conviction. A man might as reasonably expect to bind an immaterial spirit with a cord, or to beat down a wall with an argument, as to convince the understanding by threats and tortures. Persecution is much more likely to make men hypocrites than sincere converts. They may perhaps, if they have not a firm and heroic courage, change their profession while they retain their sentiments; and, supposing them before to be unwarily in the wrong, they may learn to add falsehood and villany to error. How glorious a prize! especially when one considers at what an expense it is gained. But,

"4th. Persecution tends to produce much mischief and confusion in the world. It is mischievous to those on whom it falls; and in its consequences so mischievous to others, that one would wonder any wise princes should ever have admitted it into their dominions, or that they should not have immediately banished it thence; for, even where it succeeds so far as to produce a change in men's forms of worship, it generally makes them no more than hypocritical professors of what they do not believe, which must undoubtedly debauch their characters; so that, having been villains in one respect, it is very probable that they will be so in another, and, having brought deceit and falsehood into their religion, that they will easily bring it into their conversation and commerce. This will be the effect of persecution where it is yielded to; and where it is opposed (as it must often be by upright and conscientious men, who have the greater claim upon the protection and favor of government) the mischievous consequences of its fury will be more flagrant and shocking. Nay, perhaps, where there is no true religion, a native sense of honor in a generous mind may stimulate it to endure some hardships for the cause of truth. 'Obstinacy,' as one well observes, 'may rise as the understanding is oppressed, and continue its opposition for a while, merely to avenge the cause of its injured liberty.'

"Nay, 5th. The cause of truth itself must, humanly speaking, be not only obstructed, but destroyed, should persecuting principles universally prevail. For, even upon the supposition that in some countries it might tend to promote and establish the purity of the Gospel, yet it must surely be a great impediment to its progress. What wise heathen or Mohammedan prince would ever admit Christian preachers into his dominions, if he knew it was a principle of their religion that as soon as the majority of the people were converted by arguments, the rest, and himself with them, if he continued obstinate, must be proselyted or extirpated by fire and sword? If it be, as the advocates for persecution have generally supposed, a dictate of the law of nature to propagate the true religion by the sword; then certainly a Mohammedan or an idolater, with the same notions, supposing him to have truth on his side, must think himself obliged in conscience to arm his powers for the extirpation of Christianity; and thus a holy war must cover the face of the whole earth, in which nothing but a miracle could render Christians successful against so vast a disproportion in numbers. Now, it seems hard to believe that to be a truth which would naturally lead to the extirpation of truth in the world; or that a Divine religion should carry in its own bowels the principle of its own destruction.

    "But, 6th. This point is clearly determined by the lip of truth itself; and persecution is so far from being encouraged by the Gospel, that it is most directly contrary to many of its precepts, and indeed to its whole genius. It is condemned by the example of Christ, who went about doing good; who came not to destroy men's lives, but to save them; who waived the exercise of his miraculous power against his enemies, even when they most unjustly and cruelly assaulted him, and never exerted it to the corporal punishment, even of those who had most justly deserved it. And his doctrine also, as well as his example, has taught us to be harmless as doves; to love our enemies; to do good to them that hate us; and pray for them that despitefully use and persecute us."

From all this we may learn that the Church which tolerates, encourages, and practises persecution, under the pretense of concern for the purity of the faith, and zeal for God's glory, is not the Church of Christ; and that no man can be of such a Church without endangering his salvation. Let it ever be the glory of the Protestant Church, and especially of the Church of England, that it discountenances and abhors all persecution on a religious account; and that it has diffused the same benign temper through that State with which it is associated.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-14.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Salt therefore is good: but even if the salt have lost its savor, wherewith shall it be seasoned? It is fit neither for the land nor for the dunghill; men cast it out. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.

For a more detailed study of the salt metaphor, see my Commentary on Matthew, Matthew 5:13. The use of the metaphor here is different from that in Matthew. Christ used many of his illustrations on various occasions and for the purpose of making different points. Spence declared that:

Here "salt" stands for the spirit of self-sacrifice, self-renunciation. When in a man, or in a nation, or in a church, that salt is savourless, then that spirit is dead; and there is no hope remaining for the man, for the people, or the church.[41]

Likewise Dr. Ash wrote that: "SALT represented disciples who would count the cost and pay the price. Men who would not were as worthless as tasteless salt."[42]

This passage has no bearing whatever upon the doctrine of the final perseverance of the saints, or impossibility of apostasy; but that does not prevent the allegation that it does. Based upon the chemical fact that sodium chloride CANNOT lose its taste, that salt "(cannot) ever lose its peculiar pungency and power to hinder corruption," Bliss concluded that "no true subject of regenerating grace ever has or ever will become utterly void of new life."[43] However, Christ said nothing of sodium chloride, the salt of that day being an utterly different product, which not only COULD but frequently did lose its taste (see my Commentary on Matthew, Matthew 5:13). The illustration as here given by Christ posed no impossibility at all. "If even the salt have lost its savor" was certainly a development that Christ held to be possible, for he went further and declared that "It is fit neither for land nor for the dunghill."

