Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 15:24

for this son of mine was dead and has come to life again; he was lost and has been found.' And they began to celebrate.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Dancing;   God Continued...;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Joy;   Penitent;   Prodigal Son;   Readings, Select;   Salvation;   Young Men;   Scofield Reference Index - Death;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Home;   Joy;   Joy-Sorrow;   Merriment;   Mirth;   New;   Parental;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Prodigal Son;   Religion;   Resurrection, Spiritual;   Son;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Losing and Things Lost;   Salvation;   Seeking;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Death, Spiritual;   Joy of God over His People, the;   Life, Spiritual;   Parables;   Pardon;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Dancing;   Grace;   Joy;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Gospel;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Banquet;   Harmony of the Gospels;   Imagery;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Prodigal Son;   Repentance;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brotherhood (2);   Children of God;   Complacency;   Dead, the ;   Death (2);   Father, Fatherhood;   Gospel (2);   Justice (2);   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Parable;   Poet;   Regeneration (2);   Religious Experience;   Repentance (2);   Righteous, Righteousness;   Salvation;   Son, Sonship;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Alive;   Barley;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Joy;   Perdition;   Regeneration;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for November 6;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Was dead - Lost to all good - given up to all evil. In this figurative sense the word is used by the best Greek writers. See many examples in Kypke.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Was dead - This is capable of two significations:

1.“I supposed” that he was dead, but I know now that he is alive.

2.He was “dead to virtue” - he was sunk in pleasure and vice.

The word is not unfrequently thus used. See 1 Timothy 5:6; Matthew 8:22; Romans 6:13. Hence, to be restored to “virtue” is said to be restored again to life, Romans 6:13; Revelation 3:1; Ephesians 2:1. It is probable that this latter is the meaning here. See Luke 15:32.

Was lost - Had wandered away from home, and we knew not where he was.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For this my son was dead,.... These words contain the reasons of the above entertainment, and of all that spiritual joy and mirth; in which the father acknowledges the returning penitent as his son; though he had behaved so wickedly before, and though he judged himself unworthy of the relation; and this he did, by sending the Spirit of adoption into his heart, to witness his sonship to him; and takes notice of his past state and condition, to show the great reason there was for joy, at his present one: for before be was "dead", dead in Adam, in whom all died; dead in law, being under a sentence of condemnation and death; and dead in trespasses and sins, which is a spiritual or moral death: in which all mankind by nature are: and which lies in a separation from God, Father, Son, and Spirit; in an alienation from the life of God; in a deformation of the image of God; in a loss of original righteousness; in the darkness of the understanding; in the inordinateness of the affections; in the pollution of the mind and conscience; in the stubbornness of the will; and in an impotency to that which is spiritually good; and in a privation of spiritual sense and motion: this had been the case, but now it was otherwise:

and is alive again: the Spirit of life from Christ had entered into him, and Christ was formed in his heart; and a principle of life was infused into him; a divine image was enstamped upon his soul; the understanding was enlightened in divine things; the affections were set upon them; the will was subjected to God, to his will and law, and to Christ and his righteousness, and the way of salvation by him, and to his commands and ordinances; and principles of grace and holiness were wrought in him, to do as well as to will; a spiritual sense of things were given him; a spiritual sight, hearing, tasting, and feeling, and savouring; he lived a life of holiness from Christ, of faith upon him, and of communion with him, and to his glory: and he came to be so, not of himself, nor by any creature; for no man can quicken himself, nor can any creature do it for him; it was entirely owing to the power and grace of God: and great reason here was for joy and mirth, as there is for every one that is quickened by the Spirit of God; for such shall never enter into condemnation, nor die again, but shall live and reign with Christ for ever:

he was lost; lost in Adam, and in himself; so he was when in the far country, and when among the swine and husks; so as that he knew not where he was, nor what a condition he was in; nor did he know how to get out of it, nor could he help himself; nor could any other creature; though not irretrievably and irrecoverably lost; not to the love of God, his knowledge of him, care and provision for him in Christ, in his counsel and covenant: hence the following mercy,

