Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:35

It is useless either for the soil or for the manure pile; it is thrown out. He who has ears to hear, let him hear."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Hypocrisy;   Jesus, the Christ;   Manure;   The Topic Concordance - Salt;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Agriculture or Husbandry;   Parables;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jesus Christ;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Salt;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Dung;   Luke, Gospel of;   Minerals and Metals;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ambassage;   Discourse;   Ear (2);   Fellowship (2);   Hearing;   Husbandman ;   Ideas (Leading);   Poet;   Power;   Sermon on the Mount;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Salt;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Dung;   Dunghill;   Ear;   Fit;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Agriculture;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

It is neither fit for the land,.... For the manuring of it, when it has lost its savour and spirit; otherwise it makes land fruitful, if too much is not used, and especially fixed salts have this use; though Pliny saysF15Nat. Hist. l. 31. c. 7. ,

"every place in which salt is found, it is barren and brings forth nothing.'

Nor yet for the dunghill; to mix with dung, and help it, that it may be the more serviceable for the earth; and just such useless things, are a mere external profession of religion, and professors of it, and ministers of the word, without the grace of God; they are of no use, but hurtful to the church, and to the world; these phrases are left out in the Persic and Ethiopic versions:

but men cast it out; into the streets, as entirely useless: and so such graceless professors and ministers, are to be cast out of the churches of Christ now, and will be excluded the kingdom of heaven hereafter:

he that hath ears to hear, let him hear; this being a point of great importance and consequence; See Gill on Matthew 11:15.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Dunghill (κοπριανkoprian). Later word in the Koiné vernacular. Here only in the N.T., though in the lxx.

Men cast it out (εχω βαλλουσιν αυτοexō ballousin auto). Impersonal plural. This saying about salt is another of Christ‘s repeated sayings (Matthew 5:13; Mark 9:50). Another repeated saying is the one here about having ears to hear (Luke 8:8; Luke 14:35, Matthew 11:15; Matthew 13:43).

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

It is fit neither for the land nor for the dunghill: [men] cast it out1. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear2.

  1. It is fit neither for the land nor for the dunghill: [men] cast it out. The condition of those who begin the Christian life and fail to persevere is dangerous in the extreme (Hebrews 6:4-12; Hebrews 10:26-39).

  2. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. See Hebrews 10:26-39.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

35 It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill; but men cast it out. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.

Ver. 35. He that hath ears to hear] This is usually added by our Saviour in matters of greatest consequence and nearest concernment. {See Trapp on "Matthew 13:9"} {See Trapp on "Matthew 13:43"}

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:35. οὔτε, neither) That is to say, it brings with it neither immediate (direct) nor mediate (indirect) profit. The divine who is destitute of spiritual salt is not even politically profitable: Isaiah 9:14-15.— ἔξω, out) There is sternness here, even in the mode of expression.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:34"

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:35". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

For the land-the dunghill; for being sown to fertilize the soil, nor for being mingled with the dunghill. So a professed follower of Christ, who has lost His spirit, is of no value to the church here, and has no fitness for admission to heaven hereafter. Let all worldly-minded disciples hear this.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“He who has ears to hear, let him hear.”

Jesus then finishes this passage, and the whole section, with the plea that men and women might hear His words. Let those who have ears to hear, hear. This could signify that they must ensure that they listen, mark, learn and inwardly digest. Or that only those to whom God gives ‘hearing’ will understand. Both are true, for the one complements the other. The question therefore that each of us must ask is, have we got hearing ears?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

35.Fit neither for the land—That is, to be used as soil; neither as manure.

He that hath ears to hear—The commentator will fail to understand this whole discourse, 25-35, unless he keeps in his eye the audience to which it was so kindly directed; namely, a retinue of loose but admiring attendants, who applauded at every step, but who were liable, under opposing influences, to cry crucify him to-morrow. This expostulation aims to call them to consider their depth of feeling and the true method of being an earnest disciple of Jesus. He illustrates his meaning by the most practical examples, popular but expressive, and founded in the truest common sense as well as the deepest wisdom. The whole is impressively closed with earnest admonitions to every man who had ears to hear his touching words, to accept them in their true force. Some of them may truly have heard with the ear of the soul. It was from this pitiable yet interesting class that many of his followers who formed the body of his apostolic Church after his ascension, were gathered. For true religion easier finds its way to the vacant destitute soul, which has merely the primitive common sense which God has given, than into the most cultivated mind occupied already with its systems and with its prejudices.

 

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:35. Neither for the land, nor for the dunghill. Fuller than Matthew 5:13 : ‘good for nothing.’ It is not useful directly or indirectly.

Men east it out (emphatically), because it is thus useless.

He that hath ears to hear, etc. This common formula calls attention to the importance of what had been said, implying that it has an application to all the hearers, and admonishing them to make that application to their own hearts.

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Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:35. , neither for land nor for dung (is it fit, as in Luke 9:62). The idea seems to be that savourless salt is neither earth nor manure.— is emphatic = out they cast it, as worthless, good for nothing, mere refuse, a waste substance.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

for. Greek. eis. App-104. land. App-129.

the dunghill = manure.

out = without

He that hath, &c. See App-142.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(35) It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill.—The illustration, differing as it does from that in Matthew 5:13 and Mark 9:50, proves the independence of the saying as here recorded. A new use of salt, distinct from that of preserving food, or its symbolic meaning in sacrifice, is brought before us, and becomes the ground-work of a new parable. The use is obviously a lower and humbler one than the others. The salt serves, mingling with the dung-hill, to manure and prepare the ground for the reception of the seed. Bear this in mind, and the interpretation of the parable, connected, as it thus is, with that of the Fig-tree (see Note on Luke 13:8), is obvious. A corrupt church cannot even exercise an influence for good over the secular life of the nation which it represents. The religious man whose religion has become an hypocrisy cannot even be a good citizen, or help others forward in the duties of their active life by teaching or example. The church and the individual man are alike fit only to be “cast out”—to become, i.e., a by-word and proverb of reproach. Our Lord’s sense, if we may so speak, of the depth and fulness of the meaning of His words, is shown by His emphatic reproduction of the words that had accompanied His first parable, “He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.”

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill; but men cast it out. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.
but
John 15:6
He
8:8; 9:44; Matthew 11:15; 13:9; Revelation 2:7,11,17,29 Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 29:23 - salt;  1 Kings 14:10 - as a man taketh;  Jeremiah 13:7 - it was;  Ezekiel 15:3 - GeneralMalachi 2:3 - spread;  Matthew 5:13 - if;  Matthew 25:30 - cast;  Mark 9:50 - is good

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:35". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.