Whereas in Matthew Christians are viewed as "the salt of the earth," here it is the spirit of renunciation and sacrifice within Christians which is the salt.

Strict and demanding as the conditions of true discipleship assuredly are, the rewards are abundantly sufficient to justify any and all sacrifices required in following the Lord Jesus Christ.

[41] Ibid.

[42] Anthony Lee Ash, The Gospel according to Luke (Austin, Texas: Sweet Publishing Company, 1972), p. 63.

[43] George R. Bliss, An American Commentary on the New Testament (Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: The Judson Press,), Vol. II, Luke, p. 239.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Salt is good,.... See Gill on Matthew 5:13, Mark 10:50.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

7 Salt [is] good: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned?

(7) The disciples of Christ must be wise, both for themselves and for others: otherwise they become the most foolish of all.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-14.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

34. Salt is good;: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned?

[But if the salt have lost his savour.] This hath a very good connection with what went before. Our Saviour had before taught how necessary it was for him that would apply himself to Christ and his religion, to weigh and consider things beforehand, how great and difficult things he must undergo, lest when he hath begun in the undertaking he faint and go back; he apostatize, and become unsavoury salt.

Savour suits very well with the Hebrew word which both signifies unsavoury and a fool; Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? Thy prophets have seen for thee vanity and that which is unsavoury. [Vain and foolish things, AV] The Greek, vain things and folly. He gave not that which is unsavoury to God. The Greek, he did not give folly to God, [nor charged God foolishly, AV].

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-14.html. 1675.

Vincent's Word Studies

Have lost its savor

See on Matthew 5:13.

Shall it be seasoned

See on Mark 9:50.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned?

Salt — Every Christian, but more eminently every minister. Matthew 5:13; Mark 9:50.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Salt therefore is good: but if even the salt have lost its savor1, wherewith shall it be seasoned?

  1. Salt therefore is good: but if even the salt have lost its savor,
  2. wherewith shall it be seasoned? Our Lord twice before used such language. See and see . Salt is here used as a symbol of perseverance.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Salt, without its savor, denotes the form and semblance of piety without its spirit.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-14.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

34 Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned?

Ver. 34. Salt is good] This was a sentence much in our Saviour’s mouth, Matthew 5:13; Mark 9:50; and is here used to set forth the desperate condition of apostates.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 14:34

I. What is it in the spiritual life which answers to the influence of salt in the natural life? I answer: A certain deep, secret power of the Spirit of God, acting generally through the word, in the conscience, upon the intellect, the affections, the will of a man, whereby he is made and kept in a state of inward life and purity; and whereby, again, he is, among his fellowmen, with whomsoever he comes in contact a means and channel of good, of truth, of a sound state of holiness and happiness. The salt in man is the Divine part that is in him; a presence imbuing all his thoughts with God; and the salt which such men carry, the salt of the Church, is that expansive propagating power with which the truth is entrusted for God, that it may cleanse, change, save the whole earth.

II. For this holy property we are all responsible. For it is a thing greatly depending upon our use and cultivation of it. It can easily be diminished, and it can continually be increased. A very little sin, a very little carelessness, a very little worldly contact, a very little self-indulgence, a very little grieving of the Spirit of God, will impoverish it, vitiate it, neutralise it. It will lose its virtue, it will grow vapid, it will cease to be. But one true prayer, one act pleasing to God, one honouring of the Holy Ghost, will immediately quicken it, and give it a keener power. For it is very sensitive and very susceptible to all influence. The soul's atmosphere is always affected, moment by moment.

III. It is God's common law, that that which is best in its use, is also that which is worst in its abuse. The brine which does not cure, destroys. The same salt which fertilises the field can turn a garden into a desert. Just so it is with that mystic, hallowing, self-diffusing principle in heavenly life which is in the soul. Trifle with it, and it will go; and if it go, the emptiness will be greater than if it had never been. Shut it up, and do not use it; and by stagnation it will grow corrupt. Turn it away from the purpose for which it was implanted, and by retribution it will become your misery and your sin. Lose it, and it will be, at the last day, your heaviest condemnation. "Salt is good: but if the salt once lose his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned?"

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 5th series, p. 245.


These words bring us at once, as Christian citizens, into contact with the most fearful and difficult problem of our times.