and is found; not only by Christ, in redemption, but by the Spirit of Christ in the effectual calling; when he was brought and came to himself, and saw his lost state and condition by nature; and when he was directed and brought home to his Father's house, and entertained with all the provisions of it; and such have reason to rejoice and be glad, for they shall be found in Christ at death and at judgment, and shall be with him to all eternity:

and they began to be merry: all parties. The Father expressed his joy, and the gladness of his heart, upon the return of his son to him; he exhorted to be merry on this account, Luke 15:23 and enforces it with reasons in this verse, taken from the relation he stood in to him, and the wonderful change that had passed upon him, and the finding of him; and he rejoices himself at his conversion, in the exercise of that grace which he himself implanted, and in the performance of duty by his assistance: not that any new joy arises in God's heart at such a time; for he always rejoiced in the persons of his elect, as they were the objects of his love, as chosen in Christ, and given to him, and as interested in the covenant of grace; and he rejoiced in the accomplishment of their salvation, by his Son: but in conversion, there are new expressions of joy; he rejoices over them to do them good, and rejoices in the good he does them; and this is the open beginning of his joy, and but the beginning of it; for it will continue, it is not all over, not all expressed, but will be in the fullest manner hereafter, to all eternity: the returned son began to be merry, as he had good reason for it; as that he was come back from the far country, where a mighty famine had been: and from the citizen of that country, his fields, and swine; that he was come to his father, and his father's house, where was bread enough and to spare; an house well furnished with all suitable provisions; a family made up of saints, where ministers of the Gospel are stewards, and angels guards, and where Christ is Son, priest, and master; and that he was received here, and owned as a son; not only was one secretly, but was owned as such openly; and was not only called so by the servants, but by the father himself; and that after he had behaved so vilely, and in his own conscience knew he was unworthy of the relation; and that he was received immediately, as soon as ever he came, and that in the most tender manner; and was entertained in the most free, generous, and sumptuous way; though he went away from his father of himself, and had spent his substance in a scandalous manner; and was in a most filthy, ragged, and piteous condition; and that he should be clothed with the best robe, the robe of Christ's righteousness; and so had nothing to fear from law and justice; nor was he in any danger of wrath to come because of his sins; nor had he any reason to doubt of his right and admission to the heavenly glory; and that he had the ring of love on the hand of faith, and could believe his interest in it, which is better than life, and will continue for ever; and that his feet were shod with the preparation of the Gospel of peace; that he understood the Gospel, and was brought to a submission to Gospel ordinances, and had his conversation agreeably to it; and that the fatted calf was killed, and set before him to eat of, and feed upon: and now he began to live and fare sumptuously, and to have spiritual joy and pleasure, which he never knew before; and this was but the beginning of joy to him: spiritual joy is not all over at once, it continues and increases; nor is it full and perfect in this life, but in heaven it will be complete, and without interruption; the servants also, the ministers of the Gospel, began to be merry on this occasion; who express their joy at the conversion of sinners, because of the glory of Father, Son, and Spirit, concerned in it; because of the grace bestowed then on sinners themselves; and because the interest of Christ is strengthened, and his churches increased, and Satan's kingdom weakened; and because their own ministry is blessed; and which strengthens their hands and hearts, and encourages them to go on in their work: and this is but the beginning of their joy; for they continue to rejoice at the growth of grace in believers, and when they are in a thriving and flourishing condition; when they walk becoming the Gospel of Christ, and live in peace among themselves; and persevere in faith and holiness to the end; and these will be their joy and crown of rejoicing, at the coming of Christ Jesus.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

my son — now twice his son.

dead  …  lost — to me; to himself - to my service, my satisfaction; to his own dignity, peace, profit.

alive again  …  found — to all these.

merry — (See on Luke 15:10).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

And is alive (και ανεζησενkai anezēsen). First aorist active indicative of αναζαωanazaō to live again. Literally, he was dead and he came back to life.

