Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:6

And they could make no reply to this.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Miracles;   Sabbath;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Courage;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heal, Health;   Miracle;   Sabbath;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Cures;   Discourse;   Imagination;   Israel, Israelite;   Logia;   Sabbath ;   Science (2);   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Certain;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Sabbath;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And they could not answer again unto these things. As Hobbs said, "They did not want to admit that they valued their law and property more than they valued a man; but their attitude spoke louder than their words."[12] There is no New Testament example of an episode in which the Pharisees were able to answer Jesus' words in open debate.

ENDNOTE:

[12] Ibid.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And they could not answer him again to these things,.... The justice, equity, mercy, and humanity that appeared in our Lord's reasonings, and the cases he instanced in, being agreeable to their own tenets and practices, their mouths were shut up, and they could not return an answer to them, without being exposed,

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Could not answer again (ουκ ισχυσαν ανταποκριτηναιouk ischusan antapokrithēnai). Did not have strength to answer back or in turn (αντιanti -) as in Romans 9:20. They could not take up the argument and were helpless. They hated to admit that they cared more for an ox or ass or even a son than for this poor dropsical man.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

The Fourfold Gospel

And they could not answer again unto these things1.

  1. And they could not answer again unto these things. Though silenced, the Pharisees relented not, either as to their bigotry or their hatred.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

6 And they could not answer him again to these things.

Ver. 6. And they could not answer] Yet ran away with the bit in their mouths.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:1"

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And they could not answer again to these things.’

They had no answer to give. How do you accuse a man of blasphemy when He heals successfully in the name of God? So they had nothing to say. But they had plenty in their thoughts, and it was probably not very pleasant. For their silence did not mean that they were satisfied. Only that they were biding their time. How often this happens when men’s prejudices are being laid bare and they are not willing to admit it. Instead of admitting that they might be wrong they simmer and determine how they can justify themselves by getting their revenge.

Sometimes what Jesus did on the Sabbath aroused great anger (Luke 3:6). At other times, as here, less so. But it all had a cumulative effect. And the cumulative effect in the hearts and minds of those who failed to enter into His own position that it was right to do good on the Sabbath, was that He was seen as a person with little regard for the Sabbath. They might have accepted that occasionally He might possibly have had some justification, if only it had been occasionally, but the point was not that. The point was that He kept on doing good on the Sabbath, and showing compassion, in spite of what people thought. He did not seem to know where to stop or to have any regard for how they thought. And it was that aspect of things that took hold of their minds, and it was the only aspect that was passed on when they spoke of it to others. Jesus, they would say, may claim to be a prophet, but really He was a Sabbath-breaker. Their minds had become so tunnel-visioned that they completely overlooked the fact that every example of ‘work’ that they criticised was connected with, and was the result of, a remarkable miracle (Luke 4:38; Luke 6:6; Luke 13:14; Mark 1:21; John 5:9; John 9:14), and was an act of God’s mercy..

This then brought them to a place where they had to make a decision. Was He really to be seen as the Son of Man Who was Lord of the Sabbath and therefore as having the right to make binding decisions about it, something which the clear evidence of God’s working through Him pointed to (they never once denied that a miracle had been done. The whole point was that it had), or was He simply someone who stretched things beyond the limit, thereby revealing His casual attitude towards God? The majority of them decided on the latter, and therefore sought to condemn Him as One Who led astray of the people. So they closed their minds to all else. But at the heart of the matter lay a crucial question. Which mattered most to God? Did He prefer them to fulfil all His ritual requirements as interpreted by their own teachers to the utmost extent, regardless of human need, or did He prefer them to relax them when they might result in a failure to do positive good, and to reveal compassion, something which might be seen in God’s eyes as an even greater requirement, especially when what resulted was so obviously of God. They chose the former. Jesus chose the latter. (Many today have sadly overthrown both attitudes. They have made the Sabbath a day for doing whatever they want. They are therefore wrong on all counts and are despising God even more).

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Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6.Could not answer him—The miracle was displayed before their eyes; the question was propounded for their discussion; and before both they were silenced. But it is one thing to silence a man and another to convince; and it is another thing still to change his heart and save his soul.

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:6. And they could not. The argument was conclusive. Thus thwarted and overcome, they doubtless hated Him the more.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:6. . (again in Romans 9:20): silenced but of course not convinced. The difference in the way of thinking too great to be overcome in a moment.

Luke has three Sabbath cures. The present one has no very distinctive features. The accumulation may point to a desire to help weak Christians to get above their scruples by an appeal to the Master (Schanz). In the first and second cases the principle of Christ’s defence is indicated: it is lawful to do good (Luke 6:9); you may do for a man, a fortiori, what it is lawful to do for a beast (Luke 13:15). In the present case it is not indicated. It may be: you may do for another what you all do for your own, son or ox (Meyer, J. Weiss); or if need is a valid plea in any case, it is valid in all cases (Schanz).

 

 

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

answer again = reply.

to = as

to. Greek pros. App-101.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) And they could not answer him again.—The Greek is, perhaps, a little more emphatic—“They had no power, they were powerless to answer him.”

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And they could not answer him again to these things.
13:17; 20:26,40; 21:15; Acts 6:10
Reciprocal: Matthew 22:46 - no

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.