I. If there ever was a people since the first promulgation of the Gospel, who from their position, their political advantages, their commercial influence, ought to be able practically to fulfil the noble office of being the salt of the earth, it is our own nation: and in some measure I do trust we are answering to this character. Let us not conceal either side of the picture. We need encouragement as well as exhortation. To some extent we have held forth the word of truth, and are doing the work of evangelising the world. Some grains of the salt yet possess and exert their conserving and quickening power. But very many have lost their savour. In the midst of this Christian people there are large portions of the social body which are utterly without power for good, and not only so, but in themselves the subjects of moral and spiritual decay. These are the salt that has lost its savour.

II. With such salt in the physical world, the case, as our Saviour's words go on to state, is hopeless. The mere material, once endued by God's creative hand with vivid and salutary qualities, and having lost these qualities, no man may requicken or restore. And thus, too, it would be with mere animal life. The loss of vital power no human means can remedy. Of both of these we can say only, "The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away." In neither case is there bestowed the gift of self-guidance, of conscious reflection and determinate action. In neither of them is there responsible free-will, able of itself to fall—able to seek His help from whom is every good gift, again to rise. But with man's spirit; thank God, it is not so. Here, the salt may lose its savour, and be again seasoned. Here we are in a higher region of being altogether. Here God acts, according indeed to the same analogies, and consistently with the same unchangeable attributes, but by different and higher laws, belonging to the spiritual kingdom. And here it is not as in creation, where He carries on His mysterious agencies in secret alone. In the far nobler work of recreation and regeneration He condescends to accept His people as His fellow-workers. By persuasion, by preaching, by the ordinances of grace, all administered by human means, He is pleased to carry on the conversion of the souls of men, and the restoration to life and vigour of the dead and withered members of the Church.

H. Alford, Quebec Chapel Sermons, vol. iii., p. 203.


Three times, and in three different connections, this memorable proverb is recorded in our Lord's teaching—in each case in reference to the failure of that which was excellent and hopeful. In St. Matthew it is applied generally to the influence of His new people on the world; in St. Mark, to the danger to ourselves of the careless or selfish use of our personal influence; in St. Luke, to the conditions of sincere discipleship. But in all cases it contemplates the possible failure of religion to do its perfect work. There are temptations and mischiefs arising not of our religion itself, out of the position in which it places us and the things which it encourages in us. Let us take two or three examples.

I. "Who loved me," says St. Paul, "and gave Himself for me." There are hardly more affecting words in the New Testament, and they describe what must thrill through every man's mind who believes in the Cross of Christ, just in proportion as he grasps its meaning. But it is not without reason that we are told that what should kindle his boundless devotion may be full of peril. It may touch the subtle springs of selfishness. Religious autobiography is not without warnings that the true and awful words, "What shall a man give in exchange for his soul?" may be perverted into a narrow and timid care for it, worried with petty fears and scruples, or cares ignoble and degrading, because without interest in God's great purposes without a generous trust in His wisdom and mercy, without sympathy for others.

II. Again, religion must be active; and towards the evils which are in the world it is bound to be hostile and aggressive. And yet this necessity shows us too often a religion, a very sincere and honest religion, which cannot avoid the dangers which come with activity and conflict. It sometimes seems to lose itself and its end in the energy with which it pursues its end.

III. Again, religion is a matter of the affections; and men may be led astray by their affections in religion as in other things. We must carry the remembrance of the awful saying of the text with us, not only in our hours of relaxation and enjoyment, but when we believe ourselves to be most intent and most sincere in doing our Master's service.

Dean Church, Oxford University Herald, Dec. 16th, 1882.

References: Luke 14:34-35; D. Fraser, Metaphors of the Gospels, p. 1; Preacher's Monthly, vol. x., p. 29. Luke 14—F. D. Maurice, The Gospel of the Kingdom of Heaven, p. 219.



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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-14.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our Saviour here compares his disciples to salt, thereby denoting their usefulness, salt being one of the most useful things in nature; and pointing out also their duty, which is to season themselves and others with sound doctrine. But hypocritical professors are like unsavory salt; they are neither savory in themselves nor serviceable to others. Our Saviour compares such Christians who have no savor of piety and goodness upon their spirits, to salt, that, having lost its goodness, is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill: that is, being of a brackish nature, it is wholly unfit to manure the ground, and will rather occasion barrenness than any fruitfulness or increase.