He was lost (ην απολωλωςēn apolōlōs periphrastic past perfect active of απολλυμιapollumi and intransitive, in a lost state) and he was found (ευρετηheurethē). He was found, we have to say, but this aorist passive is really timeless, he is found after long waiting (effective aorist) The artists have vied with each other in picturing various items connected with this wonderful parable.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Is alive - is found ( ἀνέζησεν - εὑρέθη )

Both aorists, and pointing back to a definite time in the past; doubtless the moment when he “came to himself.” Wyc., hath lived.

The Prodigal Son is a favorite subject in Christian art. The return of the penitent is the point most frequently chosen, but the dissipation in the far country and the degradation among the swine are also treated. The dissipation is the subject of an interesting picture by the younger Teniers in the gallery of the Louvre. The prodigal is feasting at a table with two courte-sans, in front of an inn, on the open shutter of which a tavern-score is chalked. An old woman leaning on a stick begs alms, possibly foreshadowing the fate of the females at the table. The youth holds out his glass, which a servant fills with wine. In the right-hand corner appears a pigsty where a stable-boy is feeding the swine, but with his face turned toward the table, as if in envy of the gay revellers there. All the costumes and other details of the picture are Dutch. Holbein also represents him feasting with his mistress, and gambling with a sharper who is sweeping the money off the table. The other points of the story are introduced into the background. Jan Steen paints him at table in a garden before an inn. A man plays the guitar, and two children are blowing bubbles - “an allegory of the transient pleasures of the spendthrift.” Mrs. Jameson remarks that the riotous living is treated principally by the Dutch painters. The life among the swine is treated by Jordaens in the Dresden Gallery. The youth, with only a cloth about his loins, approaches the trough where the swine are feeding, extends his hand, and seems to ask food of a surly swineherd, who points him to the trough. In the left-hand corner a young boor is playing on a pipe, a sorrowful contrast to the delicious music of the halls of pleasure. Salvator Rosa pictures him in a landscape, kneeling with clasped hands amid a herd of sheep, oxen, goats, and swine. Rubens, in a farm-stable, on his knees near a trough, where a woman is feeding some swine. He looks imploringly at the woman. One of the finest examples of the treatment of the return is by Murillo, in the splendid picture in the gallery of the Duke of Sutherland. It is thus described by Stirling (“Annals of the Artists of Spain”): “The repentant youth, locked in the embrace of his father, is, of course, the principal figure; his pale, emaciated countenance bespeaks the hardships of his husk-coveting time, and the embroidery on his tattered robe the splendor of his riotous living. A little white dog, leaping up to caress him, aids in telling the story. On one side of this group a man and a boy lead in the fatted calf; on the other appear three servants bearing a light-blue silk dress of Spanish fashion, and the gold ring; and one of them seems to be murmuring at the honors in preparation for the lost one.”

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-15.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

for this my son was dead1, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.

  1. For this my son was dead. The condition of the impenitent sinner is frequently expressed in the Bible under the metaphor of death (Romans 6:13; Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 5:14; Revelation 3:1).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