Learn hence, that sincere and serious Christians are and will be as the salt of the earth; that is, good and savory in themselves, and endeavoring by exhortation and good example to season others; but hypocriticl professors and apostatizing Christians will be cast out, and trampled upon as unsavory salt.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-14.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:34. ἅλας, salt) Which means the disciples: Matthew 5:13; Mark 9:50. Salt is something pungent (sharp): let the Christian be so. See the preceding verse [in which the strong pungency which attends Christian self-renunciation is brought out strikingly.] [We must do sharply what is to be done, and must do it also gravely (seriously).(153)—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 34,35. See Poole on "Matthew 5:13". See Poole on "Mark 9:50", where we met with the most of what we have in these verses. By salt in this place our Saviour seemeth to mean a Christian life and profession. It is a good, a noble, a great thing to be a Christian: but one that is so in an outward profession may lose his savour. Though a man cannot fall away from truth, and reality of grace, yet he may fall away from his profession; he may be given up to believe lies, and embrace damnable errors; he may shake off that dread of God which he seemed to have upon him; and then what is he good for? Wherewith shall he be seasoned? He is neither fit for the land nor the dunghill: as some things will spoil dunghills, so debauched professors do but make wicked men worse, by prejudicing and hardening them against the ways and truths of God.

He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. It is a usual epiphonema, or sentence, by which Christ often shuts up grave and weighty discourses: the sense is; You had therefore need to look about you, and to undertake the profession of my religion upon such weighty grounds and principles as will carry you through the practice of it to the end, against all the oppositions you shall meet with; for if you apostatize from your profession, you will be the worst of men, neither fit for the church nor for the world (for you will make that the worse;) indeed fit for nothing but for the fire of hell.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:34". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Сольдобрая вещь См. пояснения к Мф. 5:13; Мк. 9:50. В Своем служении Христос употреблял этот самый образ по крайней мере в трех разных случаях.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Salt is good; to season provisions, and perserve them from putrefaction. In the present connection, salt means divine grace manifested in a spirit of self-denial for Christ’s sake. this brings salvation to its possessor and to others.

If the salt have lost his savor; its saltness; if holy self-denial has given place to worldliness and self-indulgence.

Seasoned? its saltness be restored.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

34.Salt is good—Excellent is salt! is, literally translated, the Lord’s exclamation. The true living, sparkling, stimulating, conservating article is the very emblem of faith, perseverance, and life. He who has the principle it symbolizes will not merely chase at my heels, but truly tread in my footsteps.

Have lost its savour—If we have taken up with salt which has no saltness, then truly it is no salt at all.

Wherewith’ seasoned—That is, wherewith shall the salt be re-endowed with its saline power? There is no giving any Christian value to that religion which has no self-surrender to Christ in it.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:34. Salt therefore is good. ‘Therefore’ connects this favorite aphorism with what precedes. It is good then to be my disciple, in the way of self-renunciation, and thus to be the means of conserving spiritual life among men, just as salt does in the natural world; but if even the salt, which is very unnatural and unlikely, have lost its savor, if my disciple through a return to selfishness loses this peculiarity, where-with shall it be seasoned? Our Lord is warning from a human point of view, and not giving prominence to His own Almighty sustaining power, as in passages like John 10:28-29. The same remark applies to Luke 14:29.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

But if the salt, &c. Man, after he has once been illumined with the light of faith, should he be so unfortunate as to fall into the sink of his former evil habits, what remedy is there remaining for him? He is, as our Saviour says, neither profitable for the land nor for the dunghill, but shall be cast out. (Luke xiv. 35.) (Ven. Bede)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Salt, &c. See note on Matthew 5:13.

if, &c. A contingent assumption. App-118.

lost his savour = become tasteless. Compare Matthew 5:13.

wherewith = with (Greek. en App-104.) what.

seasoned. Only here, Mark 9:50. Colossians 4:6.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(34) Salt is good.—The words are all but identical with those of Matthew 5:13, and resemble those of Mark 9:50. (See Notes on those passages.) They appear now, however, in a very different context, and the train of thought is not at first sight so clear. The common element in all three instances is that salt represents the purifying element in life, the principle of unselfish devotion. Here, the special aspect of that element is self-renunciation. In proportion as that is incomplete, the salt loses its savour. The question, Wherewith shall it be salted? is asked as in the accents of almost hopeless sadness. What other purifying influences can be brought to bear on us when the love of Christ has failed?

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Salt is good: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be seasoned?
Salt
Common salt, or muriate of soda, consists of soda in combination with muriatic acid, and is for the most part an artificial preparation from sea water, though found in some countries in a solid and massive state. See particularly Le 2:13.
but
Matthew 5:13; Mark 9:49,50; Colossians 4:6; Hebrews 2:4-8
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 29:23 - salt;  1 Kings 14:10 - as a man taketh;  Job 6:6 - that which;  Jeremiah 13:7 - it was;  Ezekiel 15:3 - GeneralMatthew 25:30 - cast

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:34". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.