24 For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.

Ver. 24. For this my son was dead, &c.] So fareth it with every faithful Christian. He was dead, but now lives, and cannot be insensible or ignorant of such a change.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 15:24. This my son was dead, and is alive, &c.— It is by a very common and beautiful emblem, that vicious persons are represented as dead, both by sacred and prophane authors; (Compare 1 Timothy 5:6. Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 5:14.) and the natural death of their children would certainly be less grievous to pious parents, than to see them abandoned to such a course as this young sinner took. Nothing so powerfully calls home the mind as distress; (see Luke 15:17.) the tense fibre then relaxes,—the soul retires into itself,—sits pensive, and susceptible, through grace, of right impressions: if we have a friend, it is then that we think of him; if a benefactor, at that moment all his kindnesses press upon our mind.—Gracious and bountiful God! is it not for this, through thy grace and blessing, that they who in their prosperity forget thee, do yet remember and return to thee in the hour of their sorrow? When our heart is in heaviness, upon whom can we think but thee?—who knowest our necessities afar off, puttest all our tears in thy bottle, seest every careful thought, hearest every sigh and melancholy groan that we utter?—Strange! that we should only begin to think of God with comfort, (if we do then,) when with joy and comfort we can think of nothing else.—Man is surely a compound of riddles and contradictions: by the law of his nature he avoids pain; and yet, unless he suffer in the flesh, he will not cease from sin, though it is sure to bring pain and misery upon his head for ever. Whilst all went pleasurablyon with the prodigal, we hear not one word concerning his father; no pang of remorse for the sufferings in which he had left him, or resolution of returning to make up the account of his folly: his first hour of distress, through the gracious Spirit of God, seemed to be his first hour of wisdom: When he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father have bread enough and to spare, whilst I perish! Of all the terrors of nature, that of dying by hunger surely is the greatest; and it is wisely woven into our frame, to awaken men to industry, and call forth their talents.—It had this effect, through Divine grace, with the prodigal: he arose, to go unto his father—Alas! how shall he tell his story?—ye who have had this round, tell me in what words he shall give in to his father the items of his extravagance and folly?—Yet leave the story, it will be told more concisely: when he was yet a great way off, (Luke 15:20.) his father saw him.—Compassion told it in few words:—he fell upon his neck, and kissed him.—The idea of a son so ruined as this was, and yet returning, would double the father's caresses; every effusion of his tenderness would add bitterness to his son's remorse.—"Gracious heaven! what a father have I rendered miserable!" Luke 15:21. And he said, I have sinned,—and am no more worthy to be called thy son.—But the father said,—Bring hither the best robe.—O ye affections! how fondly do you play at cross-purposes with each other?—It is the natural dialogue of true transport; joy is not methodical; and when an offender—beloved—seems, if it were possible, to overcharge himself in the offence, words are too cold, and a conciliated heart replies by tokens of esteem. And he said,—Bring forth the best robe, &c.—and let us eat, and be merry.—When the affections so kindly and graciously break loose, joy is another name for religion: we look up, as we taste it. The cold stoic without, may ask sullenly, (with the older brother, Luke 15:26; Luke 15:28.) "what it means?" and refuse to enter; but the pious and compassionate fly impetuously to the banquet, given for a son who was dead, and is alive again; who was lost and is found. Was it not for this, that God gave man music to strike upon the kindly passions? but we must never forget, that no distress or sorrow is effectual to the salvation of the soul, but that which brings us, in brokenness of heart and genuine contrition for our sins, to our heavenly Father through Jesus Christ, by whose grace and merit alone salvation can be obtaine

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-15.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

24.] νεκ. κ. ἀνέζ.,the lost money: ἀπολωλ. καὶ εὑρέθη,the lost sheep: see 1 John 3:14; Ephesians 2:5; 1 Peter 2:25.

ἤρξαντο, a contrast to the ἤρξατο in Luke 15:14.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:24. οὗτος, this) This is a [triumphal] verse, or formula of words, and hymn, which has in it somewhat of rhythm, and seems to have been often repeated; see Luke 15:32 : it was accompanied with symphony (‘music’), Luke 15:25. The ancients used verse when strongly affected. See Genesis 37:33; 1 Chronicles 13 (12):18, [which are in the Hebraic form of poetry, parallelism.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 15:23"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 15:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-15.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

My son was dead-lost; he was dead to excellence and to happiness and dead as to being the means of either to his father’s house. He was lost to goodness, to duty, and to heaven.

Alive-found; he has returned with right feelings to his father and friends, and is a source of rich enjoyment to himself and them. Who, not lost to goodness, would not be partaker of their joy?

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24.Dead’ alive—The metaphors of death and life, to express ruin and recovery, can be found in various languages. Thus Cicero at his return to Rome after banishment says, in a public address to the city, that he is recalled from death to life; from despair to hope; from destruction to safety.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:24. Was dead, and is alive again. Even in the parable, the father speaks figuratively of moral death; much more in the application is it true; the state of sin is a moral death, the state of salvation a moral resurrection.

Was lost, and is found. This expresses the relation to the father. In the application: Sin is estrangement from God, salvation fellowship with God.

And they began to be merry. The same point is now reached as in the other parables; and the eating with penitent sinners (Luke 15:2) abundantly justified.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-15.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Luke 15:24. For this my son was dead — Was considered by me as dead; and is alive again — “It is by a very common and beautiful emblem, that vicious persons are represented as dead, both by sacred and profane authors; and the natural death of their children would be less grievous to pious parents than to see them abandoned to such a course as this young sinner took.” — Doddridge. He was lost and is found — We looked upon him as utterly lost, but lo! he is come back again, beyond all expectation, in safety. Two things here are worthy of observation: 1st, That the conversion of a soul from sin to God is the raising of that soul from death to life, and the finding of that which seemed to be lost. It is a great, wonderful, and happy change: it is like that which passes upon the face of the earth when the spring returns. 2d, The conversion of sinners is very pleasing to the God of heaven, and all that belong to his family ought to rejoice in it. Those in heaven do, and those on earth should, rejoice. And they began to be merry — They sat down to the feast, rejoicing exceedingly at the happy occasion of it.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/luke-15.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Was dead, and is come to life again. A sinner, in mortal sin, is deprived of the divine grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul. At his conversion it is restored to him, and he begins to live again. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

was. Not the past tense of the verb "die", but of the verb "to be". He had been as a dead man (Greek. nekros. App-189) to his father.

is found = was; i.e. "when he came to himself" (Luke 15:17), which shows that that was the result of the father"s seeking. began, &c. Contrast "began to be in want" (Luke 15:14).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.

For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. Now, twice his son. "He was lost" - both to his Father and to himself, lost to his Father's service and satisfaction, lost to his own dignity, peace, profit. But he "is alive again" - to all these.

But what of the older brother all this time? That we are now about to see.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) This my son was dead.—The words, looked at merely as part of the story, have a wonderful pathos. Absence, alienation, the self-chosen shame, this had made the father think of the son as “dead.” Death would indeed have been far easier to bear. Spiritually, we are taught that repentance is nothing less than the passing from the death of sin to the life of righteousness, from the “graves of lust” (Numbers 11:34) to the power of the resurrection. The “lost” and “found” appear as furnishing the link that connects this with the preceding parables, and makes the trilogy, as it were, complete.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.
this
32; Mark 8:22; John 5:21,24,25; 11:25; Romans 6:11,13; 8:2; 2 Corinthians 5:14,15; Ephesians 2:1,5; 5:14; Colossians 2:13; 1 Timothy 5:6; Jude 1:12; Revelation 3:1
he
4,8; 19:10; Genesis 45:28; Jeremiah 31:15-17; Ezekiel 34:4,16; Matthew 18:11-13
they
7,9; 10:19; Isaiah 35:10; 66:11; Jeremiah 31:12-14; Romans 12:15; 1 Corinthians 12:26
Reciprocal: Exodus 24:11 - did eat;  Deuteronomy 28:63 - rejoiced over;  Proverbs 23:15 - even mine;  Song of Solomon 3:11 - in the day of the;  Isaiah 53:10 - the pleasure;  Isaiah 55:7 - the wicked;  Jeremiah 31:20 - Is Ephraim;  Micah 7:18 - he delighteth;  Zephaniah 3:17 - will rejoice;  Matthew 18:13 - he rejoiceth;  Luke 15:5 - rejoicing;  Luke 15:6 - his;  Acts 15:3 - they caused;  Philemon 1:11 - profitable;  1 John 3:14 - we have

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.